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1

Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Production and Handling Slide 21: Melting Points of Uranium and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Points of Uranium and Uranium Compounds Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Melting Points of Uranium and Uranium...

3

Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Questions and Answers - What's the melting point of steel?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,would your body instantly crystallize? If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,<br>would your body instantly crystallize? Previous Question (If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is a material with a freezing point above 0 degrees Celsius?) What is a material with a freezingpoint above 0 degrees Celsius? What's the melting point of steel? That depends on the alloy of steel you are talking about. The term alloy is almost always used incorrectly these days, especially amongst bicyclists. They use the term to mean aluminum. What the term alloy really means is a mixture of metals, any kind of metals. Almost all metal used today is a mixture and therefore an alloy. Most steel has other metals added to tune its properties, like strength,

5

A NONLINEAR TWO-PHASE STEFAN PROBLEM WITH MELTING POINT GRADIENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NONLINEAR TWO-PHASE STEFAN PROBLEM WITH MELTING POINT GRADIENT: A CONSTRUCTIVE APPROACH D. D. Ang-dimensional two-phase Stefan problem, modeling a layer of solid material floating on liquid. The model includes of a cake of ice floating in water after the surface of the ice has received a fresh snowfall

Keinert, Fritz

6

Draft report on melt point as a function of composition for urania-based systems  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the testing of a urania (UO{sub 2.00}) sample as a baseline and the attempt to determine the melt point associated with 4 compositions of urania-ceria and urania-neodymia pseudo binaries provided by ORNL, with compositions of 95/5, and 80/20 and of (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} and (U/Nd)O{sub 2.00} in the newly developed ceramic melt point determination system. A redesign of the system using parts fabricated from tungsten was undertaken in order to help prevent contamination and tungsten carbide formation in the crucibles. The previously developed system employed mostly graphite parts that were shown to react with the sample containment black-body crucible leading to unstable temperature readings and crucible failure, thus the redesign. Measured melt point values of UO{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.95}Ce{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.80}Ce{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.95}Nd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.80}Nd{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00} were measured using a 2-color pyrometer. The value measured for UO{sub 2.00} was consistent with the published accepted value 2845 C {+-} 25 C, although a wide range of values has been published by researchers and will be discussed later in the text. For comparison, values obtained from a published binary phase diagram of UO{sub 2}-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for comparison with our measure values. No literature melt point values for comparison with the measurements performed in this study were found for (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} in our stoichiometry range.

Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Byler, Darrin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Dielectric relaxation of water below the melting point: the effect of inner pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite water is the most studied substance in the Earth, it is not completely understood why its structural and dynamical properties give rise to some anomalous behaviors. Interesting properties emerge when experiments at low temperatures and/or high pressures, are performed. Here we report dielectric measurements of cold water under constrained conditions, i.e. water that below the melting point can not freeze. The inner pressure shifts the {\\alpha} relaxation peak to similar frequencies as seen in ice Ih. Also, when we reach the triple point at 251 K, ice III seems to form. As far as we know, this via to obtain such crystalline phase has not been observed.

Abril Angulo-Sherman; Hilda Mercado-Uribe

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

A molecular dynamics simulation of the melting points and glass transition temperatures of myo-and neo-inositol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A molecular dynamics simulation of the melting points and glass transition temperatures of myo molecular potentials for atomistic simulation studies COMPASS H. Sun, J. Phys. Chem. B 102, 7338 1998 force field and molecular dynamics techniques. Our results show that the calculated heats of sublimation

de Gispert, Adrià

9

Generalized Interpolation Material Point Approach to High Melting Explosive with Cavities Under Shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Criterion for contacting is critically important for the Generalized Interpolation Material Point(GIMP) method. We present an improved criterion by adding a switching function. With the method dynamical response of high melting explosive(HMX) with cavities under shock is investigated. The physical model used in the present work is an elastic-to-plastic and thermal-dynamical model with Mie-Gr\\"uneissen equation of state. We mainly concern the influence of various parameters, including the impacting velocity $v$, cavity size $R$, etc, to the dynamical and thermodynamical behaviors of the material. For the colliding of two bodies with a cavity in each, a secondary impacting is observed. Correspondingly, the separation distance $D$ of the two bodies has a maximum value $D_{\\max}$ in between the initial and second impacts. When the initial impacting velocity $v$ is not large enough, the cavity collapses in a nearly symmetric fashion, the maximum separation distance $D_{\\max}$ increases with $v$. When the initial shock wave is strong enough to collapse the cavity asymmetrically along the shock direction, the variation of $D_{\\max}$ with $v$ does not show monotonic behavior. Our numerical results show clear indication that the existence of cavities in explosive helps the creation of ``hot spots''.

X. F. Pan; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Jianshi Zhu

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

A simple monatomic ideal glass former: the glass transition by a first-order phase transition above the melting point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A liquid can form under cooling a glassy state either as a result of a continuous slowing down or by a first order polyamorphous phase transition. The second scenario has so far always been observed below the melting point where it interfered with crystalline nucleation. We report the first observation of the liquid-glass transition by a first order phase transition above the melting point. The observation was made in a molecular dynamics simulation of a one-component system with a model metallic pair potential. This is also the first observation of a simple monatomic ideal glass former -- a liquid that avoids crystallization at any cooling rate. Besides its conceptual importance, this result indicates a possibility of existence of metallic ideal glass formers.

Måns Elenius; Tomas Oppelstrup; Mikhail Dzugutov

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Spatial point pattern analysis applied to bubble nucleation in silicate melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental bubble nucleation studies are used for determining the nucleation mechanism as a function of experimental conditions, the resulting bubble number density, and can also yield estimates of the melt-vapor surface tension. This provides important ... Keywords: Bubble, Experiments, Nucleation, Spatial statistics, Spatstat

Joanna Mongrain; Jessica F. Larsen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Absence of superheating for ice Ih with a free surface : a new method of determining the melting point of different water models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for ice Ih with a free surface. The simulations were carried out at several temperatures and each run lasted more than 7ns. At high temperatures the ice melts. It is demonstrated that the melting process starts at the surface and propagates to the bulk of the ice block. Already at the temperatures below the melting point, we observe a thin liquid layer at the ice surface, but the block of ice remains stable along the run. As soon as the temperature reaches the melting point the entire ice block melts. Our results demonstrate that, unlike in the case of conventional simulations in the NpT ensemble, overheating of the ice Ih with a free surface does not occur. That allows to estimate the melting point of ice at zero pressure. We applied the method to the following models of water: SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P/Ew, TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005, and found good agreement between the melting temperatures obtained by this procedure and the values obtained either from free energy calculations or from direct simulations of the ice/water interface.

Carlos Vega; Maria Martin-Conde; Andrzej Patrykiejew

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Microsoft PowerPoint - srnl_24x36vert Nov2010 EM tech exchange melt rate model choi.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhancement of DWPF Melt Rate Model (WP 4.2.3) Enhancement of DWPF Melt Rate Model (WP 4.2.3) A.S. Choi, D. H. Miller, Engineering Process Development D. M. Immel, Imaging and Radiation Systems Free energy output is re-arranged into various functional groups based on literature data on aluminoborosilicate glass structural units Methodology: Objective: Develop a predictive tool for the impact of feed chemistry on relative melt rate of HLW glasses. Input Semi-empirical 4-Stage DWPF Cold Cap Model Output Phase Equilibria & Speciation of Melt, Intermediate Condensed Phases, Calcine Gases and Their Free Energies Feed Chemistry NIST Free Energy Database for Complex Liquids Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) Experiments Derive an empirical correlation of relative melt rates using free energy functional groups. X-Ray Imaging &

14

Melting Snowflakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many snowflakes in various melting stages were directly sampled at the, ground in almost the same way as described by Knight. From these observations the degrees of melting of snowflakes are classified into five stages. Breakup behavior of ...

Yasushi Fujiyoshi

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

37, p.325, 2012 17 Advanced Manufacturing 18 Permanent magnets and batteries o Molten salt electrolysis process * Use Mg to reduce the melting points of heavy rare...

16

Melting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...iron. In recent years, great improvements in energy efficiency have been realized by constructing these pots from ceramic material and using either gas or electric immersion heaters to supply heat to the bath. If a central melting facility is used, liquid casting alloy is delivered either by ladle or by using...

17

Lower-Melting-Point Solder Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant manufacturing cost reductions can be realized with ... and/or circuit board materials in product assembly in order to reduce production costs.

18

Electron Beam Melting (EBM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) I Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

19

Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting Program Organizers: Ian Harris, EWI; Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University; ...

20

NMSSM Higgs Benchmarks Near 125 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent LHC indications of a SM-like Higgs boson near 125 GeV are consistent not only with the Standard Model (SM) but also with Supersymmetry (SUSY). However naturalness arguments disfavour the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We consider the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) with a SM-like Higgs boson near 125 GeV involving relatively light stops and gluinos below 1 TeV in order to satisfy naturalness requirements. We are careful to ensure that the chosen values of couplings do not become non perturbative below the grand unification (GUT) scale, although we also examine how these limits may be extended by the addition of extra matter to the NMSSM at the two-loop level. We then propose four sets of benchmark points corresponding to the SM-like Higgs boson being the lightest or the second lightest Higgs state in the NMSSM or the NMSSM-with-extra-matter. With the aid of these benchmark points we discuss how the NMSSM Higgs boson near 125 GeV may be distinguished from the SM Higgs boson in future LHC searches.

S. F. King; M. Muhlleitner; R. Nevzorov

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improved MK42 Melting Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved Mark 42 melting model has been defined for establishing confinement protection limits (CPLs). This report describes the new melting model and its application in computing CPLs.

Tudor, A.A.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

12 GeV Upgrade | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Science Science A Schematic of the 12 GeV Upgrade The 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly expand the research capabilities of Jefferson Lab, adding a fourth experimental hall, upgrading existing halls and doubling the power of the lab's accelerator. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S: 12 GeV Home Public Interest Scientific Opportunities Hall D Status Updates Contacts Three-Year Accelerator Schedule 2014 - 2016 top-right bottom-left-corner bottom-right-corner 12 GeV Upgrade Physicists at Jefferson Lab are trying to find answers to some of nature's most perplexing questions about the universe by exploring the nucleus of the atom. Their goal is to answer such questions as: "What is the universe made of?" and "What holds everyday matter together?" In their search for answers, physicists smash electrons into atoms using

23

PYROMETALLURGY AND MELTING PRACTICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental technique has been devised for studying the reaction kinetics of the ... The system investigated was similar to the lead blast furnace slag which is ... Characterization of the recovered metal demonstrates that the performance of ... problems associated with oxygen combustion in aluminum melting furnaces.

24

JEFFERSON LAB 12 GEV CEBAF UPGRADE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron Linac operating at approx6 GeV and is devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade is a $310 M project, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. The project received construction approval in September 2008 and has started the major procurement process. The cryogenic aspects of the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the Linacs by adding ten new high-performance, superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CMs) to the existing 42 1/4 cryomodules; doubling of the 2 K cryogenics plant; and the addition of eight superconducting magnets.

Rode, C. H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, 23606 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

25

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nonferrous Metal Melting -- Marketing Kit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industrial sector increasingly relies on electric furnaces for nonferrous metal melting due to declining electricity cost, greater use of recycled secondary nonferrous materials, and tightened environmental regulations. This Nonferrous Metal Melting -- Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel perform a progressive analysis of electrotechnology applications in nonferrous metal melting systems. The kit is designed for utility personnel who have limited knowledge of the no...

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

28

Superalloy Melting and Cleanliness Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

are achievable. The VAR solidification rate can be controlled by the melt rate with the large heat sink of the water cooled copper crucible producing a relatively.

29

The 115 GeV Higgs Odyssey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On his way home from Troy, Odysseus had arrived within reach of Ithaca when a great storm blew up. He was swept away, and only several years later was he able to return to reclaim his rights from the rapacious suitors, with the aid of his son Telemachus. Some wonder whether this epic is repeating itself, if the Higgs weighs 115 GeV. If so, are CMS and ATLAS cast in the role of Telemachus? In this paper, I first discuss how close to Ithaca LEP may have been, the fact that a 115 GeV Higgs boson would disfavour technicolour, its potential implications for supersymmetry, and finally the prospects for completing the Higgs Odyssey.

John Ellis

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

The 115 GeV Higgs Odyssey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On his way home from Troy, Odysseus had arrived within reach of Ithaca when a great storm blew up. He was swept away, and only several years later was he able to return to reclaim his rights from the rapacious suitors, with the aid of his son Telemachus. Some wonder whether this epic is repeating itself, if the Higgs weighs 115 GeV. If so, are CMS and ATLAS cast in the role of Telemachus? In this paper, I first discuss how close to Ithaca LEP may have been, the fact that a 115 GeV Higgs boson would disfavour technicolour, its potential implications for supersymmetry, and finally the prospects for completing the Higgs Odyssey.

Ellis, Jonathan Richard

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Booster 6-GeV study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; /Fermilab; Norem, J.; /Argonne

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Booster 6-GeV study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wider aperture, which has been obtained along the Booster beam line recently, brings the opportunity to run beams with the intensity higher than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Extra accelerating voltages can be achieved either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate via a slower acceleration, and this motivates the 6-GeV study.

Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; /Fermilab; Norem, James; /Argonne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Impact of Melting Ice on Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice melts when it is in contact with ocean waters that have temperatures above the in situ freezing point. The product is a mixture of meltwater and seawater having properties intermediate between those of the two components. Density is one of ...

Adrian Jenkins

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

35

Questions and Answers - What is a material with a freezing point above 0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's the melting point of steel? What's the melting point of steel? Previous Question (What's the melting point of steel?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is a meniscus?) What is a meniscus? What is a material with a freezing point above 0 degrees Celsius? A material exists as a solid when it is below its freezing point. So, we need to find a material that is a solid at some temperature above 0°C. Almost any solid abject around you would fit this description - an aluminum soda can, a candle or a piece of chocolate all have freezing points above 0°C. Keep in mind that a material's freezing point is the same as its melting point. These are just different terms for the same thing, it just depends on whether energy is going into a substance (melting) or if energy is being

36

Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Muon interactions at 490 GeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

E665 is a new, high-energy muon scattering experiment at Fermilab. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on deuterium, hydrogen, and xenon targets during the 1987--88 fixed target run. These data are being analyzed with various physics objectives in mind, and a number of preliminary results have been obtained. This paper presents four of results, specifically the small {chi}{sub Bj} ratio of xenon and deuterium cross sections, inclusive hadron distributions, two jet signals, and exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production.

Schmitt, M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Identification of the Melting Layer through Dual-Polarization Radar Measurements at Vertical Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Features of the melting layer of precipitation such as height and thickness are important in many meteorological applications. Doppler radar observations with a vertically pointing antenna have often been used in order to derive these features ...

Luca Baldini; Eugenio Gorgucci

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Talking Points  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Talking Points Talking Points NATURAL GAS MARKET INTEGRITY: How EIA Helps Presentation by William F. Hederman Congressional Research Service at EIA 30 th Anniversary Conference April 8, 2008 Washington, DC INTRODUCTION 1. Price levels and volatility cause suspicions. 2. Actual integrity and perceived integrity are both important for markets. 3. EIA was created in response to a crisis of confidence in energy market information. CANDIDATE INTEGRITY CRITERIA 1. Transparency 2. Efficiency (gathering, reporting, monitoring data) v. equity 3. Stability/predictability v. dynamism/volatility 4. Clarity (understanding) "DRAFT" TEN COMMANDMENTS/SUGGESTIONS 1. First presented at World Energy Congress, Rome, Nov. 2007 panel on Energy Market Integrity.

40

MU(& Ge-+v,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

fil fil MU(& Ge-+v, . !d R&arch & Development b This document consists of 6 Contract Ho. pages and - . --------------_____---. figures No.--~--of.--~~-_-copies, Series,&,, This subcontract entered into this 20 day 0fSepte~ber , 1943, by and between the University of Cliicago, a corporation not for pecuniary profit organized under the ICVS of the Stnto of Illinois, of Chicago, Illinois (hereinafter called "the Contractor") and Yiolverine Tube Divisionof Caluzet 2 Eecla Consolidated Co;-,er co, . a cor?orntion organized under the laws cf the State of l~lch~;an - of Detroit, I:ichigan --- (hersinnftcr called "the Subcontractoi"). WIEHEAS, tho Contractor has heretofore onterod into a contract v;ith the United States of America (rcprcse;!tcd by its dtlly designated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

3 GeV Injector Design Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Polarized Proton Collisions at 205 GeV at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of 2 stronger than those below 100 GeV making it important to examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were first accelerated to the record energy of 205 GeV in RHIC with a significant polarization measured at top energy in 2005. This Letter presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival to orbit distortions.

Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Courant, E.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gill, R.; Glenn, J.; Huang, H.; Kewisch, J.; Luccio, A.; Luo, Y.; Pilat, F. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] (and others)

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

Electron Beam Melting: The New Directional Solidification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Electron Beam Melting: ...

44

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Multimuon production in 280 GeV ?+ iron interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented on dimuon and trimuon final states in 280 GeV ?+ iron interactions. Both dimuon and trimuon data show clear evidence for open charm production and suggest strongly that the dominant production process is photon?gluon fusion. Similar amounts of elastic and inelastic (shower energy ?5 GeV) J/? production are measured in the trimuon sample. Elastic J/? production is consistent with photon?gluon fusion plus naive assumptions. Inelastic J/? production is inconsistent with this simple model

The European Muon Collaboration

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mechanical Behavior of Melt Mixing Polypropylene Organoclay ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the effect of the nanocomposite dispersion and morphology, another nanocomposite was prepared by melt mixing of polypropylene and a modified ...

47

Produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of processing TiAl by additive manufacturing by using the selective electron beam melting (SEBM) provides a new approach to reach near

48

Flux Lattice in Superconductors and Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our early data suggested that there was a melting transition to a "vortex liquid" in high temperature superconductors, but it's possible relation to the ...

49

Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrical resistivity of oxide melts is important for the design and operation of electric furnaces. The electrical properties of glass and slag ...

50

Spin Structure with JLab 6 and 12 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights of JLab 6 GeV results on spin structure study and plan for 12 GeV program. Spin structure study is full of surprises and puzzles. A decade of experiments from JLab yield these exciting results: (1) valence spin structure; (2) precision measurements of g{sub 2}/d{sub 2} - high-twist; (3) spin sum rules and polarizabilities; and (4) first neutron transversity. There is a bright future as the 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly enhance our capability: (1) Precision determination of the valence quark spin structure flavor separation; (2) Precision measurements of g{sub 2}/d{sub 2}; and (3) Precision extraction of transversity/tensor charge.

Jian-Ping Chen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Jefferson Lab 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron Linac operating at ~6 GeV and is devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade is a $310 M project, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. The project received construction approval in September 2008 and has started the major procurement process. The cryogenic aspects of the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the Linacs by adding ten new high-performance, superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CMs) to the existing 42 1/4 cryomodules; doubling of the 2 K cryogenics plant; and the addition of eight superconducting magnets.

Claus Rode

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

GeV Emission from Collisional Magnetized Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic fields may play a dominant role in gamma-ray bursts, and recent observations by the Fermi satellite indicate that GeV radiation, when detected, arrives delayed by seconds from the onset of the MeV component. Motivated by this, we discuss a magnetically dominated jet model where both magnetic dissipation and nuclear collisions are important. We show that, for parameters typical of the observed bursts, such a model involving a realistic jet structure can reproduce the general features of the MeV and a separate GeV radiation component, including the time delay between the two. The model also predicts a multi-GeV neutrino component.

P. Mészáros; M. J. Rees

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

Sachs, Emanuel M. (42 Old Middlesex Rd., Belmont, MA 02178)

1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, synchrotron radiation emitted by circulating electron beams has come into wide use as a powerful, versatile source of x-rays for probing the structure of matter and for studying various physical processes. Several synchrotron radiation facilities with different designs and characteristics are now in regular operation throughout the world, with recent additions in this country being the 0.8-GeV and 2.5-GeV rings of NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, none of the operating facilities has been designed to use a low-emittance, high-energy stored beam, together with modern undulator devices, to produce a large number of hard x-ray beams of extremely high brilliance. This document is a proposal to the Department of Energy to construct and operate high-energy synchrotron radiation facility at Argonne National Laboratory. We have now chosen to set the design energy of this facility at 7.0 GeV, with the capability to operate at up to 7.5 GeV.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A lattice for the 50 GeV muon collider ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent progress report on the lattice design of the 50-50 GeV muon collider is presented. The ring circumference needs to be as small as possible due to the short lifetime of the 50 GeV muons. The background at the detector is affected by the continuous decay of muons into electrons which requires a dipole between the high focusing quadrupoles and the detector. To obtain a luminosity on the order of 1{times}10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} it is required to have beam intensities on the order of 1{times}10{sup 12} particles per bunch. The rms momentum spread of the beam is equal to 0.12% and the beta functions at the interaction point are equal to 4 cm. The maxima of the betatron functions at these quadrupoles are 1,300 m, resulting in large chromaticities which must be corrected by local chromatic correction. Pairs of horizontal and vertical chromatic sextupoles are located at locations where the corresponding betatron functions are 100 m and the values of the horizontal dispersion functions are 3 and 2 m, respectively. They are carefully placed so that most of their nonlinear effects are canceled. The dynamic aperture is larger than 7 times the mean size of the beam for the momentum offsets larger than {minus}6 and +10 sigmas.

Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ng, K.Y.; Weishi, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Design of 10 GeV laser wakefield accelerator stages with shaped laser modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF 10 GEV LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATORSTAGES WITH SHAPED LASER MODES ? E. Cormier-Michel, E.PAL framework, of 10 GeV laser plasma wake?eld ac- celerator

Cormier-Michel, Estelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA):A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator W.P. Leemans ' , R.of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA)

Leemans, W.P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EA-0389: Proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at DOE's Argonne...

60

THE MAGNET LATTICE OF THE LBL 1-2 GeV SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Chasman- Green TBA Lattices," LBL-21279, to be published19, 1987 THE MAGNET LATTICE OF THE LBL 1-2 GeV SYNCHROTRONLBL- 22193 THE MAGNET LATTICE OF THE LBL 1-2 GeV SYNCHROTRON

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sleptons at post-WMAP benchmark points at LHC(CMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a possibility to detect sleptons at post-WMAP benchmark points at LHC(CMS). We find that at $L_{tot}=30 fb^{-1}$ it would be possible to detect sleptons at points A, B, C, D, G. We also investigate the production and decays of right and left sleptons separately. We find that at $L_{tot}=30 fb^{-1}$ it would be possible to detect right sleptons with a mass up to 200 GeV and left ones with a mass up to 300 GeV.

Yu. M. Andreev; S. I. Bityukov; N. V. Krasnikov

2004-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Front Tracking Model of Simultaneous Melting and Solidification ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This results in dynamic melting and solidification throughout the weld pool, which can be modelled using the authors' Front Tracking algorithm. Melting is ...

63

Non-Ferrous Melting Practice, 1946 - Title Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement and Control of Temperatures in Smelting, Refining and. Melting Nonferrous Metals. By P. H. DIKE and M. J. BRADLEY .... I. Melting of Brass and ...

64

Non-Ferrous Melting Practice, 1946 (Electronic Format)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Ferrous Melting Practice examines the melting of brass, bronze, copper alloys, nickel, magnesium, aluminum, lead, and tin. This title also has information

65

Molecular stretching in polymer melts undergoing steady elongational flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular stretching in polymer melts undergoing steady elongational flow. Kell Mortensen Centre DTU, Lyngby, Denmark The molecular stretching of a polymer melt undergoing steady elongational

66

Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers Title Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

67

Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Model of Pulsed Laser Melting 2.1 Experimental Systemto be Modeled 2.2 Laser Absorption . . . . . . . . . . .a prototypical 0.3 J/cm 2 laser ?uence PLM at 0.5 J/m 2 Ge-

Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Oxygen – Permeable Solid/Melt Composite Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodic Behavior of Silicon (?) in BaF2-CaF2 –SiO2 Melts ... Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Uranium Chloride in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic.

69

Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equal interface energies with the matrix. The two shadedat 0.5 J/m 2 Ge-matrix interface energy. The melting plateauare the interface energies between the matrix and the liquid

Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement  

SciTech Connect

Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PIà ƒ  ¢Ã ‚  € à ‚  ™ s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

RADIATION HAZARDS ENCOUNTERED IN ARC MELTING THORIUM  

SciTech Connect

A project to provide information on the hazards associated wlth arc melting of Th is described. A general airsampling analysis was made to determine the separation, concentration, and distribution of Th daughter (decay) products throughout arc melting, machining, and forging processes found in a handling facility. The value of well coordinated health physics program is stressed in connection with potential health hazards and personnel protection. Building, equipment, and exhaust ventilation requirements for such a facility are discussed, along wlth special handling methods. (auth)

Lowery, R.R.

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

Stone, M.E.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

Pilat, Fulvia C. [JLAB

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A quasimechanism of melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids  

SciTech Connect

It has been know for half a century that many crystalline organic solids undergo an acceleration in the rate of thermal decomposition as the melting temperature is approached. This acceleration terminates at the melting point, exhibiting an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence in the faster decomposition rate from the liquid phase. This observation has been modeled previously using various premelting behaviors based on e.g. freezing point depression induced by decomposition products or solvent impurities. These models do not, however, indicate a mechanism for liquid formation and acceleration which is an inherent function of the bulk thermodynamics of the molecule. Here we show that such an inherent thermodynamic mechanism for liquid formation exists in the form of the so-called quasi-liquid layer at the solid surface. We explore a kinetic mechanism which describes the acceleration of rate and is a function of the free energies of sublimation and vaporization. We construct a differential rate law from these thermodynamic free energies and a normalized progress variable. We further construct a reduced variable formulation of the model which is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and show that it is applicable to the observed melt acceleration in several common organic crystalline solids. A component of the differential rate law, zero order in the progress variable, is shown to be proportional to the thickness of the quasiliquid layer predicted by a recent thermodynamic theory for this phenomenon. This work therefore serves not only to provide new insight into thermal decomposition in a broad class or organic crystalline solids, but also further validates the underlying thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon of liquid formation on the molecular surface at temperatures below the melting point.

Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

David Schwam

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Production of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei in reactions induced by {sup 136}Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV on a beryllium target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production cross sections of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei obtained in the fragmentation of {sup 136}Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) at GSI. The measured cross sections are compared to {sup 238}U fission yields and model calculations to determine the optimum reaction mechanism to extend the limits of the chart of the nuclides around the r-process waiting point at N=82.

Benlliure, J.; Fernandez-Ordonez, M.; Casarejos, E.; Pereira, J. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, L.; Rejmund, F.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L. [IPN Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Boudard, A.; Ducret, J. E.; Leray, S.; Volant, C.; Villagrasa, C. [DAPNIA/SPhN, DSM-CEA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Enqvist, T.; Heinz, A.; Henzlova, D.; Henzl, V.; Kelic, A.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Schmidt, K.-H. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] (and others)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Argonne PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process into the TRACK code, stripping simulations (SNS, FNAL-HINS) - Lattice for the 8-GeV linac, "Project X" 5 Papers J. Xu, P. Ostroumov and J. Nolen, "A Parallel 3D Poisson...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chemical equilibrium study at SPS 158A GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed study of chemical freeze-out in nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energy 158A GeV is presented. By analyzing hadronic multiplicities within the statistical hadronization approach, the chemical equilibration of p-p, C-C, Si-Si and Pb-Pb systems is studied as a function of the number of participating nucleons in the system. Additionally, Two Component statistical hadronization model is applied to the data and is found to be able to explain the observed strangeness hadronic phase space under-saturation.

Jaakko Manninen

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

How is the blazar GeV emission really produced?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the external Compton (EC) model for the production of the GeV emission in blazars makes specific predictions for the spectrum and variability of those blazars characterized by a high Compton dominance (Compton to synchrotron luminosity ratio). These unavoidable features have not been observed, casting doubt on the validity of this popular model. We argue that synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) models including the higher orders of Compton scattering are more promising, and we briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the geometry of the broad line region (BLR).

Markos Georganopoulos; Eric Perlman; Demosthenes Kazanas; Brian Wingert

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is in progress. Construction began in 2008 and the project should be completed in 2015. The upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and new experimental equipment in three of the experimental halls. A brief overview of this upgrade project is presented along with some highlights of the anticipated experimental program.

R.D. McKeown

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A New Look at the Melting Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors derive a relationship between the vertical Doppler spectrum of the rain just below the radar bright band and that of the snow just above. It neglects vertical air motions and assumes that each snowflake simply melts to form a raindrop ...

Fiona J. Drummond; R. R. Rogers; S. A. Cohn; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; J. S. Wilson

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

GOES Observation of a Rapidly Melting Snowband  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GOES observation of rapid dissipation of a 5–10 cm (2–4 inches) depth snowband over the central and upper Mississippi River valley on 15 April 1980 is presented. Differences in the local weather between the stations with and without melting snow ...

Carlyle H. Wash; Delain A. Edman; John Zapotocny

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Silicon purification melting for photovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability of polysilicon feedstock has become a major issue for the photovoltaic (PV) industry in recent years. Most of the current polysilicon feedstock is derived from rejected material from the semiconductor industry. However, the reject material can become scarce and more expensive during periods of expansion in the integrated-circuit industry. Continued rapid expansion of the PV crystalline-silicon industry will eventually require a dedicated supply of polysilicon feedstock to produce solar cells at lower costs. The photovoltaic industry can accept a lower purity polysilicon feedstock (solar-grade) compared to the semiconductor industry. The purity requirements and potential production techniques for solar-grade polysilicon have been reviewed. One interesting process from previous research involves reactive gas blowing of the molten silicon charge. As an example, Dosaj et all reported a reduction of metal and boron impurities from silicon melts using reactive gas blowing with 0{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2}. The same authors later reassessed their data and the literature, and concluded that Cl{sub 2}and 0{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2} gas blowing are only effective for removing Al, Ca, and Mg from the silicon melt. Researchers from Kawasaki Steel Corp. reported removal of B and C from silicon melts using reactive gas blowing with an 0{sub 2}/Ar plasma torch. Processes that purify the silicon melt are believed to be potentially much lower cost compared to present production methods that purify gas species.

VAN DEN AVYLE,JAMES A.; HO,PAULINE; GEE,JAMES M.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Appendix B - Control Points  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B B Control Points B.1 Injector Control Points Qty Type Device 2 Magnet Bend magnet - DL1 bend 9 Magnet Quad magnet 10 Magnet X-Y Corrector Pair 2 Magnet Solenoid 2 Magnet...

90

The Jefferson Lab program: From 6 GeV operations to the 12 GeV upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and the CEBAF accelerator operated for more than a decade, running a comprehensive scientific program that improved our understanding of the strong interaction. The facility is now moving toward an upgrade of the machine, from 6 to 12 GeV; a new experimental hall will be added and the equipment of the three existing halls will be enhanced. In this contribution some selected results from the rich physics program run at JLab, as well as the prospects for the near future, will be presented.

Marco Battaglieri

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Semantic point detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local features are the building blocks of many visual systems, and local point detector is usually the first component for local feature extraction. Existing local point detector are designed with target for matching and it may not perform well when ... Keywords: semantic point detector

Kuiyuan Yang; Lei Zhang; Meng Wang; Hong-Jiang Zhang

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Melting Layer: A Laboratory Investigation of Ice Particle Melt and Evaporation near 0°C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting, freezing, and evaporation of individual and aggregates of snow crystals are simulated in the laboratory under controlled temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity. Crystals of selected habit are grown on a vertical filament and ...

R. G. Oraltay; J. Hallett

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Experimental studies of melting and crystallization processes in planetary interiors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting and crystallization processes on the Earth and Moon are explored in this thesis, and the topics of melt generation, transport, and crystallization are discussed in three distinct geologic environments: the Moon's ...

Krawczynski, Michael James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Process Mapping of Melt Pool Dimension Control in Electron Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Process Mapping of Melt ...

98

Microstructure of Titanium Alloy Prepared by Selective Laser Melting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solidification in Additive Manufacturing. Presentation Title, Microstructure of Titanium Alloy Prepared by Selective Laser Melting in Vacuum.

99

Method and apparatus for drawing monocrystalline ribbon from a melt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for drawing a monocrystalline ribbon or web from a melt comprising utilizing a shaping die including at least two elements spaced one from the other each having a portion thereof located below the level of the melt and another portion located above the level of the melt a distance sufficient to form a raised meniscus of melt about the corresponding element.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Schwuttke, Guenter H. (Poughkeepsie, NY)

1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microwave Absorption Measurements of Melting Spherical and Nonspherical Hydrometeors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements were made of the absorption behavior of melting and freezing hydrometeors using resonant cavity perturbation techniques at a wavelength of 2.82 cm. Melting ice spheres with equivalent melted diameters between 1.15 and 2.00 mm exhibit ...

Robert John Hansman Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Large melting point hysteresis of Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matrix and solid/matrix interface energies. Second, thematrix, and might lead to an overall increase in elastic energy.matrix. However, based on the density change, a 2.5 nm interface interface notes energy (

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

104

Abrupt grain boundary melting in ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of impurities on the grain boundary melting of ice is investigated through an extension of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, in which we include retarded potential effects in a calculation of the full frequency dependent van der Waals and Coulombic interactions within a grain boundary. At high dopant concentrations the classical solutal effect dominates the melting behavior. However, depending on the amount of impurity and the surface charge density, as temperature decreases, the attractive tail of the dispersion force interaction begins to compete effectively with the repulsive screened Coulomb interaction. This leads to a film-thickness/temperature curve that changes depending on the relative strengths of these interactions and exhibits a decrease in the film thickness with increasing impurity level. More striking is the fact that at very large film thicknesses, the repulsive Coulomb interaction can be effectively screened leading to an abrupt reduction to zero film thickness.

L. Benatov; J. S. Wettlaufer

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

Meihui Wang

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

200-GeV ISA with room temperature magnets  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design study of 200-GeV proton intersecting storage accclerators with room temperature magnets is presented. The key to this study was thc desire to keep the electric power consumptiom to an acceptable level (40 MW). The design has been optimized by choosing small-gap (4 cm) aluminum coil dipoles operating at about 15 kG. The luminosity of this machine is limited to about 10/sup 32/ cm-/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ by transverse space-charg e effects. An order of magnitude higher luminositics can be obtained by adding a booster of modest cost. A novel vacuum system using distributed Ti-sublimation pumps results in considerable savings. A cost comparison with a high-luminosity superconducting machine is given. (auth)

Willis, W.J.; Danby, G.T.; Hahn, H.; Halama, H.J.; Maschke, A.W.; Month, M.; Parzen, G.; Polk, I.

1974-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

EAMidnightPointMahogany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Prepared By Bureau of Land Management - Prineville and Burns...

108

PowerPoint Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

y x Main crack surface Dislocation loops Crack initiation point Crack branching (BLJ + thermal motion) Crack embryo 3D view of surface particles Developed crack Crack development...

109

Macroparticle simulations of antiproton lifetime at 150 GeV in the te vatron  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we report on a systematic study of antiproton lifetime at the injection energy of 150 GeV in the Tevatron. Our parallel beam-beam model can handle both strong-strong and weak-strong beam-beam collisions with arbitrary beam-beam separation and beam distributions. In this study, we have only used the weak-strong capability due to the fact that the antiproton intensity is much smaller than the proton intensity. We have included all 72 long-range beam-beam collisions with a linear transfer map between adjacent collision points and taken into account linear chromaticity. The effects of antiproton emittance, beam-beam separation, proton intensity, and machine chromaticity have been investigated. Initial results show that the antiproton lifetime as a function of the proton intensity from the simulation is in good agreement with that from the experimental measurements. The antiproton lifetime can be significantly improved by increasing the beam separation and by reducing the antiproton emittance.

Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.; Sen, Tanaji; Xiao, Meiqin

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Point-Based Graphics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polygon-mesh approach to 3D modeling was a huge advance, but today its limitations are clear. Longer render times for increasingly complex images effectively cap image complexity, or else stretch budgets and schedules to the breaking point. Point-based ... Keywords: Computer Graphics, Computers

Markus Gross; Hanspeter Pfister

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Swirling Melting Characteristics of Fly Ashes from Co-Firing of MSWI in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting treatment is an efficient for heavy metal stabilization in MSW fly ash. The fly ashes from co-firing of municipal solid waste and coal incinerator were melted in the swirling melting furnace system under various temperatures. The melting characteristics ... Keywords: fly ash, co-firing, melting, melting temperature, heavy metals, fixation rate

Wang Xue-tao; Jiao You-zhou; Xu Bin; Jin Bao-sheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV

Blackmore, V; Doucas, G; Kimmitt, M F; Molloy, S; Ottewell, B; Perry, C; Woods, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Depth Profiles of Radionuclides Induced in Shielding Concrete of the 12 GeV Proton Accelerator Facility at KEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depth Profiles of Radionuclides Induced in Shielding Concrete of the 12 GeV Proton Accelerator Facility at KEK

Miura, T; Ishihama, S; Ohotsuka, N; Kunifuda, T

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Search for Heavy Majorana Neutrinos in Same-Sign mumu+jets and ee+jets Events in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cut (GeV) Predicted MC truth Ratio Table 6.6: Predicted andcut (GeV) Predicted MC truth Ratio Table 6.7: Predicted and

Giordano, Ferdinando

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

MELTING AND FORMING OF SER FUEL RODS  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-one metal alloy reds were fabricated for the SNAP Experimental Reactor (SER), a compact nuclear power source. These rads were 1 in. in diameter by 10 in. long and consisted of an alloy containing 7 wt.% highly enriched uranium and 93 wt.% zinconium. Melting of the alloy was done by generally accepted consumable-arc meltiag techniques. Extrusion of alloy slugs into rods was carried out, unclad, at 850 deg F. Suitable controls were developed to insure uniformity of products and reproducibility of batches. The procedures developed for this application are considered adequate for future requirements. (auth)

Drennan, P.S.

1960-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Definition: Point To Point Transmission Service | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

non-firm basis from the Point(s) of Receipt to the Point(s) of Delivery.1 Related Terms transmission lines, transmission line References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability...

117

Dew Point and Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hounds for hunting. I recently had a situation where the temperature was 68 degrees, humidity was 54% and dew point was 62 degrees. My dogs were not able to perform as well as...

118

ARM - Point Reyes News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Takes Off in July June 30, 2005 Guest Instruments to Collect Aerosol Data During Coastal Field Campaign June 15, 2005 Mobile Facility Arrives Safe and Sound in Point Reyes...

119

Team Sand Point (SP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this flight report is to summarize the field activities of the ShoreZone aerial video imaging (AVI) survey conducted out of Sand Point and Cold Bay in

Team Cold Bay (cb

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Gamma-Ray Bursts Above 1 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the principal results obtained by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory relating to the study of gamma-ray bursts was the detection by the EGRET instrument of energetic ($>$100 MeV) photons from a handful of bright bursts. The most extreme of these was the single 18 GeV photon from the GRB940217 source. Given EGRET's sensitivity and limited field of view, the detection rate implies that such high energy emission may be ubiquitous in bursts. Hence expectations that bursts emit out to at least TeV energies are quite realistic, and the associated target-of-opportunity activity of the TeV gamma-ray community is well-founded. This review summarizes the observations and a handful of theoretical models for generating GeV--TeV emission in bursts sources, outlining possible ways that future positive detections could discriminate between different scenarios. The power of observations in the GeV--TeV range to distinguish between spectral structure intrinsic to bursts and that due to the intervening medium between source and observer is also discussed.

Matthew G. Baring

1997-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Measurement of the Inclusive Charm Cross Section at 4.03 GeV and 4.14 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cross section for charmed meson production at $\\sqrt{s} = 4.03 $ and 4.14 GeV has been measured with the Beijing Spectrometer. The measurement was made using 22.3 $pb^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ data collected at 4.03 GeV and 1.5 $pb^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ data collected at 4.14 GeV. Inclusive observed cross sections for the production of charged and neutral D mesons and momentum spectra are presented. Observed cross sections were radiatively corrected to obtain tree level cross sections. Measurements of the total hadronic cross section are obtained from the charmed meson cross section and an extrapolation of results from below the charm threshold.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Blum, I; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Chen, Y Q; Cheng Bao Sen; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Dunwoodie, W M; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gratton, P; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Gu, Y F; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Han, Y; Harris, F A; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hitlin, D G; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Hu, X Q; Huang, Y Z; Huang, G S; Izen, J M; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Jones, B D; Ju, X; Ke, Z J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, B K; Kong, D; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Lankford, A; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, R B; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li, X N; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Lou, X C; Lowery, B; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Malchow, R; Mandelkern, M A; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Oyang, J; Paluselli, D; Pan, L J; Panetta, J; Porter, F; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Schernau, M; Schmid, B; Schultz, J; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Standifird, J; Stoker, D; Sun, F; Sun, H S; Sun, Y; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Toki, W; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, F; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, T J; Wang, Y Y; Weaver, M; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, P P; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, W; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye, S W; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu, Y H; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G P; Zhou, H S; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhuang, B A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Evolution of shear-induced melting in dusty plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatiotemporal development of melting is studied experimentally in a 2D dusty plasma suspension. Starting with an ordered lattice, and then suddenly applying localized shear, a pair of counter-propagating flow regions develop. A transition between two melting stages is observed before a steady state is reached. Melting spreads with a front that propagates at the transverse sound speed. Unexpectedly, coherent longitudinal waves are excited in the flow region.

Yan Feng; J. Goree; Bin Liu

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

Production of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei in reactions induced by 136Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV on a beryllium target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production cross sections of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei obtained in the fragmentation of 136Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) at GSI. 125Pd was identified for the first time. The measured cross sections are compared to 238U fission yields and model calculations in order to determine the optimum reaction mechanism to extend the limits of the chart of the nuclides around the r-process waiting point at N=82.

Benlliure, J; Audouin, L; Boudard, A; Casarejos, E; Ducret, J E; Enqvist, T; Heinz, A; Henzlova, D; Henzl, V; Kelic, A; Leray, S; Napolitani, P; Pereira, J; Rejmund, F; Ricciardi, M V; Schmidt, K -H; Schmitt, C; Stéphan, C; Tassan-Got, L; Volant, C; Villagrasa, C; Yordanov, O

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Molecular Dynamics Simulation on the Surface Melting and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal and non-thermal ultra-fast laser induced surface melting and nanojoining of Ag nanoparticles and nanowires were investigated ...

126

Melting and Refining Technology of High-Temperature Steels and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n outlook into the future position of the various melting and .... Inert Gas carburization. Continuous Casting. In Reactor Vessel: - Inert Gas a Arc Remelting (PAR).

127

Energy Efficient Operation of Secondary Aluminum Melting Furnaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2007 ... Energy Efficient Operation of Secondary Aluminum Melting Furnaces by P.E. King, J.J. Hatem, and B.M. Golchert ...

128

The Present Status of Melting Technology for Alloy 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the section. The availability of such larger pieceweights in Alloy. 718 could quite. CONCLUSION. Over the long development of melting techniques for Alloy 718,.

129

Transient Melt Pool Response in Wire Feed Electron Beam Direct ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Transient Melt Pool Response in Wire Feed Electron Beam Direct ... Abstract Scope, Wire feed electron beam direct digital manufacturing ...

130

Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Wasteforms for an Advanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Wasteforms for an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle. Author(s), Kyle S Brinkman, Jake Amoroso, Kevin Fox, ...

131

PDF PRIMER: Secondary Melting Processes for Superalloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... Secondary melting of superalloy stock is required to improve chemical homogeneity and reduce levels of inclusions. This primer describes the ...

132

Crystal-melt interfacial Properties of HCP Metals by Molecular ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Crystal-melt interfacial properties were studied by molecular dynamics simulations using different MEAM and EAM interatomic potentials for Mg, ...

133

The Effects of Withdrawal and Melt Overheating Histories on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roger C. Reed, Kenneth A. Green, Pierre Caron, Timothy P. Gabb, Michael G. Fahrmann, Eric ..... of physical or chemical properties of the melt, such as diffusive.

134

A15: Relation between Melting and Hydrogen Desorption ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, we investigated the melting temperatures and hydrogen desorption properties of LiBH4-NaBH4 mixtures with various compositions, ...

135

Strategic Focus Points  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus Points Focus Points June 2011 1. Establish the human capital and organizational foundation to create a high-performing organization. 2. Implement a cyber risk-management and incident response program that ensures effective security of Federal and M&O networks, provides appropriate flexibility, and meets legal requirements and OMB expectations. 3. Improve IT Services (EITS) into a best-in-class provider from both a technical and business perspective. 4. Implement and institutionalize a reformed, integrated information management governance process that respects the goal to treat M&Os distinctively different than true Federal entities. 5. Transition to 5-year planning and programming, using the NNSA Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Evaluation (PPBE) process as a starting point to include resource and requirements validation.

136

Improving Floating Point Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Improving Floating Point Compression through Binary Masks Leonardo A. Bautista Gomez Argonne National Laboratory Franck Cappello Argonne National Laboratory Abstract-Modern scientific technology such as particle accel- erators, telescopes and supercomputers are producing extremely large amounts of data. That scientific data needs to be processed using systems with high computational capabilities such as supercomputers. Given that the scientific data is increasing in size at an exponential rate, storing and accessing the data is becoming expensive in both, time and space. Most of this scientific data is stored using floating point representation. Scientific applications executed in supercomputers spend a large amount of CPU cycles reading and writing floating point values, making data compression techniques an interesting way to increase computing efficiency.

137

Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » July 2013 Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Scientists at University of Texas, Austin, accelerate electrons to 2 GeV in table top apparatus. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Neil Fazel The inside of the University of Texas, Austin, vacuum chamber where

138

e+e- pair production from 10 GeV to 10 ZeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e + e ? Pair Production from 10 GeV to 10 ZeV Spencer R.very high energies, pair production (? ? e + e ? ) exhibitsatoms reduces the pair production cross section considerably

Klein, Spencer R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

LS-35 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnet Field Calculations Robert J. Lari September 23, 1985 Quadrupole Magnet Figure 1 shows the cross section of...

140

Fragmentation studies of 158 A GeV Pb ions using CR39 nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six stacks of CR39 nuclear track detectors with different targets were exposed to a lead ion beam of 158 A GeV at the CERN-SPS, at normal incidence, in order to study the fragmentation properties of ultra-relativistic lead nuclei. Measurements of the total, break-up and pick-up charge-changing cross sections of 158 A GeV Pb ions have been made for the first time.

Dekhissi, H; Giorgini, M; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Patrizii, L; Popa, V; Serra, P; Togo, V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Study on the Gasification and Melting Characteristics of Electronic Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment) or “electronic waste” is an important issue in the whole world. Its gasification and melting characteristics were studied here. The experiments proved that over 50% of WEEE ... Keywords: WEEE, electronic waste, gasification, pyrolysis, melting

Wenlong Wang; Jing Sun; Chunyuan Ma; Yong Dong; Zhiqiang Wang; Xiren Xu; Zhanlong Song

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Melting of Ice in Cold Stratified Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the melting of ice in cold water vertically stratified with salt. The study extends previous investigations of ice melting in cold water at uniform salinity and in warm water with a salinity gradient. We find, in agreement with the ...

Herbert E. Huppert; Edward G. Josberger

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization of the SuperOPF Commercialization of the SuperOPF Framework: Phase III (Theme: Co- optimization Stochastic SuperOPF- renewables) Performers: PSERC: Hsiao-Dong Chiang - LEAD Cornell University: Ray Zimmerman Bigwood Systems, Inc.: Patrick Causgrove, Bin Wang Phase I: 1.(support industrial model) A commercial-grade core SuperOPF software supporting various industrial-grade power system models such as (i) CIM-compliance; and (ii) PSS/E data format 2. A multi-stage OPF solver with adaptive homotopy-based Interior Point Method for large- scale power systems (PJM: 14,000-bus data) Bigwood Systems Inc., 2013 3 Results: Efficiency and Robustness (Analytical Jacobian matrices) Loading Conditions One-Staged Interior Point Method Multi-Staged Scheme 1 Succeeded Succeeded

144

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud - - Aerosol Properties Aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site at the AMF Point Reyes Site Maureen Dunn , Mike Jensen , Pavlos Kollias , Mark Miller , Peter Daum Mary Jane Bartholomew , David Turner , Elisabeth Andrews and Anne Jefferson Introduction Ground based observations from the MASRAD, Pt. Reyes AMF July 1-Sept 15, 2005 indicate a relationship between coastal marine stratus cloud properties, boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei and the upwelling of cool oceanic waters measured at an offshore NOAA buoy. Cloud Drizzle to CCN Atmosphere to Cloud Upwelling SST to Atmosphere Conclusion Coastal marine stratus clouds increase in thickness as the underlying sea surface

145

EAMidnightPointMahogany  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Prepared By Bureau of Land Management - Prineville and Burns Districts DOI-BLM-OR-P040-2011-0021-EA DOE/EA-1925 Environmental Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Lead Agency United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Prineville District 3050 N.E. 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754 Tel: 541 416 6700 Burns District 28910 Hwy 20 West, Hines, OR 97738 Tel: 541 573 4400 Cooperating Agency United States Department of Energy Golden Field Office Golden, Colorado 80401 Tel: 720-356-1563 Fax: 720-356-1560 April 2013 Environmental Assessment Table of Contents 1

146

Evaluating Point Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically, point forecasting methods are compared and assessed by means of an error measure or scoring function, such as the absolute error or the squared error. The individual scores are then averaged over forecast cases, to result in a summary measure of the predictive performance, such as the mean absolute error or the (root) mean squared error. I demonstrate that this common practice can lead to grossly misguided inferences, unless the scoring function and the forecasting task are carefully matched. Effective point forecasting requires that the scoring function be specified ex ante, or that the forecaster receives a directive in the form of a statistical functional, such as the mean or a quantile of the predictive distribution. If the scoring function is specified ex ante, the forecaster can issue the optimal point forecast, namely, the Bayes rule. If the forecaster receives a directive in the form of a functional, it is critical that the scoring function be consistent for it, in the sense that the expect...

Gneiting, Tilmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fluctuations of the number of neutral pions at high multiplicity in pp interactions at 50 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained by measuring fluctuations of the number of neutral pions in the SERP-E-190 Experiment (Thermalization Project) upon irradiating a liquid-hydrogen target of the SVD-2 setup with a beam of 50-GeV protons are presented. A simulation of the detection of photons from the decay of neutral pions with the aid of an electromagnetic calorimeter revealed a linear relation between the number of detected photons and the mean number of neutral pions in an event. After the introduction of corrections for the loss of charged tracks because of a limited acceptance of the setup, trigger operation, and the efficiency of the data-treatment system, distributions of the number of neutral pions, N{sub 0}, were obtained for each value of the total number of particles in an event, N{sub tot} = N{sub ch} + N{sub 0}. The fluctuation parameter {omega} = D/ Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket N{sub 0} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket was measured. In the region N{sub tot} > 22, fluctuations of the number of neutral pions increase, which, within statistical models (GCE, CE, MCE), indicates that the system involving a large number of pions approaches the pion-condensate state. This effect was observed for the first time.

Ryadovikov, V. N., E-mail: riadovikov@ihep.ru [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Large-Scale Oceanographic Constraints on the Distribution of Melting and Freezing under Ice Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies suggest that ice shelves experience asymmetric melting and freezing. Topography may constrain oceanic circulation (and thus basal melt–freeze patterns) through its influence on the potential vorticity (PV) field. However, melting ...

Christopher M. Little; Anand Gnanadesikan; Robert Hallberg

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conard Stair Conard Stair Enforcement Program Manager B&W Y-12 March 2012 Enforcement Coordination Working Group Spring 2012 Meeting Y-12 Approach to Enforcement Y-12 Enforcement Program Office (EPO) * Integrated program with a single point of contact for enforcement activities for radiological protection, worker safety and health, and classified information security * Proceduralized and automated process that provides consistent documentation of compliance determinations and reporting * Uses a decentralized approach with Line Management Price- Anderson Officers (LMPOs) assisted by a cadre of subject matter experts to perform screening determinations * Provides policy, direction, guidance, and independent oversight * Serves as chief technical advisor to senior leadership team on

150

Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

David Rue

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A point of order 8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A formula expressing a point of order 8 on an elliptic curve, in terms of the roots of the associated cubic polynomial, is given. Doubling such a point yields a point of order 4 distinct from the well-known points of order 4 given in standard references such as "A course of Modern Analysis" by Whittaker and Watson.

Semjon Adlaj

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34 October 23, 1985 YC/AVR To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A. As shown in the example, the project is first divided into: 1.1 Project Management and Administration

154

New Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction from 5 to 15 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron fraction at energies between 5 and 15 GeV with the balloon-borne HEAT-pbar instrument in the spring of 2000. The data presented here are compatible with our previous measurements, obtained with a different instrument. The combined data from the three HEAT flights indicate a small positron flux of non-standard origin above 5 GeV. We compare the new measurement with earlier data obtained with the HEAT-e+- instrument, during the opposite epoch of the solar cycle, and conclude that our measurements do not support predictions of charge sign dependent solar modulation of the positron abundance at 5 GeV.

J. J. Beatty; A. Bhattacharyya; C. Bower; S. Coutu; M. A. DuVernois; S. McKee; S. A. Minnick; D. Muller; J. Musser; S. Nutter; A. W. Labrador; M. Schubnell; S. Swordy; G. Tarle; A. Tomasch

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

155

Options for an 11 GeV RF Beam Separator for the Jefferson Lab CEBAF Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab has had, since first demonstration in 1996, the ability to deliver a 5-pass electron beam to experimental halls (A, B, and C) simultaneously. This capability was provided by a set of three, room temperature 499 MHz rf separators in the 5th pass beamline. The separator was two-rod, TEM mode type resonator, which has a high shunt impedance. The maximum rf power to deflect the 6 GeV beams was about 3.4kW. The 12 GeV baseline design does not preserve the capability of separating the 5th pass, 11 GeV beam for the 3 existing halls. Several options for restoring this capability, including extension of the present room temperature system or a new superconducting design in combination with magnetic systems, are under investigation and are presented.

Jean Delayen, Michael Spata, Haipeng Wang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

5-10 GeV Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Burst Fireballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gamma-ray burst fireball is likely to contain an admixture of neutrons, in addition to protons, in essentially all progenitor scenarios. Inelastic collisions between differentially streaming protons and neutrons in the fireball produce muon neutrinos (antineutrinos) of ~ 10 GeV as well as electron neutrinos (antineutrinos) of ~ 5 GeV, which could produce ~ 7 events/year in kilometer cube detectors, if the neutron abundance is comparable to that of protons. Photons of ~ 10 GeV from pi-zero decay and ~ 100 MeV electron antineutrinos from neutron decay are also produced, but will be difficult to detect. Photons with energies < 1 MeV from shocks following neutron decay produce a characteristic signal which may be distinguishable from the proton-related MeV photons.

John N. Bahcall; Peter Meszaros

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tribal Leader Forum, Phoenix, AZ - May 30 - 31, 2013 State Incentives and Project Impacts Main Points - Market Context * State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) - What are they? - How can they help your project? - Potential gap means more market demand for RE projects Starting a Renewable Energy Project * What renewable resources exist? * What sites with resources do you own? * To whom will you sell the electricity? * How will federal and state incentives or policies impact your project? * Access to transmission * Other policies - Interconnection standards - Environmental standards Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) * A requirement set by a state for utilities to generate x% of electricity from renewables by a specific date

158

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Acceptance of Smart Grid Customer Acceptance of Smart Grid DOE Energy Advisory Committee Meeting June 6, 2013 Judith Schwartz, To the Point + INNOVATORS EARLY ADOPTERS EARLY MAJORITY LATE MAJORITY LATE ADOPTERS Indifferents Tech Enthusiasts Green Altruists Comfort Lovers Cost Conscious Doubters Green buildings Simple feedback interface Price incentives Seamless automation Who Are Our Customers? + Why Will They Care About SG? 1. Information, incentives, and automation to easily reduce or defer electricity use 2. Integrate clean generation and transportation 3. Reduce, pinpoint, and restore outages + Fly Under the Radar Active Engagement Slow Build Back end deployment first in sequence AMI rollout in process or pilots are imminent Practice incremental modernization efforts High % of "indifferent"

159

Melting of Aluminum by Electricity: A Review of Operating Practice and Discussion of Cost Factors for Melting Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, about 10 million tons of aluminum ingot and various forms of scrap were melted to produce a variety of products. The majority of the aluminum was melted in oil or natural gas-fired furnaces. However, as old gas-fired furnaces are being replaced or capacity is being increased, consideration is being given to electric-fired furnaces to obtain more energy efficient melting and increased yield of product. The purpose of this report is to acquaint the reader with the various types of commercial elect...

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Radar Observations and Simulation of the Melting Layer of Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The melting layer in precipitation is physically modeled and compared with high resolution Doppler radar data. The model includes a new formulation of the dielectric properties and can handle all ice particles with densities ranging from pure ...

Wim Klaassen

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Stripe melting and quantum criticality in correlated metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study theoretically quantum melting transitions of stripe order in a metallic environment, and the associated reconstruction of the electronic Fermi surface. We show that such quantum phase transitions can be continuous ...

Mross, David Fabian

162

Rhyolite magma degassing: an experimental study of melt vesiculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

quires studying the separation of gas from melt in high- ly viscous liquids ..... been measured as a function of temperature on a natural rhyolite sample ( cylindrical ..... In general, bubble loss at constant foam volume has two sources: ( a) coal-.

163

On the Estimation of Antarctic Iceberg Melt Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of Antarctic iceberg melt rates made from field observations, iceberg distribution statistics, laboratory experiments and theoretical studies give a wide range of values. Evaluation of the errors associated with each method allows for ...

Steve Neshyba; Edward G. Josberger

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Modeling Forest Cover Influences on Snow Accumulation, Sublimation, and Melt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive, physically based model of snow accumulation, redistribution, sublimation, and melt for open and forested catchments was assembled, based on algorithms derived from hydrological process research in Russia and Canada. The model was ...

A. N. Gelfan; J. W. Pomeroy; L. S. Kuchment

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Melt generation in the Earth's mantle at Convergent Plate Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The five geologic studies presented in this thesis document how the recycling of tectonic plates at subduction zones has a profound effect on the melting behavior of the Earth's mantle. Two experimental studies (Chapters ...

Till, Christy B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

GeV EMISSION FROM COLLISIONAL MAGNETIZED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic fields may play a dominant role in gamma-ray bursts, and recent observations by Fermi indicate that GeV radiation, when detected, arrives delayed by seconds from the onset of the MeV component. Motivated by this, we discuss a magnetically dominated jet model where both magnetic dissipation and nuclear collisions are important. We show that, for parameters typical of the observed bursts, such a model involving a realistic jet structure can reproduce the general features of the MeV and a separate GeV radiation component, including the time delay between the two. The model also predicts a multi-GeV neutrino component.

Meszaros, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Center for Particle Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rees, M. J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Implications of 98 GeV and 125 GeV Higgs scenario in non-decoupling SUSY with updated ATLAS, CMS and PLANCK data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss both MSSM and NMSSM scenarios in which the lightest Higgs boson with $m_h=98$~GeV is consistent with the small excess ($\\sim 2.3 \\sigma$) observed at the LEP in $e^+ e^-\\rightarrow Zh$, with $h \\rightarrow b {\\bar b}$ process and the heavier Higgs boson of mass close to 125~GeV as the observed candidate of the SM Higgs like particle at the LHC. We show the allowed regions in the non-decoupling Higgs zone of MSSM parameter space which are consistent with several low energy constraints coming from heavy flavour physics, latest experimental data on Higgs signals and lower limit on superparticle masses from 7~TeV and 8~TeV LHC run. We also implement the constraints from the relic density of the cold dark matter as obtained from the recent PLANCK data. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of observing the light Higgs boson of mass 98~GeV at the 14~TeV LHC run via $pp \\rightarrow V h$, with $h \\rightarrow b \\bar b$ using the technique of jet substructure. Our analysis shows that at 14~TeV LHC run wit...

Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Chakraborty, Amit; Chattopadhyay, Utpal; Das, Debottam; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method and apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, T.F.; Hurd, J.L.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Structure of Glass-Forming Melts - Lanthanide in Borosilicates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past few years, we studied several complex Na2O-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glass systems to answer key questions: effects of melt chemistry on solubility of lanthanide oxides; lanthanide solution behavior, and intermediate-range ordering in the melts. This paper summarizes our currently understanding on rare earth elements in borosilicate glasses, covering solution behavior, solubility limits, crystalization and phase separation.

Li, Hong; Li, Liyu; Qian, Morris; Strachan, Denis M.; Wang, Zheming

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

John Crepeau

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Hurd, Jeffery L. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

END POINTS MANAGEMENT End Points Management The Need for End Point Specifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT End Points Management The Need for End Point Specifications The Need for a Method to Derive End Points Guiding Principles for Specifying End Points Tailored Approach Headquarters, Field Office, and Contractor Roles End Points Approvals Contractor Organization Functions for End Points Implementation Training and Walkdown Guidance for the Facility Engineers The Need for End Point Specifications The policy of the EM is that a formal project management approach be used for the planning, managing, and conducting of its projects. A fundamental premise of project management for facility deactivation is answering the question: How do you know when the project is complete? Just as the design specifications are essential to a

173

Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy  

SciTech Connect

The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Blind Benchmark Calculations for Melt Spreading in the ECOSTAR Project  

SciTech Connect

The Project ECOSTAR (5. EC Framework Programme) on Ex-Vessel Core Melt Stabilisation Research is oriented towards the analysis and mitigation of severe accident sequences that could occur in the ex-vessel phase of a postulated core melt accident. Spreading of the corium melt on the available basement surface is an important process, which defines the initial conditions for concrete attack and for the efficiency of cooling in case of water contact, respectively. The transfer and spreading of the melt on the basement is one of the major issues in ECOSTAR. This is addressed here by a spreading code benchmark involving a large-scale spreading experiment that is used for the validation of the existing spreading codes. The corium melt is simulated by a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO and FeO with a sufficiently wide freezing interval. In the 3-dim benchmark test ECOKATS-1 170 litres of oxide melt are poured onto a 3 m by 4 m concrete surface with a low flow rate of about 2 l/s. From the results of an additional 2-dim channel experiment some basic rheological data (e.g. initial viscosity) are obtained in order to minimise the uncertainty in material properties of the melt. The participating spreading codes CORFLOW (Framatome ANP/FZK), LAVA (GRS), and THEMA (CEA) differ from each other by their focus of modelling and the assumptions made to simplify the relevant transport equations. In a first step both experiments (3-dim/2-dim) are calculated blindly by the participating codes. This serves for an overall assessment of the codes capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with rather unknown material properties. In a second step the 3-dim experiment ECOKATS-1 is recalculated by the codes with the more precise knowledge of the rheological behaviour of the oxide melt in the 2-dim experiment. This, in addition, serves for the validation of the codes' capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with well-known material properties. Based on the benchmark results and taking the specific validation process for each of the three codes applied into account, it is recommended that the spreading issue for reactor safety research be considered closed. (authors)

Spengler, C.; Allelein, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany); Foit, J.J.; Alsmeyer, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 36 40, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Spindler, B.; Veteau, J.M. [CEA, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Artnik, J.; Fischer, M. [Framatome ANP, P.O. Box 32 20, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Measurements of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction From 1 to 50 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two measurements of the cosmic-ray positron fraction as a function of energy have been made using the High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) balloon-borne instrument. The first flight took place from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico in 1994, and yielded results above the geomagnetic cutoff energy of 4.5 GeV. The second flight from Lynn Lake, Manitoba in 1995 permitted measurements over a larger energy interval, from 1 GeV to 50 GeV. In this letter we present results on the positron fraction based on data from the Lynn Lake flight, and compare these with the previously published results from the Ft. Sumner flight. The results confirm that the positron fraction does not increase with energy above ~10 GeV, although a small excess above purely secondary production cannot be ruled out. At low energies the positron fraction is slightly larger than that reported from measurements made in the 1960's. This effect could possibly be a consequence of charge dependence in the level of solar modulation.

HEAT Collaboration; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; J. J. Beatty; G. A. de Nolfo; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; C. J. Chaput; S. Coutu; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; J. Knapp; D. M. Lowder; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; S. L. Nutter

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION BEYOND 1 GeV USING IONIZATION INDUCED INJECTION*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of laser wake field accelerator experiments leading to electron energy exceeding 1 GeV are described. Theoretical concepts and experimental methods developed while conducting experiments using the 10 TW Ti:Sapphire laser at UCLA were implemented and transferred successfully to the 100 TW Callisto Laser System at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. To reach electron energies greater than 1 GeV with current laser systems, it is necessary to inject and trap electrons into the wake and to guide the laser for more than 1 cm of plasma. Using the 10 TW laser, the physics of self-guiding and the limitations in regards to pump depletion over cm-scale plasmas were demonstrated. Furthermore, a novel injection mechanism was explored which allows injection by ionization at conditions necessary for generating electron energies greater than a GeV. The 10 TW results were followed by self-guiding at the 100 TW scale over cm plasma lengths. The energy of the self-injected electrons, at 3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} plasma density, was limited by dephasing to 720 MeV. Implementation of ionization injection allowed extending the acceleration well beyond a centimeter and 1.4 GeV electrons were measured.

Marsh, K A; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Pak, A; silva, L O; Lemos, N; Fonseca, R A; de Freitas, S; Albert, F; Doeppner, T; Filip, C; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Price, D; Ralph, J; Pollock, B B

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

? cross section in p+p collisions at ?s=200??GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a measurement of the ?(1S+2S+3S)?e+e- cross section at midrapidity in p+p collisions at ?s=200??GeV. We find the cross section to be 114±38(stat+fit)-24+23(syst)??pb. Perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading ...

Balewski, Jan T.

178

Measurements of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction From 1 to 50 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two measurements of the cosmic-ray positron fraction as a function of energy have been made using the High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) balloon-borne instrument. The first flight took place from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico in 1994, and yielded results above the geomagnetic cutoff energy of 4.5 GeV. The second flight from Lynn Lake, Manitoba in 1995 permitted measurements over a larger energy interval, from 1 GeV to 50 GeV. In this letter we present results on the positron fraction based on data from the Lynn Lake flight, and compare these with the previously published results from the Ft. Sumner flight. The results confirm that the positron fraction does not increase with energy above ~10 GeV, although a small excess above purely secondary production cannot be ruled out. At low energies the positron fraction is slightly larger than that reported from measurements made in the 1960's. This effect could possibly be a consequence of charge dependence in the level of solar modulation.

Barwick, S W; Beatty, J J; De Nolfo, G A; Bhattacharya, A; Bower, C; Musser, J A; Chaput, C J; Coutu, S; McKee, S; Tarlé, G; Tomasch, A D; Knapp, J; Lowder, D M; Müller, D; Swordy, S P; Torbet, E; Nutter, S L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fabrication and Testing Status of CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Cavities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 12 GeV upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is under way. All cavities have been built by industry and are presently undergoing post-processing and final low and high power qualification before cryomodule assembly. The status is reported including fabrication-related experiences, observations and issues throughout production, post-processing and qualification.

Marhauser, F; Davis, G K; Forehand, D; Grenoble, C; Hogan, J; Overton, R B; Reilly, A V; Rimmer, R A

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Performance of First C100 Cryomodules for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the project is a doubling of the available beam energy of CEBAF from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due primarily to the construction and installation of ten "C100" cryomodules in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver an average 108 MV each from a string of eight seven-cell, electropolished superconducting RF cavities operating at an average accelerating gradient of 19.2 MV/m. The new cryomodules fit in the same available linac space as the original CEBAF 20 MV cryomodules. Cryomodule production started in September 2010. Initial acceptance testing started in June 2011. The first two C100 cryomodules were installed and tested from August 2011 through October 2011, and successfully operated during the last period of the CEBAF 6 GeV era, which ended in May 2012. This paper will present the results of acceptance testing and commissioning of the C100 style cryomodules to date.

Drury, Michael A. [JLAB; Burrill, Andrew B. [JLAB, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH; Davis, G. Kirk [JLAB; Hogan, John P. [JLAB; King, Lawrence [JLAB; Marhauser, Frank [JLAB; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB; Preble, Joseph [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Reilly, Anthony V. [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB; Wiseman, Mark A. [JLAB

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 9.2 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were collected using the large acceptance STAR detector at {radical}s{sub NN} = 9.2 GeV from a test run of the collider in the year 2008. Midrapidity results on multiplicity density (dN/dy) in rapidity (y), average transverse momentum (), particle ratios, elliptic flow, and HBT radii are consistent with the corresponding results at similar {radical}s{sub NN} from fixed target experiments. Directed flow measurements are presented for both midrapidity and forward rapidity regions. Furthermore the collision centrality dependence of identified particle dN/dy, , and particle ratios are discussed. These results also demonstrate that the capabilities of the STAR detector, although optimized for {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, are suitable for the proposed QCD critical point search and exploration of the QCD phase diagram at RHIC.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

183

Measurement of the response of an SCG1-C scintillation glass shower detector to 2 to 17. 5 GeV positrons  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the response of an electromagnetic shower counter constructed from the new scintillation glass (SCG1-C, Ohara Optical Glass, Inc.) to positrons in the energy range 2 to 17.5 GeV. We have measured the energy resolution of this 18.4 radiation length detector plus its attendant SF5 lead glass shower counter array to be sigma/E = (1.64 +- 0.14)% + (1.13 +- 0.33)%/..sqrt..E with the constant term dominated by variations in the conversion point of the positron and shower leakage. We found this counter to be linear over the energy range examined. We have also measured the light output of the SCG1-C counter relative to light output of the SF5 lead glass guard blocks using 17.5 GeV positrons. We find that the SCG1-C counter produces 5.10 +- 0.30 more light at the phototube than the SF5 lead glass counters.

Cox, B.; Hale, G.; Mazur, P.O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

On Convex Decompositions of Points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given a planar point set in general position, S, we seek a partition of the points into convex cells, such that the union of the cells forms a simple polygon, P, and every point from S is on the boundary of P. Let f(S) ...

Kiyoshi Hosono; David Rappaport; Masatsugu Urabe

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Observation of gamma-ray emission from the galaxy M87 above 250 GeV with VERITAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiwavelength observation of the nearby radio galaxy M87 provides a unique opportunity to study in detail processes occurring in Active Galactic Nuclei from radio waves to TeV gamma-rays. Here we report the detection of gamma-ray emission above 250 GeV from M87 in spring 2007 with the VERITAS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array and discuss its correlation with the X-ray emission. The gamma-ray emission is measured to be point-like with an intrinsic source radius less than 4.5 arcmin. The differential energy spectrum is fitted well by a power-law function: dPhi/dE=(7.4+-1.3_{stat}+-1.5_{sys})(E/TeV)^{-2.31+-0.17_{stat}+-0.2_{sys}} 10^{-9}m^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}. We show strong evidence for a year-scale correlation between the gamma-ray flux reported by TeV experiments and the X-ray emission measured by the ASM/RXTE observatory, and discuss the possible short-time-scale variability. These results imply that the gamma-ray emission from M87 is more likely associated with the core of the galaxy than with other bright X-ray features in the jet.

V. A. Acciari; M. Beilicke; G. Blaylock; S. M. Bradbury; J. H. Buckley; V. Bugaev; Y. Butt; O. Celik; A. Cesarini; L. Ciupik; P. Cogan; P. Colin; W. Cui; M. K. Daniel; C. Duke; T. Ergin; A. D. Falcone; S. J. Fegan; J. P. Finley; G. Finnegan; P. Fortin; L. F. Fortson; K. Gibbs; G. H. Gillanders; J. Grube; R. Guenette; G. Gyuk; D. Hanna; E. Hays; J. Holder; D. Horan; S. B. Hughes; M. C. Hui; T. B. Humensky; A. Imran; P. Kaaret; M. Kertzman; D. B. Kieda; J. Kildea; A. Konopelko; H. Krawczynski; F. Krennrich; M. J. Lang; S. LeBohec; K. Lee; G. Maier; A. McCann; M. McCutcheon; J. Millis; P. Moriarty; R. Mukherjee; T. Nagai; R. A. Ong; D. Pandel; J. S. Perkins; M. Pohl; J. Quinn; K. Ragan; P. T. Reynolds; H. J. Rose; M. Schroedter; G. H. Sembroski; A. W. Smith; D. Steele; S. P. Swordy; A. Syson J. A. Toner; L. Valcarcel; V. V. Vassiliev; S. P. Wakely; J. E. Ward; T. C. Weekes; A. Weinstein; R. J. White; D. A. Williams; S. A. Wissel; M. D. Wood; B. Zitzer

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Molecular dynamics simulation of UO2 nanocrystals melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study melting of uranium dioxide (UO2) nanocrystals (NC) isolated in vacuum (i.e. non-periodic boundary conditions) using molecular dynamics (MD) in the approximation of pair potentials and rigid ions. We calculate the size dependence of the temperature and heat of melting, the density jump for crystals of cubic shape and volumes up to 1000 nm^3 (50000 particles). Linear and parabolic extrapolations of these dependences to macroscopic (infinite) size are considered, the parabolic is found to be better suited for the analysis of data on the temperature and the heat of melting. The closest to the modern experimental data estimates of the melting temperature of macrocrystals are obtained using the interaction potentials Goel-08 (2969K), Yakub-09 (3105K) and MOX-07 (3291K). The density jump at melting is well reproduced by Yakub-09 (8.66%) and MOX-07 (7.97%). The heat of fusion for all sets of the potentials considered is found to be underestimated by 50-75%, possibly because of the excluded he...

Boyarchenkov, A S; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Melt processing of Bi--2212 superconductors using alumina  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Superconducting articles and a method of forming them, where the superconducting phase of an article is Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.y (Bi-2212). Alumina is combined with Bi-2212 powder or Bi-2212 precursor powder and, in order to form an intimate mixture, the mixture is melted and rapidly cooled to form a glassy solid. The glassy solid is comminuted and the resulting powder is combined with a carrier. An alternative to melting is to form the mixture of nanophase alumina and material having a particle size of less than about 10 microns. The powder, with the carrier, is melt processed to form a superconducting article.

Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 9.2 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were collected using the large acceptance STAR detector at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 9.2 GeV from a test run of the collider in the year 2008. Midrapidity results on multiplicity density (dN/dy) in rapidity (y), average transverse momentum (), particle ratios, elliptic flow, and HBT radii are consistent with the corresponding results at similar $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ from fixed target experiments. Directed flow measurements are presented for both midrapidity and forward rapidity regions. Furthermore the collision centrality dependence of identified particle dN/dy, , and particle ratios are discussed. These results also demonstrate the readiness of the STAR detector to undertake the proposed QCD critical point search and the exploration of the QCD phase diagram at RHIC.

STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

MEASUREMENT OF SINGLE TRANSVERSE-SPIN ASYMMETRY IN FORWARD PRODUCTION OF PHOTONS AND NEUTRONS IN PP COLLSION AT SQUARE ROOT = 200 GEV.  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was commissioned for polarized proton-proton collisions, at the center of mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the run in 2001-2002. The authors have measured the single transverse-spin asymmetry A{sub N} for production of photons, neutral pions, and neutrons at the very forward angle. The asymmetries for the photon and neutral pion sample were consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. In contrast, the neutron sample exhibited an unexpectedly large asymmetry. This large asymmetry will be used for the non-destructive polarimeter for polarized proton beams at the collision points in the RHIC interaction region.

BAZILEVSKY,A.MAKDISI,Y.ET AL.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

KRUGER AA; HRMA P

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

194

Experimental limits on massive neutrinos from e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilations at 29 GeV  

SciTech Connect

A search was made in 29 GeV e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilations for massive neutrinos decaying to e/sup +-/X/sup /minus plus//(..nu..) where X is a muon or meson. A 300 pb/sup /minus/1/ data sample yielded just one candidate event with a mass m/sub ex/ > 1.8 GeV. Significant limits are found for new neutrinos with masses from 1.8 to 6.7 GeV and with mixing parameters in the range 10/sup /minus/6/ < chemically bondUchemically bond/sup 2/ < 1. 12 refs., 4 figs.

Akerlof, C.; Chapman, J.; Errede, D.; Ken, M.T.; Meyer, D.I.; Neal, H.; Nitz, D.; Thun, R.; Tschirhart, R.; Derrick, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Schneider, Ken C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE H. J. Moe V. R. Veluri LS-55-Revised Harch 1987 2 1.0 Introduction Shielding estimates for the linac, positron converter, booster synchrotron and the positron storage ring have been computed using preliminary design information. Calculations have been made of the resulting radiation for several types of operations involving normal beam loss, as well as, certain accidental beam losses. When available, experimental data from existing accelerator and light source facilities have been used in lieu of theoretical estimates. 2.0 Shielding Design Objective The Department of Energy's basic occupational exposure limit is 5 rem per year (DOE 81). However, in its guidance for maintaining exposures "as

197

Radiation damage induced by GeV electrons in W-Re and Cu targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 UCRL-JC-148049 July 2002 Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes Radiation Damage Induced by GeV Electrons in W-Re Targets for Next Generation Linear Colliders M.-J. Caturla 1* , S. Roesler 2 , V. K. Bharadwaj 3 , D. C. Schultz 3 , J. C. Sheppard 3 , J. Marian 1 , B. D. Wirth 1 , W. Stein 1 and A. Sunwoo 1 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 2 CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland 3 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California s: We have studied the structural damage of W-Re targets produced by electrons with energies of several GeV and under different conditions of total number of electrons, beam shape and target depth. We report the differences in damage levels for different designs considered in the construction of the next generation of linear accelerators, and discuss the possible effects in the lifetime

198

ESTIMATION OF TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24 G. K. Shenoy APRIL 18,1985 Here we make an estimation of the total power radiated from a positron trajectory through the bending magnets, undulators and wigglers. Bending Magnets The power P B per each bending magnet in the ring is given by (1) where E = 6 GeV B = field average over the magnet length = 0.67 T I = stored current = 0.1 A L = trajectory in each dipole magnet = 2.95 m (Ref. LS-12) This gives P B = 6021 watts. Since there are 64 such dipoles in the ring, the total power radiated from dipoles is T P B (watts) = P B (watts) x 64 = 385 kwatts 2 Undulators The total power radiated from a sinosoidal undulator is either given by P u (watts) (2) or by (3) where N = number of undulator periods of length AO (em), K is the deflection

199

A 125GeV Higgs Boson and Muon g-2 in More Generic Gauge Mediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported exciting hints of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson with a mass around 125GeV. A Higgs boson this heavy is difficult to realize in conventional models of gauge mediation. Here we revisit the lightest Higgs boson mass in "more generic gauge mediation," where the Higgs doublets mix with the messenger doublets. We show that a Higgs boson mass around 125GeV can be realized in more generic gauge mediation models, even for a relatively light gluino mass ~1TeV. We also show that the muon anomalous magnetic moment can be within 1sigma of the experimental value for these models, even when the Higgs boson is relatively heavy. We also discuss the LHC constraints and the prospects of discovery.

Evans, Jason L; Shirai, Satoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Beam Physics for the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade Project  

SciTech Connect

Beam physics aspects of the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF are presented. The CEBAF Upgrade to 12 GeV is achieved via 5.5 recirculations through the linacs, and the installation of 10 new high-gradient cryomodules. A new experimental hall, Hall D, is envisioned at the end of North Linac. Simulation results for straight-through and recirculated injectors are summarized and compared. Beam transport designs are discussed and evaluated with respect to matching and beam breakup (BBU) optimization. Effects of synchrotron radiation excitation on the beam properties are calculated. BBU simulations and derived specifications for the damping of higher order modes of the new 7-cell cavities are presented. The energies that provide longitudinal polarization in multiple experimental halls simultaneously are calculated. Finally, a detailed optics design for the Hall D transport line has been obtained.

L. Merminga; J. F. Benesch; S.A. Bogacz; Y.-C. Chao; A. Freyberger; J.M. Grames; L. Harwood; R. Kazimi; G.A. Krafft; M. Spata; M. Tiefenback; M. Wiseman; B.C. Yunn; Y. Zhang

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SRF CAVITY PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW FOR THE 12 GeV UPGRADE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CEBAF accelerator, a recirculating CW electron accelerator that is currently operating at Jefferson Laboratory, is in the process of having 10 new cryomodules installed to allow for the maximum beam energy to be increased from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This upgrade required the fabrication, processing and RF qualification of 80, seven cell elliptical SRF cavities, a process that was completed in February 2012. The RF performance achieve in the vertical testing dewars has exceeded the design specification by {approx}25% and is a testament to the cavity design and processing cycle that has been implemented. This paper will provide a summary of the cavity RF performance in the vertical tests, as well as review the overall cavity processing cycle and duration for the project.

A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

An overview of the planned Jefferson Lab 12-GeV helium refrigerator upgrade  

SciTech Connect

In February 2006, Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA, received â Critical Decision 1â (CD-1) approval to proceed with the engineering and design of the long anticipated upgrade to increase the beam energy of CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This will require the installation of 10 new cryomodules, and additional 2.1-K refrigeration beyond the available 4600 W to handle the increased heat loads. Additionally, a new experimental hall, Hall D, is planned that will require the installation of a small, available refrigerator. This paper will present an overview of the integration of the new proposed refrigeration system into CEBAF, the installation of the available refrigerator for Hall D, and includes planned work scope, current schedule plans and project status.

Arenius, Dana; Creel, Jonathan; Dixon, Kelly; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Wright, Mathew

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A CONCEPTUAL 3-GEV LANSCE LINAC UPGRADE FOR ENHANCED PROTON RADIOGRAPHY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design of a 3-GeV linac upgrade that would enable enhanced proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is presented. The upgrade is based on the use of superconducting accelerating cavities to increase the present LANSCE linac output energy from 800 MeV to 3 GeV. The LANSCE linac currently provides negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) and proton (H{sup +}) beams to several user facilities that support Isotope Production, NNSA Stockpile Stewardship, and Basic Energy Science programs. Required changes to the front-end, the accelerating structures, and to the RF systems to meet the new performance goals, and changes to the existing beam switchyard to maintain operations for a robust user program are also described.

Garnett, Robert W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'Hara, James F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rees, Daniel E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Walstrom, Peter L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Coalescing at 8 GeV in the Fermilab Main Injector  

SciTech Connect

For Project X, it is planned to inject a beam of 3 10{sup 11} particles per bunch into the Main Injector. To prepare for this by studying the effects of higher intensity bunches in the Main Injector it is necessary to perform coalescing at 8 GeV. The results of a series of experiments and simulations of 8 GeV coalescing are presented. To increase the coalescing efficiency adiabatic reduction of the 53 MHz RF is required. This results in {approx}70% coalescing efficiency of 5 initial bunches. Data using wall current monitors has been taken to compare previous work and new simulations for 53 MHz RF reduction, bunch rotations and coalescing, good agreement between experiment and simulation was found. By increasing the number of bunches to 7 and compressing the bunch energy spread a scheme generating approximately 3 10{sup 11} particles in a bunch has been achieved. These bunches will then be used in further investigations.

Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Chase, B.; Dye, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yang, M.-J.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Some issues on the RF system in the 3 GeV Fermilab pre-booster  

SciTech Connect

Some issues are presented on the rf system in the future Fermilab prebooster, which accelerates 4 bunches each containing 0.25 x 10{sub 14} protons from 1 to 3 GeV kinetic energy. The problem of beam loading is discussed. The proposal of having a non-tunable fixed-frequency rf system is investigated. Robinson's criteria for phase stability are checked and possible Robinson instability growth is computed.

Ng, K. Y.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MODEL STORAGE RING FOR 6 GEV OPERATION AS A SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advance per half cell (degree.) Vertical phaae advance per half cell (degrees) Maximum horizontal bet.a {m} Maximum vertical bet.a (m) Maximum dispersion {m} Momentum compact.ion Synchrotron damping t.ime (milliV) Est.imat.ed total power demand (MW) 'Ie 1.0 (6.6 GeV) QUADRUPOLES Number 320 Lengths (m) 0.5 (256) 0

Kemner, Ken

207

Nonintrusive Emittance Measurement of 1GeV H- Beam with a Laser  

SciTech Connect

A laser wire based transverse phase space measurement system has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The system allows a nonintrusive measurement of 1GeV hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the high energy beam transport (HEBT). This paper describes the design, installation, and measurement performance of the system. Major technical challenges in the implementation and commissioning of the nonintrusive phase space diagnostics at high brightness particle accelerator facilities are discussed.

Liu, Yun [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Long, Cary D [ORNL; Menshov, Alexander A [ORNL; Pogge, James R [ORNL; Webster, Anthony W [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Post LHC8 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e^+e^- Collider (ILC) in light of the first two years of serious data taking at LHC: LHC7 with ~5 fb^{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt{s}=7 TeV and LHC8 with ~20 fb^{-1} at \\sqrt{s}=8 TeV. Strong new limits from LHC8 SUSY searches, along with the discovery of a Higgs boson with m_h~125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. After a review of the current status of supersymmetry, we present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, radiatively-driven natural SUSY (RNS), NUHM2 with low m_A, a focus point case from mSUGRA/CMSSM, non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, stau-coannihilation, Kallosh-Linde/spread SUSY model, mixed gauge-gravity mediation, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH), and one example with the recently discovered Higgs boson being the heavy CP-even state H. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC8 limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at \\sqrt{s}~0.25-1 TeV. The benchmark points also present a view of the widely diverse SUSY phenomena which might still be expected in the post LHC8 era at both LHC and ILC.

Howard Baer; Jenny List

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Melting Processes and Solidification in Alloys 718-625  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

much heat loss during teeming.4-6 .... dendritic network which is characteristic of this alloy, interdendritic flow of highly- segregated liquid can ..... F.J. Zanner et al., “Observation of Melt rate as a Function of Arc Power,” Met Trans. 15B, 1984) ...

210

Phase-field simulations of partial melts in geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diffuse interface description based on a multi-phase-field model for geological grain microstructures is introduced, especially useful in the treatment of partially molten structures. Each grain as well as different phases are represented by individual ... Keywords: Grain growth, Microstructure, Numerical modelling, Partial melt, Phase-field model

Frank Wendler; Jens K. Becker; Britta Nestler; Paul D. Bons; Nicolas P. Walte

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Decontamination of steel by melt refining: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

It has been reported that a large amount of metal waste is produced annually by nuclear fuel processing and nuclear power plants. These metal wastes are contaminated with radioactive elements, such as uranium and plutonium. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain level. Because of high cost, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low level contaminated metals. It has been shown by some investigators that a melt refining technique can be used for the processing of the contaminated metal wastes. In this process, contaminated metal is melted wit a suitable flux. The radioactive elements are oxidized and transferred to a slag phase. In order to develop a commercial process it is important to have information on the thermodynamics and kinetics of the removal. Therefore, a literature search was carried out to evaluate the available information on the decontamination uranium and transuranic-contaminated plain steel, copper and stainless steel by melt a refining technique. Emphasis was given to the thermodynamics and kinetics of the removal. Data published in the literature indicate that it is possible to reduce the concentration of radioactive elements to a very low level by the melt refining method. 20 refs.

Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

ON THE ORIGIN OF > 10 GeV PHOTONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermi/LAT has detected long-lasting high-energy photons (>100 MeV) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the highest energy photons reaching about 100 GeV. One proposed scenario is that they are produced by high-energy electrons accelerated in GRB forward shocks via synchrotron radiation. We study the maximum synchrotron photon energy in this scenario, considering the properties of the microturbulence magnetic fields behind the shock, as revealed by recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical analyses of relativistic collisionless shocks. Due to the small-scale nature of the microturbulent magnetic field, the Bohm acceleration approximation, in which the scattering mean free path is equal to the particle Larmor radius, breaks down at such high energies. This effect leads to a typical maximum synchrotron photon of a few GeV at 100 s after the burst and this maximum synchrotron photon energy decreases quickly with time. We show that the fast decrease of the maximum synchrotron photon energy leads to a fast decay of the synchrotron flux. The 10-100 GeV photons detected after the prompt phase cannot be produced by the synchrotron mechanism. They could originate from the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the early afterglow if the circumburst density is sufficiently large, or from the external inverse Compton process in the presence of central X-ray emission, such as X-ray flares and prompt high-latitude X-ray emission.

Wang Xiangyu; Liu Ruoyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lemoine, Martin [Institut d'Astrophysique de paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200??GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200??GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with ...

Balewski, Jan T.

214

Points  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Selections Project Selections Announced October 26, 2009 Lead Research Organization (Partner Organizations) DOE Grant Amount Lead Organization Location Project Description 1366 Technologies Inc. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Lab for PV Research) $4,000,000 Lexington, MA Renewable Power (solar) "Direct Wafer" technology to form high efficiency "monocrystalline- equivalent" silicon wafers directly from molten silicon, with potential to halve the installed cost of solar photovoltaics. Agrivida, Inc. $4,565,800 Medford, MA Biomass Energy Cell wall-degrading enzymes grown within the plant itself that are activated after harvest, dramatically reducing the cost of cellulosic biofuels and chemicals Arizona State University (Fluidic Energy,

215

Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect

Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

Leemans, Wim (LOASIS Program, AFRD)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Effect of Bubbles Released from a Melting Ice Wall on the Melt-Driven Convection in Salt Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The buoyancy created by the release of air bubbles from melting glacial ice walls results from both the upward drag of the bubbles and the density defect caused by the steady-state distribution of bubbles in the water. Calculations using typical ...

Edward G. Josberger

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled Surface Air Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer surface melting plays an important role in the evolution of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over modern ice shelves and ice sheets in a climate scenario forced by ...

Jeremy G. Fyke; Lionel Carter; Andrew Mackintosh; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Spatial and Temporal Transferability of a Distributed Energy-Balance Glacier Melt Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling melt from glaciers is crucial to assessing regional hydrology and eustatic sea level rise. The transferability of such models in space and time has been widely assumed but rarely tested. To investigate melt model transferability, a ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Gwenn E. Flowers

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Melting Effect as a Factor in Precipitation-Type Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of atmospheric cooling due to melting precipitation is examined to evaluate its contribution to determining precipitation type. The “melting effect” is typically of second-order importance compared to other processes that influence ...

John S. Kain; Stephen M. Goss; Michael E. Baldwin

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Model of Intense Downdrafts Driven by the Melting and Evaporation of Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ono-dimensioral time-dependent model of a downdraft driven by the melting and evaporation of precipitation and precipitation loading is formulated. Equations for particle melting, particle evaporation, particle concentration, precipitation ...

R. C. Srivastava

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Effect of Melting Processes on the Development of a Tropical and a Midlatitude Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several sensitivity tests are performed to assess the effect of melting processes on the development of a midlatitude continental squall line and a tropical oceanic squall line. It is found that melting processes play an important role in the ...

W-K. Tao; J. R. Scala; B. Ferrier; J. Simpson

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Grid Points (GridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (GridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (GridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. Synopsis. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantum melting of charge ice and non-Fermi-liquid behavior: An exact solution for the extended Falicov-Kimball model in the ice-rule limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact solution is obtained for a model of itinerant electrons coupled to ice-rule variables on the tetrahedron Husimi cactus, an analogue of the Bethe lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. It reveals a quantum critical point with the emergence of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in melting of the "charge ice" insulator. The electronic structure is compared with the numerical results for the pyrochlore-lattice model to elucidate the physics of electron systems interacting with the tetrahedron ice rule.

Masafumi Udagawa; Hiroaki Ishizuka; Yukitoshi Motome

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Critical Point for Science?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, taboo ideas become arespectable part of science? Occult Sciences Tripos? CU Institute of Astrology? Telepathy, ‘memory of water’, ‘cold fusion’?Scientific theology, intelligent design? Mar. 5, 2008/CUPS A Critical Point for Science / Brian Josephson 32...

Josephson, B D

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION BY ZINC CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blending and reaction conditions would be less than 10 centipoises, the effective viscosity of the melt/coal

Vermeulen, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Physical Basis for the Temperature-Based Melt-Index Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close relationship between air temperature measured at standard screen level and the rate of melt on snow and ice has been widely used to estimate the rate of melt. The parameterization of the melt rate using air temperature usually takes a ...

Atsumu Ohmura

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An Integrated Method for Accurate Determination of Melting in High-Pressure Laser Heating Experiments  

SciTech Connect

We present an integrated approach for melting determination by monitoring several criteria simultaneously. In particular we combine x-ray diffraction observations with the detection of discontinuities in the optical properties by spectroradiometric measurements. This approach significantly increases the confidence of melt identification, especially with low-Z samples. We demonstrate the method with observations of melt in oxygen at 47 and 55 gigapascals.

Benedetti, L R; Antonangeli, D; Farber, D L; Mezouar, M

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was identified as the primary factor that accelerates dross formation specifically in the transition from two phases to three phase growth. Limiting magnesium oxidation on the surface of molten aluminum therefore becomes the key to minimizing melt loss, and technology was developed to prevent magnesium oxidation on the aluminum surface. This resulted in a lot of the work being focused on the control of Mg oxidation. Two potential molten metal covering agents that could inhibit dross formation during melting and holding consisting of boric acid and boron nitride were identified. The latter was discounted by industry as it resulted in Boron pick up by the melt beyond that allowed by specifications during plant trials. The understanding of the kinetics of dross formation by the industry partners helped them understand how temperature, alloy chemistry and furnace atmosphere (burner controls--e.g. excess air) effected dross formation. This enables them to introduce in their plant process changes that reduced unnecessary holding at high temperatures, control burner configurations, reduce door openings to avoid ingress of air and optimize charge mixes to ensure rapid melting and avoid excess oxidation.

Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

MAAP5 BWR Core Melt Progression Model Enhancement Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes proposed enhancements to the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) core melt progression model for BWRs. MAAP is an EPRI-owned and -licensed computer program that simulates the operation of light water and heavy water moderated nuclear power plants for both current and advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs. The Fukushima accident—the first full-scale accident for a BWR design—poses challenges to the current core model that must be addressed.The ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

231

Melt processing of radioactive waste: A technical overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear operations have resulted in the accumulation of large quantities of contaminated metallic waste which are stored at various DOE, DOD, and commercial sites under the control of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste will accumulate at an increasing rate as commercial nuclear reactors built in the 1950s reach the end of their projected lives, as existing nuclear powered ships become obsolete or unneeded, and as various weapons plants and fuel processing facilities, such as the gaseous diffusion plants, are dismantled, repaired, or modernized. For example, recent estimates of available Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex have suggested that as much as 700,000 tons of contaminated 304L stainless steel exist in the gaseous diffusion plants alone. Other high-value metals available in the DOE complex include copper, nickel, and zirconium. Melt processing for the decontamination of radioactive scrap metal has been the subject of much research. A major driving force for this research has been the possibility of reapplication of RSM, which is often very high-grade material containing large quantities of strategic elements. To date, several different single and multi-step melting processes have been proposed and evaluated for use as decontamination or recycling strategies. Each process offers a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses, and ultimately, no single melt processing scheme is optimum for all applications since processes must be evaluated based on the characteristics of the input feed stream and the desired output. This paper describes various melt decontamination processes and briefly reviews their application in developmental studies, full scale technical demonstrations, and industrial operations.

Schlienger, M.E.; Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation documents the development of a broadband electron spectrometer (ESM) for GeV class Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), the production of high quality GeV electron beams (e-beams) for the first time in a LWFA by using a capillary discharge guide (CDG), and a statistical analysis of CDG-LWFAs. An ESM specialized for CDG-LWFAs with an unprecedented wide momentum acceptance, from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, has been developed. Simultaneous measurement of e-beam spectra and output laser properties as well as a large angular acceptance (> {+-} 10 mrad) were realized by employing a slitless scheme. A scintillating screen (LANEX Fast back, LANEX-FB)--camera system allowed faster than 1 Hz operation and evaluation of the spatial properties of e-beams. The design provided sufficient resolution for the whole range of the ESM (below 5% for beams with 2 mrad divergence). The calibration between light yield from LANEX-FB and total charge, and a study on the electron energy dependence (0.071 to 1.23 GeV) of LANEX-FB were performed at the Advanced light source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Using this calibration data, the developed ESM provided a charge measurement as well. The production of high quality electron beams up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale accelerator was demonstrated. The experiment used a 310 {micro}m diameter gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide that channeled relativistically-intense laser pulses (42 TW, 4.5 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) over 3.3 centimeters of sufficiently low density ({approx_equal} 4.3 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma. Also demonstrated was stable self-injection and acceleration at a beam energy of {approx_equal} 0.5 GeV by using a 225 {micro}m diameter capillary. Relativistically-intense laser pulses (12 TW, 1.3 x 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) were guided over 3.3 centimeters of low density ({approx_equal} 3.5 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma in this experiment. A statistical analysis of the CDG-LWFAs performance was carried out. By taking advantage of the high repetition rate experimental system, several thousands of shots were taken in a broad range of the laser and plasma parameters. An analysis program was developed to sort and select the data by specified parameters, and then to evaluate performance statistically. The analysis suggested that the generation of GeV-level beams comes from a highly unstable and regime. By having the plasma density slightly above the threshold density for self injection, (1) the longest dephasing length possible was provided, which led to the generation of high energy e-beams, and (2) the number of electrons injected into the wakefield was kept small, which led to the generation of high quality (low energy spread) e-beams by minimizing the beam loading effect on the wake. The analysis of the stable half-GeV beam regime showed the requirements for stable self injection and acceleration. A small change of discharge delay t{sub dsc}, and input energy E{sub in}, significantly affected performance. The statistical analysis provided information for future optimization, and suggested possible schemes for improvement of the stability and higher quality beam generation. A CDG-LWFA is envisioned as a construction block for the next generation accelerator, enabling significant cost and size reductions.

Nakamura, Kei

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Diphoton Decay Excess and 125 GeV Higgs Boson in Gauge-Higgs Unification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of gauge-Higgs unification scenario in a 5-dimensional flat spacetime, we investigate Higgs boson production via gluon fusion and its diphoton decay mode at the LHC. We show that the signal strength of the Higgs diphoton decay mode observed at ATLAS and CMS, which is considerably larger than the Standard Model expectation, can be explained by a simple gauge-Higgs unification model with color-singlet bulk fermions to which a half-periodic boundary condition is assigned. The bulk fermions also play a crucial role in reproducing the observed Higgs boson mass around 125 GeV.

Nobuhito Maru; Nobuchika Okada

2013-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

PHENIX Direct Photons in 200 GeV p+p and Au+Au Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first positive direct photon results in Au+Au at sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV along with initial p+p results at the same energy. The p+p result is found to be consistent with NLO perturbative QCD predictions within its large uncertainties. In central Au+Au collisions, an excess over expected background as large as 200-300% is observed from p_T = 4-12 GeV/c. This large signal is shown to be consistent with the scaled pQCD photon prediction, together with suppression of meson background sources.

Justin Frantz

2004-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

A neutron dose detector with REM response to 1 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limitation of current remmeters, which do not measure neutron dose equivalents above about 15 MeV, is a serious problem at high-energy accelerator facilities, where a much wider range of neutron energies exist. The purpose of this work was to measure the response of a modified Anderson-Braun (A-B) remmeter to neutron energies up to 1 GeV. The modifications to the standard A-B remmeter were based on the experimental results of Pb(n,xn) reactions.

Sun, R.K.; Krebs, G.F.; Smith, A.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Hsu, H.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

SPIN Effects, QCD, and Jefferson Laboratory with 12 GeV electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QCD and Spin physics are playing important role in our understanding of hadron structure. I will give a short overview of origin of hadron structure in QCD and highlight modern understanding of the subject. Jefferson Laboratory is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the energy of electron beam up to 12 GeV. JLab is one of the leading facilities in nuclear physics studies and once operational in 2015 JLab 12 will be crucial for future of nuclear physics. I will briefly discuss future studies in four experimental halls of Jefferson Lab.

Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Conformal Higgs model: Charged gauge fields can produce a 125GeV resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the conformal Higgs model, the dynamical value of parameter $\\lambda$ in Lagrangian term $-\\lambda(\\Phi^\\dag\\Phi)^2$ depends on the mass of an intermediate neutral boson field that combines interacting scalars $W^+_\\mu W_-^\\mu$ and $Z^*_\\mu Z^\\mu$. If this mass is $125GeV$, $\\lambda$ is negative and of order $10^{-88}$, in agreement with the empirical value deduced from well-established cosmological and electroweak data. Hence this intermediate scalar boson field is a candidate to explain the recently observed LHC resonance. The conformal Higgs model considers coupled fields: metric tensor $g_{\\mu\

R. K. Nesbet

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

Davis, G. Kirk [JLAB; Matalevich, Joseph R. [JLAB; Wiseman, Mark A. [JLAB; Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Asymptotics of Greedy Energy Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a symmetric kernel $k:X\\times X \\to \\mathbb{R}\\cup\\{+\\infty\\}$ on a locally compact Hausdorff space $X$, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of greedy $k$-energy points $\\{a_{i}\\}_{1}^{\\infty}$ for a compact subset $A\\subset X$ that are defined inductively by selecting $a_{1}\\in A$ arbitrarily and $a_{n+1}$ so that $\\sum_{i=1}^{n}k(a_{n+1},a_{i})=\\inf_{x\\in A}\\sum_{i=1}^{n}k(x,a_{i})$. We give sufficient conditions under which these points (also known as Leja points) are asymptotically energy minimizing (i.e. have energy $\\sum_{i\

A. López García; E. B. Saff

2009-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

242

Search for the QCD critical point in nuclear collisions at 158A GeV at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pion production in nuclear collisions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) is investigated with the aim to search, in a restricted domain of the phase diagram, for power laws in the behavior of correlations that are ...

Roland, Christof E.

243

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion

Gourber, J P

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2

Brand, K

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Vacuum-Pump Control System Using Programmable Logic Controllers on the TCP/IP Network for the 2.5-GeV Storage Ring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum-Pump Control System Using Programmable Logic Controllers on the TCP/IP Network for the 2.5-GeV Storage Ring

Kanaya, N; Maezawa, H; Factory, P

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Synchro-betatron resonances in the 8 GeV proton driver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major difference of these two versions is the size (circumference) and the maximum energy. In the first study, the circumference is chosen to be 711.3m, which is 1.5 times the present Booster, with the maximum energy of 16 GeV. In the second version, it is mandated to be the same as Booster together with the same maximum energy of 8 GeV. One of the major impacts of the reduced size of the ring is the inevitable reduction in the total length of available space for injection/collimation/extraction systems and for rf cavities, 14 slots of 7.43m each in the smaller ring compared with 24 slots of 6.15m each in the larger ring. Since each cavity occupies a slot of 2.35m and 22 cavities are desirable, seven or eight slots out of 14 in the smaller ring must be reserved for rf, only six or seven remaining for all other systems. The constraint in space is particularly troublesome for the extraction system since the beam loss at extraction (at the highest beam energy) is the major concern of any high intensity proton machines.

Shoroku Ohnuma

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Environmental assessment of the proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

The potential environmental impacts of construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory were evaluated. Key elements considered include on- and off-site radiological effects; socioeconomic effects; and impacts to aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna, wetlands, water and air quality, cultural resources, and threatened or endangered species. Also incorporated are the effects of decisions made as a result of the preliminary design (Title I) being prepared. Mitigation plans to further reduce impacts are being developed. These plans include coordination with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and other responsible agencies to mitigate potential impacts to wetlands. This mitigation includes providing habitat of comparable ecological value to assure no net loss of wetlands. These mitigation actions would be permitted and monitored by COE. A data recovery plan to protect cultural resources has been developed and approved, pursuant to a Programmatic Agreement among the US Department of Energy, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office. Applications for National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and air emissions permits have been submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), respectively. 71 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

GeV Wakefield acceleration of low energy electron bunches using Petawatt lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of accelerating electrons to the GeV level using a Petawatt laser focused in a uniform plasma is investigated. The proposed scheme relies on the wakefield acceleration of an electron bunch from a state-of-the-art radio-frequency accelerator. Using an analytical model as well as numerical simulations performed with WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], a systematical study of the injector parameters is carried out. In particular, it is found that the quality of the accelerated electron bunch--in terms of bunch length and energy spread--depends crucially on the injection energy. Injection energies of a few MeV lead to a GeV electron beam with sub-100 fs bunches and 10% energy spreads. Most of the features of the acceleration process can be explained within the linear response framework, including both the reduction of energy spread and bunch length at low injection energies. The role of nonlinear effects is discussed.

Lifschitz, A.F.; Faure, J.; Malka, V.; Mora, P. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, Ecole Polytechnique, ENSTA, CNRS, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, UMR 7644, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

The magnet lattice of the LBL 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the magnet chosen for the LBL 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source. The structure has a circumference of 196.8 m, with 12 dispersion free straight sections that can accommodate insertion devices up to 5 m long. The achromatic arcs that connect these straight sections feature combined function (gradient) bending magnets. Utilization of three such magnets in the so-called three-bend-achromat (TBA) arrangement, has several beneficial effects: (1) it reduces the amplitude of the vertical beta-function in the bending magnets, thereby minimizing the required aperture; (2) it changes the damping partition number in such a way as to reduce the natural emittance; and (3) it produces separation of the beta-functions such that relatively low sextupole strengths are sufficient for chromatic correction. The result is a structure with very low emittance (4 nm-rad at 1.5 GeV) that is correctable with only two families of sextupoles while maintaining excellent chromatic properties and acceptable dynamic aperture. In this paper we describe the details of the storage ring and discuss the characteristic features of the lattice.

Jackson, A.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

125 GeV Higgs Boson From Gauge-Higgs Unification: A Snowmass white paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In certain five dimensional gauge theories compactified on the orbifold $S^1/Z_2$ the Standard Model Higgs doublet is identified with the zero mode of the fifth component of the gauge field. This gauge-Higgs unification scenario is realized at high energies, and the Standard Model as an effective theory below the compactification scale satisfies the boundary condition that the Higgs quartic coupling vanishes at the compactification scale (gauge-Higgs condition). This is because at energies above the compactification scale, the five dimensional gauge invariance is restored and the Higgs potential vanishes as a consequence. We consider scenario where top quark Yukawa and weak gauge coupling unification can be realized and identify the compactification scale as one at which this two coupling couplings have the same value. Taking into account the experimental uncertainties in measurements of the top quark mass and the QCD coupling constant, the Higgs mass prediction of 119-126 GeV from the gauge-Higgs unification scenario is consistent with the experimentally measured value of 125-126 GeV. More precise measurements of the top quark mass and the QCD coupling constant are crucial to reduce the interval of the Higgs mass prediction and thereby test the feasibility of the gauge-Higgs unification scenario.

Ilia Gogoladze; Nobuchika Okada; Qaisar Shafi

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

Polarization components in $?^{0}$ photoproduction at photon energies up to 5.6 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new data for the polarization observables of the final state proton in the $^{1}H(\\vec{\\gamma},\\vec{p})\\pi^{0}$ reaction. These data can be used to test predictions based on hadron helicity conservation (HHC) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). These data have both small statistical and systematic uncertainties, and were obtained with beam energies between 1.8 and 5.6 GeV and for $\\pi^{0}$ scattering angles larger than 75$^{\\circ}$ in center-of-mass (c.m.) frame. The data extend the polarization measurements data base for neutral pion photoproduction up to $E_{\\gamma}=5.6 GeV$. The results show non-zero induced polarization above the resonance region. The polarization transfer components vary rapidly with the photon energy and $\\pi^{0}$ scattering angle in c.m. frame. This indicates that HHC does not hold and that the pQCD limit is still not reached in the energy regime of this experiment.

W. Luo; E. J. Brash; R. Gilman; M. K. Jones; M. Meziane; L. Pentchev; C. F. Perdrisat; A. J. R. Puckett; V. Punjabi; F. R. Wesselmann; A. Ahmidouch; I. Albayrak; K. A. Aniol; J. Arrington; A. Asaturyan; O. Ates; H. Baghdasaryan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; P. Bosted; W. Boeglin; C. Butuceanu; P. Carter; S. Chernenko; M. E. Christy; M. Commisso; J. C. Cornejo; S. Covrig; S. Danagoulian; A. Daniel; A. Davidenko; D. Day; S. Dhamija; D. Dutta; R. Ent; S. Frullani; H. Fenker; E. Frlez; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; Y. Goncharenko; K. Hafidi; D. Hamilton; D. W. Higinbotham; W. Hinton; T. Horn; B. Hu; J. Huang; G. M. Huber; E. Jensen; H. Kang; C. Keppel; M. Khandaker; P. King; D. Kirillov; M. Kohl; V. Kravtsov; G. Kumbartzki; Y. Li; V. Mamyan; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; A. Marsh; Y. Matulenko; J. Maxwell; G. Mbianda; D. Meekins; Y. Melnik; J. Miller; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; B. Moffit; O. Moreno; J. Mulholland; A. Narayan; Nuruzzaman; S. Nedev; E. Piasetzky; W. Pierce; N. M. Piskunov; Y. Prok; R. D. Ransome; D. S. Razin; P. E. Reimer; J. Reinhold; O. Rondon; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; K. Shestermanov; S. Sirca; I. Sitnik; L. Smykov; G. Smith; L. Solovyev; P. Solvignon; I. I. Strakovsky; R. Subedi; R. Suleiman; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; A. Vasiliev; M. Veilleux; S. Wood; Z. Ye; Y. Zanevsky; X. Zhang; Y. Zhang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

Design of the Trigger Interface and Distribution Board for CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The design of the Trigger Interface and Distribution (TID) board for the 12 GeV Upgrade at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at TJNAL is described. The TID board distributes a low jitter system clock, synchronized trigger, and synchronized multi-purpose SYNC signal. The TID also initiates data acquisition for the crate. With the TID boards, a multi-crate system can be setup for experiment test and commissioning. The TID board can be selectively populated as a Trigger Interface (TI) board, or a Trigger Distribution (TD) board for the 12 GeV upgrade experiments. When the TID is populated as a TI, it can be located in the VXS crate and distribute the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC through the VXS P0 connector; it can also be located in the standard VME64 crate, and distribute the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC through the VME P2 connector or front panel. It initiates the data acquisition for the front crate where the TI is positioned in. When the TID is populated as a TD, it fans out the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC from trigger supervisor to the front end crates through optical fibres. The TD monitors the trigger processing on the TIs, and gives feedback to the TS for trigger flow control. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) is utilised on TID board to provide programmability. The TID boards were intensively tested on the bench, and various setups.

Gu, Jianhui; Dong, Hai; Cuevas, R; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Heyes, William; Jastrzembski, Edward; Kaneta, Scott; Nganga, Nicholas; Moffit, Bryan; Raydo, Benjamin; Timmer, Carl

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Novel Higgs-to-125 GeV Higgs boson decays in the complex NMSSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) a variety of parameter configurations yields a Higgs boson consistent with the one observed at the LHC. Additionally, the Higgs sector of the model can contain explicit CP-violating phases even at the tree level, in contrast with the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this article we present the complete one-loop Higgs boson mass matrix of the complex NMSSM in the renormalisation-group improved effective potential approach. We also present the trilinear Higgs boson self-couplings and the complete set of expressions for various partial decay widths of a generic CP-mixed Higgs boson in the model. We then analyse a very interesting phenomenological scenario wherein the decay of a relatively light pseudoscalar-like Higgs boson into ~ 125 GeV SM-like Higgs boson(s) is induced by non-zero CP-violating phases. We discuss in detail a few benchmark cases in which such a decay can contribute significantly to the production of SM-like Higgs bosons at the LHC on top of the gluon fusion process. It can thus be partially responsible for the gamma.gamma excess near 125 GeV due to the subsequent decay of the SM-like Higgs boson. Such a scenario is extremely difficult to realize in the complex MSSM and, if probed at the LHC, it could provide an indication of the non-minimal nature of supersymmetry.

Shoaib Munir

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

HIGGS BOSON SEARCH AT PHOTON COLLIDER FOR MH = 140 ? 190 GEV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Higgs boson within the mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV can be discovered at a photon collider in the reaction ?? ? WW (with real or virtual W). Quite moderate resolution in the effective mass of the WW system is required. Preliminary remarks. A discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the main goals for the next generation of colliders. If the Higgs boson mass MH is larger than 2MZ, Higgs boson can be discovered at LHC, photon colliders [1] or e + e ? linear colliders [2] via the sizable decay mode H ? ZZ. For all types of collisions a background to this decay mode is rather small. If MH Higgs boson can be discovered at photon colliders or e + e ? linear colliders via the dominant decay mode H ? b ¯ b and at LHC – via the decay mode H ? ??. The mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV is the most difficult one for the Higgs boson discovery. In this mass range the decay mode H ? W + W ? with real or virtual W’s (W ? ? q¯q, e¯?,...) is dominant, branching ratios of other decay modes decrease rapidly and their using for the Higgs boson discovery is very difficult. The use of the H ? W + W ? decay at e + e ?

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

HIGGS BOSON SEARCH AT PHOTON COLLIDER FOR MH = 140 ? 190 GEV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Higgs boson within the mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV can be discovered at a photon collider in the reaction ?? ? WW (with real or virtual W) with the luminosity integral about 1 fb ?1. The reasonable resolution in the effective mass of the WW system is required. Preliminary remarks. A discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the main goals for the next generation of colliders. If the Higgs boson mass MH is larger than 2MZ, it can be discovered at LHC, photon colliders [1] or e + e ? linear colliders [2] via the sizable decay mode H ? ZZ. For all types of collisions a background to this decay mode is rather small. If MH Higgs boson can be discovered at e + e ? linear colliders or photon colliders via the dominant decay mode H ? b ¯ b and at LHC – via the decay mode H ? ??. The mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV is the most difficult one for the Higgs boson discovery. In this mass range the decay mode H ? W + W ? with real or virtual W’s

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Cosmic-Ray antiproton flux between 3 and 49 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a new measurement of the cosmic ray antiproton spectrum. The data were collected by the balloon-borne experiment CAPRICE98 which was flown on 28-29 May 1998 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, USA. The experiment used the NMSU-WIZARD/CAPRICE98 balloon-borne magnet spectrometer equipped with a gas Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector, a time-of-flight system, a tracking device consisting of drift chambers and a superconducting magnet and a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. The RICH detector was the first ever flown capable of mass-resolving charge-one particles at energies above 5 GeV. A total of 31 antiprotons with rigidities between 4 and 50 GV at the spectrometer were identified with small backgrounds from other particles. The absolute antiproton energy spectrum was determined in the kinetic energy region at the top of the atmosphere between 3.2 and 49.1 GeV. We found that the observed antiproton spectrum and the antiproton-to-proton ratio are consistent with a pure secondary origin. However, a primary component may not be excluded.

WiZard/CAPRICE Collaboration

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and analyzed for diagnostic purposes. As a result of these activities, a body of knowledge consisting of personal accounts, photos, reports and archived solid samples was gained regarding the physical nature of the melt glass that formed during an underground nuclear test. In this memo report, we summarize previously published reports, compile archived photos, document and describe melt glass samples and summarized discussions from former field engineers and radiochemists who had direct knowledge of drill-back samples. All the information presented in the report was gathered from unclassified sources. We have included as wide a variation of samples as we could document. Unfortunately, as part of the drill-back and diagnostic efforts, it was not common practice to photograph or physically describe the material returned to the surface.

Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad “tail” arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt “network.” Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Method to decrease loss of aluminum and magnesium melts  

SciTech Connect

A method to minimize oxidation of metal during melting processes is provided, the method comprising placing solid phase metal into a furnace environ-ment, transforming the solid-phase metal into molten metal phase having a molten metal surface, and creating a barrier between the surface and the environment. Also provided is a method for isolating the surface of molten metal from its environment, the method comprising confining the molten metal to a controlled atmos-phere, and imposing a floating substrate between the surface and the atmosphere.

Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Calaway, Jr., Wallis F. (Woodridge, IL); Moore, Jerry F. (Naperville, IL); Krumdick, Gregory K. (Crete, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

BP Cherry Point Congeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVISED 404 (B) (1) REVISED 404 (B) (1) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Prepared for: BP West Coast Products, LLC Revised June 29, 2004 1501 Fourth Avenue, Suite 1400 Seattle, WA 98101-1616 (206) 438-2700 33749546.05070 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 I NT RODUCTI ON ................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 P URPOSE AND NEE D .......................................................................................................... 1 2.1 RELIABILITY .................................................................................................... 1 2.2 COST-EFFECTIVENESS ................................................................................... 3 2.3 SIZE OF FACILITY............................................................................................

263

A Higgs boson near 125 GeV with enhanced di-photon signal in the NMSSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural region in the parameter space of the NMSSM can accomodate a CP-even Higgs boson with a mass of about 125 GeV and, simultaneously, an enhanced cross section times branching ratio in the di-photon channel. This happens in the case of strong singlet-doublet mixing, when the partial width of a 125 GeV Higgs boson into bb is strongly reduced. In this case, a second lighter CP-even Higgs boson is potentially also observable at the LHC.

Ellwanger, Ulrich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A Higgs boson near 125 GeV with enhanced di-photon signal in the NMSSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural region in the parameter space of the NMSSM can accomodate a CP-even Higgs boson with a mass of about 125 GeV and, simultaneously, an enhanced cross section times branching ratio in the di-photon channel. This happens in the case of strong singlet-doublet mixing, when the partial width of a 125 GeV Higgs boson into bb is strongly reduced. In this case, a second lighter CP-even Higgs boson is potentially also observable at the LHC.

Ulrich Ellwanger

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Lambda0 polarization in p p ---> p Lambda0 K+ (pi+ pi-) at 27.5-GeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polarization of 1973 {Lambda}{sup 0}'s from the specific reaction pp {yields} p{Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){sup 5} created by 27.5 Gev incident protons on a liquid hydrogen target, as a function of {chi}{sub F}, P{sub T}, and M{sub {Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +}}, is, within statistics, consistent with the polarization of {Lambda}{sup 0}'s from pp {yields} P{sub fast} {Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +} at 800 GeV.

Felix, J.; Christian, D.C.; Church, M.D.; Forbush, M.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartouni, E.P.; Holmes, Stephen D.; Huson, F.R.; Jensen, D.A.; Knapp, B.C.; Kreisler, M.N.; Uribe, J.; Stern, B.J.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wehmann, A.; Wiencke, L.R.; White, J.T.; /Guanajuato U. /Fermilab /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /Texas A-M /Massachusetts U.,

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optimization of Core Point Detection in Fingerprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares and documents the work of an optimized fingerprint core point determination algorithm. This work focuses to present an efficient and precise way for the extraction of core point. Core Point is detected using least mean square algorithm. ...

Nabeel Younus Khan; M. Younus Javed; Naveed Khattak; Umer Munir Yongjun Chang

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Exclusive Photoproduction of Charged Pions in Hydrogen and Deuterium from 1 to 6 GeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of the transition region in the description of exclusive processes and hadron structure, from the nucleon-meson degrees of freedom in meson-exchange models at low energy to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom in pQCD at high energy, is essential for us to understand the strong interaction. The differential cross section measurements for exclusive reactions at fixed center-of-mass angles enable us to investigate the constituent counting rule, which explicitly connects the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to the energy dependence of differential cross sections. JLab Experiment E94-104 was carried out in Hall A with two high resolution spectrometers. It included the coincidence cross section measurement for the [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] process with a deuterium target and the singles measurement for the [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process with a hydrogen target. The untagged real photons were generated by the electron beam impinging on a copper radiator. The photon energies ranged from 1.1 to 5.5 GeV, corresponding to the center-of-mass energies from 1.7 to 3.4 GeV. The pion center-of-mass angles were fixed at 50 deg, 70 deg, 90 deg, and also 100 deg, 110 deg at a few energies. The JLab E94-104 data presented in this thesis contain four interesting features. The data exhibit a global scaling behavior for both [pi]{sup -} and [pi]{sup +} photoproduction at high energies and high transverse momenta, consistent with the constituent counting rule and the existing [pi]{sup +} photoproduction data. This implies that the quark-gluon degrees of freedom start to play a role at this energy scale. The data suggests possible substructure of the scaling behavior, which might be oscillations around the scaling value. There are several possible mechanisms that can cause oscillations, for example the one associated with the generalized constituent counting rule involving quark orbital angular momentum. The data show an enhancement in the scaled cross section at center-of-mass energy near 2.2 GeV, where baryon resonances are not as well known as those at low energies. The differential cross section ratios for exclusive [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] to [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process at [theta]{sub cm} = 90 deg start to show consistency with the prediction based on one-hard-gluon-exchange diagrams at high energies.

Lingyan Zhu

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

Micropatterning of a Bipolar Plate Using Direct Laser Melting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct laser melting (DLM) technology has been used to fabricate the micro-pattern of the bipolar plate in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). A suitable approach to enhance the performance of the bipolar plate has been performed to optimize the DLM process. To fabricate the micro pattern, a DLM process with 316L stainless steel powder has been used. For the melted height of 1 mm, the DLM process conditions were optimized such as; laser power of 200 W, scan rate of 36.62 mm/s and the 8-layer structures. To characterize the effect of material type, the bipolar plates of various types were analyzed. In case of the 316L stainless steel DLM patterning, a current density of 297 mA/cm{sup 2} was achieved but the case of the 316L stainless steel plate, 248 mA/cm{sup 2} current density that is lower than that of other materials was achieved. The overall cell performance of 316L stainless steel DLM patterning bipolar plate was better than that of the 316L stainless steel plate. This has significant advantages for the micropatterning using DLM process. The use of 316L stainless steel powder material as micro pattern material will reduce the machining cost as well as volume of the fuel cell stack.

Jang, Jeong-hwan; Joo, Byeong-don; Mun, Sung-min; Moona, Young-hoon [School of Mechanical Engineering/ Engineering Research Center for Net Shape and Die Manufacturing, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electrical charging during the sharkskin instability of a metallocene melt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow instabilities are widely studied because of their economical and theoretical interest, however few results have been published about the polymer electrification during the extrusion. Nevertheless the generation of the electrical charges is characteristic of the interaction between the polymer melt and the die walls. In our study, the capillary extrusion of a metallocene polyethylene (mPE) through a tungsten carbide die is characterized through accurate electrical measurements thanks a Faraday pail. No significant charges are observed since the extrudate surface remains smooth. However, as soon as the sharkskin distortion appears, measurable charges are collected (around 5 10-8 C/m2). Higher level of charges are measured during the spurt or the gross-melt fracture (g.m.f) defects. This work is focused on the electrical charging during the sharkskin instability. The variation of the electrical charges versus the apparent wall shear stress is investigated for different die geometries. This curve exhibits a linear increase, followed by a sudden growth just before the onset of the spurt instability. This abrupt charging corresponds also to the end of the sharkskin instability. It is also well-known that wall slip appears just at the same time, with smaller velocity values than during spurt flow. Our results indicate that electrification could be a signature of the wall slip. We show also that the electrification curves can be shifted according to the time-temperature superposition principle, leading to the conclusion that molecular features of the polymer are also involved in this process.

S. Tonon; A. Lavernhe-Gerbier; F. Flores; A. Allal; C. Guerret-Piécourt

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Erratum: Experimental Vibrational Zero-Point Energies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Erratum: Experimental Vibrational Zero-Point Energies: Diatomic Molecules †J ... error in the calculated zero point energy ZPE for ... All rights reserved. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

1 GeV CW nonscaling FFAG for ADS, and magnet parameters  

SciTech Connect

Multi-MW proton driver capability remains a challenging, critical technology for many core HEP programs, particularly the neutrino ones such as the Muon Collider and Neutrino factory, and for high-profile energy applications such as Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADS) and Accelerator Transmutation of Waste for nuclear power and waste management. Work is focused almost exclusively on an SRF linac, as, to date, no re-circulating accelerator can attain the 10-20 MW capability necessary for the nuclear applications. Recently, the concept of isochronous orbits has been explored and developed for nonscaling FFAGs using powerful new methodologies in FFAG accelerator design. Work is progressing on a stable, high-intensity, 1 GeV isochronous FFAG. Initial specifications of novel magnets with the nonlinear radial fields required to support isochronous operation are also reported here.

Johnstone C.; Meot, F.; Snopok, P.; Weng, W.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Progress on Neutron-Target Multipoles above 1 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We report a new extraction of nucleon resonance couplings using ?{sup ?} photo-production cross sections on the neutron. The world database for the process ?n ? ?{sup ?}p above 1 GeV has quadrupled with the addition of new differential cross sections from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. Differential cross sections from CLAS have been improved with a new final-state interaction determination using a diagrammatic technique taking into account the SAID phenomenological NN and ?N final-state interaction amplitudes. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations. With the addition of these new cross sections, significant changes are seen in the high-energy behavior of the SAID cross sections and amplitudes.

Strakovsky, I I; Gao, H; Briscoe, W J; Dutta, D; Kudryavtsev, A E; Mirazite, M; Paris, M; Rossi, P; Stepanyan, S; Tarasov, V E

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Production and Testing Experience with the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CEBAF recirculating CW electron linear accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently undergoing a major upgrade to 12 GeV. This project includes the fabrication, preparation, and testing of 80 new 7-cell SRF cavities, followed by their incorporation into ten new cryomodules for subsequent testing and installation. In order to maximize the cavity Q over the full operable dynamic range in CEBAF (as high as 25 MV/m), the decision was taken to apply a streamlined preparation process that includes a final light temperature-controlled electropolish of the rf surface over the vendor-provided bulk BCP etch. Cavity processing work began at JLab in September 2010 and will continue through December 2011. The excellent performance results are exceeding project requirements and indicate a fabrication and preparation process that is stable and well controlled. The cavity production and performance experience to date will be summarized and lessons learned reported to the community.

A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, F. Marhauser, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Preparation and Testing of the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Eighty new 7-cell, low-loss cell-shaped cavities are required for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade project. In addition to ten pre-production units fabricated at JLab, the full set of commercially-produced cavities have been delivered. An efficient processing routine, which includes a controlled 30 micron electropolish, has been established to transform these cavities into qualified 8-cavity strings. This work began in 2010 and will run through the end of 2011. The realized cavity performance consistently exceeds project requirements and also the maximum useful gradient in CEBAF: 25 MV/m. We will describe the cavity processing and preparation protocols and summarize test results obtained to date.

Reilly, A. V.; Bass, T.; Burrill, A.; Davis, G. K.; Marhauser, F.; Reece, C. E.; Stirbet, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Remote Handling Devices for Disposition of Enriched Uranium Reactor Fuel Using Melt-Dilute Process  

SciTech Connect

Remote handling equipment is required to achieve the processing of highly radioactive, post reactor, fuel for the melt-dilute process, which will convert high enrichment uranium fuel elements into lower enrichment forms for subsequent disposal. The melt-dilute process combines highly radioactive enriched uranium fuel elements with deleted uranium and aluminum for inductive melting and inductive stirring steps that produce a stable aluminum/uranium ingot of low enrichment.

Heckendorn, F.M.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Measurements of Compton Scattering on the Proton at 2 - 6 GeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Similar to elastic electron scattering, Compton Scattering on the proton at high momentum transfers(and high p?) can be an effective method to study its short-distance structure. An experiment has been carried out to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering (RCS) on the proton for 2.3-5.7 GeV electron beam energies and a wide distribution of large scattering angles. The 25 kinematic settings sampled a domain of s = 5?11(GeV/c)2,?t = ?7(GeV/c)2 and ?u = 0.5?6.5(GeV/c)2. In addition, a measurement of longitudinal and transverse polarization transfer asymmetries was made at a 3.48 GeV beam energy and a scattering angle of ?cm = 120o. These measurements were performed to test the existing theoretical mechanisms for this process as well as to determine RCS form factors. At the heart of the scientific motivation is the desire to understand the manner in which a nucleon interacts with external excitations at the above listed energies, by comparing and contrasting the two existing models – Leading Twist Mechanism and Soft Overlap “Handbag” Mechanism – and identify the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, the Handbag Mechanism allows one to calculate reaction observables in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), which have the function of bridging the wide gap between the exclusive(form factors) and inclusive(parton distribution functions) description of the proton. The experiment was conducted in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility(Jefferson Lab). It used a polarized and unpolarized electron beam, a 6% copper radiator with the thickness of 6.1% radiation lengths (to produce a bremsstrahlung photon beam), the Hall A liquid hydrogen target, a high resolution spectrometer with a focal plane polarimeter, and a photon hodoscope calorimeter. Results of the differential cross sections are presented, and discussed in the general context of the scientific motivation.

Areg Danagoulian

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Skin Effect of Hf-Rich Melts and Some Aspects in its Usage for Hf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USAGE FOR Hf-CONTAINING. CAST NICKEL- ... of advanced gas turbines. ... were polished by metallo- graphy and then melted by tungsten inert gas(TIG).

279

063 Synthesis and Characterization of New Lead-Free Low Melt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

063 Synthesis and Characterization of New Lead-Free Low Melt Sealing Glasses ... Powders by Using a Solution Combustion Synthesis in an Air Atmosphere.

280

A Study of the Effect of Electro-Slag Re-Melting Parameters on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

melting (VAR). The structural soundness of this intermediate ESR ingot directly affects its resistance against cracking due to thermal stress in the course of VAR ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coupled Macro-Micro Modeling of the Secondary Melting of Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

beam heating (EBBM), energy losses by radiation and conduction and latent ... correspondingly smaller on the smaller scales of pilot VAR and. EBBM melts.

282

Investigation of residual stresses in the laser melting of metal powders in additive layer manufacturing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Laser Melting (LM) is an Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) process used to produce three-dimensional parts from metal powders by fusing the material in a layerby-… (more)

Roberts, Ibiye Aseibichin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservation Policy in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservationare heavily dependent on sea ice for their survival, both asvulnerable to the receding sea ice boundaries predicted to

Shaffer, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Multiphysics CFD Modeling of a Free Falling Jet during Melt-Blowing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Multiphysics CFD Modeling of a Free Falling Jet during Melt- Blowing Slag Fiberization ... A Micro-Macro Model of a PEM Fuel Cell System.

285

Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz booster simulations  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 130405 (2007)] allows direct and e#14;fficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted and beam loaded laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV (parameters not computationally accessible otherwise). This verifies the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated electron beam transverse dynamics and energy spread. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively. Agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference for a 0.1 GeV class stage. Obtaining these speedups and levels of accuracy was permitted by solutions for handling data input (in particular particle and laser beams injection) and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference, as well as mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness.

Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Di-electron spectrum at mid-rapidity in p+p collisions at ?s=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the mid-rapidity mass spectrum of di-electrons and cross sections of pseudoscalar and vector mesons via e[superscript +]e[superscript ?] decays, from ?s=200 GeV p+p collisions, measured by the large-acceptance ...

Balewski, Jan T.

287

Third harmonic flow of charged particles in Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, v[subscript 3], known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200 GeV, based ...

Betancourt, M. J.

288

Direct photons in 200 GeV p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au from PHENIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct photons were measured with the PHENIX experiment in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. To tackle the p_T region below 5 GeV/c, direct photons were measured through their internal conversion into e^+e^- in Au+Au collisions.

Stefan Bathe; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

Directed flow in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ =62.4 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the directed flow ($v_1$) measured in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 62.4 GeV in the mid-pseudorapidity region $|\\eta|directed flow is in the direction opposite to that of fragmentation neutrons.

STAR Collaboration; J. Adams

2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Inclusive meson production in 3.5 GeV pp collisions studied with the HADES spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the inclusive di?electron invariant?mass spectrum from p + p interactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. It is a very important reference for the study of vector meson production off the nucleus

Anar Rustamov; The HADES Collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Studies of nucleon-gold collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon pair using tagged d+Au interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectra of charged hadrons produced near mid-rapidity in d+Au, p+Au and n+Au collisions at - = 200 GeV are presented as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. These measurements were performed using the ...

Reed, Corey (Corey James)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Muon g - 2 anomaly and 125 GeV Higgs: Extra vector-like quark and LHC prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ATLAS and CMS collaborations recently reported indication of a Higgs boson around 125GeV. If we add extra vector-like quarks to the MSSM, such a relatively heavy Higgs can be naturally realized in the GMSB framework, simultaneously explaining the muon g - 2 anomaly. I will discuss LHC prospect of this attractive model.

Iwamoto, Sho [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Line tensions, correlation lengths, and critical exponents in lipid membranes near critical points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membranes containing a wide variety of ternary mixtures of high chain-melting temperature lipids, low chain-melting temperature lipids, and cholesterol undergo lateral phase separartion into coexisting liquid phases at a miscibility transition. When membranes are prepared from a ternary lipid mixture at a critical composition, they pass through a miscibility critical point at the transition temperature. Since the critical temperature is typically on the order of room temperature, membranes provide an unusual opportunity in which to perform a quantitative study of biophysical systems that exhibit critical phenomena in the two-dimensional Ising universality class. As a critical point is approached from either high or low temperature, the scale of fluctuations in lipid composition, set by the correlation length, diverges. In addition, as a critical point is approached from low temperature, the line tension between coexisting phases decreases to zero. Here we quantitatively evaluate the temperature dependence of line tension between liquid domains and of fluctuation correlation lengths in lipid membranes in order to extract a critical exponent, nu. We obtain nu=1.2 plus or minus 0.2, consistent with the Ising model prediction nu=1. We also evaluate the probability distributions of pixel intensities in fluoresence images of membranes. From the temperature dependence of these distributions above the critical temperature, we extract an independent critical exponent beta=0.124 plus or minus 0.03 which is consistent with the Ising prediction of beta=1/8.

Aurelia R. Honerkamp-Smith; Pietro Cicuta; Marcus D. Collins; Sarah L. Veatch; Marcel den Nijs; M. Schick; Sarah L. Keller

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Convertibility of Function Points into COSMIC Function Points: A study using Piecewise Linear Regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: COSMIC Function Points and traditional Function Points (i.e., IFPUG Function Points and more recent variation of Function Points, such as NESMA and FISMA) are probably the best known and most widely used Functional Size Measurement methods. ... Keywords: COSMIC Function Points, Data analysis, Function Point analysis, Functional Size Measurement, Functional size measure convertibility, Outliers

Luigi Lavazza; Sandro Morasca

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Critical Point Symmetries in Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Point Symmetries (CPS) appear in regions of the nuclear chart where a rapid change from one symmetry to another is observed. The first CPSs, introduced by F. Iachello, were E(5), which corresponds to the transition from vibrational [U(5)] to gamma-unstable [O(6)] behaviour, and X(5), which represents the change from vibrational [U(5)] to prolate axially deformed [SU(3)] shapes. These CPSs have been obtained as special solutions of the Bohr collective Hamiltonian. More recent special solutions of the same Hamiltonian, to be described here, include Z(5) and Z(4), which correspond to maximally triaxial shapes (the latter with ``frozen'' gamma=30 degrees), as well as X(3), which corresponds to prolate shapes with ``frozen'' gamma=0. CPSs have the advantage of providing predictions which are parameter free (up to overall scale factors) and compare well to experiment. However, their mathematical structure [with the exception of E(5)] needs to be clarified.

Bonatsos, D; Petrellis, D; Terziev, P A; Yigitoglu, I; Bonatsos, Dennis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2004 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council July 12, 2004 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your reference is the abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. This document is designed to correct information and further explain what was provided in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-megawatt gas-fired combined cycle cogeneration facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional

297

Dynamic melt rate control on a Laboratory scale VAR furnace without load cell feedback  

SciTech Connect

Based on a linearized version of an accurate, low order, dynamic melt rate model, a feedback melt rate controller was designed and tested on a small VAR furnace at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Model based control was necessary because the furnace is not equipped with a working load cell transducer. The model was incorporated into a process filter that produces estimates of electrode thermal boundary layer, electrode gap, electrode position and electrode mass. Estimated values for the thermal boundary layer and electrode gap were used for feedback. The input commands were melting current and electrode drive speed. A test melt was performed wherein a 0.127 m diameter 304SS electrode was melted into 0.165 m diameter ingot at a nominal melt rate of 27 g/s. Toward the end of the test, a melt rate step up to 32 g/s was commanded. The controller initiated a nonlinear current ramp to produce the commanded step. Electrode position data were analyzed and the results used to determine that the actual melt rate profile followed the commanded profile relatively well.

Beaman, Joseph J.; Melgaard, d; Shelmidine, G. J. (Gregory J.); Tubesing, P. K. (Philip K.); Aikin, R. M. (Robert M.); Williamson, R. L. (Rodney L.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The anisotropic free energy of the Lennard-Jones crystal-melt interface James R. Morris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anisotropic free energy of the Lennard-Jones crystal-melt interface James R. Morris Metal; accepted 22 May 2003 We have calculated the free energy of the crystal-melt interface for the Lennard are in good agreement with previous calculations of the free energies, based upon simulations used

Song, Xueyu

299

Application of Dual-Polarization Radar Melting-Layer Detection Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A polarimetric melting-layer detection algorithm developed for an S-band radar has been modified for use by the King City C-band radar in southern Ontario, Canada. The technique ingests radar scan volume data to determine the melting-layer top ...

S. Boodoo; D. Hudak; N. Donaldson; M. Leduc

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Heat Transfer Analysis of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Based on Snow Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of Wuhan district weather conditions of January 5, 2010, heat transfer mechanism of Beijing-Zhuhai Expressway Hubei section of asphalt concrete pavement based on snow melting is analyzed and the model of heat transmission is established. ... Keywords: asphalt concrete pavement, ground-source heat, pump, deicing and snow melting, heat flux

Yan-ping Tu; Jie Li; Chang-sheng Guan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Simplified Ice–Ocean Coupled Model for the Antarctic Ice Melt Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Antarctic Ocean, sea ice melts mostly by warming of the ocean mixed layer through heat input (mainly solar radiation) in open water areas. A simplified ice–upper ocean coupled model is proposed in which sea ice melts only by the ocean heat ...

Kay I. Ohshima; Sohey Nihashi

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Numerical simulation of melting in two-dimensional cavity using adaptive grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical simulation of melting of chemically pure material in two-dimensional square cavity. A single-domain model is used which does not require interface tracking and allows the use of a fixed grid in order to solve governing ... Keywords: adaptive moving grid, grid generation, melting

Jure Mencinger

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Melting curve and Hugoniot of molybdenum up to 400 GPa by ab initio simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the high pressure melting curve from static compression experiments. Our calculated P(V ) and T(P) Hugoniot on new ab initio calculations of Tm(P) for Mo, and on the P(V ) and T(P) relations on the Hugoniot. We it to calculate melting curves. In such calculations, no empirical model is used to describe the interactions

Alfè, Dario

305

Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Abstract During the drilling of injection well KS-13 in 2005 at the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) well field, on the island of Hawaii, a 75-meter interval of diorite containing brown glass inclusions was penetrated at a depth of 2415 m. At a depth of 2488 m a melt of dacitic composition was encountered. The melt flowed up the well bore and was repeatedly re-drilled over a depth interval of 8 m, producing several kilograms of clear, colorless vitric cuttings at the surface. The dacitic glass cuttings have a perlitic texture, a silica content of 67 wgt.%, are enriched in alkalis and nearly

306

Microsoft PowerPoint - Glenn Grant 2.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and components is driven by: The multistep process of fabrication from powder (melt, milling and mixing of oxide particle, vacuum canning, densification CIPHIP or HIP,...

307

Fixed-Point Cell Mini Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The ITS-90 Fixed-Point Cell Mini-Workshop is scheduled to be given at ... hands-on" laboratory training in the realization of ITS-90 fixed-point cells. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

InitiativesTalkingPoints | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ativesTalkingPoints&0; More Documents & Publications Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour &8220;C-3E&8221; WOMEN&8217;S INITIATIVE: Renewable Energy and a Smart Grid...

309

Function points as a universal software metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Function point metrics are the most accurate and effective metrics yet developed for software sizing and also for studying software productivity, quality, costs, risks, and economic value. Unlike the older "lines of code" metric function points can be ...

Capers Jones

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Minimal capacity points and the Lowest eigenfunctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of the point of minimal capacity of the domain, and observe a connection between this point and the lowest eigenfunction of a Laplacian on this domain, in one special case.

Mark Levi; Jia Pan

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Of The Proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and (FONSI) OF THE PROPOSED and (FONSI) OF THE PROPOSED 7-GeV ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE Table of Contents LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ABSTRACT 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 PURPOSE 1.2 THE APS PROJECT AT ANL 1.3 SUMMARY OF THE PROPOSED ACTION 1.4 NEED FOR ACTION 2.0 THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF APS AND CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES (PROPOSED ACTION) 2.1.1 APS Facility Description 2.1.2 Utility Services 2.1.3 Gaseous Emissions, Liquid Effluents, and Wastes 2.1.4 Construction Activities 2.1.5 Decommissioning 2.2 ALTERNATIVES 2.2.1 No Action 2.2.2 Construction at Another ANL Site 3.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 3.2 CLIMATOLOGY AND AIR QUALITY 3.2.1 Climatology 3.2.2 Air Quality 3.3 DEMOGRAPHY AND SOCIOECONOMIC PROFILE 3.4 LAND USE 3.4.1 Site and Vicinity

312

Quark compound Bag model for NN scattering up to 1 GeV  

SciTech Connect

A Quark Compound Bag model has been constructed to describe NN s-wave scattering up to 1 GeV. The model contains a vertex interaction H/sub D/leftrightarrow/NN/ for describing the excitation of a confined six-quark Bag state, and a meson-exchange interaction obtained from modifying the phenomenological core of the Paris potential. Explicit formalisms and numerical results are presented to reveal the role of the Bag excitation mechanism in determining the relative wave function, P- and S-matrix of NN scattering. We explore the merit as well as the shortcoming of the Quark Compound Bag model developed by the ITEP group. It is shown that the parameters of the vertex interaction H/sub D/leftrightarrow/NN/ can be more rigorously determined from the data if the notation of the Chiral/Cloudy Bag model is used to allow the presence of the background meson-exchange interaction inside Bag excitation region. The application of the model in the study of quark degrees of freedom in nuclei is discussed. 41 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fasano, C.; Lee, T.S.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Inferring the nature of the boson at 125-126 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a bosonic resonance near 125 GeV has been firmly established at the Large Hadron Collider. Understanding the exact nature of this boson is a priority. The task now is to verify whether the boson is indeed the scalar Higgs as proposed in the Standard Model of particle physics, or something more esoteric as proposed in the plethora of extensions to the Standard Model. This requires a verification that the boson is a J^{PC}=0^{++} state with couplings precisely as predicted by the Standard Model. Since a non Standard Model boson can in some cases mimic the Standard Model Higgs in its couplings to gauge bosons, it is essential to rule out any anomalous behavior in its gauge couplings. We present a step by step methodology to determine the properties of this resonance without making any assumptions about its couplings. We present the analysis in terms of measurements that would require the minimum number of events. We show that by studying three uni-angular distributions and other readily measurable observables, one can unambiguously confirm whether the new boson is indeed the Higgs with J^{PC}=0^{++} and with couplings to Z bosons exactly as predicted in the Standard Model.

Tanmoy Modak; Dibyakrupa Sahoo; Rahul Sinha; Hai-Yang Cheng

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Studies of Nucleon Form Factors with 12 GeV CEBAF and SuperBigBite  

SciTech Connect

The elastic electromagnetic form factors are among the most fundamental quantities that describe the ground-state structure of the proton and neutron. Precision data of the form factors over a wide kinematical range provide a powerful test of current theories of hadron structure. A number of experiments aiming to measure the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the neutron, G{sub E}{sup n} and G{sub M}{sup n}, and proton, G{sub E}{sup p}, at very high momentum transfer, up to the range of Q{sup 2} = 10-14 (GeV/c){sup 2}, are planned to be carried out with the future 11 GeV electron beam of the upgraded CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. These experiments will determine the nucleon form factors with unprecedented precision to Q{sup 2}-values up to three times higher than those of existing data. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual design of a new spectrometer, SuperBigBite, that will be used in these and other future experiments at Jefferson Lab.

Jens-Ole Hansen

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Discovery of a GeV Blazar Shining Through the Galactic Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovered a new gamma-ray source near the Galactic plane, Fermi J0109+6134, when it flared brightly in 2010 February. The low Galactic latitude (b = -1.2{sup o}) indicated that the source could be located within the Galaxy, which motivated rapid multi-wavelength follow-up including radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We report the results of analyzing all 19 months of LAT data for the source, and of X-ray observations with both Swift and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We determined the source redshift, z = 0.783, using a Keck LRIS observation. Finally, we compiled a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) from both historical and new observations contemporaneous with the 2010 February flare. The redshift, SED, optical line width, X-ray obsorption, and multi-band variability indicate that this new Gev source is a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Because several of the optical emission lines have equivalent width > 5 {angstrom}, this blazar belongs in the flat-spectrum radio quasar category.

Vandenbroucke, J.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellini, A.; /Padua U., Astron. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Bolte, M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Cheung, C.C.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NAS, Washington, D.C.; Civano, F.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Donato, D.; /NASA, Goddard; Fuhrmann, L.; /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron.; Funk, S.; Healey, S.E.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Hill, A.B.; /Joseph Fourier U.; Knigge, C.; /Southampton U.; Madejski, G.M.; Romani, R.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Santander-Garcia, M.; /IAC, La Laguna /Isaac Newton Group /Laguna U., Tenerife; Shaw, M.S.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Steeghs, D.; /Warwick U.; Torres, M.A.P.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Van Etten, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

316

Light Stops, Light Staus and the 125 GeV Higgs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS and CMS experiments have recently announced the discovery of a Higgs-like resonance with mass close to 125 GeV. Overall, the data is consistent with a Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs boson. Such a particle may arise in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM with average stop masses of the order of the TeV scale and a sizable stop mixing parameter. In this article we discuss properties of the SM-like Higgs production and decay rates induced by the possible presence of light staus and light stops. Light staus can affect the decay rate of the Higgs into di-photons and, in the case of sizable left-right mixing, induce an enhancement in this production channel up to $\\sim$ 50% of the Standard Model rate. Light stops may induce sizable modifications of the Higgs gluon fusion production rate and correlated modifications to the Higgs diphoton decay. Departures from SM values of the bottom-quark and tau-lepton couplings to the Higgs can be obtained due to Higgs mixing effects triggered by light third ...

Carena, Marcela; Shah, Nausheen R; Wagner, Carlos E M; Wang, Lian-Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Strange particle production in p+p collisions at root s=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present strange particle spectra and yields measured at midrapidity in root s = 200 GeV proton-proton (p + p) collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass (m(T) = root PT2 + m(2)) scaling of hadron production in p + p collisions seems to break down at higher m(T) and that there is a difference in the shape of the m(T) spectrum between baryons and mesons. We observe midrapidity antibaryon to baryon ratios near unity for Lambda and Xi baryons and no dependence of the ratio on transverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach the quark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transverse momentum on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particle mass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominated particle production. The data are compared with previous measurements made at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron and Intersecting Storage Rings and in Fermilab experiments and with leading-order and next-to-leading-order string fragmentation model predictions. We infer from these comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from p + p collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jets rather than from quark jets.

Abelev, B. I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Strange Particle Production in $p+p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200GeV  

SciTech Connect

We present strange particle spectra and yields measured atmid-rapidity in sqrt text s=200 GeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions atRHIC. We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass(mathrm mT \\equiv\\sqrt mathrm p_T 2+\\mathrm m2) scaling of hadronproduction in p+p collisions seems to break down at higher \\mt and thatthere is a difference in the shape of the \\mt spectrum between baryonsand mesons. We observe mid-rapidity anti-baryon to baryon ratios nearunity for Lambda and Xi baryons and no dependence of the ratio ontransverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach thequark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transversemomentum (\\mpt) on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particlemass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominatedparticle production. The data are compared to previous measurements fromCERN-SPS, ISR and FNAL experiments and to Leading Order (LO) and Next toLeading order (NLO) string fragmentation model predictions. We infer fromthese comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from $p+p$collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jetsrather than quark jets.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta,N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: Melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (P{sub H}-V{sub H}) point and interfacial temperature T{sub R} on the release of Hugoniot pressure (P{sub R}) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining P{sub H}-V{sub H} and T{sub R}. The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2 between the melting temperatures measured under shock and those measured in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell at {approx}100 GPa.

Li Jun; Zhou Xianming; Li Jiabo; Wu Qiang; Cai Lingcang; Dai Chengda [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, Mianyang, 621900 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

The IMPROVE-1 Storm of 1–2 February 2001. Part IV: Precipitation Enhancement across the Melting Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous model simulations indicate that in stratiform precipitation, the precipitation rate can increase by 7% in the melting layer through direct condensation onto melting snow and the resultant cooled rain. In the present study, a model ...

Christopher P. Woods; John D. Locatelli; Mark T. Stoelinga

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Dirk Windelberg Nano-point-geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dirk Windelberg Nano-point-geometry for use in material science 12. M¨arz 2010, M¨unchen D¨at Hannover #12;D.Windelberg: Nano-point-geometry for use in material science tr1003 e.tex (8. Juli 2010) 1 Nano-point-geometry for use in material science 1 microstructure 2 determination of height of voxels 3

Windelberg, Dirk

322

Selective spatio-temporal interest points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress in the field of human action recognition points towards the use of Spatio-Temporal Interest Points (STIPs) for local descriptor-based recognition strategies. In this paper, we present a novel approach for robust and selective STIP detection, ... Keywords: Action recognition, Bag-of-words, Complex scenes, Local descriptors, Multiple actors, Spatio-temporal interest points, Support vector machines

Bhaskar Chakraborty; Michael B. Holte; Thomas B. Moeslund; Jordi Gonzílez

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Single/Few Bunch Space Charge Effects at 8 GeV in the Fermilab Main Injector  

SciTech Connect

For Project X, it is planned to inject a beam of 3 10{sup 11} particles per bunch into the Main Injector. Therefore, at 8 GeV, there will be increased space charge tune shifts and an increased incoherent tune spread. In preparation for these higher intensity bunches exploratory studies have commenced looking at the transmission of different intensity bunches at different tunes. An experiment is described with results for bunch intensities between 20 and 300 10{sup 9} particles. To achieve the highest intensity bunches coalescing at 8 GeV is required, resulting in a longer bunch length. Comparisons show that similar transmission curves are obtained when the intensity and bunch length have increased by similar factors. This indicates the incoherent tune shifts are similar, as expected from theory. The results of these experiments will be used in conjugation with simulations to further study high intensity bunches in the Main Injector.

Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yang, M.-J.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Delayed Gev Emission from Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts : Impact of a Relativistic Wind on External Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sudden collapse of a compact object, or coalescence of a compact binary, can generate an unsteady relativistic wind that lasts for a few seconds. The wind is likely to carry a high magnetic field; and its Lorentz factor depends on the extent to which it is 'loaded' with baryons. If the Lorentz factor is $\\sim 100$, internal dissipation and shocks in this wind produce a non-thermal gamma-ray burst, detectable in the range $0.1\\MeV \\siml E_\\gamma \\siml 0.1-1\\GeV$ out to cosmological distances. The cooled wind ejecta would subsequently be decelerated by the external medium. The resultant blast wave and reverse shock can then give rise to a second burst component, mainly detectable in the GeV range, with a time delay relative to the MeV burst ranging from minutes to hours.

P. Meszaros; M. J. Rees

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Light Nuclides Produced in the Proton-Induced Spallation of 238U at 1 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of light and intermediate-mass nuclides formed in the reaction 1H+238U at 1 GeV was measured at the Fragment Separator (FRS) at GSI, Darmstadt. The experiment was performed in inverse kinematics, shooting a 1 A GeV 238U beam on a thin liquid-hydrogen target. 254 isotopes of all elements in the range from Z=7 to Z=37 were unambiguously identified, and the velocity distributions of the produced nuclides were determined with high precision. The results show that the nuclides are produced in a very asymmetric binary decay of heavy nuclei originating from the spallation of uranium. All the features of the produced nuclides merge with the characteristics of the fission products as their mass increases.

M. V. Ricciardi; P. Armbruster; J. Benlliure; M. Bernas; A. Boudard; S. Czajkowski; T. Enqvist; A. Kelic; S. Leray; R. Legrain; B. Mustapha; J. Pereira; F. Rejmund; K. -H. Schmidt; C. Stephan; L. Tassan-Got; C. Volant; O. Yordanov

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microsoft PowerPoint - NEILS for HTF page 1_ebf.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A good HTF must be able to absorb a substantial amount of energy in a given volume, a property known as volumetric heat capacity. Physical properties such as viscosity, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity must also be considered. Ionic liquids (IL) were discovered more than 30 years ago and are organic compounds with negligible vapor pressure. ILs are molten salts with low melting points below 100°C, high liquid range above 400°C, in some cases, freezing points below 0°C. For example, experiments conducted at SRNL examined the ionic liquid known as [C 4 mmim][NTf 2 ] due to commercial availability, good thermal stability, and tolerable viscosity. The studies indicate that the addition of Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles to the ionic liquid can increase density of the liquid by 10%, and increase volumetric heat capacity by 40% compared to neat ILs and 70% compared to traditional volatile

327

Exotic Effects at the Charm Threshold and Other Novel Physics Topics at JLab-12 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics topics which can be investigated with the 12 GeV upgrade at J-Lab. The topics include new the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances accessible above the charm threshold, intrinsic charm and strangeness phenomena, the exclusive Sivers effect, hidden-color Fock states of nuclei, local two-photon interactions in deeply virtual Compton scattering, and non-universal antishadowing.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

Direct photons in d+Au collisions at s_(NN)**(1/2)=200GeV with STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are presented of an ongoing analysis of direct photon production in s_(NN)=200GeV deuteron-gold collisions with the STAR experiment at RHIC. A significant excess of direct photons is observed near mid-rapidity 0

STAR collaboration

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Centrality Dependence of Direct Photon Production in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first measurement of direct photons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au+Au collision centrality and compared to NLO pQCD calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

PHENIX Collaboration; S. S. Adler

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Direct photon measurement in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200GeV a t RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct photon production in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV has been measured. The result is compared to several theoretical calculations, and found that it is not inconsistent with ones including thermal radiation from QGP or jet-photon conversion process on top of a NLO pQCD expectation. The direct photon contribution in dilepton measurement is also evaluated.

Takao Sakaguchi

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

Particle distribution and nuclear stopping in Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transverse momentum distribution of produced charged particles is investigated for gold-gold collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV. A simple parameterization is suggested for the particle distribution based on the nuclear stopping effect. The model can fit very well both the transverse momentum distributions at different pseudo-rapidities and the pseudo-rapidity distributions at different centralities. The ratio of rapidity distributions for peripheral and central collisions is calculated and compared with the data.

L. L. Zhu; C. B. Yang

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hybrid Dynamic Density Functional Theory for Polymer Melts and Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a high-speed and accurate hybrid dynamic density functional theory for the computer simulations of the phase separation processes of polymer melts and blends. The proposed theory is a combination of the dynamic self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type theory with the random phase approximation (GRPA). The SCF theory is known to be accurate in evaluating the free energy of the polymer systems in both weak and strong segregation regions although it has a disadvantage of the requirement of a considerable amount of computational cost. On the other hand, the GRPA theory has an advantage of much smaller amount of required computational cost than the SCF theory while its applicability is limited to the weak segregation region. To make the accuracy of the SCF theory and the high-performance of the GRPA theory compatible, we adjust the chemical potential of the GRPA theory by using the SCF theory every constant time steps in the dynamic simulations. The performance of the GRPA and the hybrid theories is tested by using several systems composed of an A/B homopolymer, an AB diblock copolymer, or an ABC triblock copolymer. Using the hybrid theory, we succeeded in reproducing the metastable complex phase-separated domain structures of an ABC triblock copolymer observed by experiments.

Takashi Honda; Toshihiro Kawakatsu

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fragmentation and quench behavior of corium melt streams in water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of molten core materials with water has been investigated for the pour stream mixing mode. This interaction plays a crucial role during the later stages of in-vessel core melt progression inside a light water reactor such as during the TMI-2 accident. The key issues which arise during the molten core relocation include: (i) the thermal attack and possible damage to the RPV lower head from the impinging molten fuel stream and/or the debris bed, (ii) the molten fuel relocation pathways including the effects of redistribution due to core support structure and the reactor lower internals, (iii) the quench rate of the molten fuel through the water in the lower plenum, (iv) the steam generation and hydrogen generation during the interaction, (v) the transient pressurization of the primary system, and (vi) the possibility of a steam explosion. In order to understand these issues, a series of six experiments (designated CCM-1 through {minus}6) was performed in which molten corium passed through a deep pool of water in a long, slender pour stream mode. Results discussed include the transient temperatures and pressures, the rate and magnitude of steam/hydrogen generation, and the posttest debris characteristics.

Spencer, B.W.; Wang, K.; Blomquist, C.A.; McUmber, L.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schneider, J.P. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Preferential orientation of Te precipitates in melt-grown CZT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium zinc telluride (Cd1-xZnxTe or CZT) has proved to be a useful material for semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers and other electro-optic devices. It is often grown Te-rich to optimize its electrical characteristics, but this off-stoichiometric growth leads to the formation of semimetallic Te precipitates in the semiconducting host crystal. These precipitates can impair device performance and their formation needs to be inhibited, if possible, during growth. Characterization of melt-grown CZT has shown that Te precipitates are often faceted. In this study, characterization of several particles of different shapes revealed that most of the Te precipitates were preferentially oriented with the {101}CZT||{-12-10}Te . A secondary orientation relationship was also observed as {11-1}CZT||{01-11}Te for one of the {111}CZT family of planes. One of the particles exhibited {110}CZT||{01-10}Te and {001}CZT||{0001}Te . Precipitates were often found on {111}CZT twin boundaries and, in these cases, it was possible to assign specific orientations with respect to the twin plane. The expected orientation of the {0001}-plane of Te aligned with the {111}-plane of CZT was not observed even though a good lattice match is predicted in ab initio models. Observations of strained and polycrystalline Te precipitates are also discussed with relevance to the ab initio model and to impacts on electronic properties.

Henager, Charles H.; Edwards, Danny J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Bliss, Mary; Jaffe, John E.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Melting of low-level radioactive non-ferrous metal for release  

SciTech Connect

Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH has gained lots of experience from melting ferrous metals for recycling in the nuclear cycle as well as for release to general reuse. Due to the fact that the world market prices for non-ferrous metals like copper, aluminium or lead raised up in the past and will remain on a high level, recycling of low-level contaminated or activated metallic residues from nuclear decommissioning becomes more important. Based on the established technology for melting of ferrous metals in a medium frequency induction furnace, different melt treatment procedures for each kind of non-ferrous metals were developed and successfully commercially converted. Beside different procedures also different melting techniques such as crucibles, gas burners, ladles etc. are used. Approximately 340 Mg of aluminium, a large part of it with a uranium contamination, have been molten successfully and have met the release criteria of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. The experience in copper and brass melting is based on a total mass of 200 Mg. Lead melting in a special ladle by using a gas heater results in a total of 420 Mg which could be released. The main goal of melting of non-ferrous metals is release for industrial reuse after treatment. Especially for lead, a cooperation with a German lead manufacturer also for recycling of non releasable lead is being planned. (authors)

Quade, Ulrich; Kluth, Thomas; Kreh, Rainer [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cladding hull decontamination and densification process. Part 2. Densification by inductoslag melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inductoslag melting process was developed to densify Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls. It is a cold crucible process that uses induction heating, a segmented water-cooled copper crucible, and a calcium fluoride flux. Metal and flux are fed into the furnace through the crucible, located at the top of the furnace, and the finished ingot is withdrawn from the bottom of the furnace. Melting rates of 40 to 50 kg/h are achieved, using 100 to 110 kW at an average energy use of 2.5 kWh/kg. The quality of ingots produced from factory supplied cladding tubing is sufficient to satisfy nuclear grade standards. An ingot of Zircaloy-4, made from melted cladding tubing that had been autoclaved to near reactor exposure and then descaled by the hydrogen fluoride decontamination process prior to Inductoslag melting, did not meet nuclear grade standards because the hydrogen, nitrogen, and hardness levels were too high. Melting development work is described that could possibly be used to test the capability of the Inductoslag process to satisfactorily melt a variety and mix of materials from LWR reprocessing, decontamination, and storage options. Results of experiments are also presented that could be used to improve remote operation of the melting process.

Nelson, R.G.; Montgomery, D.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The melting layer: The radar bright band is dark for lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the melting layer were made with radar and lidar, during light rain. At the height at which a weather radar sees a bright band, the backscatter from the lidar has a minimum. Sometimes this minimum is more than 20 dB deep relative to the rain underneath. In this paper the measurements will be analysed in detail. Five mechanisms that can contribute to this effect are discussed: 1. Refractive index change during melting; 2. Aggregation and breakup; 3. Structural collapse of the melting snowflake; 4. Enhanced vertical backscatter of water droplets; 5. The orientation and shape of the melting crystals. Keywords: radar, cloud radar, lidar, melting layer, orientation of crystals. 1. Introduction In the Netherlands stratiform rain is mainly produced by the melting of ice particles into rain droplets. Normally this happens in a well-defined layer, just below the zero degree level. This melting layer is characterised by high radar reflections, the so-called bright band. This b...

V. K. C. Venema; H. W. J. Russchenberg; A van Lammeren; A. Apituley; L.P. Ligthart; Royal Netherl; S Meteorological Organisation

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fermi LAT Observations of LS I +61 303: First Detection of an Orbital Modulation in GeV Gamma Rays  

SciTech Connect

This Letter presents the first results from the observations of LS I +61{sup o}303 using Large Area Telescope data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope between 2008 August and 2009 March. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated at 26.6 {+-} 0.5 days. This constitutes the first detection of orbital periodicity in high-energy gamma rays (20 MeV-100 GeV, HE). The light curve is characterized by a broad peak after periastron, as well as a smaller peak just before apastron. The spectrum is best represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux above 100 MeV of 0.82 {+-} 0.03(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst) 10{sup -6} ph cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 6.3 {+-} 1.1(stat) {+-} 0.4(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 2.21 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). There is no significant spectral change with orbital phase. The phase of maximum emission, close to periastron, hints at inverse Compton scattering as the main radiation mechanism. However, previous very high-energy gamma ray (>100 GeV, VHE) observations by MAGIC and VERITAS show peak emission close to apastron. This and the energy cutoff seen with Fermi suggest that the link between HE and VHE gamma rays is nontrivial.

Abdo, A.A.; /Federal City Coll. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Grenoble, CEN; /more authors..

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fermi LAT observations of cosmic-ray electrons from 7 GeV to 1 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of our analysis of cosmic-ray electrons using about 8x10{sup 6} electron candidates detected in the first 12 months on-orbit by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This work extends our previously published cosmic-ray electron spectrum down to 7 GeV, giving a spectral range of approximately 2.5 decades up to 1 TeV. We describe in detail the analysis and its validation using beam-test and on-orbit data. In addition, we describe the spectrum measured via a subset of events selected for the best energy resolution as a cross-check on the measurement using the full event sample. Our electron spectrum can be described with a power law {proportional_to}E{sup -3.08{+-}0.05} with no prominent spectral features within systematic uncertainties. Within the limits of our uncertainties, we can accommodate a slight spectral hardening at around 100 GeV and a slight softening above 500 GeV.

Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Digel, S. W.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Funk, S.; Glanzman, T. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew Houk, and Xueyu Song*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew-melt interfacial free energy calculations using capillary wave approach. Using this method, we have calculated the free energies of the fcc crystal-melt interfaces for the hard-sphere system as a function of crystal

Song, Xueyu

342

AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California Point Reyes Deployment AMF Home Point Reyes Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Experiment Planning MASRAD Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Outreach Posters Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (horizontal) Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (vertical) News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco. Shelters: 38° 5' 30.51" N, 122° 57' 19.90" W Instrument Field: 38° 5' 27.6" N, 122° 57' 25.80" W Altitude: 8 meters Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM

343

Analysis of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass 58761v1 Page 1 White Paper - Analysis of Cross-Over Points for Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel and Amorphous Ribbon for the MVLT Superclass Cross-over points for the Medium Voltage Liquid Filled distribution transformer super-class have been analyzed based on the Engineering Analysis provided by the Department of Energy. For the purpose of this white paper, a cross-over point is defined as where the low-cost curve fitted to the point cloud for all of the transformers with M-3 grain-oriented electrical steel core designs crosses the low-cost curve fitted to the point cloud for all of the transformers with amorphous (SA1) core designs. This analysis is based on the data from the DOE Engineering Analysis. It excludes uncorroborated data

344

BOILDDlG Ol'ILI'rDS PaR 7 GeV ADVABCED PlO1'OII SOURCE BASED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Based on Maxi.a. Coaponent Design of 1.1 GaV. The building utilities, electrical power and cooling water requirements, were estimated for the 7 GeV Advanced...

345

Direct Photons in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment has measured direct photons at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV in $p+p$, $d$+Au and Au+Au collisions. For $p_{T}$ $direct photons in Au+Au.

B. Sahlmueller; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Charged hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon pair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) collides Au ions at a center of mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon pair, which produces the most energetic collisions yet seen in the laboratory. RHIC has also collided proton ...

Kane, Jay Lawrence

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Search for 1-100 GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Search for 1-100 GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using one hundred gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2 spectra of gamma-ray bursts peak around a few hundred keV, EGRET has ob- served photons in the GeV energy

California at Santa Cruz, University of

348

The Science and Experimental Equipment for the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the compelling scientific case for upgrading the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV. Such a facility will make profound contributions to the study of hadronic matter. In particular, it will allow breakthrough programs to be launched in four main areas: • The experimental study of gluonic excitations in order to understand the funda- mentally new dynamics that underpins all of nuclear physics: the confinement of quarks. Theoretical conjectures, now strengthened by lattice QCD simulations, indicate that the most spectacular new prediction of QCD – quark confinement – occurs through the formation of a string-like “flux tube” between quarks. This conclusion (and proposed mechanisms of flux tube formation) can be tested by determining the spectrum of the gluonic excitations of mesons. • The Fundamental Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks. A vast improvement in our knowledge of the fundamental structure of the proton and neutron can be achieved. Not only can existing “deep inelastic scattering” cross sections be extended for the first time to cover the critical region where their basic three-quark structure dominates, but also measure- ments of new “deep exclusive scattering” cross sections will open the door to a comprehensive characterization of these wavefunctions using the framework of the Generalized Parton Distri- butions; these data will provide access to information on the correlations among the quarks. These studies will be complemented by detailed measurements of elastic and transition form factors, determining the dynamics underlying the quark-gluon structure through measure- ments of their high-momentum-transfer behavior and providing essential constraints on their description. • The Physics of Nuclei. A broad and diversified program of measurements that (taken together with the hadron studies outlined above) aims to provide a firm intellectual under- pinning for all of nuclear physics by answering the question “How does the phenomenological description of nuclei as nucleons interacting via an effective interaction parameterized using meson exchange arise from the underlying dynamics of quarks and gluons?” It has two main components: The emergence of nuclei from QCD. Experiments aimed at understanding how the description of nuclei in terms of nucleons interacting via the N ? N force arises from the more fundamental QCD description. It includes the investigation of the partonic structure of nuclei, of short range structures in nuclei, and of the modification of the quark-gluon structure of the nucleons and mesons by the nuclear environment. Fundamental QCD processes in the nuclear arena. Experiments aimed at under- standing how hadron-hadron interactions arise from the underlying quark-gluon struc- ture of QCD. • Tests of the Standard Model of electro-weak interactions and the determination of fundamental parameters of this model. Precision, parity-violating electron scat- tering experiments made feasible by the 12 GeV Upgrade have the sensitivity to search for deviations from the Standard Model that could signal the presence of new physics. Preci- sion measurements of the two-photon decay widths and transition form factors of the three neutral pseudoscalar mesons ?0, ?, and ? via the Primakoff effect will lead to a significant improvement on our knowledge of chiral symmetry in QCD, in particular on the ratios of quark masses and on chiral anomalies. This science program has expanded significantly since the project was first presented to the Nuclear Sciences Advisory Committee (NSAC) in the form of a White Paper [WP01] produced as part of the 2001-2002 NSAC Long Range Planning Process and since the pre-Conceptual Design Report (pCDR) produced in June 2004 to document the Upgrade science and experimental equipment plans [pCDR]. While focusing on science, this document also provides a brief description of the required detector and accelerator upgrades so that it can serve as an overview of t

Arrington, John; Bernstein, Aron; Brooks, William; Burker, Volker; Cardman, Lawrence; Carlson, Carl; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Jian-Ping; Dzierba, Alex; Ent, Rolf; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fenker, Howard; Gao, Haiyan; Gasparian, Ashot; Goity, Jose; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holt, Roy; Hyde, Charles; De Jager, Cornelis; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiangdong; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kumar, Krishna; Laget, Jean; Mack, David; Meyer, Curtis; Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Radyushkin, Anatoly; Ramsey-Musolf, Mike; Reimer, Paul; Richards, David; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Salgado, Carlos; Smith, Elton; Schiavilla, Rocco; Souder, Paul; Stoler, Paul; Thomas, Anthony; Ulmer, Paul; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weiss, Christian

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Applicability of a Bonner Shere technique for pulsed neutron in 120 GeV proton facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The data on neutron spectra and intensity behind shielding are important for radiation safety design of high-energy accelerators since neutrons are capable of penetrating thick shielding and activating materials. Corresponding particle transport codes--that involve physics models of neutron and other particle production, transportation, and interaction--have been developed and used world-wide [1-8]. The results of these codes have been ensured through plenty of comparisons with experimental results taken in simple geometries. For neutron generation and transport, several related experiments have been performed to measure neutron spectra, attenuation length and reaction rates behind shielding walls of various thicknesses and materials in energy range up to several hundred of MeV [9-11]. The data have been used to benchmark--and modify if needed--the simulation modes and parameters in the codes, as well as the reference data for radiation safety design. To obtain such kind of data above several hundred of MeV, Japan-Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) collaboration for shielding experiments has been started in 2007, based on suggestion from the specialist meeting of shielding, Shielding Aspects of Target, Irradiation Facilities (SATIF), because of very limited data available in high-energy region (see, for example, [12]). As a part of this shielding experiment, a set of Bonner sphere (BS) was tested at the antiproton production target facility (pbar target station) at FNAL to obtain neutron spectra induced by a 120-GeV proton beam in concrete and iron shielding. Generally, utilization of an active detector around high-energy accelerators requires an improvement on its readout to overcome burst of secondary radiation since the accelerator delivers an intense beam to a target in a short period after relatively long acceleration period. In this paper, we employ BS for a spectrum measurement of neutrons that penetrate the shielding wall of the pbar target station in FNAL.

Sanami, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Iwamoto, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Arakawa, H.; Shigyo, N.; /Kyushu U.; Leveling, A.F.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

7-GeV advanced photon source beamline initiative: Conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R&D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R&D.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Physics Opportunities with the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

We are at the dawn of a new era in the study of hadronic nuclear physics. The non-Abelian nature of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the resulting strong coupling at low energies represent a significant challenge to nuclear and particle physicists. The last decade has seen the development of new theoretical and experimental tools to quantitatively study the nature of confinement and the structure of hadrons comprised of light quarks and gluons. Together these will allow both the spectrum and the structure of hadrons to be elucidated in unprecedented detail. Exotic mesons that result from excitation of the gluon field will be explored. Multidimensional images of hadrons with great promise to reveal the dynamics of the key underlying degrees of freedom will be produced. In particular, these multidimensional distributions open a new window on the elusive spin content of the nucleon through observables that are directly related to the orbital angular momenta of quarks and gluons. Moreover, computational techniques in Lattice QCD now promise to provide insightful and quantitative predictions that can be meaningfully confronted with, and elucidated by, forthcoming experimental data. In addition, the development of extremely high intensity, highly polarized and extraordinarily stable beams of electrons provides innovative opportunities for probing (and extending) the Standard Model, both through parity violation studies and searches for new particles. Thus the 12 GeV upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address these and other important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics.

Dudek, Jozef; Essig, Rouven; Kumar, Krishna; Meyer, Curtis; McKeown, Robert; Meziani, Zein Eddine; Miller, Gerald A; Pennington, Michael; Richards, David; Weinstein, Larry

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Spin Density Matrix Elements in Exclusive rho^0 Electroproduction on 1H and 2H Targets at 27.5 GeV Beam Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spin Density Matrix Elements (SDMEs) describing the angular distribution of exclusive rho^0 electroproduction and decay are determined in the HERMES experiment with 27.6 GeV beam energy and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets. Eight (fifteen) SDMEs that are related (unrelated) to the longitudinal polarization of the beam are extracted in the kinematic region 1 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 7 GeV^2, 3.0 GeV < W < 6.3 GeV, and -t < 0.4 GeV^2. Within the given experimental uncertainties, a hierarchy of relative sizes of helicity amplitudes is observed. Kinematic dependences of all SDMEs on Q^2 and t are presented, as well as the longitudinal-to-transverse rho^0 electroproduction cross section ratio as a function of Q^2. A small but statistically significant deviation from the hypothesis of s-channel helicity conservation is observed. An indication is seen of a contribution of unnatural-parity-exchange amplitudes; these amplitudes are naturally generated with a quark-exchange mechanism.

HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

Study of cesium volatility from sodium carbonate based melts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this study was to obtain thermodynamic data on cesium volatility from sodium carbonate-based molten salts for application to the Rockwell-ETEC molten salt oxidation process. At 1073 to 1373 K, volatility tests were conducted on a horizontal and a vertical transpiration apparatus using a carrier gas composed of CO{sub 2}(g) and H{sub 2}O(g) which was passed over or bubbled through a sodium carbonate bath containing cesium carbonate and various additives. The major vapor species was identified to be CsOH(g) except when greater than 3% chloride is present in the melt, then the major vapor species is CsCl(g). The decrease in volatility of cesium as a function of cesium concentration in Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3{minus}}Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures follows Raoult`s law very closely. Thus, this system exhibits close to ideal solution behavior. Addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate decreases the cesium volatility by just under a factor of 2, and the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride increases the cesium volatility about an order of magnitude. The addition of 2.0 wt % ash, molecular sieve, or silica show little or no effect. However, the data indicate that higher concentrations of ash will decrease the cesium volatility. For the addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate the activity coefficient, {gamma}(Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sup {1/2}}, is calculated to be 0.720 {plus_minus} 0.068, and for the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride, the activity coefficient, {gamma}(CsCl), is calculated to be 8.118 {plus_minus} 2.317. Assuming that Henry`s law applies, these activity coefficients are used to extrapolate the effect on cesium retention in the molten salt oxidizer of sulfate and chloride at lower cesium concentrations.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

End Points Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management End Points Management The policy of the EM is that a formal project management approach be used for the planning, managing, and conducting of its projects. Specifying and achieving end points is a systematic, engineering way of proceeding from an existing condition to a stated desired final set of conditions in which the facility is safe and can be economically monitored and maintained. An end point method is a way to translate broad mission statements to explicit goals that are readily understood by engineers and craft personnel who do the work. (It should be recognized that while end points as addressed here are for a final set of conditions for deactivation, they may represent an interim point for the overall EM cleanup goal.) End Points Management

355

Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking August 13, 2010 - 6:32pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs The Energy Department's Hanford Site in Washington used Recovery Act funds to safely take down the K East Reactor's 175-foot-high exhaust stack near the Columbia River. The demolition was a crucial step toward dismantling the external footprint of the reactor and clears the way for additional work to clean up the area. Watch footage of the blast above or find more information at http://www.hanford.gov Normally, we think of things melting (or changing from a solid to a liquid)

356

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

357

Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207 Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207 Recent studies carried out on the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team's beamline I-ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source provide new insights into charge melting and polaron collapse. X-ray and neutron scattering measurements directly demonstrate the existence of polarons in the paramagnetic phase of optimally doped colossal magnetoresistive oxides. The polarons exhibit short-range correlations that grow with decreasing temperature, but disappear abruptly at the ferromagnetic transition because of the sudden charge delocalization. The "melting" of the charge ordering as we cool through TC occurs with the collapse of the quasistatic polaron scattering, and provides important new

358

A Meteorological Experiment in the Melting Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program ...

J. Oerlemans; H. F. Vugts

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radar Reflectivity-Ice Water Content Relationships for Use above the Melting Level in Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression equations linking radar reflectivity (Ze) and ice water content (IWC) were calculated from airborne radar and particle image data that were collected above the melting level in two hurricanes. The Ze ? IWC equation from the stratiform ...

Robert A. Black

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

Van Ark, Emily M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Analysis of Z–R Relations Based on LDR Signatures within the Melting Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inclusion of polarimetric measurements for the quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by weather radars as well as space- and airborne radars is considered most promising now-a-days. Because the melting layer region is usually marked by ...

Stefan Kowalewski; Gerhard Peters

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Local Advection of Momentum, Heat, and Moisture during the Melt of Patchy Snow Covers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical atmospheric boundary layer model, based on higher-order turbulence closure assumptions, is developed and used to simulate the local advection of momentum, heat, and moisture during the melt of patchy snow covers over a 10-km ...

Glen E. Liston

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Model Representation of Freezing and Melting Precipitation: Implications for Winter Weather Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During episodes of sustained moderate or heavy precipitation in conjunction with near-freezing temperatures and weak horizontal temperature advection, the latent heat released (absorbed) by the freezing (melting) of falling precipitation may ...

Gary M. Lackmann; Kermit Keeter; Laurence G. Lee; Michael B. Ek

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Size and shape dependence on melting temperature of gallium nitride nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the ...

Paneerselvam Antoniammal; Dakshanamoorthy Arivuoli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Mathematical Model of the Ocean Boundary Layer under Drifting Melting ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of the ocean boundary layer under drifting melting ice is formulated, verified, and applied. The model is based on the conservation equations for heat, salt, and momentum and uses turbulence models to achieve closure. Novel ...

U. Svensson; A. Omstedt

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Melting of Snow Cover in a Tropical Mountain Environment in Bolivia: Processes and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine the physical processes involved in the melting and disappearance of transient snow cover in nonglacierized tropical areas, the CROCUS snow model, interactions between Soil–Biosphere–Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model, and coupled ...

Yves Lejeune; Ludovic Bouilloud; Pierre Etchevers; Patrick Wagnon; Pierre Chevallier; Jean-Emmanuel Sicart; Eric Martin; Florence Habets

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Increased Runoff from Melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet: A Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors attribute significantly increased Greenland summer warmth and Greenland Ice Sheet melt and runoff since 1990 to global warming. Southern Greenland coastal and Northern Hemisphere summer temperatures were uncorrelated between the 1960s ...

Edward Hanna; Philippe Huybrechts; Konrad Steffen; John Cappelen; Russell Huff; Christopher Shuman; Tristram Irvine-Fynn; Stephen Wise; Michael Griffiths

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Inexact and accelerated proximal point algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

required, with the sum of total errors that can be possibly infinite. This is a remarkable fact that does not occur in the classical (non accelerated) proximal point ...

369

Josephson phase qubit with an optimal point  

SciTech Connect

Current fluctuations in a Josephson phase qubit are considered to be a source of decoherence, especially for pure dephasing. One possible way of evading such decoherence is to employ an optimal operation point as used in flux and charge qubits, where the qubit is insensitive to the bias fluctuations. However, there is no optimal point in a phase qubit since qubit energy splitting becomes monotonically smaller with increasing the bias current. Here we propose a phase qubit with an optimal point by introducing qubit energy splitting that depends nonmonotonically on the current bias realized in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions. The effect of junction asymmetry on the optimal point is also investigated.

Kosugi, Norihito; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Matsuo, Shigemasa [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Approximating the Radii of Point Sets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p and flat F. Computing the radii of point sets is a fundamental problem ...... tributions, and order statistics,” Handbook of Combinatorial Optimization. (Vol.

371

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

372

New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

373

Wolf Point Substation, Roosevelt County, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western), an agency of the United States Department of Energy, is proposing to construct the 115-kV Wolf Point Substation near Wolf Point in Roosevelt County, Montana (Figure 1). As part of the construction project, Western's existing Wolf Point Substation would be taken out of service. The existing 115-kV Wolf Point Substation is located approximately 3 miles west of Wolf Point, Montana (Figure 2). The substation was constructed in 1949. The existing Wolf Point Substation serves as a Switching Station'' for the 115-kV transmission in the region. The need for substation improvements is based on operational and reliability issues. For this environmental assessment (EA), the environmental review of the proposed project took into account the removal of the old Wolf Point Substation, rerouting of the five Western lines and four lines from the Cooperatives and Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, and the new road into the proposed substation. Reference to the new proposed Wolf Point Substation in the EA includes these facilities as well as the old substation site. The environmental review looked at the impacts to all resource areas in the Wolf Point area. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

FINAL_2013_NBC_Talking-Points  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR National Building Competition Talking Points and Messages Competition Overview * For the fourth consecutive year, EPA's ENERGY STAR program is hosting the 2013...

375

PowerPoint Presentation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation PowerPoint Presentation More Documents & Publications US Department of Energy Office of the Chief Information Officer PARS II User Guide LES' URENCO-USA Facility...

376

End Point Implementation Examples | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Examples End Point Implementation Examples More Documents & Publications Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80...

377

NREL Scientists Reveal Origin of Diverse Melting Behaviors of Aluminum Nanoclusters (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research reveals active role of cluster symmetries on the size-sensitive, diverse melting behaviors of metallic nanoclusters, providing insight to understanding phase changes of nanoparticles for thermal energy storage. Unlike macroscopic bulk materials, intermediate-sized nanoclusters with around 55 atoms inherently exhibit size-sensitive melting changes: adding just a single atom to a nanocluster can cause a dramatic change in melting behavior. Microscopic understanding of thermal behaviors of metal nanoclusters is important for nanoscale catalysis and thermal energy storage applications. However, it is a challenge to obtain a structural interpretation at the atomic level from measured thermodynamic quantities such as heat capacity. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) revealed a clear correlation between the diverse melting behaviors of aluminum nanoclusters and cluster core symmetries. These simulations reproduced, for the first time, the size-sensitive heat capacities of aluminum nanoclusters, which exhibit several distinctive shapes associated with the diverse melting behaviors of the clusters. The size-dependent, diverse melting behaviors of the aluminum clusters are attributed to the reduced symmetry (from Td {yields} D2d {yields} Cs) with increasing the cluster sizes and can be used to help design thermal storage materials.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for using cerium, which is rather easy to analyze using passive nondestructive analysis gamma-ray spectrometry, as a surrogate for plutonium in the final analysis of TMI-2 melted fuel debris. The generation of this report is motivated by the need to perform nuclear material accountancy measurements on the melted fuel debris that will be excavated from the damaged nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, which were destroyed by the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Lessons may be taken from prior U.S. work related to the study of the TMI-2 core debris to support the development of new assay methods for use at Fukushima Daiichi. While significant differences exist between the two reactor systems (pressurized water reactor (TMI-2) versus boiling water reactor (FD), fresh water post-accident cooing (TMI-2) versus salt water (FD), maintained containment (TMI-2) versus loss of containment (FD)) there remain sufficient similarities to motivate these comparisons.

D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Luminosity issues in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run  

SciTech Connect

Several luminosity issues are reviewed. Questions remain, which are stated for further investigation. Some suggestions are made for possible luminosity improvement. There are several factors affecting the luminosity in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run: (1) The highest bunch intensity at RHIC early store (1.5 hour after accramp in this note) in 2009 is 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. In 2008 run, it was 1.42 x 10{sup 11} protons, which gives rise to 30% higher luminosity if other conditions are the same. Yellow ramp efficiency is identified as one of the main problem. Meanwhile, the beam-beam induced loss in about 1 hour into collision accounts actually no less than the ramp. (2) The typical transverse emittance at early store is 13 {pi}{micro}m for bunch intensity of 10{sup 11} protons, but it is 17 {pi}{micro} for 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. The increase of the emittance implies a 30% difference in luminosity if other conditions are the same. The emittance growth with electron cloud below instability threshold may be partially responsible. Meanwhile, the Booster scraping may also be relevant. (3) The luminosity lifetime in 2009 run is significantly lower than that in 2005, 2006, and 2008 runs. At the beam-beam parameter of 0.01, the typical average luminosity lifetime in early store is 10 hours in 2009, and it is 15 hours in previous runs. Given 8 hours of store time, this implies more than 20% of the difference in integrated luminosity. The 0.7 m betastar adopted in 2009 might be relevant, but the evidence is not fully convincing. On the other hand, the continuing RF voltage ramp in store may be of concern. (4) In the last month of the run, the polarization at RHIC early store is declined from 60% to 55%, a 30% reduction in p{sup 4} factor. It is noted that the Booster scraping is reduced in order to increase bunch intensity at RHIC, and the source polarization is also declined at the same time. Questions regarding these issues are discussed, and some suggestions are made.

Zhang,S.Y.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

New statistical methods for detecting point alignments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of straight-linear point alignments has a number of geological applications. Assessing the statistical significance of such alignments is relatively straightforward in the case of overall lineament orientation, but becomes complicated for non-stationary ... Keywords: Alignment detection, Directional statistics, Point patterns, Spatial analysis

Ø. Hammer

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

Hals, Kjetil M D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Definition: Point Absorber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Absorber Point Absorber Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Point Absorber Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front greater than the physical dimension of the device. There are floating and submerged models.[1] Related Terms Wave power; PowerBouy References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_power Poi LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ntabsorber.jpg Example of a Point Absorber A submerged pressure differential wave energy capturing device, which can be considered a fully submerged point absorber. A pressure differential is induced within the device as the wave passes, driving a fluid pump to create mechanical energy. Retrieved from

383

Cross section and recoil properties of copper isotopes from uranium bombarded with 12-GeV protons  

SciTech Connect

Cross sections and thick-target recoil properties have been measured on of /sup 238/U with protons. The kinetic energies are much smaller than expected From a conventional fission process, even for the neutron-rich /sup 67/Cu. It is proposed thai these Cu nuclides are produced at proton energies above 3 GeV by the fission of low mass nuclei which are the residues of an intranuclear cascade process involving high deposition energy and the emission of fragments prior to fission both in the fast cascade and the evaporation stage. (auth)

Chang, S.K.; Sugarman, N.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon's quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the non-perturbative regime.

A. J. R. Puckett; E. J. Brash; M. K. Jones; W. Luo; M. Meziane; L. Pentchev; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; F. R. Wesselmann; A. Ahmidouch; I. Albayrak; K. A. Aniol; J. Arrington; A. Asaturyan; H. Baghdasaryan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; P. Bosted; W. Boeglin; C. Butuceanu; P. Carter; S. Chernenko; E. Christy; M. Commisso; J. C. Cornejo; S. Covrig; S. Danagoulian; A. Daniel; A. Davidenko; D. Day; S. Dhamija; D. Dutta; R. Ent; S. Frullani; H. Fenker; E. Frlez; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; Y. Goncharenko; K. Hafidi; D. Hamilton; D. W. Higinbotham; W. Hinton; T. Horn; B. Hu; J. Huang; G. M. Huber; E. Jensen; C. Keppel; M. Khandaker; P. King; D. Kirillov; M. Kohl; V. Kravtsov; G. Kumbartzki; Y. Li; V. Mamyan; D. J. Margaziotis; A. Marsh; Y. Matulenko; J. Maxwell; G. Mbianda; D. Meekins; Y. Melnik; J. Miller; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; B. Moffit; O. Moreno; J. Mulholland; A. Narayan; S. Nedev; Nuruzzaman; E. Piasetzky; W. Pierce; N. M. Piskunov; Y. Prok; R. D. Ransome; D. S. Razin; P. Reimer; J. Reinhold; O. Rondon; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; K. Shestermanov; S. Sirca; I. Sitnik; L. Smykov; G. Smith; L. Solovyev; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; A. Vasiliev; M. Veilleux; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; S. Wood; Z. Ye; Y. Zanevsky; X. Zhang; Y. Zhang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reducing the longitudinal emittance of the 8-GeV beam via the rf manipulation in a booster cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bunch rotation will cause the longitudinal emittance growth whenever there are far more A rf stations than B rf stations, or vice versa. An alternate method via optimizing the RFSUM curve in a Booster cycle has been investigated using the ESME simulation. Since the rf manipulation at transition crossing can reduce the longitudinal emittance 31% and the momentum spread 17%, eventually, the rms momentum spread of 2.98 MeV and the longitudinal emittance of 0.061 eV {center_dot} sec with 95% of the beam can be achieved at 8-GeV.

Yang, Xi; Lebedev, Valeri A.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reducing the momentum spread of 8-GeV proton beam via the bunch rotation in Booster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It requires Booster to be able to deliver 8-GeV proton beams to Main Injector at the intensity of 4.5 x 10{sup 12} per batch with a longitudinal emittance of 0.12 eV {center_dot} sec and a momentum spread ({Delta}p) of 18 MeV in order to achieve the antiproton production rate of 24 x 10{sup 10} per hour. Bunch rotation via the RFSUM reduction at the end of a cycle has been implemented to reach the goal. Afterward, it is important for us to develop diagnostic tools and tuning capabilities to make bunch rotation operationally reliable.

Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Padilla, Rene; Pellico, William A.; Dey, Joseph E.; Koba, Kiyomi; /Fermilab

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Multihadron-event properties in e sup + e sup minus annihilation at radical s =52--57 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the general properties of multihadron final states produced by {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation at center-of-mass energies from 52 to 57 GeV in the AMY detector at the KEK collider TRISTAN. Global shape, inclusive charged-particle, and particle-flow distributions are presented. Our measurements are compared with QCD+fragmentation models that use either leading-logarithmic parton-shower evolution or QCD matrix elements at the parton level, and either string or cluster fragmentation for hadronization.

Li, Y.K.; Li, J.; Cheng, C.P.; Gu, P.; Ye, M.H.; Zhu, Y.C.; Imlay, R.; Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; McNeil, R.R.; Metcalf, W.; Myung, S.S.; Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S.; Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trahern, C.G.; Breedon, R.E.; Kim, G.N.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Smith, J.R.; Stuart, D.; Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kim, S.K.; Kurihara, Y.; Maki, A.; Nozaki, T.; Omori, T.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takaiwa, Y.; Terada, S.; Walker, R.C.; Kajino, F.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Thomas, T.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Sasaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Bacala, A.; Liu, J.; Park, I.H.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Vinson, J.; Auchincloss, P.; Blanis, D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Eno, S.; Fry, C.A.; Harada, H.; Ho, Y.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kumita, T.; Mori, T.; Olsen, S.L.; Shaw, N.M.; Sill, A.; Thorndike, E.H.; Ueno, K.; Zheng, H.W.; Kobayashi, S.; The AMY Collaboration

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Feasibility of Near-field ODR Beam-size Monitoring at 23 GeV at FACET  

SciTech Connect

Extension of near-field optical diffraction radiation (ODR) imaging to the 23 GeV beams at the proposed FACET facility at SLAC has been evaluated. The beam-size sensitivity at the 10- to 20-{micro}m sigma level based on a simple model will be reported. Polarization effects are also seen to be important and will be discussed. The comparisons to previous experimental results and the modeling results indicate sufficient feasibility for planning of the experiments in the coming year.

Lumpkin, A.H.; /Fermilab; Yao, C.-Y.; /Argonne; Hogan, M.; /SLAC; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

High Transverse Momentum Xi Baryon Correlations in p+p Collisions at s^(1/2)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angular correlations between produced high pT Xi baryons and unidentified charged and neutral particles are observed in high-tower-triggered (on a large electromagnetic energy deposit) s^(1/2)=200 GeV p+p collisions. This trigger favors events with higher average multiplicity than those in minimum bias. These events are likely to contain jets. The average multiplicity of a high-tower triggered event is similar to that of a minimum bias event containing a Xi, which implies that Xi baryons are likely to be produced in jets. Xi mean pT is higher in the triggered data then in the minimum bias sample.

Betty I. Bezverkhny

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

390

The odd-even effect of the melting temperature of polymer film on finite lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To find a quantitative understanding on the odd-even effect of melting finite polymer film, we proposed an equation for computing the melting temperature. For a dimer film covering a constant rectangular area but with different width, the melting temperature for odd number of width is always larger than that for even number of width. There is no experiment for melting two dimensional film so far. The existed experimental data of melting three dimensional powder reported the opposite phenomena. We computed the entropy growth rate of two dimensional confined dimer film on finite rectangle and torus. The entropy of two dimensional long belt with an even number of width is always larger than the entropy for an odd number of width. When the length of the rectangle goes to infinity, the speed of entropy growth shows a linear dependence on the width. This linear relationship originates from the constant melting temperature in thermal dynamic limit. Fusing two small rectangles with odd number of length into one big rectangle gains more entropy than fusing two small rectangles with even number of length. Fusing two small toruses with even number of length into one big torus reduces entropy. While fusing two small toruses with odd number of length increases the entropy. The entropy difference between covering a torus and covering a rectangle decays to zero when the lattice size becomes infinite. The correlation function between two topologically distinguishable loops on torus also demonstrate odd-even effect. We expect an experiment of melting two dimensional film to test this theory.

Tieyan Si

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

Microsoft PowerPoint - Project X Discussion_SDH.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne-Fermilab Collaboration on Argonne-Fermilab Collaboration on Project X (Accelerator) Steve Holmes projectx.fnal.gov Argonne-Fermilab Collaboration Meeting November 27, 2007 Page 2 ANL-FNAL Meeting, 11-27-07 - S. Holmes Outline * Project X Program - Steve H. - What is Project X? - November 12-13 Workshop - Areas of collaboration - Modes of collaboration * High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Program - Giorgio A. - Goals of the program - Areas of collaboration - Relationship to Project X Page 3 ANL-FNAL Meeting, 11-27-07 - S. Holmes What is Project X? ILC-style 8 GeV H - linac: 9mA x 1 msec x 5 Hz 8 GeV slow/fast spill 200 kW 2.25E14 protons/1.4 sec Stripping Foil Recycler 3 linac pulse/fill Main Injector 1.4 sec cycle 120 GeV fast extraction 2.3 MW 1.7E14 protons/1.4 sec Single turn transfer @ 8 GeV NOνA initially,

392

Energy dependence of pi, p and pbar transverse momentum spectra for Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the energy dependence of the transverse momentum (pT) spectra for charged pions, protons and anti-protons for Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV. Data are presented at mid-rapidity (lbar y rbar 7 GeV/c) the modification is similar for both energies. The p/pi+ and pbar/pi- ratios for central collisions at sqrt sNN = 62.4 GeV peak at pT _~;; 2 GeV/c. In the pT range where recombination is expected to dominate, the p/pi+ ratios at 62.4 GeV are larger than at 200 GeV, while the pbar/pi- ratios are smaller. For pT> 2 GeV/c, the pbar/pi- ratios at the two beam energies are independent of pT and centrality indicating that the dependence of the pbar/pi- ratio on pT does not change between 62.4 and 200 GeV. These findings challenge various models incorporating jet quenching and/or constituent quark coalescence.

Ritter, H

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Measurements of the Electron-Helicity Dependent Cross Sections of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CEBAF at 12 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose precision measurements of the helicity-dependent and helicity independent cross sections for the ep->epg reaction in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) kinematics. DVCS scaling is obtained in the limits Q^2>>Lambda_{QCD}^2, x_Bj fixed, and -\\Delta^2=-(q-q')^22 GeV^2, W>2 GeV, and -\\Delta^21 GeV^2. We will use our successful technique from the 5.75 GeV Hall A DVCS experiment (E00-110). With polarized 6.6, 8.8, and 11 GeV beams incident on the liquid hydrogen target, we will detect the scattered electron in the Hall A HRS-L spectrometer (maximum central momentum 4.3 GeV/c) and the emitted photon in a slightly expanded PbF_2 calorimeter. In general, we will not detect the recoil proton. The H(e,e'g)X missing mass resolution is sufficient to isolate the exclusive channel with 3% systematic precision.

J. Roche; C. E. Hyde-Wright; B. Michel; C. Munoz Camacho

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

Measurements of the Electron-Helicity Dependent Cross Sections of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CEBAF at 12 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose precision measurements of the helicity-dependent and helicity independent cross sections for the ep->epg reaction in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) kinematics. DVCS scaling is obtained in the limits Q^2>>Lambda_{QCD}^2, x_Bj fixed, and -\\Delta^2=-(q-q')^22 GeV^2, W>2 GeV, and -\\Delta^21 GeV^2. We will use our successful technique from the 5.75 GeV Hall A DVCS experiment (E00-110). With polarized 6.6, 8.8, and 11 GeV beams incident on the liquid hydrogen target, we will detect the scattered electron in the Hall A HRS-L spectrometer (maximum central momentum 4.3 GeV/c) and the emitted photon in a slightly expanded PbF_2 calorimeter. In general, we will not detect the recoil proton. The H(e,e'g)X missing mass resolution is sufficient to isolate the exclusive channel with 3% systematic precision.

Roche, J; Hyde-Wright, E; Gavalian, G; Amarian, M; Bltmann, S; Dodge, G E; Juengst, H; Lachniet, J; Radyushkin, A; Ulmer, P E; Weinstein, L B; Ball, J; Bertin, P Y; Brossard, M; De Masi, R; Garçon, M; Girod, F X; Guidal, M; MacCormick, M; Mazouz, M; Niccolai, S; Pire, B; Procureur, S; Sabatie, F; Voutier, E; Wallon, S; Muoz Camacho, C; Camsonne, A; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Deur, A; Gaskell, D; Higinbotham, D; De Jager, C; Le Rose, J; Hansen, O; Michaels, R; Nanda, S; Saha, A; Stepanyan, S; Wojtsekhowski, B; Markowitz, P E C; Zheng, X; Gilman, R; Jiang, X; Kuchina, E; Ransome, R; Deshpande, Abhay A; Liyanage, N; Choi, S; Kang, H; Lee, B; Yumin, Oh; Jongsog, S; Sirca, S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC 2012 Cold Finger Separation [9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* LiCl * LiCl-CsCl (5 wt% CsCl) * Melted salt at 685C * Positioned cold finger at the molten salt top surface * Experiments began once salt temperature reached 660C ( 3C)...

396

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Impact of the Source of Alkali on Sludge Batch 3 Melt Rate (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) melt rate tests in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) have indicated that improvements in melt rate can be achieved through an increase in the total alkali of the melter feed. Higher alkali can be attained by the use of an ''underwashed'' sludge, a high alkali frit, or a combination of the two. Although the general trend between melt rate and total alkali (in particular Na{sub 2}O content) has been demonstrated, the question of ''does the source of alkali (SOA) matter?'' still exists. Therefore the purpose of this set of tests was to determine if the source of alkali (frit versus sludge) can impact melt rate. The general test concept was to transition from a Na{sub 2}O-rich frit to a Na{sub 2}O-deficient frit while compensating the Na{sub 2}O content in the sludge to maintain the same overall Na{sub 2}O content in the melter feed. Specifically, the strategy was to vary the amount of alkali in frits and in the sludge batch 3 (SB3) sludge simulant (midpoint or baseline feed was SB3/Frit 418 at 35% waste loading) so that the resultant feeds had the same final glass composition when vitrified. A set of SOA feeds using frits ranging from 0 to 16 weight % Na{sub 2}O (in 4% increments) was first tested in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) to determine if indeed there was an impact. The dry-fed MRF tests indicated that if the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge (16% Na{sub 2}O feed) or the frit (the 0% Na{sub 2}O feed), then melt rate was negatively impacted when compared to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed currently being processed at DWPF. The MRF melt rates for the 4 and 12% SOA feeds were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 (8% SOA) feed. Due to this finding, a smaller subset of SOA feeds that could be processed in the DWPF (4 and 12% SOA feeds) was then tested in the Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF). The results from a previous SMRF test with SB3/Frit 418 (Smith et al. 2004) were used as the SMRF melt rate of the baseline feed. The SOA SMRF test results agreed with those of the MRF tests for these two feeds as the melt rates were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed. In other words, the source of alkali was close enough to the baseline feed as to not negatively impact melt rate. Based on these results, there appears to be an acceptable range of the source of alkali that results in the highest melt rate for a particular sludge batch. If, however, the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge or the frit, then melt rate will be lower. Although SB3 simulant sludge and Frit 418 were used for these tests, it was not the intent of these tests to determine an optimum source of alkali range for SB3. Rather, the findings of these tests should be used to help in the decision process for future sludge batch washing and/or blending strategies. The results, however, do confirm that the current processing of SB3 is being performed in the proper source of alkali range. Because all of this testing was performed on small-scale equipment with slurried, non-radioactive simulant, the exact impact of the source of alkali with SB3 in the DWPF melter could not be fully evaluated.

Smith, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Strategies for sharing a floating point unit between SPEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floating Point Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .compliant floating point unit”. In DATE ’06: Proceedings offor sharing a Floating Point Unit between SPEs A Thesis

Lugo Martinez, Jose E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour More Documents & Publications...

400

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Decontamination of metals by melt refinings/slagging: An annotated bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--500 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging: First year progress report  

SciTech Connect

As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult. The problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technologies for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of pilot scale melting demonstrations (100-500 lbs) to be conducted at selected commercial facilities. This program will identify methods that can be used to recycle stainless steel RSM which will be used to fabricate high and low level waste canisters for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility. This report summarizes the results of an extensive literature review and the first year`s progress on slag design, small-scale melt refining of surrogate-containing stainless steel (presently only a three month effort), and pilot-scale preparation of surrogate master ingots.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs  

SciTech Connect

The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

Search for Charged Higgs Bosons in e+e- Collisions at sqrts(s) = 189-209 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search is made for charged Higgs bosons predicted by Two-Higgs-Doublet extensions of the Standard Model (2HDM) using electron-positron collision data collected by the OPAL experiment at sqrt(s)=189-209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 600 pb-1. Charged Higgs bosons are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into q qbar, tau nu or A W+-. No signal is observed. Model-independent limits on the charged Higgs-boson production cross section are derived by combining these results with previous searches at lower energies. Under the assumption BR(H+- -> tau nu) + BR(H+- -> qq)=1, motivated by general 2HDM type II models, excluded areas on the [m(H+-), BR(H+- -> tau nu)] plane are presented and charged Higgs bosons are excluded up to a mass of 76.3 GeV at 95% confidence level, independent of the branching ratio BR(H+- -> tau nu). A scan of the 2HDM type I model parameter space is performed and limits on the Higgs-boson masses m(H+-) and m(A) are presented for different choices of tan(beta).

The OPAL collaboration

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Enhancement of Loop induced 125GeV Higgs pair production through Large-Extra-Dimensions model at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of 5 fb^-1 of data at the LHC, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations have presented evidence for a Higgs boson with a mass in the 125 GeV range. We consider the 125 GeV neutral Higgs pair production process in the context of large-extra-dimensions(LED) model including the Kaluza-Klein(KK) excited gravitons at the LHC. We take into account the LED effects coming from gluon-gluon fusion and quark-antiquark collision channels as well as their corresponding next-to-leading order(NLO) QCD loop induced corrections. We analyse their impacts on both the total cross section and some key distributions. Indeed,pp -> HH has the clear advantage of a lower standard model(SM) background compare to process like pp -> jj, though its SM prediction is very small, it is shown that the LED model raises the cross section of Higgs pair production compare to its SM prediction and enhance the transverse momentum(pHT) and invariant mass(MHH) Distributions especially at high scales of pH T and MHH. By including the NLO QCD loop corrections, the scale dependence of total cross section can be reduced obviously. Choose suitable decay modes like HH -> bbrr or HH -> bbmumu and some simple cuts, we can strongly reduce the SM background but keep most of the LED effects, leading Higgs pair production a promising channel to search LED effects.

Hao Sun; Ya-Jin Zhou

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Constraints on large-extra-dimensions model through 125 GeV Higgs pair production at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of 5 fb^-1 of data at the LHC, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations have presented evidence for a Higgs boson with a mass in the 125 GeV range. We consider the 125 GeV neutral Higgs pair production process in the context of large-extra-dimensions (LED) model including the Kaluza-Klein (KK)excited gravitons at the LHC. We consider the standard model(SM) Higgs pair production in gluon-gluon fusion channel and pure LED effects through graviton exchange as well as their interferences. It is shown that such interferences should be included; the LED model raises the transverse momentum (Pt)and invariant mass (M_HH) distributions at high scales of Pt and M_HH of the Higgs pair production. By using the Higgs pair production we could set the discovery limit on the cutoff scale M_S up to 6 TeV for delta = 2 and 4.5 TeV for delta = 6.

Hao Sun; Ya-Jin Zhou; He Chen

2012-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Emission of forward neutrons by 158A GeV indium nuclei in collisions with Al, Cu, Sn and Pb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cross sections of forward emission of one, two and three neutrons by 158A GeV 115In nuclei in collisions with Al, Cu, Sn and Pb targets are reported. The measurements were performed in the framework of the ALICE-LUMI experiment at the SPS facility at CERN. Various corrections accounting for the absorption of beam nuclei and produced neutrons in target material and surrounding air were introduced. The corrected cross section data are compared with the predictions of the RELDIS model for electromagnetic fragmentation of 115In in ultraperipheral collisions, as well as with the results of the abrasion-ablation model for neutron emission in hadronic interactions. The measured neutron emission cross sections well agree with the RELDIS results, with the exception of In-Al collisions where the measured cross sections are larger compared to RELDIS. This is attributed to a relatively large contribution of hadronic fragmentation of In on Al target with respect to electromagnetic fragmentation, on the contrary to similar measurements performed earlier with 30A GeV 208Pb colliding with Al.

E. V. Karpechev; I. A. Pshenichnov; T. L. Karavicheva; A. B. Kurepin; M. B. Golubeva; F. F. Guber; A. I. Maevskaia; A. I. Reshetin; V. V. Tiflov; N. S. Topilskaya; P. Cortese; G. Dellacasa; R. Arnaldi; N. DeMarco; A. Ferretti; M. Gallio; A. Musso; C. Oppedisano; A. Piccotti; E. Scomparin; E. Vercellin; C. Cicalo; G. Puddu; E. Siddi; P. Szymanski; I. Efthymiopoulos

2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

409

End Points Specification Methods | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

End Points Specification Methods End Points Specification Methods End Points Specification Methods Two methods to develop end point specifications are presented. These have evolved from use in the field for deactivation projects. The hierarchical method is systematic, comprehensive, and completely defensible as to the basis for each specification. This method may appear complex to the uninitiated, but it is a straightforward application of a systematic engineering approach. It is labor intensive only during the final stage. This method is appropriate to the type of project involving a complex facility that contains process systems and a variety of contaminated areas or other hazards. The checklist method is an approach that is more appropriate to facilities which require less detailed planning, such as for industrial

410

Tribal Points of Contacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Points of Contacts Points of Contacts Tribal Points of Contacts US DOE-Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 ph: (202) 586-5944 fax: (202) 586-5000 Richland Operations Office- Hanford Indian Nations Program P.O. Box 550- MSIN A7-75 Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-6332 fax: (509) 376-1563 West Valley Demonstration Project Tribal Government Liaison P.O. Box 191- 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 14171 ph: (716) 942-4629 fax: (716) 942-2068 Albuquerque Operations Office Tribal Government Liaison P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 ph: (505) 845-5977 fax: (505) 845-4154 Tribal Points of Contact Richland Operations Office: Hanford Albuquerque Operations Office: Yakama Indian Nation Environmental Restoration/ Waste Management Program

411

Star Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Wind Farm Point Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Point Wind Farm Facility Star Point Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Modesto Irrigation District Location Near Moro OR Coordinates 45.474734°, -120.704412° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.474734,"lon":-120.704412,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

412

Point380 LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point380 LLC Point380 LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Point380, LLC Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80302 Sector Carbon Product Point380 provides carbon consulting and resource management solutions to a broad range of clients seeking energy related risk analysis and policy analysis. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Cedar Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Wind Farm Point Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedar Point Wind Farm Facility Cedar Point Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Enbridge Inc. Developer RES Americas Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Elbert CO Coordinates 39.219417°, -104.537167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.219417,"lon":-104.537167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Saturation Point Analysis of Moist Convective Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified approach to the thermodynamics of cloudy air, cloud-clear air mixing processes, atmospheric thermodynamic equilibrium structure and instability is formulated, using a new concept: the Saturation Point. This permits the representation of ...

Alan K. Betts

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

INTERIOR-POINT METHODS FOR NONCONVEX NONLINEAR ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 4, 2005 ... problem is not convex, the algorithm will be searching for a local optimum. ..... the terms in the barrier objective of our infeasible interior-point method. ..... In order to enter dual feasibility restoration mode, we monitored the ...

416

Computing proximal points of nonconvex functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search direction used in an inexact proximal point algorithm is an .... term is a convex function on an open neighbourhood V of x; see [35, Thm. 10.33, p. ...... (3c

417

Indian Point-2 Flash Photography Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the EPRI Electromagnetic & Radio Frequency Interference Working Group on a flash photography event at the Indian Point-2 (IP-2) nuclear power plant.

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cloud Thermodynamic Models in Saturation Point Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-dimensional thermodynamic models for cloud-environment mixing, evaporation into downdrafts and precipitation from updrafts are presented in a parallel treatment using convective pressure scales and saturation point coordinates. This common ...

Alan K. Betts

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

N=8 Supergravity 4-point Amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the explicit expressions in N=8 supergravity for the bosonic 4-particle tree and 1-loop amplitudes including vectors and scalars. We also present the candidate 4-point UV divergences in a form of helicity amplitudes, corresponding to 3-loop manifestly N=8 supersymmetric and Lorentz covariant counterterm. This may shed some light on the 3-loop finiteness of N=8 SG and on a conjectured higher loop finiteness. We perform a supersymmetric deformation to complex momentum of the 4-point generating function including higher-loop counterterms and the 1-loop UV finite amplitudes. Using the explicit form of the scalar part of the 3-loop counterterm and of the 1-loop UV finite scalar 4-point amplitudes we find that they both have an unbroken E7 symmetry. We derive from E7 symmetry the low-energy theorem for the 1-loop n-point amplitudes.

Renata Kallosh; Ching Hua Lee; Tomas Rube

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

N=8 Supergravity 4-point Amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the explicit expressions in N=8 supergravity for the bosonic 4-particle tree and 1-loop amplitudes including vectors and scalars. We also present the candidate 4-point UV divergences in a form of helicity amplitudes, corresponding to 3-loop manifestly N=8 supersymmetric and Lorentz covariant counterterm. This may shed some light on the 3-loop finiteness of N=8 SG and on a conjectured higher loop finiteness. We perform a supersymmetric deformation to complex momentum of the 4-point generating function including higher-loop counterterms and the 1-loop UV finite amplitudes. Using the explicit form of the scalar part of the 3-loop counterterm and of the 1-loop UV finite scalar 4-point amplitudes we find that they both have an unbroken E7 symmetry. We derive from E7 symmetry the low-energy theorem for the 1-loop n-point amplitudes.

Kallosh, Renata; Rube, Tomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Point-Contact Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of silicon photovoltaic cell called the point-contact cell is under development. This report describes the cell and an analytic model developed for use in design optimization. Necessary future cell development work is discussed.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

FortyPoint Seven | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name FortyPoint Seven Place England, United Kingdom Zip BH14 8LQ Sector Biofuels Product A Biofuels company founded by John Nicholas, one of Biofuels Corporation...

423

Change-Point Detection in Meteorological Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical methods of change-point detection can be useful for discovering inhomogeneities in precipitation, air pressure, or temperature time series caused by a change in the measurement process such as a relocation of a gauge. The method is ...

Daniela Jarušková

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evidence for the onset of deconfinement and quest for the critical point by NA49 at the CERN SPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NA49 results on hadron production obtained in PbPb collisions at SPS energies from 20 to 158 A GeV are shown and discussed as evidence for the onset of deconfinement. The primary measures are the pion yield, the kaon-to-pion ratio and the slope parameter of transverse mass distributions. The possible indication of the QCD critical point signatures was investigated in the event-by-event fluctuations of various observables such as the mean transverse momentum, particle multiplicity and azimuthal angle distributions as well as in the particle ratio fluctuations. The energy dependence of these observables was measured in central PbPb collisions in the full SPS energy range while for analysis of the system size dependence data from pp, CC, SiSi, and PbPb collisions at the top SPS energy were used.

Melkumov, G. L., E-mail: georgui.melkoumov@cern.ch [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Anticic, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Croatia); Baatar, B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Barna, D. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Bartke, J. [Polish Academy of Sciences, H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Beck, H. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet (Germany); Betev, L. [CERN (Switzerland); Bialkowska, H. [Institute for Nuclear Studies (Poland); Blume, C. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet (Germany); Bogusz, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Boimska, B. [Institute for Nuclear Studies (Poland); Book, J. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet (Germany); Botje, M. [NIKHEF (Netherlands); Buncic, P. [CERN (Switzerland); Cetner, T. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Christakoglou, P. [NIKHEF (Netherlands); Chung, P. [Stony Brook University (SUNYSB), Department of Chemistry (United States); Chvala, O. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics (Czech Republic); Cramer, J. G. [University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory (United States); Eckardt, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Germany); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18.36 eV Muon critical energy 1312. GeV Melting point 214.4 K -58.70 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 398.8 K 125.6 C Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 18.00 0.158821 C 6 8.00...

426

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31.76 eV Muon critical energy 200. GeV Melting point 161.4 K -111.8 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 165.1 K -108.0 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.39 For muons, dEdx a(E) + b(E)...

427

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

41.63 eV Muon critical energy 402. GeV Melting point 1941. K 1668. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3560. K 3287. C For muons, dEdx a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of...

428

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44.13 eV Muon critical energy 297. GeV Melting point 1211. K 938.2 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3106. K 2833. C For muons, dEdx a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of...

429

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

e-) 21.00 MeV (for e+) Molire radius 13.53 g cm-2 1.719 cm Plasma energy 55.17 eV Muon critical energy 347. GeV Melting point 1811. K 1538. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3134. K 2861....

430

The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade Project at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, OAS-RA-L-11-13  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade Project at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility OAS-RA-L-11-13 September 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 30, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEPUTY DIRECTOR FOR SCIENCE PROGRAMS, OFFICE OF SCIENCE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND FINANCIAL POLICY, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER FROM: David Sedillo, Director NNSA & Science Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade Project at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility" Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-13 BACKGROUND In September 2008, the Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Science approved a construction project to double the electron beam energy of the Continuous Electron Beam

431

Experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water (ZREX): Hydrogen generation and chemical augmentation of energetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the first data series of experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water are described. These experiments involved dropping 1-kg batches of pure zirconium or zirconium-zirconium dioxide mixture melt into a column of water. A total of nine tests were conducted, including four with pure zirconium melt and five with Zr-ZrO{sub 2} mixture melt. Explosions took place only in those tests which were externally triggered. While the extent of zirconium oxidation in the triggered experiments was quite extensive, the estimated explosion energetics were found to be very small compared to the combined thermal and chemical energy available.

Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

Krupa, J.F.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

434

Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, Carol M. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Rapid excavation by rock melting (LASL Subterrene Program). Status report, September 1973--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research was directed at establishing the technical and economic feasibility of excavation systems based upon the rock-melting (Subterrene) concept. A series of electrically powered, small-diameter prototype melting penetrators was developed and tested. Research activities include optimizing penetrator configurations, designing high-performance heater systems, and improving refractory metals technology. The properties of the glass linings that are automatically formed on the melted holes have been investigated for a variety of rocks and soils. Thermal and fluid-mechanics analyses of the melt flows were conducted with the objective of optimizing penetrator designs. Field tests and demonstrations of the prototype devices continue to be performed in a wide range of rock and soil types. Primary emphasis was placed on the development of a penetrator designed for more economical extraction of geothermal energy and of small-diameter penetrators which can be utilized in support of geothermal energy exploration programs. Optimization of well design, the trade-off of advance rate with operating life, the advantages of using the melt-glass hole casing for well-bore seal-off, rig automation, and the benefits which result from the insensitivity of rock melting to formation temperatures and geologic variations were also studied. Subsystem hardware development was directed toward resolution of critical technical questions related to penetrators for dense rock, debris handling, electrical heater configuration, and establishing penetrator life. Laboratory experiments and field tests provide data for final system design optimizations and indicate proof of applicability of the concept to a geothermal well hole-forming system. A field test unit to form relatively shallow vertical holes for heat flow surveys in support of geothermal exploration studies has been designed, fabricated, and field tested.

Hanold, R.J. (comp.)

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Lifetime Response of a Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lifetime studies in four-point flexure were performed on a Hi-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite over a temperature range of 700 degrees to 1150 degrees C in air. The composite consisted of ~40 vol. % Hi-NicalonTM fiber (8-harness weave) with a 0.5 Mu-m BN fiber coating and a melt-infiltration SiC matrix wand was tested with as-machined surfaces. Lifetime results indicated that the composite exhibited a stress-dependent lifetime at stress levels above an apparent fatigue limit, similar to the trend observed in CG-NicalonTM fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. At less than or equal to 950 degrees C, the lifetimes of Hi-Nicalon/MI SiC composites decreased with increasing applied stress level and test temperature. However, the lifetimes were extended as test temperature increased from 950 degees to 1150 degrees C as a result of surface crack sealing due to glass formation by the oxidation of Mi SiC matrix. The lifetime governing processes were, in general, attributed to the progressive oxidation of BN fiber coating and formation of glassy phase, which formed a strong bond between fiber and matrix, resulting in embrittlement of the composite with time.

Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Singh, M.

1999-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear modification and elliptic flow measurements for $?$ mesons at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV d+Au and Au+Au collisions by PHENIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first results of the nuclear modification factors and elliptic flow of the phi mesons measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in high luminosity Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factors R_AA and R_CP of the phi follow the same trend of suppression as pi0's in Au+Au collisions. In d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV, the phi mesons are not suppressed. The elliptic flow of the phi mesons, measured in the minimum bias Au+Au events, is statistically consistent with other identified particles.

Dipali Pal

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Complete measurement of three-body photodisintegration of 3He for photon energies between 0.35 and 1.55 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The three-body photodisintegration of 3He has been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab, using tagged photons of energies between 0.35 GeV and 1.55 GeV. The large acceptance of the spectrometer allowed us for the first time to cover a wide momentum and angular range for the two outgoing protons. Three kinematic regions dominated by either two- or three-body contributions have been distinguished and analyzed. The measured cross sections have been compared with results of a theoretical model, which, in certain kinematic ranges, have been found to be in reasonable agreement with the data.

CLAS Collaboration; S. Niccolai; G. Audit; B. L. Berman; J. M. Laget; S. Strauch

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

Scale/Analytical Analyses of Freezing and Convective Melting with Internal Heat Generation  

SciTech Connect

Using a scale/analytical analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate constant internal heat generation for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. The analysis also consider constant heat flux (in a cylindrical geometry).We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

Ali S. Siahpush; John Crepeau; Piyush Sabharwall

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Application of rock melting to construction of storage holes for nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rock melting technology can provide in-situ glass liners in nuclear waste package emplacement holes to reduce permeability and increase borehole stability. Reduction of permeability would reduce the time and probability of groundwater contacting the waste packages. Increasing the stability of the storage boreholes would enhance the retrievability of the nuclear waste packages. The rock melting hole forming technology has already been tested in volcanic tuff similar to the geology at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Neudecker, J.W. Jr.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A demonstration experiment of steam-driven, high-pressure melt ejection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A steam blowdown test was performed at the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility to test the steam supply system and burst diaphragm arrangement that will be used in subsequent Surtsey Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments. Following successful completion of the steam blowdown test, the HIPS-10S (High-Pressure Melt Streaming) experiment was conducted to demonstrate that the technology to perform steam-driven, high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) experiments has been successfully developed. In addition, the HIPS-10S experiment was used to assess techniques and instrumentation design to create the proper timing of events in HPME experiments. This document discusses the results of this test.

Allen, M.D.; Pitch, M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Nichols, R.T. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

A collaborative study has been established under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management International Program between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, to investigate potential improvements in melt rate via chemical additions to the glass frit. Researchers at KRI suggested a methodology for selecting frit additives based on empirical coefficients for optimization of glass melting available in the Russian literature. Using these coefficients, KRI identified B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, and MnO as frit additives that were likely to improve melt rate without having adverse effects on crystallization of the glass or its chemical durability. The results of the melt rate testing in the SMK melter showed that the slurry feed rate (used as a gauge of melt rate) could be significantly increased when MnO or CuO were added to Frit 550 with the SMR-2 sludge. The feed rates increased by about 27% when MnO was added to the frit and by about 26% when CuO was added to the frit, as compared to earlier results for Frit 550 alone. The impact of adding additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the frit was minor when added with CuO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed a more significant, 39% improvement in melt rate when added with MnO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} also reduced the viscosity of the glasses during pouring. Samples of the glasses from the melt rate testing characterized at SRNL showed that there were no significant impacts on crystallization of the glasses. All of the glasses had very good chemical durability. Chemical composition measurements showed that the frit additives were present in concentrations below the targeted values in some of the glasses. Therefore, it is possible that higher concentrations of these additives may further improve melt rate, although the impacts of higher concentrations of these components on crystallization and durability would need to be determined. Overall, the results show an excellent potential for these additives to significantly improve waste throughput for DOE vitrification facilities. A complete report from KRI is included as an appendix to this document.

Fox, K.; Marra, J.

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

Melting of nanocrystals embedded in a crystal matrix heated by nanosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of phase transformations of nanocrystals in a crystal matrix is considered upon non-stationary heating by laser pulses. The melting and crystallization kinetics of nanocrystals is described taking into account their size, shape, elemental composition, and elastic deformations appearing due to the mismatch of the lattice constants for nanocrystals and the matrix. The possibility of decreasing the dispersion of nanocrystals over their size in heterostructures with quantum dots is predicted. As an example, melting of Ge nanocrystals in a Si matrix is considered.

Zinoviev, V. A., E-mail: zinoviev@isp.nsc.ru; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Smagina, Zh. V., E-mail: smagina@isp.nsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Ivlev, G. D.; Gatskevich, E. I.; Malevich, V. L. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics (Belarus)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Superconductivity, superfluidity and zero-point oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently it is thought that in order to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity is necessary to understand the mechanism of formation of electron pairs. However, the paired electrons cannot form a superconducting condensate. They perform disorderly zero-point oscillations and there are no attractive forces in their ensemble. To create a unified ensemble of particles, the pairs must order their zero-point fluctuations so that an attraction between the particles appears. For this reason, the ordering of zero-point oscillations in the electron gas is the cause of superconductivity and the parameters characterizing this order determine the properties of superconductors. The model of condensation of zero-point oscillations creates the possibility to obtain estimates for the critical parameters of elementary superconductors, which are also in the satisfactory agreement with measured data. On the another hand, the phenomenon of superfluidity in He-4 and He-3 can be similarly explained due to the ordering of zero-point fluctuations. Thus it is established that the both related phenomena are based on the same physical mechanism.

B. V. Vasiliev

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Tipping Point Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tipping Point Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tipping Point Renewable Energy Name Tipping Point Renewable Energy Place Columbus, Ohio Zip 43221 Sector Solar Website http://tipenergy.com/ Coordinates 40.0097883°, -83.0683519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0097883,"lon":-83.0683519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

Midnight Point Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midnight Point Geothermal Project Midnight Point Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Midnight Point Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 43.548333333333°, -119.97611111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.548333333333,"lon":-119.97611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prairie Pointe Townhomes Prairie Pointe Townhomes After a tornado destroyed most of Greensburg, Kansas, in 2007, the residents needed affordable housing. Prairie Pointe Townhomes is a low-income rental development that was completed in July 2008. Eight of the 16 units in this townhome complex were awarded the first residential U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum rating in Kansas and are estimated to use about 50% less energy than similar buildings built to existing building codes. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * Well-insulated 2 x 6 walls use blown-in cellulose insulation with an R-Value of 22.5 to prevent heat loss and save energy * Well-insulated roof with an R-value of R-38 prevents heat loss through the roof and helps keep building cool in summer

448

Relative localization of point particle interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the main concepts of the recently introduced principle of relative locality and investigate some aspects of classical interactions between point particles from this new perspective. We start with a physical motivation and basic mathematical description of relative locality and review the treatment of a system of classical point particles in this framework. We then examine one of the unsolved problems of this picture, the apparent ambiguities in the definition of momentum constraints caused by a non-commutative and/or non-associative momentum addition rule. The gamma ray burst experiment is used as an illustration. Finally, we use the formalism of relative locality to reinterpret the well-known multiple point particle system coupled to 2+1 Einstein gravity, analyzing the geometry of its phase space and once again referring to the gamma ray burst problem as an example.

José Ricardo Oliveira

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

Medecki, Hector (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

Medecki, H.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreatPoint Energy GreatPoint Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name GreatPoint Energy Address 222 Third Street Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02142 Sector Biomass Product Converts coal, petroleum coke and biomass into natural gas Website http://www.greatpointenergy.co Coordinates 42.3672873°, -71.0814466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3672873,"lon":-71.0814466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Microsoft Word - CX-Harbour_Pointe_130621  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2013 5, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Toni L. Timberman Project Manager - TSE-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Harbour Pointe Small Generator Integration Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic Equipment Location: Mukilteo, Snohomish County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to integrate UniEnergy Technologies' (UET) 1.5-megawatt battery generation project into BPA's balancing authority (BA) in response to a UET small generator interconnection request. The proposed point of interconnection is at Snohomish Public Utility District's (SnoPUD) Harbour Pointe Substation. In order to integrate

453

LIDAR, Point Clouds, and their Archaeological Applications  

SciTech Connect

It is common in contemporary archaeological literature, in papers at archaeological conferences, and in grant proposals to see heritage professionals use the term LIDAR to refer to high spatial resolution digital elevation models and the technology used to produce them. The goal of this chapter is to break that association and introduce archaeologists to the world of point clouds, in which LIDAR is only one member of a larger family of techniques to obtain, visualize, and analyze three-dimensional measurements of archaeological features. After describing how point clouds are constructed, there is a brief discussion on the currently available software and analytical techniques designed to make sense of them.

White, Devin A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO doe mar 10 brief Compatibility Mode Microsoft PowerPoint - Overview Briefing - Tab 1 DOE's Procurement System July 2008 Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

455

Transverse envelope dynamics of a 28.5 GeV electron beam in a long plasma  

SciTech Connect

The transverse dynamics of a 28.5 GeV electron beam propagating in a 1.4 m long, 0-2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} plasma are studied experimentally in the underdense or blow-out regime. The transverse component of the wake field excited by the short electron bunch focuses the bunch, which experiences multiple betatron oscillations as the plasma density is increased. The spot size variations are observed using optical transition radiation and Cherenkov radiation. In this regime, the behavior of the spot size as a function of the plasma density is well described by a simple beam envelope model. Dynamic changes of the beam envelope are observed by time resolving the Cherenkov light.

Clayton, C.E.; Blue, B.E.; Dodd, E.S.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Wang, S.; Catravas, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Assmann, R.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Raimondi, P.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton to Proton Abundance Ratio between 4 and 50 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of the antiproton to proton abundance ratio, pbar/p, in the cosmic radiation. The HEAT-pbar instrument, a balloon borne magnet spectrometer with precise rigidity and multiple energy loss measurement capability, was flown successfully in Spring 2000, at an average atmospheric depth of 7.2 g/cm^2. A total of 71 antiprotons were identified above the vertical geomagnetic cut-off rigidity of 4.2 GV. The highest measured proton energy was 81 GeV. We find that the pbar/p abundance ratio agrees with that expected from a purely secondary origin of antiprotons produced by primary protons with a standard soft energy spectrum.

A. S. Beach; J. J. Beatty; A. Bhattacharyya; C. Bower; S. Coutu; M. A. DuVernois; A. W. Labrador; S. McKee; S. A. Minnick; D. Muller; J. Musser; S. Nutter; M. Schubnell; S. Swordy; G. Tarle; A. Tomasch

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

457

$J/?$ polarization in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV in STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a polarization measurement of inclusive $J/\\psi$ mesons in the di-electron decay channel at mid-rapidity at 2 $< p_T <$ 6 GeV/c in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV. Data were taken with the STAR detector at RHIC. The $J/\\psi$ polarization measurement should help to distinguish between the different models of the $J/\\psi$ production mechanism since they predict different $p_T$ dependences of the $J/\\psi$ polarization. In this analysis, $J/\\psi$ polarization is studied in the helicity frame. The polarization parameter $\\lambda_{\\theta}$ measured at RHIC becomes smaller towards high $p_T$, indicating more longitudinal $J/\\psi$ polarization as $p_T$ increases. The result is compared with predictions of presently available models.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Measurements of Transverse Energy Distributions in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transverse energy (E{sub T}) distributions have been measured for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR collaboration at RHIC. E{sub T} is constructed from its hadronic and electromagnetic components, which have been measured separately. E{sub T} production for the most central collisions is well described by several theoretical models whose common feature is large energy density achieved early in the fireball evolution. The magnitude and centrality dependence of E{sub T} per charged particle agrees well with measurements at lower collision energy, indicating that the growth in E{sub T} for larger collision energy results from the growth in particle production. The electromagnetic fraction of the total E{sub T} is consistent with a final state dominated by mesons and independent of centrality.

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Botje, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R> Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

459

Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v{sub 1}), elliptic flow (v{sub 2}), and the fourth harmonic (v{sub 4}) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution of particles from Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are summarized and compared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results for identified particles are presented and fit with a Blast Wave model. For v{sub 2}, scaling with the number of constituent quarks and parton coalescence is discussed. For v{sub 4}, scaling with v{sub 22} and quark coalescence predictions for higher harmonic flow is discussed. The different anisotropic flow analysis methods are compared and nonflow effects are extracted from the data. For v{sub 2}, scaling with the number of constituent quarks and parton coalescence are discussed. For v{sub 2}{sup 2} and quark coalescence are discussed.

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Akhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; et al.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

460

Photon and neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_{NN}) = 130 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first inclusive photon measurements about mid-rapidity (|y|Photon pair conversions were reconstructed from electron and positron tracks measured with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the STAR experiment. With this method, an energy resolution of Delta(E)/E = 2% at 0.5 GeV has been achieved. Reconstructed photons have also been used to measure the transverse momentum (pt) spectra of pi0 mesons about mid-rapidity (|y| photon photon decay channel. The fractional contribution of the pi0 -> photon photon decay to the inclusive photon spectrum decreases by 20% +/- 5% between pt = 1.65 GeV/c and pt = 2.4 GeV/c in the most central events, indicating that relative to pi0 -> photon photon decay the contribution of other photon sources is substantially increasing.

STAR Collaboration

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Measurements of transverse energy distributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 200$ GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transverse energy ($E_T$) distributions have been measured for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 200$ GeV by the STAR collaboration at RHIC. $E_T$ is constructed from its hadronic and electromagnetic components, which have been measured separately. $E_T$ production for the most central collisions is well described by several theoretical models whose common feature is large energy density achieved early in the fireball evolution. The magnitude and centrality dependence of $E_T$ per charged particle agrees well with measurements at lower collision energy, indicating that the growth in $E_T$ for larger collision energy results from the growth in particle production. The electromagnetic fraction of the total $E_T$ is consistent with a final state dominated by mesons and independent of centrality.

STAR Collaboration; J. Adams

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

Measurement of 0.25{endash}3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The balloon-borne isotope matter-antimatter experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on 16{endash}17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 GeV. Both the absolute flux of antiprotons and the antiproton/proton ratio are consistent with recent theoretical work in which antiprotons are produced as secondary products of cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. This consistency implies a lower limit to the antiproton lifetime of {approximately}10{sup 7} yr. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.; Krizmanic, J.F.; Krombel, K.; Ormes, J.F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Labrador, A.W.; Davis, A.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Schindler, S.M.; Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J.; Webber, W.R.; Menn, W.; Hof, M.; Reimer, O.; Simon, M.; Rasmussen, I.L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)]|[California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)]|[New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States)]|[University of Siegen, Siegen, 57068 (Germany)]|[Danish Space Research Institute, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Forward Drift Chamber for the GlueX Experiment at the 12 GeV CEBAF Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GlueX experiment will search for exotic mesons produced by 9 GeV linearly polarized photons from the upgraded CEBAF machine. It is critical to detect and measure the four-momenta of all the charged particles and photons resulting from the decays of the mesons. The solenoid-based detector system includes tracking detectors and calorimeters. The Forward Drift Chamber, FDC, consists of 24 circular planar drift chambers of 1m diameter. Additional cathode readout is required to achieve efficient pattern recognition. The detection of photons by the electromagnetic calorimeters imposes constraints on the amount of material used in the FDC. The specific features of the detector and the readout electronics will be described. Results from the tests of the full scale prototype will be presented, as well.

Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Forward Drift Chamber for the GlueX experiment at the 12 GeV CEBAF machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GlueX experiment will search for exotic mesons produced by 9 GeV linearly polarized photons from the upgraded CEBAF machine. It is critical to detect and measure the four-momenta of all the charged particles and photons resulting from the decays of the mesons. The solenoid-based detector system includes tracking detectors and calorimeters. The Forward Drift Chamber, FDC, consists of 24 circular planar drift chambers of 1m diameter. Additional cathode readout is required to achieve efficient pattern recognition. The detection of low energy photons by the electromagnetic calorimeters imposes constraints on the amount of material used in the FDC. The specific features of the detector and the readout electronics will be described. Results from the tests of the full scale prototype will be presented, as well.

Lubomir Pentchev, Benedikt Zihlmann

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation has been demonstrated as a technique for measuring the longitudinal profile of charged particles bunches in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider, the need has arisen for a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile at extremely high energies. Smith-Purcell radiation has been used for the first time in the multi-GeV regime to measure the longitudinal profile of the 28GeV SLAC beam. The experiment has both successfully determined the bunch length, and has also demonstrated its sensitivity to bunch profile changes. The challenges associated with this technique, and its prospects as a diagnostic tool are reported here.

Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Ottewell, B.; Perry, C.; /Oxford U.; Kimmitt, M.F.; /Essex U.; Arnold, R.; Molloy, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

466

Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission  

SciTech Connect

We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Takahashi, Y.; /Waseda U., RISE; Cheung, C.C.; /Natl. Acad. Sci. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Hayashida, M.; /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Grandi, P.; /Bologna Observ.; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Celotti, A.; /SISSA, Trieste; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; /Waseda U., RISE; Taylor, G.B.; /New Mexico U.; Tosti, G.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; McConville, W.; /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; Finke, J.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; D'Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Response of Ice Shelf Basal Melting to Variations in Ocean Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional ocean general circulation model is used to study the response of idealized ice shelves to a series of ocean-warming scenarios. The model predicts that the total ice shelf basal melt increases quadratically as the ocean ...

Paul R. Holland; Adrian Jenkins; David M. Holland

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Ice-Seawater Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction with Melting or Freezing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-moment, turbulence closure model is applied to the problem of the dynamic and thermodynamic interaction of sea ice and the ocean surface mixed layer. In the case of ice moving over a warm, ocean surface layer, melting is intrinsically a ...

George L. Mellor; Miles G. McPhee; Michael Steele

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

470

Arc-melting preparation of single crystal LaB.sub.6 cathodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing single crystals of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB.sub.6) by arc melting a rod of compacted LaB.sub.6 powder. The method is especially suitable for preparing single crystal LaB.sub.6 cathodes for use in scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM).

Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA)

1977-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

Utilization of melting techniques for borehole wall stabilization. [Applied to geothermal well production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program on the Subterrene concept based on excavation by melting has been completed. Theoretical and experimental studies were made for a broad range of applications. Most recently, a study of Subterrene deep geothermal well production systems predicted that, compared to rotary-drilled wells, significant cost savings are possible, e.g., 2 and 4 million dollars for 10-km-deep wells and geothermal gradients of 25 and 40 K/km, respectively. It was also concluded that for most wells the rate of penetration of the melting bits should be increased several times over that attained in the Subterrene tests. Subterrene melting penetration tests showed that borehole glass liners can be formed in a wide variety of materials and structural characterization tests showed that tuff glass cylinders can be many times stronger in compression than the parent material. Also, the tests showed that the rock-glass liner permeability decreases rapidly with confining pressure. New melting devices are conceivable that could line rotary-drilled boreholes with rock glass or other materials with resultant improvements in well costs. With emphasis on borehole liners, an overview of Subterrene program results, data on rock-glass liners, and suggestions on how molten materials might be applied to the borehole wall as part of a rotary drilling operation are presented.

Altseimer, J.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A model for temperature prediction of melted steel in the electric arc furnace (EAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constant aspiration to optimize electric arc steelmaking process causes an increase of the use of advanced analytical methods for the process support. The goal of the paper is to present the way to predict temperature of melted steel in the electric ...

Marcin Blachnik; Krystian M?czka; Tadeusz Wieczorek

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z