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1

Creep measuring device for low melting point metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CREEP MEASURING DEVICE FOR LOW MELTING POINT METALS A Thesis MARC-EMMANUEL GILBERT PORTAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AA;M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987... Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering CREEP MEASURING DEVICE FOR LOW MELTING POINT METALS A Thesis MARC-EMMANUEL GILBERT PORTAL Approved as to style and content by: K. L. Peddicord (Chairman of Committee) C. A. Erdman (Member) F. R. Best (Member...

Portal, Marc-Emmanuel Gilbert

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Questions and Answers - What's the melting point of steel?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,would your body instantly crystallize? If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,<br>would your body instantly crystallize? Previous Question (If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is a material with a freezing point above 0 degrees Celsius?) What is a material with a freezingpoint above 0 degrees Celsius? What's the melting point of steel? That depends on the alloy of steel you are talking about. The term alloy is almost always used incorrectly these days, especially amongst bicyclists. They use the term to mean aluminum. What the term alloy really means is a mixture of metals, any kind of metals. Almost all metal used today is a mixture and therefore an alloy. Most steel has other metals added to tune its properties, like strength,

3

Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ? A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ? The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ? The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 ?{sup 3} for bulk to 57 ?{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Draft report on melt point as a function of composition for urania-based systems  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the testing of a urania (UO{sub 2.00}) sample as a baseline and the attempt to determine the melt point associated with 4 compositions of urania-ceria and urania-neodymia pseudo binaries provided by ORNL, with compositions of 95/5, and 80/20 and of (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} and (U/Nd)O{sub 2.00} in the newly developed ceramic melt point determination system. A redesign of the system using parts fabricated from tungsten was undertaken in order to help prevent contamination and tungsten carbide formation in the crucibles. The previously developed system employed mostly graphite parts that were shown to react with the sample containment black-body crucible leading to unstable temperature readings and crucible failure, thus the redesign. Measured melt point values of UO{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.95}Ce{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.80}Ce{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.95}Nd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.80}Nd{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00} were measured using a 2-color pyrometer. The value measured for UO{sub 2.00} was consistent with the published accepted value 2845 C {+-} 25 C, although a wide range of values has been published by researchers and will be discussed later in the text. For comparison, values obtained from a published binary phase diagram of UO{sub 2}-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for comparison with our measure values. No literature melt point values for comparison with the measurements performed in this study were found for (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} in our stoichiometry range.

Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Byler, Darrin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Melting heat transfer effects on stagnation point flow of micropolar fluid saturated in porous medium with internal heat generation (absorption)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of melting heat transfer on the two dimensional boundary layer flow of a micropolar fluid near a stagnation point embedded in a porous medium in the presence of internal heat generation/absorption is i...

M. A. A. Mahmoud; S. E. Waheed

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Temperature control of some metallic conductors in the region of the melting point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect: Electrical Engineering TEMPE~ CONTROL OF SOME METALLIC CONDUCTORS IN THE REGION OF THE MELTING POINT 4 4 E 4 K 0 5 0 A Thesis by Arifur Rahman Approved as to style and content by: (Ch... irman of Committ (Head of Department) May 1961 'the writer wishes to express his appreciation and, gratitude to Nr. E. H. Roots, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering Department, and Nr. D. H. Kimberling, Director of the Machine Shop, Physics...

Rahman, Arifur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Microsoft PowerPoint - ESGCold Cap Melting (2) [Read-Only  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Treatment Facility HLW Vitrification Facility LAW Vitrification Facility Outline * Glass-melting furnace (melter) and cold cap (batch blanket) * Melter feed conversion to...

8

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979, page C5-63 Heat capacity of rare earth metals near the melting point and the vacancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of rare earth metals near the melting point and the vacancy mechanism of melting T. Gorecki (*) Max. -The vacancy mechanism of the melting process is utilized as a starting point for deriving the formula point and changes of the same properties of metals due to the creation of vacancies has been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Microsoft PowerPoint - srnl_24x36vert Nov2010 EM tech exchange melt rate model choi.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhancement of DWPF Melt Rate Model (WP 4.2.3) Enhancement of DWPF Melt Rate Model (WP 4.2.3) A.S. Choi, D. H. Miller, Engineering Process Development D. M. Immel, Imaging and Radiation Systems Free energy output is re-arranged into various functional groups based on literature data on aluminoborosilicate glass structural units Methodology: Objective: Develop a predictive tool for the impact of feed chemistry on relative melt rate of HLW glasses. Input Semi-empirical 4-Stage DWPF Cold Cap Model Output Phase Equilibria & Speciation of Melt, Intermediate Condensed Phases, Calcine Gases and Their Free Energies Feed Chemistry NIST Free Energy Database for Complex Liquids Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) Experiments Derive an empirical correlation of relative melt rates using free energy functional groups. X-Ray Imaging &

10

New ideas for the melting pot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... degrees of the melting point. Pontikis and Sindzingre8 reviewed the tenuous evidence linking this surface roughening of crystals to surface melting and concluded that the two phenomena are probably entirely distinct ...

Robert W. Cahn

1989-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Melt Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...The resistance to shear in a molten resin, quantified as the quotient of shear stress divided by shear rate at any point in the flowing material. Elongational viscosity, which comes into plan in ...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Laser Cladding of Low Melting Point Alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser cladding has been used for some years as ... hardfacing method [1]. The two main laser cladding (and alloying) techniques are: i) ...

M. Ellis; D. C. Xiao; W. M. Steen; C. Lee…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thermodynamics of random copolymer melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on a mean-field thermodynamic analysis of AB random copolymer melts with (backbone) composition correlations that reflect realistic polymerization conditions. Depending on the strength and sign of these correlations, multiple homogeneous phases, periodic mesophases, or disordered mesophases are possible. We identify an isotropic Lifshitz point and the critical lines that emerge from it. Our results should facilitate the design of new copolymeric materials.

Glenn H. Fredrickson and Scott T. Milner

1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Melting of superheated crystals initiates on vacancies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a large variety of ideal crystals we found that when rapidly migrating atoms squash or annihilate a neighbouring vacancy and produce a disordered cluster, the heat of migration stored in the system exceeds the enthalpy increase required for the coordinating atoms of the vacancy to form a liquid phase, i.e. the liquid phase nucleates from vacancies. Furthermore volumetric analysis supports this well. This vacancy-decomposition model provides quantitative information on the melting point, the latent heat and the volume change upon melting and hence clarifies the mechanism of melting.

L. W. Wang; Q. Wang; K. Q. Lu

2010-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

15

Melt containment member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Melting of hard cubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The melting transition of a system of hard cubes is studied numerically both in the case of freely rotating cubes and when there is a fixed orientation of the particles: parallel cubes. It is shown that freely rotating cubes melt through a first-order transition, whereas parallel cubes have a continuous transition in which positional order is lost but bond-orientational order remains finite. This is interpreted in terms of a defect-mediated theory of melting.

E. A. Jagla

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Viscosity of Silicate Melts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Viscosity of silicate melts is of fundamental importance in understanding volcanic and magmatic processes in Earth. In this dissertation, experiments were conducted to obtain high-pressure… (more)

Hui, Hejiu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Upgrade of CEBAF from 6 Gev To 12 Gev: Status  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF accelerator is being upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV by the US Department of Energy. The accelerator upgrade is being done within the existing tunnel footprint. The accelerator upgrade includes: 10 new srfbased high-performance cryomodules plus RF systems, doubling the 2K helium plant's capability, upgrading the existing beamlines to operate at nearly double the original performance envelope, and adding a beamline to a new experimental area. Construction is over 75% complete with final completion projected for late FY13. Details of the upgrade and status of the work will be presented.

Harwood, Leigh [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Ave, Newport News, VA, 23606 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 ± 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng [College of Physics and electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, 453007 (China)] [College of Physics and electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, 453007 (China); Liu, Zhongli, E-mail: zhongliliu@yeah.net [College of Physics and Electric Information, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, 471002 (China)] [College of Physics and Electric Information, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, 471002 (China)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regelation: why does ice melt under pressure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike other unusual materials whose bonds contract under compression, the O:H nonbond undergoes contraction and the H-O bond elongation towards O:H and H-O length symmetry in water and ice. The energy drop of the H-O bond dictates the melting point Tm depression of ice. Once the pressure is relieved, the O:H-O bond fully recovers its initial state, resulting in Regelation.

Sun, Chang Q

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Reduced Energy Consumption for Melting in Foundries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduced Energy Consumption for Melting in Foundries Ph.D. Thesis by Søren Skov-Hansen Supervisor-melted, and hence reduce the energy consumption for melting in foundries. Traditional gating systems are known

23

Melting of iron-aluminide alloys  

SciTech Connect

The melting of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and commercial vendors is described. The melting processes evaluated includes are melting, air-induction melting (AIM), vacuum-induction melting (VIM), and electroslag remelting (ESR). The quality of the ingots studied are base on internal soundness and the surface finish obtained. The ingots were analyzed for recovery of various elements during melting. The impurity levels observed in the alloys by various melting processes were compared. Recommendations are made for viable processes for commercial melting of these alloys. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Sikka, V.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

25

Viscosity of Ring Polymer Melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity of Ring Polymer Melts ... The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts ?0,linear to their ring counterparts ?0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. ... For this reason we have determined the viscosities by fitting the complex viscosity curves with different methods to obtain reliable estimates and error bars (see Supporting Information). ...

Rossana Pasquino; Thodoris C. Vasilakopoulos; Youn Cheol Jeong; Hyojoon Lee; Simon Rogers; George Sakellariou; Jürgen Allgaier; Atsushi Takano; Ana R. Brás; Taihyun Chang; Sebastian Gooßen; Wim Pyckhout-Hintzen; Andreas Wischnewski; Nikos Hadjichristidis; Dieter Richter; Michael Rubinstein; Dimitris Vlassopoulos

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems  

SciTech Connect

The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Access to glacial and subglacial environments in the Solar System by melting probe technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of power intensive devices such as ice-melting probes in the outer Solar System strongly points to radioactive units for ... traditional space application RHU (Radioactive Heater Unit) technology is based...

Stephan Ulamec; Jens Biele; Oliver Funke…

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Melting processes of oligomeric ? and ? isotactic polypropylene crystals at ultrafast heating rates  

SciTech Connect

The melting behaviors of ? (stable) and ? (metastable) isotactic polypropylene (iPP) crystals at ultrafast heating rates are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics method. Quantitative information about the melting processes of ?- and ?-iPP crystals at atomistic level is achieved. The result shows that the melting process starts from the interfaces of lamellar crystal through random dislocation of iPP chains along the perpendicular direction of lamellar crystal structure. In the melting process, the lamellar crystal gradually expands but the corresponding thickness decreases. The analysis shows that the system expansion lags behind the crystallinity decreasing and the lagging extents for ?- and ?-iPP are significantly different. The apparent melting points of ?- and ?-iPP crystals rise with the increase of the heating rate and lamellar crystal thickness. The apparent melting point of ?-iPP crystal is always higher than that of ?-iPP at differently heating rates. Applying the Gibbs-Thomson rule and the scaling property of the melting kinetics, the equilibrium melting points of perfect ?- and ?-iPP crystals are finally predicted and it shows a good agreement with experimental result.

Ji, Xiaojing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Xuehao, E-mail: xhhe@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Jiang, Shichun, E-mail: xhhe@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn [School of Material, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)] [School of Material, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

12 GeV Upgrade | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Science Science A Schematic of the 12 GeV Upgrade The 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly expand the research capabilities of Jefferson Lab, adding a fourth experimental hall, upgrading existing halls and doubling the power of the lab's accelerator. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S: 12 GeV Home Public Interest Scientific Opportunities Hall D Status Updates Contacts Three-Year Accelerator Schedule 2014 - 2016 top-right bottom-left-corner bottom-right-corner 12 GeV Upgrade Physicists at Jefferson Lab are trying to find answers to some of nature's most perplexing questions about the universe by exploring the nucleus of the atom. Their goal is to answer such questions as: "What is the universe made of?" and "What holds everyday matter together?" In their search for answers, physicists smash electrons into atoms using

30

Questions and Answers - What is a material with a freezing point above 0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's the melting point of steel? What's the melting point of steel? Previous Question (What's the melting point of steel?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is a meniscus?) What is a meniscus? What is a material with a freezing point above 0 degrees Celsius? A material exists as a solid when it is below its freezing point. So, we need to find a material that is a solid at some temperature above 0°C. Almost any solid abject around you would fit this description - an aluminum soda can, a candle or a piece of chocolate all have freezing points above 0°C. Keep in mind that a material's freezing point is the same as its melting point. These are just different terms for the same thing, it just depends on whether energy is going into a substance (melting) or if energy is being

31

Conference on Foundry Steel Melting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... British Iron and Steel Research Association held, at Ashorne Hill, near Leamington Spa, a conference devoted to a consideration of recent scientific developments in melting steel in a manner and ... that of supplying bulk steel for ingot manufacture, and it was the object of this conference to discuss these differences with the view of guiding steel founders in the choice of ...

1949-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice melts? Do you think melting glaciers and other land-based ice masses will make sea level rise? Will it submerge the continents on which the ice used to be? Most of the...

33

A LATTICE FOR THE 50 GEV MUON COLLIDER RING.  

SciTech Connect

A resent progress report on the lattice design of the 50-50 GeV muon collider is presented. The ring circumference needs to be as small as possible due to the short lifetime of the 50 GeV muons. The background at the detector is affected by the continuous decay of muons into electrons which requires a dipole between the high focusing quadrupoles and the detector. To obtain a luminosity on the order of 1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} S{sup {minus}1} it is required to have beam intensities on the order of 1 x 10{sup 12} particles per bunch. The rms momentum spread of the beam is equal to 0.12% and the beta functions at the interaction point are equal to 4 cm. The maxima of the betatron functions at these quadrupoles are 1300 m, resulting in large chromaticities which must be corrected by local chromatic correction. Pairs of horizontal and vertical chromatic sextupoles are located at locations where the corresponding betatron functions are 100 m and the values of the horizontal dispersion functions are 3 and 2 m, respectively. They are carefully placed so that most of their nonlinear effects are canceled. The dynamic aperture is larger than 7 times the mean size of the beam for the momentum offsets larger than {minus}6 and +10 sigmas.

TRBOJEVIC,D.

1998-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

34

Laser induced melting and crystallization of boron doped amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect

Transient reflectivity experiments have been performed to measure the dynamics of laser-induced melting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and the crystallization to {micro}c-Si of films with different thicknesses on Corning 7059 glass. The laser-induced melting takes place with a velocity of 13 to 24 m/s, while the solidification is about a factor 10 slower. The crystallization starts at the Si/glass interface and at the surface. In the center of the films Si remains liquid for an extended period of time. The crystallization dynamics point towards an heterogeneous morphology of laser-crystallized Si, where the surface and the interface layers are composed of small grains and the bulk of larger grains.

Nebel, C.E.; Schoeniger, S.; Dahlheimer, B.; Stutzmann, M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Talking Points  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Talking Points Talking Points NATURAL GAS MARKET INTEGRITY: How EIA Helps Presentation by William F. Hederman Congressional Research Service at EIA 30 th Anniversary Conference April 8, 2008 Washington, DC INTRODUCTION 1. Price levels and volatility cause suspicions. 2. Actual integrity and perceived integrity are both important for markets. 3. EIA was created in response to a crisis of confidence in energy market information. CANDIDATE INTEGRITY CRITERIA 1. Transparency 2. Efficiency (gathering, reporting, monitoring data) v. equity 3. Stability/predictability v. dynamism/volatility 4. Clarity (understanding) "DRAFT" TEN COMMANDMENTS/SUGGESTIONS 1. First presented at World Energy Congress, Rome, Nov. 2007 panel on Energy Market Integrity.

36

Importance of the ‘shape' of the melting regime during partial melting of the mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... been modelled using the familiar relationship2 for the composition of a perfect fractional partial melt (PFPM).

M. J. O'Hara

1985-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

The viscosity of polymer melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple theoretical argument is presented that gives the scaling behavior of the relaxation time in a polymer melt as a function of molecular weight M. The framework for this theory is based on the reptation model of de Gennes but also incorporates the effects of excluded volume. It is argued that the effects of excluded volume change the relaxation time from M 3 to M 3 exp(const×M 2/3). This argument agrees qualitatively with a direct simulation of the reptation model that incorporates many?chain excluded volume interactions. This simulation fits experimental data quite well giving an effective power law relationship between viscosity ? and molecular weight namely ??M 3.4±.1.

J. M. Deutsch

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Molecular dynamics of LiF melting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We performed molecular-dynamics simulations of the melting and/or freezing of LiF. The simulations were done using the Tosi-Fumi model and our own model of interatomic interactions. The latter was verified by ab initio calculations of the equation of state for LiF. We show that the recent molecular-dynamics calculations by Boehler and co-workers are not adequate and their model for the interactions is not capable of providing melting temperatures in agreement with experiment. Our calculated pressure dependence of the melting temperatures gives valuable information. We found that the B1-B2 transition in LiF at around 1 Mbar removes the discrepancy between the diamond-anvil cell and shockwave melting temperatures. An explanation of the controversy between “low” and “high” melting temperatures obtained from diamond-anvil cell experiments is suggested.

A. B. Belonoshko; R. Ahuja; B. Johansson

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum itmdelivery.pdf More...

40

ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

On muons of energy ?150 Gev in association with EAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Preliminary results of an investigation on energetic penetrating particles (muons) of energy ?150 Gev are reported. These particles...4–105 particles.

B. Chowdhury; Y. C. Saxena

1971-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement  

SciTech Connect

Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PIà ƒ  ¢Ã ‚  € à ‚  ™ s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Lamellar Crystallization and Melting of Polyoxymethylene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polyoxymethylene has been crystallized isothermally from the melt and from solution and has been analyzed for the lamellar fold period as related to the melting behavior. The melt?crystallized samples gave intense low?angle x?ray and DTA peaks and in addition produced weak x?ray reflections and shoulders on the DTA melting peaks. The strong peaks yielded Tm 0(s)=210±10°C and two independent methods of calculating ? e (s) place its value at 150 erg/cm2 with a maximum variation of ±40 erg/cm2. A method of plotting the data is proposed which allows a determination of ? from the experimental data of about 14 erg/cm2. The weak peaks although not as accurate as the strong ones yielded Tm 0(w)=182°±2°C and ? e (w)=37±10 erg/cm2.

D. R. Carter; Eric Baer

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Metal melting for volume reduction and recycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the experiences with melting contaminated steel materials for volume reduction and melting uranium-contaminated copper and aluminum for possible recycle. In the past there has not been an economic incentive to reduce the volume of low-level beta-gamma contaminated metallic scrap materials in the United States. With the rising cost of transportation and burial facility fees new interest in volume reduction is being generated. This new interest has been primarily focused at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) where the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was established to demonstrate both metal melting and incineration of combustible material for volume reduction. Other demonstration programs involving melting for volume reduction and recycle of aluminum and copper, as well as ferrous scrap, were related to the Cascade Improvement and Cascade Upgrade Programs (CIP/CUP) at the Paducah, Kentucky facility. While the melting demonstrations for the CIP/CUP material were not primarily based on economic incentives, several observations recorded during the programs are of interest with regard to melting of copper and aluminum. (4 refs., 8 tabs.)

Miller, R.L.

1987-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

MU(& Ge-+v,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

fil fil MU(& Ge-+v, . !d R&arch & Development b This document consists of 6 Contract Ho. pages and - . --------------_____---. figures No.--~--of.--~~-_-copies, Series,&,, This subcontract entered into this 20 day 0fSepte~ber , 1943, by and between the University of Cliicago, a corporation not for pecuniary profit organized under the ICVS of the Stnto of Illinois, of Chicago, Illinois (hereinafter called "the Contractor") and Yiolverine Tube Divisionof Caluzet 2 Eecla Consolidated Co;-,er co, . a cor?orntion organized under the laws cf the State of l~lch~;an - of Detroit, I:ichigan --- (hersinnftcr called "the Subcontractoi"). WIEHEAS, tho Contractor has heretofore onterod into a contract v;ith the United States of America (rcprcse;!tcd by its dtlly designated

47

Charm photoproduction at 20 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sixty-two charm events have been observed in an exposure of the SLAC Hybrid Facility toa backward sacttered laser beam. Based on 22 neutral and 21 charged decays we have measured the charmed-meson lifetimes to be ?D0=(6.8-1.8+2.3)×10-13 sec, ?D±=(7.4-2.0+2.3)×10-13 sec and their ratio ?D±?D0=1.1-0.3+0.6. The inclusive charm cross section at a photon energy of 20 GeV has been measured to be 56-23+24 nb. Evidence is presented for a non-DD¯ component to charm production, consistent with (35±20)% ?c+ production and some D*± production. We have found no unambiguous F decays.

K. Abe et al. ((SLAC Hybrid Facility Photon Collaboration))

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

3 GeV Injector Design Handbook  

SciTech Connect

This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results showed an error in melt pond coverage estimation of 1.1%. The technique was then applied to Svalbard sea ice over the 2003 melt season to produce an estimate of melt pond coverage evolution. This melt pond evolution showed a similar general trend...

Dodd, Emma

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We perform an extensive survey of nonstandard Higgs decays that are consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance. Our aim is to motivate a large set of new experimental analyses on the existing and forthcoming data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The explicit search for exotic Higgs decays presents a largely untapped discovery opportunity for the LHC collaborations, as such decays may be easily missed by other searches. We emphasize that the Higgs is uniquely sensitive to the potential existence of new weakly coupled particles and provide a unified discussion of a large class of both simplified and complete models that give rise to characteristic patterns of exotic Higgs decays. We assess the status of exotic Higgs decays after LHC run I. In many cases we are able to set new nontrivial constraints by reinterpreting existing experimental analyses. We point out that improvements are possible with dedicated analyses and perform some preliminary collider studies. We prioritize the analyses according to their theoretical motivation and their experimental feasibility. This document is accompanied by a Web site that will be continuously updated with further information [http://exotichiggs.physics.sunysb.edu].

David Curtin; Rouven Essig; Stefania Gori; Prerit Jaiswal; Andrey Katz; Tao Liu; Zhen Liu; David McKeen; Jessie Shelton; Matthew Strassler; Ze’ev Surujon; Brock Tweedie; Yi-Ming Zhong

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

A quasimechanism of melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids  

SciTech Connect

It has been know for half a century that many crystalline organic solids undergo an acceleration in the rate of thermal decomposition as the melting temperature is approached. This acceleration terminates at the melting point, exhibiting an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence in the faster decomposition rate from the liquid phase. This observation has been modeled previously using various premelting behaviors based on e.g. freezing point depression induced by decomposition products or solvent impurities. These models do not, however, indicate a mechanism for liquid formation and acceleration which is an inherent function of the bulk thermodynamics of the molecule. Here we show that such an inherent thermodynamic mechanism for liquid formation exists in the form of the so-called quasi-liquid layer at the solid surface. We explore a kinetic mechanism which describes the acceleration of rate and is a function of the free energies of sublimation and vaporization. We construct a differential rate law from these thermodynamic free energies and a normalized progress variable. We further construct a reduced variable formulation of the model which is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and show that it is applicable to the observed melt acceleration in several common organic crystalline solids. A component of the differential rate law, zero order in the progress variable, is shown to be proportional to the thickness of the quasiliquid layer predicted by a recent thermodynamic theory for this phenomenon. This work therefore serves not only to provide new insight into thermal decomposition in a broad class or organic crystalline solids, but also further validates the underlying thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon of liquid formation on the molecular surface at temperatures below the melting point.

Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

Carper, J.D. (Hercules Inc., Wilmington, DE (US))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview of plasma-based accelerator concepts. IEEE Trans.using laser wake?eld accelerators. Meas. Sci. Technol. 12,for GeV laser-plasma accelerators. In Advanced Accelerator

Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Electron Coherence in a Melting Lead Monolayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Pb(1,0) spots in the LEED patterns of Fig. 1, B to D...azimuthal modulation of the LEED intensities above Tm is likely not a manifestation...associated with the particular LEED spot, and {xi} is the temperature-dependent...British Columbia V6T1Z4, Canada. Electron coherence in a melting...

F. Baumberger; W. Auwärter; T. Greber; J. Osterwalder

2004-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

55

Electron Coherence in a Melting Lead Monolayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...azimuthal modulation of the LEED intensities above Tm is likely...sixfold symmetric elementary building blocks of the 2D liquid. The slight anisotropy...associated with the particular LEED spot, and {xi} is the temperature-dependent...British Columbia V6T1Z4, Canada. Electron coherence in a melting...

F. Baumberger; W. Auwärter; T. Greber; J. Osterwalder

2004-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Melting Layer: A Laboratory Investigation of Ice Particle Melt and Evaporation near 0°C  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Melting, freezing, and evaporation of individual and aggregates of snow crystals are simulated in the laboratory under controlled temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity. Crystals of selected habit are grown on a vertical filament and ...

R. G. Oraltay; J. Hallett

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SETTLEMENT POINTS (Congo, Democra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SETTLEMENT POINTS ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ! ! ( (Congo, Democra Rwanda Republic of Tanzania Democratic Republic of Congo Settlement Points Administrative Units National

Columbia University

58

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Does the water overflow when ice melts? Do you think that melting icebergs will make the sea level rise? Do you have any reason to support your answer in question (2)...

59

The Melting Temperature of Bulk Silicon from ab initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

SciTech Connect

We estimated a melting temperature of Tm ~ 1540 ± 90 K at zero pressure for silicon from constant enthalpy and constant pressure (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations of a coexisting crystalline-liquid phase. The computed Tm is below the experimental melting point of 1685 K, but it is consistent with a previously predicted first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) at a critical point Tc ~ 1232 K and Pc ~ - 12kB [Ganesh and Widom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 075701 (2009)], which is in a highly supercooled state. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Characterization of Nanoparticle/Polymer Melt Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two types of nanoparticles are studied: carbon nanofibers and nanoclays. These nanoparticles are incorporated into a polystyrene matrix using different techniques. For the carbon nanofiber/PS composite solvent casting assisted with sonication and melt compounding methods are used. For nanoclay/PS system exfoliated and intercalated composites are prepared using in?situ polymerization and melt compounding methods respectively. Dispersion of these nanoparticles in the PS matrix is studied using TEM SEM and XRD. Rheological characterization of these composites is studied using the Rheometrics Mechanical Spectrometer (RMS800) for shear rheology and Rheometrics Melt Extensiometer (RME) for extensional rheology. Effects of the nanoparticle concentration and dispersion methods on the rheology are studied. The morphology of the composites is studied after the samples have been deformed in the rheometers at certain stage. The orientation of the nanoparticles is quantified based on TEM micrographs. Models are developed to relate the rheology the rheology of nanoparticle/polymer composites to particle concentration orientation and length; these model predictions are compared with our experimentak measurements.

Kurt Koelling; Stephen Bechtel; Jianhua Xu; Yingru Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Material Point Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Point Methods and Multiphysics for Fracture and Multiphase Problems Joseph Teran, UCLA and Alice Koniges, LBL Contact: jteran@math.ucla.edu Material point methods (MPM)...

62

GeV Emission from Collisional Magnetized Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic fields may play a dominant role in gamma-ray bursts, and recent observations by the Fermi satellite indicate that GeV radiation, when detected, arrives delayed by seconds from the onset of the MeV component. Motivated by this, we discuss a magnetically dominated jet model where both magnetic dissipation and nuclear collisions are important. We show that, for parameters typical of the observed bursts, such a model involving a realistic jet structure can reproduce the general features of the MeV and a separate GeV radiation component, including the time delay between the two. The model also predicts a multi-GeV neutrino component.

P. Mészáros; M. J. Rees

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

H. B. Thacker

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

On the correlation between hydrogen bonding and melting points in the inositols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 new phases of the inositols, 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexahydroxycyclohexane, were found. Crystal structure determinations and thermal analyses reveal a very complex picture of phases, rotator phases and phase transitions.

Bek?, S.L.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Simple Vacuum Evaporation Method of High Melting-point Metals and Its Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the height of the standard carbon film alone. The standard carbon film about 3,000 A in thickness was prepared by micro-grid technics.6 ' W and Au film are evaporated on standard carbon film 50-200 A in thickness. Those thickness of film......

Masaru KATOH; Hideki NAKAZUKA

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, synchrotron radiation emitted by circulating electron beams has come into wide use as a powerful, versatile source of x-rays for probing the structure of matter and for studying various physical processes. Several synchrotron radiation facilities with different designs and characteristics are now in regular operation throughout the world, with recent additions in this country being the 0.8-GeV and 2.5-GeV rings of NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, none of the operating facilities has been designed to use a low-emittance, high-energy stored beam, together with modern undulator devices, to produce a large number of hard x-ray beams of extremely high brilliance. This document is a proposal to the Department of Energy to construct and operate high-energy synchrotron radiation facility at Argonne National Laboratory. We have now chosen to set the design energy of this facility at 7.0 GeV, with the capability to operate at up to 7.5 GeV.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG PLASMA CELL A Proposal to the Stanford Linear. A single SLC bunch is used to both induce wakefields in the one meter long plasma and to witness that are needed to apply high-gradient plasma wakefield acceleration to large scale accelerators. The one meter

68

12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

Leckey, John P. [Indiana U.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

Leckey, John P. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Charm Photoproduction Cross Section at 20 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forty-seven charm events have been observed in an exposure of the SLAC Hybrid Facility bubble chamber to a 20-GeV backward-scattered laser beam. Thirty-seven events survive all the necessary cuts imposed. Based on this number the total charm cross section is calculated to be 63-28+33 nb.

K. Abe et al. ((Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Hybrid Facility Photon Collaboration))

1983-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

RUNNING THE AGS MMPS AT 5 HZ, 24 GEV.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to an equivalent proton enera of 29 GeV. At this energy, the maximum intensity achieved is 7 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. This corresponds to an average beam power of about 0.2 MW. Future programs in high-energy and neutron physics may require an upgrade of the AGS accelerator to an average beam power of around 4 MW, with proton beams at the energy of 24 GeV. This can be achieved with an increase of the beam intensity to 2 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse that requires a 1.5-GeV super-conducting linac [1], as a new injector and by upgrading the power supply system to allow cycling at 5 beam pulses per second. This paper describes the present mode of operation of the AGS main magnet power supply, the requirements for operation at 5 Hz and a proposed sorption of all modifications required to upgrade the AGS main magnet power supply to operate at 5 HZ, with proton beams at the energy of 24 GeV.

MARNERIS,I.; ROSER,T.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; SANDBERG,J.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sandia National Laboratories: Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

melter, and completed the melting in less than 4 days. The outstanding effort included CSP group engineers and technologists, safety, industrial health, and ergonomics experts,...

73

Photoinduced Effects in UV Laser Melting of Si in UHV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of laser heating and melting of Si in UHV is investigated by transient reflectivity with single pulse sensitivity. It is found that the heating and melting dynamics cannot be accounted for by a model of heat flow using the thermal and optical properties of Si. Experiment and theory can be reconciled assuming significantly smaller thermal conductivity and heat capacity at all temperatures from ambient to melting. The melting temperature is also smaller. It is suggested that these specific parameters are related to the photoinduced plasma.

Bogdan Dragnea and Bernard Bourguignon

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

preparing and melting the metal off-site using efficient electric Direct Immersion (DI) heat- ers, then transporting the molten metal in Transportable Electric Ladle (TEL) trucks...

75

EA-0389: Proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at DOE's Argonne...

76

Twofold reentrant melting in a double-Gaussian fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotropic pair potentials that are bounded at the origin have been proposed from time to time as models of the effective interaction between macromolecules of interest in the chemical physics of soft matter. We present a thorough study of the phase behavior of point particles interacting through a potential which combines a bounded short-range repulsion with a much weaker attraction at moderate distances, both of Gaussian shape. Notwithstanding the fact that the attraction acts as a small perturbation of the Gaussian-core model potential, the phase diagram of the double-Gaussian model (DGM) is far richer, showing two fluid phases and four distinct solid phases in the case that we have studied. Using free-energy calculations, the various regions of confluence of three distinct phases in the DGM system have all been characterized in detail. Moreover, two distinct lines of reentrant melting are found, and for each of them a rationale is provided in terms of the elastic properties of the solid phases.

S. Prestipino; C. Speranza; G. Malescio; P. V. Giaquinta

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

Meson Spectroscopy at JLab@12 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Meson, being the simplest hadronic bound system, is the ideal "laboratory" to study the interaction between quarks, to understand the role of the gluons inside hadrons and to investigate the origin of color confinement. To perform such studies it is important to measure the meson spectrum, with precise determination of resonance masses and properties, looking for rare qbar q states and for unconventional mesons with exotic quantum numbers (i.e. mesons with quantum numbers that are not compatible with a qbar q structure). With the imminent advent of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab a new generation of meson spectroscopy experiments will start: "Meson-Ex" in Hall B and "GLUEX" in Hall D. Both will use photo-production to explore the spectrum of mesons in the light-quark sector, in the energy range of few GeVs.

Celentano, Andrea [INFN-GENOVA

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Inclusive photoproduction of strange baryons at 20 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cross sections are presented for the inclusive photoproduction of KS0, ?, ?¯, ?-, ?¯ -, ?0, and ?*±(1385) at 20 GeV. An upper limit to ?- production is also given. The data come from 284 000 hadronic events photoproduced in the SLAC 1-m hydrogen-bubble-chamber hybrid facility exposed to a nearly monochromatic, polarized 20-GeV backscattered photon beam. A comparison of the KS0, ?, ?¯, and ?- rates per inelastic event to ?±p data show that ?p rates are consistent with being higher than the ?±p rates, providing evidence of an ss¯ component of the photon. The pair cross sections for KS0KS0, KS0?, KSo?¯, and ??¯ are presented. The xF distributions of the ?, ?¯, and ?- are compared to a quark-diquark fusion model, giving information on strange-baryon photoproduction mechanisms.

K. Abe et al.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Particle Production in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 9.2 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report we present the first test run results from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 9.2 GeV at RHIC. The large acceptance STAR detector has collected ~3k minimum bias collisions during this test run. The azimuthal anisotropy, identified particle spectra, particle ratios and HBT radii are observed to be consistent with the previous measurements from CERN SPS at similar center of mass energies. These results from the lowest collision energy at RHIC demonstrate the STAR detector's readiness to collect high quality data for the proposed Critical Point Search Program which allows us to explore the QCD phase diagram.

Jiayun Chen

2009-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

Homogeneous bubble nucleation in rhyolitic melt: Experiments and nonclassical theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogeneous bubble nucleation in rhyolitic melt: Experiments and nonclassical theory H. M eruptions. The first and most critical step in degassing is the nucleation of gas bubbles, which requires inferred from bubble nucleation experiments in silicate melts are, however, lower than direct macroscopic

Gonnermann, Helge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang * The Department of Geological Sciences June 2000; accepted 8 June 2000 Abstract We report experimental data of bubble growth in natural rhyolitic melt with 1.4^2.0 wt% initial total H2O at 0.1 MPa and 500^600³C. Growth of many bubbles

Zhang, Youxue

82

GeV emission from Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the GeV afterglow emission expected from a few mechanisms related to GRBs and their afterglows. Given the brightness of the early X-ray afterglow emission measured by Swift/XRT, GLAST/LAT should detect the self-Compton emission from the forward-shock driven by the GRB ejecta into the circumburst medium. Novel features discovered by Swift in X-ray afterglows (plateaus and chromatic light-curve breaks) indicate the existence of a pair-enriched, relativistic outflow located behind the forward shock. Bulk and inverse-Compton upscattering of the prompt GRB emission by such outflows provide another source of GeV afterglow emission detectable by LAT. The large-angle burst emission and synchrotron forward-shock emission are, most likely, too dim at high photon energy to be observed by LAT. The spectral slope of the high-energy afterglow emission and its decay rate (if it can be measured) allow the identification of the mechanism producing the GeV transient emission following GRBs.

A. Panaitescu

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability of Viscoelastic Poiseuille Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability generic route to melt fracture via a weakly nonlinear subcritical instability of viscoelastic Poiseuille ``subcritical'') instability due to normal stress effects; this instability appears to make melt fracture

van Saarloos, Wim

84

Thermodynamics of SiO2H2O uid near the upper critical end point from quartz solubility measurements at 10 kbar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fundamental implications for uid-rock interaction in the lower crust and upper mantle (Manning, 2004; Hack et systems may exhibit critical end points on their hydrous melting curves (e.g., Hack et al., 2007a

Manning, Craig

85

ARM - Point Reyes News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Planning MASRAD Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Outreach Posters Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (horizontal) Climate Research at...

86

Contemporary Trends power point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power point slides guiding presentation on closing the gap between political acceptability and administrative sustainability as a prerequisite for effective governance. Leadership challenges are described

Nalbandian, John

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Small Glass-Melting Furnaces for Clear, Tinted, and Specialized Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the design and application areas of small-sized glass-melting furnaces for melting various-purpose glasses are supplied.

A. A. Dymov; V. A. Fedorova

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

String melting in a photon bath  

SciTech Connect

We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

Karouby, Johanna, E-mail: karoubyj@mit.edu [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachussetts 02139 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

David Rue

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Overview o floating point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condition codes and branches are same as for single-precision o absolute value and negation can Co-processor o Integer, BCD, and floating point representations o floating point have sign instructions) or even popped twice (FCOMPP) o tests set condition codes: - C0: less or unordered

Biagioni, Edoardo S.

95

Point-Based Graphics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The polygon-mesh approach to 3D modeling was a huge advance, but today its limitations are clear. Longer render times for increasingly complex images effectively cap image complexity, or else stretch budgets and schedules to the breaking point. Point-based ... Keywords: Computer Graphics, Computers

Markus Gross; Hanspeter Pfister

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Forward charge asymmetry in 20-GeV gammap reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast forward particles photoproduced in 20-GeV interactions on a hydrogen target are shown to be preferentially positive, the asymmetry increasing with transverse momentum and Feynman x. Evidence is given that this effect is not due to forward-going target fragments. A model in which production from the photon of a forward-going spectator u is preferred over a ?, due to a higher probability for interactions of antiquarks with the proton constituents, is shown to be qualitatively consistent with the data.

V. R. O’Dell et al.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

6 GeV light source project cost estimating procedure  

SciTech Connect

To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (VBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A.

NONE

1985-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

An 8-GeV Synchrotron-Based Proton Driver  

SciTech Connect

In January 2002, the Fermilab Director initiated a design study for a high average power, modest energy proton facility. Such a facility is a possible candidate for a construction project in the U.S. starting in the middle of this decade. The key technical element is a new machine, dubbed the ''Proton Driver,'' as a replacement of the present Booster. The study of an 8-GeV synchrotron-based proton driver has been completed and published. This paper will give a summary report, including machine layout and performance, optics, beam dynamics issues, technical systems design, civil construction, cost estimate and schedule.

Weiren Chou

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

Point-contact spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-contacts between metals at low temperatures reveal non-linear structures in the current-voltage characteristics. These deviations from Ohm's law allow an energy-resolved spectroscopy of the interaction of the conduction electrons with elementary excitations (e.g. phonons) in a metal. To explain the method, the important parameters (electron mean free path versus contact dimension) in point-contact spectroscopy will be discussed together with examples of spectroscopic information obtained in various systems. Local temperature gradients in the contact region offer the possibility to study thermo-electric phenomena in small constrictions, such as thermal voltages in non-homogeneous contacts and quenching of the phonon-drag term in the thermo-power in homogeneous contacts. Besides these aspects of the point-contact technique, recent experiments will be shown with applications of point contacts other than just spectroscopy: magneto-resistance of a point contact, high-frequency rectification with a point contact as the non-linear element, electron focusing using a double point-contact set-up, electrical noise in constrictions and generation of phonons by means of point contacts.

A M Duif; A G M Jansen; P Wyder

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Melt generation in the Earth's mantle at Convergent Plate Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The five geologic studies presented in this thesis document how the recycling of tectonic plates at subduction zones has a profound effect on the melting behavior of the Earth's mantle. Two experimental studies (Chapters ...

Till, Christy B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Plasma of Electric Arc Discharge between Melted Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma of electric arc discharge between melted electrodes was experimentally investigated. Diagnostics of electric arc plasma was carried out. Optical emission and ... in plasma tends to be located at the arc ax...

A.N. Veklich; I.L. Babich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VELOCITY OF SOUND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physics VELOCITY OF SOVND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Approved as to style and content by& (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departsmnt) (Mem er (Member) May 1968...

Whitehead, John Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method and apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, T.F.; Hurd, J.L.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Hurd, Jeffery L. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Characterization of electron beam melted uranium - 6% niobium ingots  

SciTech Connect

A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to characterize uranium, 6{percent} niobium ingots produced via electron beam melting,hearth refining and continuous casting and to compare this material with conventional VIM/skull melt /VAR material. Samples of both the ingot and feed material were analyzed for niobium, trace metallic elements, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. Ingot samples were also inspected metallographically and via microprobe analysis.

McKoon, R.H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Dynamics of crystallization from segregated block copolymer melts  

SciTech Connect

Microphase separation in semicrystalline block copolymers can be driven by two forces: thermodynamic incompatibility between blocks or crystallization of one or more blocks. Prior work has demonstrated that when the block incompatibility is small, crystallization occurs from a single-phase melt and alternating lamellar microdomains result regardless of the copolymer composition. Several experimental studies have examined the time-resolved process of crystallization from single-phase melts. An added complexity in the case of semicrystalline block copolymers which have large block incompatibilities is the possible formation of an ordered melt mesophase; the presence of these microdomains may affect the crystallization process and the resultant morphology. A number of studies have investigated time-resolved crystallization from weakly segregated diblock copolymer melts, concluding that crystallization destroys any pre-existing melt microstructure resulting in a lamellar morphology. We recently reported the statically determined crystallization results for a series of ethylene-block-(3-methyl-1-butene) polymers, which will be referred to as E/MB`s. The composition of each of the polymers in the series was held constant at {approx}26 wt. % E (f{sub E}) block to produce hexagonally packed cylindrical melts, while the molecular weights were altered to obtain varying degrees of incompatibility. Through static scattering measurements, we have clearly shown that a strongly segregated cylindrical melt can confine crystallization to the pre-established microdomains under ordinary processing conditions. In this work, combined synchrotron-based SAXS and WAXS are employed to dynamically follow the microphase separation and crystallization in these materials at both the unit cell and microdomain scales.

Quiram, D.J.; Register, R.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Marchand, G.R. [Dow Chemical Co., Plaquemine, LA (United States); Ryan, A.J. [Univ. of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Strategic Focus Points  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus Points Focus Points June 2011 1. Establish the human capital and organizational foundation to create a high-performing organization. 2. Implement a cyber risk-management and incident response program that ensures effective security of Federal and M&O networks, provides appropriate flexibility, and meets legal requirements and OMB expectations. 3. Improve IT Services (EITS) into a best-in-class provider from both a technical and business perspective. 4. Implement and institutionalize a reformed, integrated information management governance process that respects the goal to treat M&Os distinctively different than true Federal entities. 5. Transition to 5-year planning and programming, using the NNSA Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Evaluation (PPBE) process as a starting point to include resource and requirements validation.

110

Improving Floating Point Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Improving Floating Point Compression through Binary Masks Leonardo A. Bautista Gomez Argonne National Laboratory Franck Cappello Argonne National Laboratory Abstract-Modern scientific technology such as particle accel- erators, telescopes and supercomputers are producing extremely large amounts of data. That scientific data needs to be processed using systems with high computational capabilities such as supercomputers. Given that the scientific data is increasing in size at an exponential rate, storing and accessing the data is becoming expensive in both, time and space. Most of this scientific data is stored using floating point representation. Scientific applications executed in supercomputers spend a large amount of CPU cycles reading and writing floating point values, making data compression techniques an interesting way to increase computing efficiency.

111

Application of a SeaWinds/QuikSCAT sea ice melt algorithm for assessing melt dynamics in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of a SeaWinds/QuikSCAT sea ice melt algorithm for assessing melt dynamics] A remotely sensed sea ice melt algorithm utilizing SeaWinds/QuikSCAT (QuikSCAT) data is developed and applied resolution radiometer Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) data set is used to identify spatially coupled relationships

112

February 2013 Point Sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February 2013 MPTs and Point Sheets National Conference of Bar Examiners 302 South Bedford Street)...............................................30 LIBRARY Excerpts from the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, 25 U.S.C. §§ 1901 et seq...................33 Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Guidelines for State Courts; Indian Child Custody

Marsh, David

113

MYSTERY OF POINT CHARGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for more general potentials and dynamical systems are obtained in [9]. ..... with a suitable multiple of Q: this operation does not change common zeros of Q ...... Terao [16] on the number of critical points for the product of powers of real linear .... J.E.Goodman and J. O'Rourke eds.,Handbook of discrete and computational ...

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

SETTLEMENT POINTS Congo, Democra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! ! ! ! ( ( ( ( ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ( ( ( ( ( (( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( (!( Botswana Congo, Democra Congo Namibia Zambia GRUMPv1 A t l a n t i c O c e a n ´ 0 250 500 Km Lambert. Available at:http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/gpw/ Democratic Republic of Congo Settlement Points

Columbia University

115

Experimental limits on massive neutrinos from e(+)e(-) annihilations at 29 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search was made in 29-GeV e(+)e(-) annihilations for massive neutrinos decaying to e(±)X(?)(?) where X is a muon or meson. A 300-pb(-1) data sample yielded just one candidate event with a mass m(e)X>1.8 GeV. Significant limits are found for new...

Baringer, Philip S.; Akerlof, C.; Chapman, J.; Errede, D.; Ken, M. T.; Meyer, D. I.; Neal, H.; Nitz,D.; Thun, R.; Tschirhart, R.; Derrick, M.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used at the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at the LCLS at SLAC, and the lower energyThe BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator W.P. Leemansa,b,c , R, USA Abstract. An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

117

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Transient rheology of a polyethylene melt under shear  

SciTech Connect

Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, we have studied the response of a C{sub 100} model polymer melt to a step change from equilibrium to a constant, high shear rate flow. The transient shear stress of the model polymer melt exhibits pronounced overshoot at the strain value predicted by the reptation model, in striking similarity to melts of longer, entangled polymer governed by reptation motion. At the maximum of shear stress overshoot, the molecular orientational order and the alignment angle are found to be midway between those characteristic of Newtonian flow and full alignment with the flow. The Doi-Edwards theory is found to be applicable but only by taking into account the shear-rate-dependence of the terminal relaxation time. We further analyze the molecular origins of such behavior in short polymer chains by decomposing the total stress into the contributions from various molecular interactions. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

Moore, J. D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States) [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Chemical Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6268 (United States); Cui, S. T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States) [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Cochran, H. D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States) [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Cummings, P. T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States) [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennesee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Chemical Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6268 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Department of Computer Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Inverse melting in a system with positive heats of formation  

SciTech Connect

Supersaturated body-centered-cubic Fe-W solid solutions with positive heats of formation were prepared by cosputtering and mechanical alloying over a wide concentration range. Upon annealing, these solid solutions were observed to undergo amorphization in the range of 20{endash}37 at.{percent} W. For Fe{sub 70}W{sub 30} and Fe{sub 67}W{sub 33} the transformation was polymorphous, indicating an inverse melting behavior. A thermodynamic analysis of the Fe-W system, which was carried out using the calculation-of-phase-diagrams method, supported that inverse melting is energetically possible in the Fe-W system. The results demonstrate that inverse melting can also occur in systems with positive heats of amorphous phase formation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, H.Y.; Michaelsen, C.; Bormann, R. [Institute for Materials Research, GKSS-Research Center, Max-Planck-Strasse, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)] [Institute for Materials Research, GKSS-Research Center, Max-Planck-Strasse, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The effect of pressure upon the melting transition of polyethylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF PRESSURE UPON THE MELTING TRANSITION OF POLYETHYLENE o m vS n Z 8 i c6 C 0 A Thesis By George Joseph Nros Approved as to style and content by: C a rman o Comm ttee (Head of Department) August 1961 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT... of the melting transition temperature of polyethylene was found to be linear for samples which have been annealed. This dependence was found to conform to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and this equation was used to obtain values for the change in specific...

Mroz, George Joseph

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Porous Al alloys by local melting and diffusion of metal powders  

SciTech Connect

A novel method exploiting local melt and diffusion induced porosity is described for producing porous Al alloys. Aluminum powder and zinc powder were blended and cold-compacted to a near net shape. A porous Al-Zn alloy component was then formed by annealing the material above the melting point of zinc but below the solidus temperature of the alloy. Pores were generated by the diffusion of molten Zn into the solid Al grains. The pore structure is shown to be determined by the volume fraction, distribution, and size of the Zn powders in the powder mixture, and by time and temperature of the annealing heat treatment. The pores can be further expanded by incorporating small amounts of titanium hydride into the powder blend and conducting the annealing treatment above the decomposition temperature of the titanium hydride (T > 447 C). Porosity levels of 45 vol.% have been achieved to date. This processing approach appears amenable to the production of sandwich panels with a gradient porosity core and fully dense face sheets, and is applicable to other solid solution systems.

Wang, N.; Starke, E.A. Jr.; Wadley, H.N.G. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud - - Aerosol Properties Aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site at the AMF Point Reyes Site Maureen Dunn , Mike Jensen , Pavlos Kollias , Mark Miller , Peter Daum Mary Jane Bartholomew , David Turner , Elisabeth Andrews and Anne Jefferson Introduction Ground based observations from the MASRAD, Pt. Reyes AMF July 1-Sept 15, 2005 indicate a relationship between coastal marine stratus cloud properties, boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei and the upwelling of cool oceanic waters measured at an offshore NOAA buoy. Cloud Drizzle to CCN Atmosphere to Cloud Upwelling SST to Atmosphere Conclusion Coastal marine stratus clouds increase in thickness as the underlying sea surface

123

EAMidnightPointMahogany  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Prepared By Bureau of Land Management - Prineville and Burns Districts DOI-BLM-OR-P040-2011-0021-EA DOE/EA-1925 Environmental Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Lead Agency United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Prineville District 3050 N.E. 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754 Tel: 541 416 6700 Burns District 28910 Hwy 20 West, Hines, OR 97738 Tel: 541 573 4400 Cooperating Agency United States Department of Energy Golden Field Office Golden, Colorado 80401 Tel: 720-356-1563 Fax: 720-356-1560 April 2013 Environmental Assessment Table of Contents 1

124

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization of the SuperOPF Commercialization of the SuperOPF Framework: Phase III (Theme: Co- optimization Stochastic SuperOPF- renewables) Performers: PSERC: Hsiao-Dong Chiang - LEAD Cornell University: Ray Zimmerman Bigwood Systems, Inc.: Patrick Causgrove, Bin Wang Phase I: 1.(support industrial model) A commercial-grade core SuperOPF software supporting various industrial-grade power system models such as (i) CIM-compliance; and (ii) PSS/E data format 2. A multi-stage OPF solver with adaptive homotopy-based Interior Point Method for large- scale power systems (PJM: 14,000-bus data) Bigwood Systems Inc., 2013 3 Results: Efficiency and Robustness (Analytical Jacobian matrices) Loading Conditions One-Staged Interior Point Method Multi-Staged Scheme 1 Succeeded Succeeded

125

Improved measurement of the bb¯ production cross section in 920 GeV fixed-target proton-nucleus collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new measurement of the bb¯ production cross section in 920 GeV proton-nucleus collisions is presented by the HERA-B Collaboration. The bb¯ production is tagged via inclusive bottom quark decays into J/? mesons by exploiting the longitudinal separation of J/??l+l- decay vertices from the primary proton-nucleus interaction point. Both e+e- and ?+?- channels are reconstructed for a total of 83±12 inclusive b?J/?X events found. The combined analysis yields a bb¯ to prompt J/? cross section ratio of ??(bb¯)??J/?=0.032±0.005stat±0.004sys measured in the xF acceptance (-0.35

I. Abt et al. (HERA-B Collaboration)

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

The impact of hot-melt adhesives on the paper recycling process  

SciTech Connect

Hot melts and other adhesives can cause contamination problems in recycling paper and paper board. Some types of hot melts cause more problems than others in fouling mill equipment and affecting paper quality. Adhesive manufacturers are evaluating two categories of repulpable hot melts--dispersible or soluble hot melts and recoverable hot melts. This paper examines the paper recycling process to understand how hot melts cause problems. A simplified depiction of a paper recycling operation is shown. The steps in the process are described.

Hayes, P.J. (Nacan Products Ltd., Bampton, Ontario (Canada). Adhesive Division); Kauffman, T.F. (National Starch and Chemical Co., Bridgewater, NJ (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Spécification technique des stations de pompage pour les faisceaux secondaires des Zones Expérimentales du synchroton de 300 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spécification technique des stations de pompage pour les faisceaux secondaires des Zones Expérimentales du synchroton de 300 GeV

Coet, P

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Potential for tunneling based on rock and soil melting. Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The rock-melting drill was invented at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1960. Electrically heated, laboratory-scale drills were subsequently shown to penetrate igneous rocks at usefully high rates, with moderate power consumptions. The development of compact nuclear reactors and of heat pipes now makes possible the extension of this technology to much larger melting penetrators, potentially capable of producing holes up to several meters in diameter and several tens of kilometers long or deep. Development of a rapid, versatile, economical method of boring large, long shafts and tunnels offers solutions to many of man's most urgent ecological, scientific, raw-materials, and energy-supply problems. A melting method appears to be the most promising and flexible means of producing such holes. It is relatively insensitive to the composition, hardness, structure, and temperature of the rock, and offers the possibilities of producing self-supporting, glass-lined holes in almost any formation and (using a technique called lithofracturing) of eliminating the debris-removal problem by forcing molten rock into cracks created in the bore wall. Large rock-melting penetrators, called Electric Subterrenes or Nuclear Subterrenes according to the energy source used, are discussed in this report, together with problems anticipated in their development. It is concluded that this development is within the grasp of present technology.

Rowley, J.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Empirical Relationships for Estimating Liquid Water Fraction of Melting Snowflakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The liquid water fraction of individual snowflakes f is an important parameter when calculating the radar reflectivity of a melting layer. A ground-based observation of f at Nagaoka, Japan, was conducted by using dye-treated filter papers that ...

Ryohei Misumi; Hiroki Motoyoshi; Satoru Yamaguchi; Sento Nakai; Masaaki Ishizaka; Yasushi Fujiyoshi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Seasonal glacier melt contribution to streamflow Neil Schaner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region. One sixth of the world's population, and one quarter of its gross

Washington at Seattle, University of

131

Solubility of water in lime-alumina-silica melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The water solubility in fused silicates of the CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-Al2O3...systems has been measured using a vacuum fusion technique. The melts were equilibrated with nitrogen as “carrier gas” containing an acc...

P. L. Sachdev; A. Majdi?; H. Schenck

1972-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE MELTS AND MAGMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROPERTIES5 Density and Equation of State6 Enthalpy, Entropy and Heat Capacity7 VI. MAGMA TRANSPORT-1- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE MELTS AND MAGMA Charles E. Lesher PROPERTIES8 Magma Rheology9 Thermal Conductivity: Radiative and Phonon10 Diffusion: Self, Tracer and Chemical

Spera, Frank J.

133

An analysis of variations in isentropic melt productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Solid solutions at atmospheric pressure in the system CaO MgOSiO2 with special reference to the instabilities of diopside, akermanite, and monticellite. Prog. Exp. Pet. pp. 8996. London: NERC. Cawthorn, R. G. 1975 Degrees of melting in mantle diapirs...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Wide-band neutrino beams at 1000 GeV  

SciTech Connect

In a previous publication, S. Mori discussed various broad-band neutrino and antineutrino beams using 1000 GeV protons on target. A new beam (SST) has been designed which provides the same neutrino flux as the quadrupole triplet (QT) while suppressing the wrong sign flux by a factor of 18. It also provides more than twice as much high energy antineutrino flux than the sign-selected bare target (SSBT) and in addition, has better neutrino suppression. While it is possible to increase the flux obtained from the single horn system over that previously described, the conclusion which states any horn focussing system seems to be of marginal use for Tevatron neutrino physics, is unchanged. Neutrino and antineutrino event rates and wrong sign backgrounds were computed using NUADA for a 100 metric ton detector of radius 1.5 meters. Due to radiation considerations and the existing transformer location, the horn beam is placed in its usual position inside the Target Tube. All other beams are placed in Fronthall. Thus, for the wide-band Fronthall trains a decay distance of 520 meters is used, versus 400 meters for the horn train. (WHK)

Malensek, A.; Stutte, L.

1983-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conard Stair Conard Stair Enforcement Program Manager B&W Y-12 March 2012 Enforcement Coordination Working Group Spring 2012 Meeting Y-12 Approach to Enforcement Y-12 Enforcement Program Office (EPO) * Integrated program with a single point of contact for enforcement activities for radiological protection, worker safety and health, and classified information security * Proceduralized and automated process that provides consistent documentation of compliance determinations and reporting * Uses a decentralized approach with Line Management Price- Anderson Officers (LMPOs) assisted by a cadre of subject matter experts to perform screening determinations * Provides policy, direction, guidance, and independent oversight * Serves as chief technical advisor to senior leadership team on

136

SharePoint 2010 Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hello and welcome to SharePoint 2010. Microsoft SharePoint has journeyed a long way since the early days of 2001 and SharePoint Portal Server 2003. SharePoint administrators and developers jumped for joy in 20...

Robert Garrett

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Atomic-Level Study of Melting Behavior of GaN Nanotubes. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melting Behavior of GaN Nanotubes. Atomic-Level Study of Melting Behavior of GaN Nanotubes. Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential have been...

138

Investigation into the Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Melt-Drawn Filaments from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-density polyethylene (HDPE) were melt-processed in a single-screw extruder fitted with a fine screen mesh and capillary in extruder output rate in this region, an indicator of the melt interaction of the two phases as co

139

A melting model for variably depleted and enriched lherzolite in the plagioclase and spinel stability fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we develop a lherzolite melting model and explore the effects of variations in mantle composition, pressure, temperature, and H[subscript 2]O content on melt composition. New experiments and a compilation of experimental ...

Till, Christy B.

140

Controls on spatial and temporal variability in Northern Hemisphere terrestrial snow melt timing, 1979-2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spring snow melt onset has occurred earlier across much of Northern Hemisphere lands in the last four decades. Understanding the mechanisms driving spring melt has remained a challenge, particularly in its spatial and temporal variability. Here, ...

J. R. Mioduszewski; A. K. Rennermalm; D. A. Robinson; L. Wang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

What Controls the Melting Properties of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What Controls the Melting Properties of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies? Rongchao Jin the relative importance of nanoparticle, oligonucleotide, and environmental variables that contribute to the observed sharp melting transitions associated with DNA-linked nanoparticle structures. These variables

142

A Comparison of Melt Processes to Prepare YBaCuO with High J c  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several melt processes which promise high J c ...in bulk YBaCuO. A comparison of various melt processes such as MTG and MPMG was performed in this stud...

M. Murakami; A. Kondoh; H. Fujimoto; K. Takamuku…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

144

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Acceptance of Smart Grid Customer Acceptance of Smart Grid DOE Energy Advisory Committee Meeting June 6, 2013 Judith Schwartz, To the Point + INNOVATORS EARLY ADOPTERS EARLY MAJORITY LATE MAJORITY LATE ADOPTERS Indifferents Tech Enthusiasts Green Altruists Comfort Lovers Cost Conscious Doubters Green buildings Simple feedback interface Price incentives Seamless automation Who Are Our Customers? + Why Will They Care About SG? 1. Information, incentives, and automation to easily reduce or defer electricity use 2. Integrate clean generation and transportation 3. Reduce, pinpoint, and restore outages + Fly Under the Radar Active Engagement Slow Build Back end deployment first in sequence AMI rollout in process or pilots are imminent Practice incremental modernization efforts High % of "indifferent"

148

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tribal Leader Forum, Phoenix, AZ - May 30 - 31, 2013 State Incentives and Project Impacts Main Points - Market Context * State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) - What are they? - How can they help your project? - Potential gap means more market demand for RE projects Starting a Renewable Energy Project * What renewable resources exist? * What sites with resources do you own? * To whom will you sell the electricity? * How will federal and state incentives or policies impact your project? * Access to transmission * Other policies - Interconnection standards - Environmental standards Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) * A requirement set by a state for utilities to generate x% of electricity from renewables by a specific date

149

Repelling Point Bosons  

SciTech Connect

There is a body of conventional wisdom that holds that a solvable quantum problem, by virtue of its solvability, is pathological and thus irrelevant. It has been difficult to refute this view owing to the paucity of theoretical constructs and experimental results. Recent experiments involving equivalent ions trapped in a spatial conformation of extreme anisotropic confinement (longitudinal extension tens, hundreds or even thousands of times transverse extension) have modified the view of relevancy, and it is now possible to consider systems previously thought pathological, in particular point Bosons that repel in one dimension. It has been difficult for the experimentalists to utilize existing theory, mainly due to long-standing theoretical misunderstanding of the relevance of the permutation group, in particular the non-commutativity of translations (periodicity) and transpositions (permutation). This misunderstanding is most easily rectified in the case of repelling Bosons.

McGuire, J. B. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quantum melting of charge ice and non-Fermi-liquid behavior: An exact solution for the extended Falicov-Kimball model in the ice-rule limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact solution is obtained for a model of itinerant electrons coupled to ice-rule variables on the tetrahedron Husimi cactus, an analogue of the Bethe lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. It reveals a quantum critical point with the emergence of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in melting of the "charge ice" insulator. The electronic structure is compared with the numerical results for the pyrochlore-lattice model to elucidate the physics of electron systems interacting with the tetrahedron ice rule.

Masafumi Udagawa; Hiroaki Ishizuka; Yukitoshi Motome

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantum melting of charge ice and non-Fermi-liquid behavior: An exact solution for the extended Falicov-Kimball model in the ice-rule limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact solution is obtained for a model of itinerant electrons coupled to ice-rule variables on the tetrahedron Husimi cactus, an analogue of the Bethe lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. It reveals a quantum critical point with the emergence of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in melting of the "charge ice" insulator. The electronic structure is compared with the numerical results for the pyrochlore-lattice model to elucidate the physics of electron systems interacting with the tetrahedron ice rule.

Udagawa, Masafumi; Motome, Yukitoshi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

On the Effect of Porous Layers on Melting Heat Transfer in an Enclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Effect of Porous Layers on Melting Heat Transfer in an Enclosure E. A. Ellinger* and C. To enhance heat transfer, the porous layers are located in regions where the melting rates for a pure the porous layer and the pure fluid layer cause strong variations in heat transfer, melt convection

Beckermann, Christoph

153

GEOCHEMISTRY AND 40 AR GEOCHRONOLOGY OF IMPACT-MELT CLASTS IN LUNAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-melt clasts in lunar meteorites [1, 2]. The dissimilarity of DaG262 and Calcalong Creek impact-melt clasts clasts, melt veins and metal grains. Calcalong Creek [4] is a polymict breccia containing sub-mm clasts of both highlands and mare affinity welded by a glassy, vesicular matrix. It is unusual among lunar

Cohen, Barbara Anne

154

Examining the mechanics of granulation with a hot melt binder in a twin-screw extruder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examining the mechanics of granulation with a hot melt binder in a twin-screw extruder B. Mu, M processing Melt agglomeration Twin screw extruder a b s t r a c t Hot melt granulation involves particle-rotating intermeshing twin screw extruder for operating temperatures between 80 1C and 120 1C. Three different screw

Thompson, Michael

155

Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Foaming Theory and Mitigation Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to enhance the basic understanding of the role of glass chemistry, including the chemical kinetics of pre-melting, solid state reactions, batch melting, and the reaction pathways in glass and/or acid addition strategy changes on the overall melting process for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

Peeler, D.K.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

157

Complex Isothermal Crystallization and Melting Behavior of Nylon 6 Nanoclay Hybrids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex Isothermal Crystallization and Melting Behavior of Nylon 6 Nanoclay Hybrids ... The complex crystallization and melting behavior of neat Nylon-6 and two Nylon-6-nanoclay hybrids with different montmorillonite concentration was studied using several experimental techniques. ... The results, depending on the crystallization temperature, indicated two sequences of melting for neat Nylon-6 and four for the nanoclay hybrids. ...

A. Zapata-Espinosa; F. J. Medellín-Rodríguez; N. Stribeck; A. Almendarez-Camarillo; S. Vega-Díaz; B. S. Hsiao; B. Chu

2005-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

END POINTS MANAGEMENT End Points Management The Need for End Point Specifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT End Points Management The Need for End Point Specifications The Need for a Method to Derive End Points Guiding Principles for Specifying End Points Tailored Approach Headquarters, Field Office, and Contractor Roles End Points Approvals Contractor Organization Functions for End Points Implementation Training and Walkdown Guidance for the Facility Engineers The Need for End Point Specifications The policy of the EM is that a formal project management approach be used for the planning, managing, and conducting of its projects. A fundamental premise of project management for facility deactivation is answering the question: How do you know when the project is complete? Just as the design specifications are essential to a

159

Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » July 2013 Two GeV Electrons Achieved by Laser Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Scientists at University of Texas, Austin, accelerate electrons to 2 GeV in table top apparatus. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Neil Fazel The inside of the University of Texas, Austin, vacuum chamber where

160

St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to allow you to recycle the following materials: To find your nearest Recycling Point please visit www.fifedirect.org.uk/wasteaware or call the Recycling Helpline on 08451 55 00 22. R&A GOLF CLUB OLD COURSE HOTEL UNIVERSITY NORTH HAUGH

St Andrews, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Polymer crystal-melt interfaces and nucleation in polyethylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetic barriers cause polymers to crystallize incompletely, into nanoscale lamellae interleaved with amorphous regions. As a result, crystalline polymers are full of crystal-melt interfaces, which dominate their physical properties. The longstanding theoretical challenge to understand these interfaces has new relevance, because of accumulating evidence that polymer crystals often nucleate via a metastable, partially ordered "rotator" phase. To test this idea requires a theory of the bulk and interfacial free energies of the critical nucleus. We present a new approach to the crystal-melt interface, which represents the amorphous region as a grafted brush of loops in a self-consistent pressure field. We combine this theory with estimates of bulk free energy differences, to calculate nucleation barriers and rates via rotator versus crystal nuclei for polyethylene. We find rotator-phase nucleation is indeed favored throughout the temperature range where nucleation is observed. Our methods can be extended to other polymers.

Scott T. Milner

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Experimental investigation of the melting transition of the plasma crystal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the melting transition of a Coulomb crystal consisting of dust particles immersed in an rf parallel plate discharge in helium were performed. The dust crystal is shown to be solid at higher gas pressure (120 Pa) and low discharge power (10–20 W). Reducing the gas pressure or increasing the discharge power leads to fluid states of the dust ensemble. Even gaslike states are observed at low pressures of about 40 Pa. The transition is attributed to an increasing effective particle temperature. The phase transition is compared with one-component-plasma and Yukawa models, and with basic predictions of theories for two-dimensional melting. © 1996 The American Physical Society.

A. Melzer; A. Homann; A. Piel

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using gas jets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one embodiment, a sheet production apparatus comprises a vessel configured to hold a melt of a material. A cooling plate is disposed proximate the melt and is configured to form a sheet of the material on the melt. A first gas jet is configured to direct a gas toward an edge of the vessel. A sheet of a material is translated horizontally on a surface of the melt and the sheet is removed from the melt. The first gas jet may be directed at the meniscus and may stabilize this meniscus or increase local pressure within the meniscus.

Kellerman, Peter L; Thronson, Gregory D; Sun, Dawei

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dislocation-mediated melting of one-dimensional Rydberg crystals  

SciTech Connect

We consider cold Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice in the Mott regime with a single atom per site at zero temperature. An external laser drive with Rabi frequency {Omega} and laser detuning {Delta} creates Rydberg excitations whose dynamics is governed by an effective spin-chain model with (quasi) long-range interactions. This system possesses intrinsically a large degree of frustration resulting in a ground-state phase diagram in the ({Delta},{Omega}) plane with a rich topology. As a function of {Delta}, the Rydberg blockade effect gives rise to a series of crystalline phases commensurate with the optical lattice that form a so-called devil's staircase. The Rabi frequency {Omega}, on the other hand, creates quantum fluctuations that eventually lead to a quantum melting of the crystalline states. Upon increasing {Omega}, we find that generically a commensurate-incommensurate transition to a floating Rydberg crystal that supports gapless phonon excitations occurs first. For even larger {Omega}, dislocations within the floating Rydberg crystal start to proliferate and a second, Kosterlitz-Thouless-Nelson-Halperin-Young dislocation-mediated melting transition finally destroys the crystalline arrangement of Rydberg excitations. This latter melting transition is generic for one-dimensional Rydberg crystals and persists even in the absence of an optical lattice. The floating phase and the concomitant transitions can, in principle, be detected by Bragg scattering of light.

Sela, Eran; Garst, Markus [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, DE-50937 Koeln (Germany); Punk, Matthias [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, DE-85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV  

SciTech Connect

The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) guidance.

Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Inelastic interaction induced by high-energy muons (6 GeV, 12 GeV) at low momentum-transfer in nuclear emulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic scattering of 6 and 12 GeV muons has been studied in Ilford K5 nuclear emulsions. For energy transfers greater than 150 MeV (for ?...2..., the cross-sections are respectively (11.1±1.4) ?b/nucleon at 12...

J. C. Montret; B. Coupat; B. Michel; F. Vazeille

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Group Response System Turning Point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · But more often I do use it within a slide show. Somewhat more difficult to manage. But some great uses-Add-in for Power Point. · Some "Clicking" practice. #12;Make A Slide-Add to this file. · Esc, click on TurningPoint add-in · Pick Insert Slide in Turning Point bar and insert a Turning Point slide after this slide

168

Printing low-melting-point alloy ink to directly make a solidified circuit or functional device with a heating pen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conductivity. Nanoscale 6, 1622-1628. ( doi:10.1039/c3nr05479a ) 33 Wang, L , and J Liu. 2014 Compatible hybrid 3D printing of metal and nonmetal inks for direct manufacture of end functional devices. Sci. China Technol. Sci. 57( doi...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fluctuations of the number of neutral pions at high multiplicity in pp interactions at 50 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained by measuring fluctuations of the number of neutral pions in the SERP-E-190 Experiment (Thermalization Project) upon irradiating a liquid-hydrogen target of the SVD-2 setup with a beam of 50-GeV protons are presented. A simulation of the detection of photons from the decay of neutral pions with the aid of an electromagnetic calorimeter revealed a linear relation between the number of detected photons and the mean number of neutral pions in an event. After the introduction of corrections for the loss of charged tracks because of a limited acceptance of the setup, trigger operation, and the efficiency of the data-treatment system, distributions of the number of neutral pions, N{sub 0}, were obtained for each value of the total number of particles in an event, N{sub tot} = N{sub ch} + N{sub 0}. The fluctuation parameter {omega} = D/ Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket N{sub 0} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket was measured. In the region N{sub tot} > 22, fluctuations of the number of neutral pions increase, which, within statistical models (GCE, CE, MCE), indicates that the system involving a large number of pions approaches the pion-condensate state. This effect was observed for the first time.

Ryadovikov, V. N., E-mail: riadovikov@ihep.ru [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

PowerPoint Posters 1 PowerPointPowerPoint Creating PostersCreating Posters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PowerPoint Posters 1 PowerPointPowerPoint ­­ Creating PostersCreating Posters Course Description: This course is designed to assist the you in creating eye-catching effective posters for presentation of research findings at scientific conferences and exhibits. Participants will create a 4' x 6' poster from

Collins, Gary S.

171

Frictional melt pulses during a V1.1 Ma earthquake along the Alpine Fault, New Zealand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at which future catastrophic earth- quakes may originate. Our current understanding of frictional melting

172

Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts  

SciTech Connect

Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad “tail” arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt “network.” Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method to decrease loss of aluminum and magnesium melts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to minimize oxidation of metal during melting processes is provided, the method comprising placing solid phase metal into a furnace environ-ment, transforming the solid-phase metal into molten metal phase having a molten metal surface, and creating a barrier between the surface and the environment. Also provided is a method for isolating the surface of molten metal from its environment, the method comprising confining the molten metal to a controlled atmos-phere, and imposing a floating substrate between the surface and the atmosphere.

Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Calaway, Jr., Wallis F. (Woodridge, IL); Moore, Jerry F. (Naperville, IL); Krumdick, Gregory K. (Crete, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process.

Hill, Mary Ann (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Bingert, Sherri A. (Jemez Springs, NM); Thoma, Dan J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process. 5 figs.

Hill, M.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Bingert, S.A.; Thoma, D.J.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of Size Polydispersity on Melting of Charged Colloidal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce simple prescriptions of the Yukawa potential to describe the effect of size polydispersity and macroion shielding effect in charged colloidal systems. The solid-liquid phase boundaries were presented with the Lindemann criterion based on molecular dynamics simulations. Compared with the Robbins-Kremer-Grest simulation results, a deviation of melting line is observed at small $\\lambda$, which means large macroion screening length. This deviation of phase boundary is qualitatively consistent with the simulation result of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation with full many-body interactions. It is found that this deviation of the solid-liquid phase behaviour is sensitive to the screening parameter.

Yong Chen

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Pion correlations in 1.8A GeV Ar on KCl and La and 1.2A GeV Xe on La  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are presented for pion interferometry measurements of 1.8A GeV Ar+KCl and Ar+La, and 1.2A GeV Xe + La at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Heavy Ion Spectrometer System. The parameters R, ?, ?, R?, and R? are presented for all three projectile-target combinations. The correlation between the extracted size of the pion source and the centrality of the collision is investigated as well as the freeze-out densities and the dependence of the source size on the mean momentum of the pion pairs. The experimental setup and analysis are discussed and comparisons made with the results of others. The phase space covered is at forward angles in the center-of-mass system.

W. B. Christie; W. F. J. Mueller; D. L. Olson; T. J. M. Symons; H. H. Wieman; D. Beavis; F. P. Brady; J. L. Romero; C. E. Tull; T. Abbott; S. Y. Fung; D. Keane; Y. Liu

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurement of charged pions in 12C + 12C collisions at 1A GeV and 2A GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a study of charged pion production in 12C + 12C collisions at incident beam energies of 1A GeV and 2A GeV using the HADES spectrometer at GSI. The main emphasis of the HADES program is on the dielectron signal from the early phase of the collision. Here, however, we discuss the data with respect to the emission of charged hadrons, specifically the production of pi+- mesons, which are related to neutral pions representing a dominant contribution to the dielectron yield. We have performed the first large-angular range measurement of the distribution of pi+- mesons for the 12C + 12C collision system covering a fairly large rapidity interval. The pion yields, transverse-mass and angular distributions are compared with calculations done within a transport model, as well as with existing data from other experiments. The anisotropy of pion production is systematically analyzed.

Agakichiev, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Measurement of charged pions in 12C + 12C collisions at 1A GeV and 2A GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a study of charged pion production in 12C + 12C collisions at incident beam energies of 1A GeV and 2A GeV using the HADES spectrometer at GSI. The main emphasis of the HADES program is on the dielectron signal from the early phase of the collision. Here, however, we discuss the data with respect to the emission of charged hadrons, specifically the production of pi+- mesons, which are related to neutral pions representing a dominant contribution to the dielectron yield. We have performed the first large-angular range measurement of the distribution of pi+- mesons for the 12C + 12C collision system covering a fairly large rapidity interval. The pion yields, transverse-mass and angular distributions are compared with calculations done within a transport model, as well as with existing data from other experiments. The anisotropy of pion production is systematically analyzed.

The HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; C. Agodi; A. Balanda; G. Bellia; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. Bielcik; A. Blanco; A. Bortolotti; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; R. Coniglione; M. Destefanis; J. Diaz; F. Dohrmann; I. Duran; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; R. Ferreira-Marques; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; E. Grosse; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Kozuch; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; J. Lamas-Valverde; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; C. Maiolino; A. Mangiarotti; J. Marin; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; E. Moriniere; J. Mousa; M. Muench; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; R. Novotny; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. Perez Cavalcanti; P. Piattelli; J. Pietraszko; V. Pospisil; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; P. Sapienza; A. Schmah; C. Schroeder; E. Schwab; R. S. Simon; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wuestenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34 October 23, 1985 YC/AVR To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A. As shown in the example, the project is first divided into: 1.1 Project Management and Administration

182

5-10 GeV Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Burst Fireballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gamma-ray burst fireball is likely to contain an admixture of neutrons, in addition to protons, in essentially all progenitor scenarios. Inelastic collisions between differentially streaming protons and neutrons in the fireball produce muon neutrinos (antineutrinos) of ~ 10 GeV as well as electron neutrinos (antineutrinos) of ~ 5 GeV, which could produce ~ 7 events/year in kilometer cube detectors, if the neutron abundance is comparable to that of protons. Photons of ~ 10 GeV from pi-zero decay and ~ 100 MeV electron antineutrinos from neutron decay are also produced, but will be difficult to detect. Photons with energies < 1 MeV from shocks following neutron decay produce a characteristic signal which may be distinguishable from the proton-related MeV photons.

John N. Bahcall; Peter Meszaros

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Particle production models in HETC88 in the energy range 3 to 30 GeV  

SciTech Connect

HETC88 is the latest version of the high-energy transport code HETC that has been used to provide accelerator shield and calorimeter design data for many years. (See Refs. 3, 4, and 5 and the refs. given therein). This version of the code is described and results are compared with experimental data in Ref. 1. The high-energy particle production model in HETC88 is a multi-chain fragmentation model based on the work of J. Ranft and S. Ritter (see Ref. 6 and the refs. given therein). The fragmentation model used in HETC88 is described and compared with experimental data. In HETC88, the fragmentation model is used at energies {ge} 5 GeV, a scaling model is used in energy range 3 to 5 GeV, and the intranuclear cascade model is used at energies {le} 3 GeV. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Alsmiller, F.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Changing the PEP-II Center-of-Mass Energy Down to 10 GeV and up to 11 GeV  

SciTech Connect

PEP-II, the SLAC, LBNL, LLNL B-Factory was designed and optimized to run at the Upsilon 4S resonance (10.580 GeV with an 8.973 GeV e- beam and a 3.119 GeV e+ beam). The interaction region (IR) used permanent magnet dipoles to bring the beams into a head-on collision. The first focusing element for both beams was also a permanent magnet. The IR geometry, masking, beam orbits and beam pipe apertures were designed for 4S running. Even though PEP-II was optimized for the 4S, we successfully changed the center-of-mass energy (E{sub cm}) down to the Upsilon 2S resonance and completed an E{sub cm} scan from the 4S resonance up to 11.2 GeV. The luminosity throughout most of these changes remained near 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The E{sub cm} was changed by moving the energy of the high-energy beam (HEB). The beam energy differed by more than 20% which produced significantly different running conditions for the RF system. The energy loss per turn changed 2.5 times over this range. We describe how the beam energy was changed and discuss some of the consequences for the beam orbit in the interaction region. We also describe some of the RF issues that arose and how we solved them as the high-current HEB energy changed.

Sullivan, M; Bertsche, K.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Numerical study of convection heat transfer during the melting of ice in a porous layer  

SciTech Connect

A numerical study is made of the melting of ice in a rectangular porous cavity heated from above. The Landau transformation is used to immobilize the ice-water interface, and the Darcy-Boussinesq equations are solved by a finite-difference technique. Results are analyzed in terms of the heating temperature and the aspect ratio of the cavity. A comparison is made with the case of melting from below. It was found that melting from above is more effective than melting from below when the heating temperature is between 0 and 8 C: convection arises earlier, the melting process is faster, and the total melt at steady state is thicker. The critical time for onset of convection is minimum when the upper boundary is heated at 6 C. At this heating temperature, one also obtains a maximum heat transfer rate (Nusselt number).

Zhang, X.; Nguyen, T.H. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electrical charging during the sharkskin instability of a metallocene melt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow instabilities are widely studied because of their economical and theoretical interest, however few results have been published about the polymer electrification during the extrusion. Nevertheless the generation of the electrical charges is characteristic of the interaction between the polymer melt and the die walls. In our study, the capillary extrusion of a metallocene polyethylene (mPE) through a tungsten carbide die is characterized through accurate electrical measurements thanks a Faraday pail. No significant charges are observed since the extrudate surface remains smooth. However, as soon as the sharkskin distortion appears, measurable charges are collected (around 5 10-8 C/m2). Higher level of charges are measured during the spurt or the gross-melt fracture (g.m.f) defects. This work is focused on the electrical charging during the sharkskin instability. The variation of the electrical charges versus the apparent wall shear stress is investigated for different die geometries. This curve exhibits a linear increase, followed by a sudden growth just before the onset of the spurt instability. This abrupt charging corresponds also to the end of the sharkskin instability. It is also well-known that wall slip appears just at the same time, with smaller velocity values than during spurt flow. Our results indicate that electrification could be a signature of the wall slip. We show also that the electrification curves can be shifted according to the time-temperature superposition principle, leading to the conclusion that molecular features of the polymer are also involved in this process.

S. Tonon; A. Lavernhe-Gerbier; F. Flores; A. Allal; C. Guerret-Piécourt

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning  

SciTech Connect

The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make Cu–Al–Ni shape-memory wires and Ni–Nb–Sn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, P. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Conceptual Design of A 1-2 GeV Synchroton Radiation Source  

SciTech Connect

A description is presented of the conceptual design of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, which is designed to produce ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation. The facility consists of an injection system (linac plus booster synchrotron), a low emittance storage ring optimized at 1.5 GeV, several insertion devices (wigglers and undulators) located in the storage ring straight sections, and beam lines from the insertion devices and bending magnets. Storage ring performance is analyzed in terms of lattice, collective instabilities and beam lifetime. The injection system and its performance are discussed. Spectral characteristics of the radiation are presented.

The 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source Design St

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

First Observation of Dielectron Production in Proton-Nucleus Collisions below 10 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have begun a program to measure dielectron production in p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LBL Bevalac. Results are presented for the reaction p+Be at 4.9 GeV. For the first time, direct dilepton production is observed below 10 GeV incident energy. The cross sections are discussed and compared to previous data at higher energies. The observation of a structure at a mass of about 275 MeV suggests that pion annihilation may be the dominant production mechanism in this mass range.

G. Roche; G. Claesson; D. Hendrie; G. F. Krebs; E. Lallier; A. Letessier-Selvon; H. S. Matis; T. Mulera; C. Naudet; L. Schroeder; P. A. Seidl; A. Yegneswaran; Z. F. Wang; J. Bystricky; J. Carroll; J. Gordon; G. Igo; S. Trentalange; T. Hallman; L. Madansky; J. F. Gilot; P. Kirk; D. Miller; G. Landaud ((DLS Collaboration))

1988-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Gamma titanium aluminide production using the Induction Skull Melting (ISM) process  

SciTech Connect

Since 1985, more than 2,000 titanium aluminide heats have been produced using the Induction Skull Melting (ISM) process. The history of ISM/Gamma production will be discussed in this paper. Gamma titanium aluminide processing with Induction Skull Melting offers many advantages over other types of reactive alloy melting methods. These advantages will be discussed as well as drawbacks. Also, potential markets and applications for ISM/Gamma will be presented.

Reed, S. [Duriron Co., Inc., Dayton, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum.

Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R., E-mail: mdeinert@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78715 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using elasticity and buoyancy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments related to sheet production are disclosed. A melt of a material is cooled to form a sheet of the material on the melt. The sheet is formed in a first region at a first sheet height. The sheet is translated to a second region such that it has a second sheet height higher than the first sheet height. The sheet is then separated from the melt. A seed wafer may be used to form the sheet.

Kellerman, Peter L.; Sun, Dawei; Helenbrook, Brian; Harvey, David S.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Procedure for determining the rate of penetration of melts into materials of capillary porosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A procedure is proposed for determining the rate of infiltration of melts into porous materials from the change in the electrical resistance of the latter.

M. A. Sherstobitov; S. I. Popel'…

1965-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Study of ice and snow melting process on conductive asphalt solar collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the snow melting process on asphalt pavements as solar collector by experiments and numerical simulation. A numerical simulation method was used to predict the general design requirements for snow melting system of asphalt pavements, and a type of experimental asphalt snow melting system has been built using the design parameters obtained from the preceding simulation. Graphite powders were used to improve the thermal conductivity of asphalt concrete and thus resulting in an improved efficiency of asphalt collector. A laboratory snow melting test was performed after real snowstorm events. The effects of thermal conductive asphalt concrete (CAC) on snow melting performance and asphalt pavement temperature distribution were evaluated. The heat transfer in the asphalt slabs and the heat requirement for the snow melting were analyzed. The results that are obtained show that asphalt solar collector (ASC) provides us a better alternative method for snow melting. The higher fluid temperature is a positive way to improve the performance of snow melting system. However, it is unnecessary to keep a too high fluid temperature so as to reduce the waste of energy. The non-uniform temperatures in the asphalt slabs are noticeable. Furthermore, the heat-transmission and the snow melting performance can be enhanced using CAC.

Mingyu Chen; Shaopeng Wu; Hong Wang; Jizhe Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphanitic melt rocks Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emplacement; (2) we... KIMBERLITE MELT CHEMISTRY Table 1: Jericho ... Source: Russell, Kelly - Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia Collection:...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity glass melts Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume 85, pages 397406, 2000 0003-004X00030439705.00 397 Summary: : PHENOMENOLOGY OF OXIDATION IN FE-BEARING ALUMINOSILICATE MELTS AND GLASSES Chemical diffusion in...

197

Points  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Selections Project Selections Announced October 26, 2009 Lead Research Organization (Partner Organizations) DOE Grant Amount Lead Organization Location Project Description 1366 Technologies Inc. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Lab for PV Research) $4,000,000 Lexington, MA Renewable Power (solar) "Direct Wafer" technology to form high efficiency "monocrystalline- equivalent" silicon wafers directly from molten silicon, with potential to halve the installed cost of solar photovoltaics. Agrivida, Inc. $4,565,800 Medford, MA Biomass Energy Cell wall-degrading enzymes grown within the plant itself that are activated after harvest, dramatically reducing the cost of cellulosic biofuels and chemicals Arizona State University (Fluidic Energy,

198

Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 9.2 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were collected using the large acceptance STAR detector at {radical}s{sub NN} = 9.2 GeV from a test run of the collider in the year 2008. Midrapidity results on multiplicity density (dN/dy) in rapidity (y), average transverse momentum (), particle ratios, elliptic flow, and HBT radii are consistent with the corresponding results at similar {radical}s{sub NN} from fixed target experiments. Directed flow measurements are presented for both midrapidity and forward rapidity regions. Furthermore the collision centrality dependence of identified particle dN/dy, , and particle ratios are discussed. These results also demonstrate that the capabilities of the STAR detector, although optimized for {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, are suitable for the proposed QCD critical point search and exploration of the QCD phase diagram at RHIC.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Baryon resonance production and dielectron decays in proton-proton collisions at 3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on baryon resonance production and decay in proton-proton collisions at a kinetic energy of $3.5$ GeV based on data measured with HADES. The exclusive channels $pp \\rightarrow np\\pi^{+}$ and $pp \\rightarrow pp\\pi^{0}$ as well as $pp \\rightarrow ppe^{+}e^{-}$ are studied simultaneously for the first time. The invariant masses and angular distributions of the pion-nucleon systems were studied and compared to simulations based on a resonance model ansatz assuming saturation of the pion production by an incoherent sum of baryonic resonances (R) with masses $<2~$ GeV/$c^2$. A very good description of the one-pion production is achieved allowing for an estimate of individual baryon-resonance production-cross-sections which are used as input to calculate the dielectron yields from $R\\rightarrow pe^+e^-$ decays. Two models of the resonance decays into dielectrons are examined assuming a point-like $RN \\gamma^*$ coupling and the dominance of the $\\rho$ meson. The results of model calculations are compared to data from the exclusive $ppe^{+}e^{-}$ channel by means of the dielectron and $pe^+e^-$ invariant mass distributions.

G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. König; W. König; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Pa\\lka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Search for point sources of high energy neutrinos with final data from AMANDA-II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos using 3.8 yr of data recorded by AMANDA-II during 2000–2006. After reconstructing muon tracks and applying selection criteria designed to optimally retain neutrino-induced events originating in the northern sky, we arrive at a sample of 6595 candidate events, predominantly from atmospheric neutrinos with primary energy 100 GeV to 8 TeV. Our search of this sample reveals no indications of a neutrino point source. We place the most stringent limits to date on E-2 neutrino fluxes from points in the northern sky, with an average upper limit of E2???+???5.2×10-11??TeV?cm-2?s-1 on the sum of ?? and ?? fluxes, assumed equal, over the energy range from 1.9 TeV to 2.5 PeV.

R. Abbasi et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Beyond the standard Higgs after the 125 GeV Higgs discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...behind and beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson...after the 125 GeV Higgs discovery C. Grojean e-mail...behind and beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson...Model up to very high energy, maybe as high as the...fill the universe with dark matter and does not...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Letter of Intent to The J-PARC 50 GeV Proton Synchrotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system would also be provide higher intensity muon beams for the PRISM project. The proposed studies are to be made using small numbers ( 1,000 total) of intense proton pulses from the 50-GeV ring at J of Materials for Vacuum Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.3.2 Studies of Carbon Targets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

McDonald, Kirk

203

Depletion of light cluster production in 1 GeV proton-nucleus collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental results for the fragment production in 1 GeV proton collisions on various nuclei are presented. It is shown that the observed depletion of the light cluster production which is also found in other experiments can be explained by a Pauli quenching mechanism.

G. Roepke; H. Schulz; L. N. Andronenko; A. A. Kotov; W. Neubert; E. N. Volnin

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A measurement of the energy loss spectrum of 150 GeV muons in iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy loss spectrum of 150 GeV muons has been measured with a prototype of ... dP/dv per radiation length of a fractional energy loss v = ?E?/E? has been measured in the range v...= 0.01 ÷ 0.95; it is compar...

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Measurement of the Nucleon Structure Function in Iron Using 215- and 93-GeV Muons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This Letter presents measurements of the nucleon structure function F2(x,Q2) based on the deep-inelastic scattering of 215- and 93-GeV muons in the iron multimuon spectrometer at Fermilab. With use of a lowest-order QCD calculation, a value of ?LO=230±40(stat.)±80(syst.) MeV/c is found.

A. R. Clark; K. J. Johnson; L. T. Kerth; S. C. Loken; T. W. Markiewicz; P. D. Meyers; W. H. Smith; M. Strovink; W. A. Wenzel; R. P. Johnson; C. Moore; M. Mugge; R. E. Shafer; G. D. Gollin; F. C. Shoemaker; P. Surko

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Argonne National Laboratory 6–7 GeV synchrotron X-ray source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1984–1985 the Argonne National Laboratory undertook a design study of a 6–7 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The effort led to a construction proposal which was reviewed early this year and recommended for funding by the US Department of Energy. This paper gives a general description of this Argonne synchrotron X-ray source.

Lee C. Teng

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Antideuteron and deuteron production in midcentral Pb+Pb collisions at 158A GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production of deuterons and antideuterons was studied by the NA49 experiment in the 23.5% most central Pb+Pb collisions at the top CERN Super Proton Synchroton (SPS) energy of ?s[subscript NN]=17.3 GeV. Invariant yields ...

Roland, Christof E.

208

Search for GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro Scaler Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search for GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro Scaler Data D. A. Williams to search for high energy emission from a sample of 98 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected from January 2000: gamma-ray sources; gamma-ray bursts; astronomical observations: gamma-ray PACS: 98.70.Rz,95.85.Pw Air

California at Santa Cruz, University of

209

The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV program on nucleon structure  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show presents the experiments planned at JLab with their 12 GeV upgrade. Experiments reported address: the use of hadron spectra as probes of QCD; the transverse structure of hadrons; the longitudinal structure of hadrons; the 3-dimensional structure of hadrons; hadrons and cold nuclear matter; and low-energy tests of the Standard Model and fundamental symmetries.

Burkert, Volker D. [JLAB

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Empirical Formula for Pion Production in Proton-Proton Collisions up to 1500 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A semiempirical formula which well represents the double-differential cross section for pion production in high-energy p p collisions is presented. The formula agrees with all data between 20 and 1500 GeV to within a factor of ?2 and is consistent with scaling and limiting fragmentation. Also presented is a set of momentum spectra at some interesting energies.

C. L. Wang

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Energy Spectrum of the Blazar Markarian 421 Above 130 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) was the first blazar detected at gamma-ray energies above 300 GeV, and it remains one of only twelve TeV blazars detected to date. TeV gamma-ray measurements of its flaring activity and spectral variability have placed constraints on models of the high-energy emission from blazars. However, observations between 50 and 300 GeV are rare, and the high-energy peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED), predicted to be in this range, has never been directly detected. We present a detection of Mrk 421 above 100 GeV as made by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) during a multiwavelength campaign in early 2004. STACEE is a ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope using the wavefront sampling technique to detect gamma rays at lower energies than achieved by most imaging Cherenkov telescopes. We also outline a method for reconstructing gamma-ray energies using a solar heliostat telescope. This technique was applied to the 2004 data, and we present the differential energy spectrum of Mrk 421 above 130 GeV. Assuming a differential photon flux dN/dE proportional to E^-a, we measure a spectral index a = 2.1 +/- 0.2 (statistical) +0.2/-0.1 (systematic). Finally, we discuss the STACEE spectrum in the context of the multiwavelength results from the same epoch.

J. E. Carson; J. Kildea; R. A. Ong; J. Ball; D. A. Bramel; C. E. Covault; D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; T. Lindner; C. Mueller; A. Jarvis; R. Mukherjee; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. A. Williams; J. Zweerink

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA,...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management Division Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management...

213

Detecting determinism from point processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

Ralph G. Andrzejak; Florian Mormann; Thomas Kreuz

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

Congressional Affairs Points of Contact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lists the Office of Congressional Affairs points of contacts. The Office of Congressional Affairs is available to assist congressional offices and committees regarding Department of Energy programs and activities.

215

Grain misorientation in thixo-billets prepared by melt stirring  

SciTech Connect

For semi solid metal (SSM) slurries, in addition to the morphology, size, distribution and percentage of the solid phase particles, the microstructure of individual solid particles is another important parameter to be considered. This is particularly an issue when SSM billets are prepared by continuous stirring of the melt to temperatures below liquidus, as in the case of electromagnetic stirring of Al-Si alloys. Microstructural evolution of the electromagnetically stirred Al-Si alloy is investigated by means of optical and electron microscopy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the stirred and unstirred cast billets has shown stirring to generate local misorientation within individual solid particles. This is an indication of growing dendrites undergoing plastic deformation during the course of SSM slurry preparation. The formation of dislocations and their subsequent rearrangement into subgrain boundaries has been shown by EBSD analysis and TEM studies of thin foil specimens respectively.

Nafisi, S., E-mail: Shahrooz.Nafisi@evrazincna.com [Facility for Electron Microscopy Research, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Department of Metals and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Szpunar, J. [Department of Metals and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Vali, H. [Facility for Electron Microscopy Research, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Ghomashchi, R. [Sunday Solar Technologies, 62 Jack Williams Drive Penrith, NSW 2750 (Australia)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Has the QCD Critical Point Been Signaled by Observations at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider?  

SciTech Connect

The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ({eta}/s) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ({radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV). A very low value is found; {eta}/s{approx}0.1, which is close to the conjectured lower bound (1/4{pi}). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

Lacey, Roy A.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Chung, P.; Holzmann, W. G.; Issah, M.; Taranenko, A. [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3400 (United States); Danielewicz, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Stoecker, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet D60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

Has the QCD Critical Point been Signaled by Observations at RHIC ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ($\\eta/s$) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV). A very low value is found $\\eta/s \\sim 0.1$, which is close to the absolute lower bound ($1/4\\pi$). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

Lacey, R A; Alexander, J M; Chung, P; Danielewicz, P; Holzmann, W G; Issah, M; Stöcker, H; Taranenko, A; Lacey, Roy A.; Stocker, Horst

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Has the QCD Critical Point been Signaled by Observations at RHIC ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ($\\eta/s$) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV). A very low value is found $\\eta/s \\sim 0.1$, which is close to the conjectured lower bound ($1/4\\pi$). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

Roy A. Lacey; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; P. Chung; W. G. Holzmann; M. Issah; A. Taranenko; P. Danielewicz; Horst Stocker

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Comparison of different melting temperature calculation methods for short DNA sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......analysis of optical melting curves for a variety of short synthetic DNA duplexes and are the most commonly used by the scientific...of optical melting curves for a vari-ety of short synthetic DNA duplexes and are the most commonly used by the scientific......

Alejandro Panjkovich; Francisco Melo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Purification of Water by Zone Melting: A Phase Diagram Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Purification of Water by Zone Melting: A Phase Diagram Interpretation ... The author comments on the application of zone melting to the purification of water from aqueous NaCl solutions by giving an interpretation of some results taking into account the binary phase diagram. ... Water / Water Chemistry ...

Mohamed Jemal

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NUMERICAL FORECAST OF THE MELTING AND THERMAL HISTORIES OF PARTICLES INJECTED IN A PLASMA JET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMERICAL FORECAST OF THE MELTING AND THERMAL HISTORIES OF PARTICLES INJECTED IN A PLASMA JET Jorge of the melting process of a particle injected in a plasma jet. The plasma process is nowadays applied to produce devices. Among the different coating systems, the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are commonly used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Thermomechanical response of a semicrystalline polymer in the vicinity of the melting by using microcantilever technology  

SciTech Connect

The melting transition of a model semicrystalline polymer has been detected by the microcantilever deflection as a function of temperature. Deflection measurements were done on arrays of 8-cantilevers spin coated with the semicrystalline polymer: poly (propylene azelate). The melting of the polymer has been corroborated by grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering experiments performed with synchrotron radiation over a single cantilever.

Soccio, M.; Rueda, D. R.; García-Gutiérrez, M. C.; Ezquerra, T. A., E-mail: t.ezquerra@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, Madrid (Spain); Luongo, G. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Esteves, C.; Salvador-Matar, A.; Ahumada, O. [MECWINS, Calle de Santiago Grisolía, No. 2, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Lotti, N.; Munari, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Universitá di Bologna, Via Terracini 28, Bologna 40131 (Italy)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Lattice Boltzmann model for melting with natural convection Christian Huber a,*, Andrea Parmigiani b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice Boltzmann model for melting with natural convection Christian Huber a,*, Andrea Parmigiani Boltzmann Heat transfer Melting Convection a b s t r a c t We develop a lattice Boltzmann method to couple and Stefan numbers) over which the correlations have been tested remains limited. The lattice Boltzmann

Manga, Michael

224

DSC Evidence for Microstructure and Phase Transitions in Polyethylene Melts at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DSC Evidence for Microstructure and Phase Transitions in Polyethylene Melts at High Temperatures polyethylenes of types HDPE, LDPE, and LLDPE. DSC data were obtained for a range of heating and cooling rates previous rheology findings of order and high-temperature transitions in polyethylene melts. Introduction

Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

225

Investigation of residual stresses induced during the selective laser melting process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jean-claude.boyer@insa-lyon.fr Keywords: Selective laser melting, layer additional method, Residual stresses. Abstract. The selective laser melting process (SLM), belonging to the family of additive manufacturing processes, can create complex geometry parts from a CAD file. Previously, only prototypes were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Floating hot-melt extruded tablets for gastroretentive controlled drug release system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a gastric floating dosage form using the puff ability at the die of a twin-screw extruder. Wei et al. [21Floating hot-melt extruded tablets for gastroretentive controlled drug release system Mamoru Fukuda bicarbonate on the physicochemical properties of controlled release hot- melt extruded (HME) tablets

Peppas, Nicholas A.

227

A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, sea ice affects the polar climate by insulating the ocean fromA continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 the Northern Hemisphere summer, absorbed solar radiation melts snow and the upper surface of Arctic sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

228

Calculations of crystal-melt interfacial free energies by nonequilibrium work measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations of crystal-melt interfacial free energies by nonequilibrium work measurements Yan Mu perturbation method to compute the interfacial free energies by nonequilibrium work measurements with cleaving, it is difficult to measure the crystal-melt interfacial free energy accurately and efficiently.1,2 Experimentally

Song, Xueyu

229

Trace element partitioning between baddeleyite and carbonatite melt at high pressures and high temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) prefer to enter baddeleyite rather than carbonate melts (D>1), whereas the light rare earth elements (LREE) and other trace elements behave incompatibly (D in carbonatite melts. Baddeleyite is known to accumulate the high field strength elements (HFSE) and some rare

230

Trace element partitioning between apatite and silicate melts Stefan Prowatke a,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The experiments were conducted at pressures of 1.0 GPa and temperatures of 1250 °C. The rare earth elements (La polymerisation of the melt, apatite/melt partition coefficients for the rare earth elements increase for about occurring apatites contain large amounts of the rare earth elements and Sr, it has been well known

231

Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

melting through laboratory ice at 22 uC in simulated summer conditions, with warmer ice producing faster boundaries was pronounced in laboratory ice warmer than 21 uC. This mechanism produced a flux of 0.1 g m22 hrSediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen* Edward E. Adams

Priscu, John C.

232

Thirty-year history of glacier melting in the Nepal Himalayas Koji Fujita,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thirty-year history of glacier melting in the Nepal Himalayas Koji Fujita,1 Lonnie G. Thompson,2 of glacier melting in the Nepal Himalayas, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D03109, doi:10.1029/2005JD005894. 1. Introduction [2] Rapid shrinkage of glaciers in the Nepal Himalayas has been observed during recent decades [e

Howat, Ian M.

233

Splashing and boiling mechanisms of melt layer losses of PFCs during plasma instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and computational modeling to predict the effects of viscosity, heat conduction, and phase change on the stability TEXTOR experi- ments have shown constantly present fine melt spray and macro- scopic losses of melt]. In this work, the inviscid stability theory [7­9] is further devel- oped to include the effects of viscosity

Harilal, S. S.

234

Rare earth element partitioning between titanite and silicate melts: Henry's law revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare earth element partitioning between titanite and silicate melts: Henry's law revisited Stefan earth elements (REE) between titanite and a range of different silicate melts. Our results show. For geochemical modelling of magmatic processes involving titanite, and indeed other accessory phases

235

Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Abstract During the drilling of injection well KS-13 in 2005 at the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) well field, on the island of Hawaii, a 75-meter interval of diorite containing brown glass inclusions was penetrated at a depth of 2415 m. At a depth of 2488 m a melt of dacitic composition was encountered. The melt flowed up the well bore and was repeatedly re-drilled over a depth interval of 8 m, producing several kilograms of clear, colorless vitric cuttings at the surface. The dacitic glass cuttings have a perlitic texture, a silica content of 67 wgt.%, are enriched in alkalis and nearly

236

MEASUREMENT OF THE SHOCK-HEATED MELT CURVE OF LEAD USING PYROMETRY AND REFLECTOMETRY  

SciTech Connect

Data on the high-pressure melting temperatures of metals is of great interest in several fields of physics including geophysics. Measuring melt curves is difficult but can be performed in static experiments (with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells for instance) or dynamically (i.e., using shock experiments). However, at the present time, both experimental and theoretical results for the melt curve of lead are at too much variance to be considered definitive. As a result, we decided to perform a series of shock experiments designed to provide a measurement of the melt curve of lead up to about 50 GPa in pressure. At the same time, we developed and fielded a new reflectivity diagnostic, using it to make measurements on tin. The results show that the melt curve of lead is somewhat higher than the one previously obtained with static compression and heating techniques.

D. Partouche-Sebban and J. L. Pelissier, Commissariat a` l'Energie Atomique,; F. G. Abeyta, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. W. Anderson, Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. E. Byers, Los Alamos National Laboratory; D. Dennis-Koller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. S. Esparza, Los Alamos National Laboratory; S. D. Borror, Bechtel Nevada; C. A. Kruschwitz, Bechtel Nevada

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Robot positioning based on point-to-point motion capability  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an optimal search method for determining the base location of a robot manipulator so that the robot can have a designated point-to-point (PTP) motion capabilities. Based on the topological characterization of the manipulator workspace and the definitions of various p-connectivity, a computational method is developed for enumerating various PTP motion capabilities into quantitative cost functions. Then an unconstrained search by minimizing the cost function yields the task feasible location of the robot base. This methodology is useful for placement of mobile manipulators and robotic workcell layout design.

Park, Y. S.; Cho, H. S.; Koh, K. C.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

Process efficiency in polymer extrusion: Correlation between the energy demand and melt thermal stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal stability is of major importance in polymer extrusion, where product quality is dependent upon the level of melt homogeneity achieved by the extruder screw. Extrusion is an energy intensive process and optimisation of process energy usage while maintaining melt stability is necessary in order to produce good quality product at low unit cost. Optimisation of process energy usage is timely as world energy prices have increased rapidly over the last few years. In the first part of this study, a general discussion was made on the efficiency of an extruder. Then, an attempt was made to explore correlations between melt thermal stability and energy demand in polymer extrusion under different process settings and screw geometries. A commodity grade of polystyrene was extruded using a highly instrumented single screw extruder, equipped with energy consumption and melt temperature field measurement. Moreover, the melt viscosity of the experimental material was observed by using an off-line rheometer. Results showed that specific energy demand of the extruder (i.e. energy for processing of unit mass of polymer) decreased with increasing throughput whilst fluctuation in energy demand also reduced. However, the relationship between melt temperature and extruder throughput was found to be complex, with temperature varying with radial position across the melt flow. Moreover, the melt thermal stability deteriorated as throughput was increased, meaning that a greater efficiency was achieved at the detriment of melt consistency. Extruder screw design also had a significant effect on the relationship between energy consumption and melt consistency. Overall, the relationship between the process energy demand and thermal stability seemed to be negatively correlated and also it was shown to be highly complex in nature. Moreover, the level of process understanding achieved here can help to inform selection of equipment and setting of operating conditions to optimise both energy and thermal efficiencies in parallel.

Chamil Abeykoon; Adrian L. Kelly; Javier Vera-Sorroche; Elaine C. Brown; Phil D. Coates; Jing Deng; Kang Li; Eileen Harkin-Jones; Mark Price

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Melt Strength Behaviour of Polyethylenes and Polyethylene Blends and its Relation to Bubble Stability in Film Blowing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Melt strength data are presented on the three major classes of commercial polyethylenes (LDPE, LLDPE and HDPE) and some of their binary blend systems. Melt strength was assessed from uniaxial tensile experiments ...

A. Ghijsels; J. J. S. M. Ente; J. Raadsen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Relationship between the residual electric resistance of solid solutions and the rate of their melting in contact with metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rates of melting of tin-, lead-, and indium-based binary solid solutions in contact with low-melting metals (Bi, Sn, In, Pb) have been measured. A linear relationship is established between the rate of con...

A. A. Akhkubekov; N. V. Dalakova; O. L. Enaldieva…

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An experimental and numerical study of surface tension-driven melt flow R.A. Parsons a,, F. Nimmo a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and numerical study of surface tension-driven melt flow R.A. Parsons a,, F. Nimmo 2007 Abstract To determine the role of surface tension-driven melt migration in planetary bodies, we, surface tension causes the melt to relax back to a homogeneous distribution. Samples composed of 76 vol

Nimmo, Francis

242

ESTIMATION OF TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24 G. K. Shenoy APRIL 18,1985 Here we make an estimation of the total power radiated from a positron trajectory through the bending magnets, undulators and wigglers. Bending Magnets The power P B per each bending magnet in the ring is given by (1) where E = 6 GeV B = field average over the magnet length = 0.67 T I = stored current = 0.1 A L = trajectory in each dipole magnet = 2.95 m (Ref. LS-12) This gives P B = 6021 watts. Since there are 64 such dipoles in the ring, the total power radiated from dipoles is T P B (watts) = P B (watts) x 64 = 385 kwatts 2 Undulators The total power radiated from a sinosoidal undulator is either given by P u (watts) (2) or by (3) where N = number of undulator periods of length AO (em), K is the deflection

243

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE H. J. Moe V. R. Veluri LS-55-Revised Harch 1987 2 1.0 Introduction Shielding estimates for the linac, positron converter, booster synchrotron and the positron storage ring have been computed using preliminary design information. Calculations have been made of the resulting radiation for several types of operations involving normal beam loss, as well as, certain accidental beam losses. When available, experimental data from existing accelerator and light source facilities have been used in lieu of theoretical estimates. 2.0 Shielding Design Objective The Department of Energy's basic occupational exposure limit is 5 rem per year (DOE 81). However, in its guidance for maintaining exposures "as

244

Radiation damage induced by GeV electrons in W-Re and Cu targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 UCRL-JC-148049 July 2002 Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes Radiation Damage Induced by GeV Electrons in W-Re Targets for Next Generation Linear Colliders M.-J. Caturla 1* , S. Roesler 2 , V. K. Bharadwaj 3 , D. C. Schultz 3 , J. C. Sheppard 3 , J. Marian 1 , B. D. Wirth 1 , W. Stein 1 and A. Sunwoo 1 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 2 CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland 3 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California s: We have studied the structural damage of W-Re targets produced by electrons with energies of several GeV and under different conditions of total number of electrons, beam shape and target depth. We report the differences in damage levels for different designs considered in the construction of the next generation of linear accelerators, and discuss the possible effects in the lifetime

245

Self-Guided Laser Wakefield Acceleration beyond 1 GeV Using Ionization-Induced Injection  

SciTech Connect

The concepts of matched-beam, self-guided laser propagation and ionization-induced injection have been combined to accelerate electrons up to 1.45 GeV energy in a laser wakefield accelerator. From the spatial and spectral content of the laser light exiting the plasma, we infer that the 60 fs, 110 TW laser pulse is guided and excites a wake over the entire 1.3 cm length of the gas cell at densities below 1.5x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. High-energy electrons are observed only when small (3%) amounts of CO{sub 2} gas are added to the He gas. Computer simulations confirm that it is the K-shell electrons of oxygen that are ionized and injected into the wake and accelerated to beyond 1 GeV energy.

Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Pak, A.; Tsung, F. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ralph, J. E.; Albert, F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Froula, D. H. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O. [GoLP/IPFN-LA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); MAE Department, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Inverse seesaw in NMSSM and 126 GeV Higgs boson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider extensions of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model (NMSSM) in which the observed neutrino masses are generated through a TeV scale inverse seesaw mechanism. The new particles associated with this mechanism can have sizable couplings to the Higgs field which can yield a large contribution to the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson. With this new contribution, a 126 GeV Higgs is possible along with order of 200 GeV masses for the stop quarks for a broad range of tan ?. The Higgs production and decay in the diphoton channel can be enhanced due to this new contribution. It is also possible to solve the little hierarchy problem in this model without invoking a maximal value for the NMSSM trilinear coupling and without severe restrictions on the value of tan ?.

Ilia Gogoladze; Bin He; Qaisar Shafi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Production cross sections of tritium in high energy nuclear reactions with 12 GeV protons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production cross sections of tritium in high energy nuclear reactions with 12 GeV protons were measured for Al, Co, Cu, Nb, Ag, In, Sn, Au and Pb targets. Large production cross sections of > 500 (mb) were obtained for Au and Pb targets. From their atomic weight dependence, tritium cross sections (?) in mb can be expressed as a function of target atomic weight (A) by the following simple equation: ?(A) = 95 exp(A107), which should be useful for predicting unknown cross sections. Together with other existing data at different energies, the present data suggest that there is no energy dependence of tritium cross section at proton energies above several GeV.

Masaharu Noguchi; Taichi Miura; Kenjiro Kondo; Takenori Suzuki; Yuichi Oki; Minoru Takasaki; Kazuhiro H. Tanaka; Masaharu Ieiri

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Observation of keyhole-mode laser melting in laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals employs high-power focused laser beams. Typically, the depth of the molten pool is controlled by conduction of heat in the underlying solid material. But, under certain conditions, the mechanism of melting can change from conduction to so-called “keyhole-mode” laser melting. In this mode, the depth of the molten pool is controlled by evaporation of the metal. Keyhole-mode laser melting results in melt pool depths that can be much deeper than observed in conduction mode. In addition, the collapse of the vapor cavity that is formed by the evaporation of the metal can result in a trail of voids in the wake of the laser beam. In this paper, the experimental observation of keyhole-mode laser melting in a laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing setting for 316L stainless steel is presented. The conditions required to transition from conduction controlled melting to keyhole-mode melting are identified.

Wayne E. King; Holly D. Barth; Victor M. Castillo; Gilbert F. Gallegos; John W. Gibbs; Douglas E. Hahn; Chandrika Kamath; Alexander M. Rubenchik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures  

SciTech Connect

There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hybrid Dynamic Density Functional Theory for Polymer Melts and Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a high-speed and accurate hybrid dynamic density functional theory for the computer simulations of the phase separation processes of polymer melts and blends. The proposed theory is a combination of the dynamic self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type theory with the random phase approximation (GRPA). The SCF theory is known to be accurate in evaluating the free energy of the polymer systems in both weak and strong segregation regions although it has a disadvantage of the requirement of a considerable amount of computational cost. On the other hand, the GRPA theory has an advantage of much smaller amount of required computational cost than the SCF theory while its applicability is limited to the weak segregation region. To make the accuracy of the SCF theory and the high-performance of the GRPA theory compatible, we adjust the chemical potential of the GRPA theory by using the SCF theory every constant time steps in the dynamic simulations. The performance of the GRPA and the hybrid theories is tested by using several systems composed of an A/B homopolymer, an AB diblock copolymer, or an ABC triblock copolymer. Using the hybrid theory, we succeeded in reproducing the metastable complex phase-separated domain structures of an ABC triblock copolymer observed by experiments.

Takashi Honda; Toshihiro Kawakatsu

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

Conformational properties of blends of cyclic and linear polymer melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An adapted version of the annealing algorithm to identify primitive paths of a melt of ring polymers is presented. This algorithm ensures that the primitive path length becomes zero for nonconcatenated rings, and that no entanglements are observed. The bond-fluctuation model was used to simulate ring-linear blends with N=150 and 300 monomers. The primitive path length and the average number of entanglements of the linear component were found to be independent of the blend composition. In contrast, the primitive path length and the average number of entanglements on a ring molecule increased approximately linearly with the fraction of linear chains, and for large N, they approached values comparable with linear chains. Threading of ring molecules by linear chains, and ring-ring interactions were observed only in the presence of linear chains. It is conjectured that for large N, these latter interactions facilitate the formation of a percolating entangled network, thereby resulting in a disproportionate retardation of the dynamical processes.

Gopinath Subramanian and Sachin Shanbhag

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biodiesel Produced by Ethanolysis: Melting Profile, Densities, and Viscosities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although biorenewable and sustainable ethanol is appealing and the fatty acid profiles of crambe, fodder radish, coconut, and macauba oils are proper for biodiesel production, there is little data regarding the physical properties of biodiesels produced by ethanolysis from these promising raw materials. ... Therefore, the objectives of the present work were to present the experimental densities and viscosities for biodiesels produced by ethanolysis from crambe oil (BPECr), fodder radish oil (BPEFR), coconut oil (BPEC), and macauba pulp oil (BPEMP) at temperatures up to 363.2 K, to compare the experimental data with calculated viscosities from the models proposed by Ceriani et al.(13) and Basso et al.(11) as well as with the densities calculated using the GCVOL model(14) and a systematized predictive methodology(11) based on the method proposed by Halvorsen et al.,(15) to determine, using differential scanning calorimetry, the melting profile of these four promising biofuels, and to correlate the three studied physical properties to the ethyl ester composition of each biodiesel. ... All biodiesels have low contents of polyunsaturated ethyl esters, a favorable characteristic for biodiesel because the oxidative stability decreases with increase of the unsaturation level. ...

Rodrigo C. Basso; Antônio J. A. Meirelles; Eduardo A. C. Batista

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

ON THE ORIGIN OF > 10 GeV PHOTONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Fermi/LAT has detected long-lasting high-energy photons (>100 MeV) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the highest energy photons reaching about 100 GeV. One proposed scenario is that they are produced by high-energy electrons accelerated in GRB forward shocks via synchrotron radiation. We study the maximum synchrotron photon energy in this scenario, considering the properties of the microturbulence magnetic fields behind the shock, as revealed by recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical analyses of relativistic collisionless shocks. Due to the small-scale nature of the microturbulent magnetic field, the Bohm acceleration approximation, in which the scattering mean free path is equal to the particle Larmor radius, breaks down at such high energies. This effect leads to a typical maximum synchrotron photon of a few GeV at 100 s after the burst and this maximum synchrotron photon energy decreases quickly with time. We show that the fast decrease of the maximum synchrotron photon energy leads to a fast decay of the synchrotron flux. The 10-100 GeV photons detected after the prompt phase cannot be produced by the synchrotron mechanism. They could originate from the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the early afterglow if the circumburst density is sufficiently large, or from the external inverse Compton process in the presence of central X-ray emission, such as X-ray flares and prompt high-latitude X-ray emission.

Wang Xiangyu; Liu Ruoyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lemoine, Martin [Institut d'Astrophysique de paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Can we push the fundamental Planck scale above $10^{19}$ GeV?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The value of the quantum gravity scale is MPl = $10^{19}$ GeV. However, this is inherently a three-dimensional quantity. We know that we can bring this scale all the way down to TeV if we introduce extra dimensions with large volume. This will solve the hierarchy problem by destroying the desert between the electroweak and gravity scales, but will also introduce a host of new problems since some things (e.g. proton stability, neutrino masses etc) have their natural habitat in this desert. In contrast, we can also solve the hierarchy problem by reducing the number of dimensions at high energies. If the fundamental theory (which does not have to be gravity as we understand it today) is lower dimensional, then the fundamental energy scale might be much greater than 1019GeV. Then, some experimental and observational limits (e.g. on Lorentz invariance violation) which are coming close to or even exceeding the scale of 1019GeV can be evaded. In addition, scattering of particles at transplanckian energies will not p...

Stojkovic, Dejan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Energy Spectrum of the Blazar Markarian 421 Above 130 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) was the first blazar detected at gamma-ray energies above 300 GeV, and it remains one of only twelve TeV blazars detected to date. TeV gamma-ray measurements of its flaring activity and spectral variability have placed constraints on models of the high-energy emission from blazars. However, observations between 50 and 300 GeV are rare, and the high-energy peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED), predicted to be in this range, has never been directly detected. We present a detection of Mrk 421 above 100 GeV as made by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) during a multiwavelength campaign in early 2004. STACEE is a ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope using the wavefront sampling technique to detect gamma rays at lower energies than achieved by most imaging Cherenkov telescopes. We also outline a method for reconstructing gamma-ray energies using a solar heliostat telescope. This technique was applied to the 2004 data, and we present the differe...

Carson, J E; Ong, R A; Ball, J; Bramel, D A; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Jarvis, A; Mukherjee, R; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

GeV Gamma-ray Flux Upper Limits from Clusters of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium. Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the intracluster medium, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) from August 2008 to February 2010. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV towards a sample of observed clusters (typical va...

al., M Ackermann et

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Experimental study of radium partitioning between anorthite and melt at 1 atm  

SciTech Connect

We present the first experimental radium mineral/melt partitioning data, specifically between anorthite and a CMAS melt at atmospheric pressure. Ion microprobe measurement of coexisting anorthite and glass phases produces a molar D{sub Ra} = 0.040 {+-} 0.006 and D{sub Ra}/D{sub Ba} = 0.23 {+-} 0.05 at 1400 C. Our results indicate that lattice strain partitioning models fit the divalent (Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra) partition coefficient data of this study well, supporting previous work on crustal melting and magma chamber dynamics that has relied on such models to approximate radium partitioning behavior in the absence of experimentally determined values.

Miller, S; Burnett, D; Asimow, P; Phinney, D; Hutcheon, I

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

A TEM study of inverse melting in Nb{sub 45}Cr{sub 55}  

SciTech Connect

Inverse melting of bcc Nb{sub 45}Cr{sub 55} is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution TEM and electron diffraction. It is shown that the transformation to the amorphous phase initiates at the bcc grain boundaries. The transformation results in an increase in incoherence, evidenced by a loss of bend contours. Some anisotropy is found in the amorphous phase produced by inverse melting, which is associated in HRTEM with preferentially oriented but discontinuous and distorted fringes. The results are consistent with the production of an amorphous phase by inverse melting.

Sinkler, W.; Michaelsen, C.; Bormann, R. [GKSS Forschungszentrum, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

System-size and centrality dependence of charged kaon and pion production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 40A GeV and158A GeV beam energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of charged pion and kaon production are presented in centrality selected Pb+Pb collisions at 40A GeV and 158A GeV beam energy as well as in semi-central C+C and Si+Si interactions at 40A GeV. Transverse mass spectra, rapidity spectra and total yields are determined as a function of centrality. The system-size and centrality dependence of relative strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 40A GeV and 158A GeV beam energy are derived from the data presented here and published data for C+C and Si+Si collisions at 158A GeV beam energy. At both energies a steep increase with centrality is observed for small systems followed by a weak rise or even saturation for higher centralities. This behavior is compared to calculations using transport models (UrQMD and HSD), a percolation model and the core-corona approach.

T. Anticic; B. Baatar; D. Barna; J. Bartke; H. Beck; L. Betev; H. Bialkowska; C. Blume; M. Bogusz; B. Boimska; J. Book; M. Botje; P. Buncic; T. Cetner; P. Christakoglou; P. Chung; O. Chvala; J. G. Cramer; P. Dinkelaker; V. Eckardt; Z. Fodor; P. Foka; V. Friese; M. Gazdzicki; K. Grebieszkow; C. Höhne; K. Kadija; A. Karev; M. Kliemant; V. I. Kolesnikov; T. Kollegger; M. Kowalski; D. Kresan; A. Laszlo; R. Lacey; M. van Leeuwen; B. Lungwitz; M. Mackowiak; M. Makariev; A. I. Malakhov; M. Mateev; G. L. Melkumov; M. Mitrovski; St. Mrowczynski; V. Nicolic; G. Palla; A. D. Panagiotou; W. Peryt; J. Pluta; D. Prindle; F. Pühlhofer; R. Renfordt; C. Roland; G. Roland; M. Rybczynski; 1 A. Rybicki; A. Sandoval; N. Schmitz; T. Schuster; P. Seyboth; F. Sikler; E. Skrzypczak; M. Slodkowski; G. Stefanek; R. Stock; H. Ströbele; T. Susa; M. Szuba; M. Utvic; D. Varga; M. Vassiliou; G. I. Veres; G. Vesztergombi; D. Vranic; Z. Wlodarczyk; A. Wojtaszek-Szwarc

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Observation of the critical end point in the phase diagram for hot and dense nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference ($R^2_{\\text{out}} - R^2_{\\text{side}}$) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au+Au ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 7.7 - 200$ GeV) and Pb+Pb ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV) collisions, are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed non-monotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature vs. baryon chemical potential ($T,\\mu_B$) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A Finite-Size Scaling (FSS) analysis of these data indicate a second order phase transition with the estimates $T^{\\text{cep}} \\sim 165$~MeV and $\\mu_B^{\\text{cep}} \\sim 100$~MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents ($\

Lacey, Roy A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Results from DASP one + e ? annihilation between 3.1 and 5.2 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the measurements one + e ? annihilation performed by the DASP Collaboration in the energy range between 3.1 and 5.2 GeV. The following topics ...

R. Brandelik; W. Braunschweig; H. -U. Martyn…

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Precision measurements of $g_1$ of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

Prok, Y; Kvaltine, N; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Pereira, S Anefalos; Avakian, H; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Briscoe, W J; Brock, J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carlin, C; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fersch, R; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garcon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Giovanetti, K L; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guler, N; Haffidi, K; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S; Jiang, X; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keith, C; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayee, M; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Peng, P; Phillips, J J; Pierce, J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Simonyan, A; Smith, C; Smith, G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons  

SciTech Connect

The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anderson, Mark; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Biselli, Angela; Bono, Jason; Briscoe, William; Brock, Joseph; Brooks, William; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Carlin, Christopher; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fersch, Robert; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Giovanetti, Kevin; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guler, Nevzat; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Keller, Daniel; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meekins, David; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, K.; Peng, Peng; Phillips, J.J.; Pierce, Joshua; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Claude; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

BP Cherry Point Congeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVISED 404 (B) (1) REVISED 404 (B) (1) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Prepared for: BP West Coast Products, LLC Revised June 29, 2004 1501 Fourth Avenue, Suite 1400 Seattle, WA 98101-1616 (206) 438-2700 33749546.05070 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 I NT RODUCTI ON ................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 P URPOSE AND NEE D .......................................................................................................... 1 2.1 RELIABILITY .................................................................................................... 1 2.2 COST-EFFECTIVENESS ................................................................................... 3 2.3 SIZE OF FACILITY............................................................................................

266

Orientifold points in M theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We identify the lift to M theory of the four types of orientifold points, and show that they involve a chiral fermion on an orbifold fixed circle. From this lift, we compute the number of normalizable ground states for the SO(N) and Sp(N) supersymmetric quantum mechanics with sixteen supercharges. The results agree with known results obtained by the mass deformation method. The mass of the orientifold is identified with the Casimir energy.

Amihay Hanany; Barak Kol; Arvind Rajaraman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

HBT puzzle at RHIC AMPT model with String Melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RsideSmall radii Small duration time dt by Stephen Johnson at RWW02 One way out: Hydro Softest point in EOS Measured extensively in heavy ion collisions reasonably described by models (hydro-ph/01120062 recent hydro studies: #12;HIJING energy in strings(soft) and minijet partons(hard) ZPC (Zhang

Lin, Zi-wei

268

Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts of energy E 10 GeV with the ARGO-YBJ detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts of energy E 10 GeV with the ARGO-YBJ detector ARGO-YBJ Collaboration of high energy gamma-ray bursts can be performed by large area air shower arrays operating at very high is the study of gamma-ray bursts of energies E 10 GeV. This can be achieved using the "single particle

Morselli, Aldo

269

Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207 Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207 Recent studies carried out on the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team's beamline I-ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source provide new insights into charge melting and polaron collapse. X-ray and neutron scattering measurements directly demonstrate the existence of polarons in the paramagnetic phase of optimally doped colossal magnetoresistive oxides. The polarons exhibit short-range correlations that grow with decreasing temperature, but disappear abruptly at the ferromagnetic transition because of the sudden charge delocalization. The "melting" of the charge ordering as we cool through TC occurs with the collapse of the quasistatic polaron scattering, and provides important new

270

Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking August 13, 2010 - 6:32pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs The Energy Department's Hanford Site in Washington used Recovery Act funds to safely take down the K East Reactor's 175-foot-high exhaust stack near the Columbia River. The demolition was a crucial step toward dismantling the external footprint of the reactor and clears the way for additional work to clean up the area. Watch footage of the blast above or find more information at http://www.hanford.gov Normally, we think of things melting (or changing from a solid to a liquid)

271

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

272

Biological and Chemical Scrubbings of Vented gas from hot-melting operation of recycled nylon plastics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aimed to develop a biotrickling-biofilter process and a two-stage chemical scrubbing process to absorb and oxidize VOCs in vented gas from hot-melt granulation… (more)

Chen, Kuan-po

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Experimental Study of Melting of Binary Mixtures with Double-Diffusive Convection in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a vertical ice surface into a salinity gradient inside an enclosure. Because of its lower salinity, the melt of ice in saline water [8-11]. Depending on the temperature and salinity of the ambient water, a number

Beckermann, Christoph

274

Melt Rheology and Thermal Stability of Nanoclay Filled Poly(3hydroxybutyrate-co-4hydroxybutyrate) Biocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Melt apparent shear viscosity for poly(3hydroxybutyrate-co-4hydroxybutyrate) composites filled with nanoclay was measured by means of a capillary...?1..., and thermal stability was conducted on a thermogravimetri...

Jia Yang; Lina Hang; Yahui Dai

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Melt blend studies of nanoclay-filled polypropylene (PP)–high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to study how the rheological factors of unfilled and nanoclay-filled HDPE–PP blend series influence the ... 100 wt % HDPE), with and without nanoclay, was prepared by using melt-mixi...

T. P. Mohan; K. Kanny

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of a plasma coating system for induction melting zirconium in a graphite crucible  

SciTech Connect

A plasma coating system has been developed for induction melting zirconium at 1900 C using a graphite crucible. This laminated coating system consists of plasma spraying the following materials onto the graphite: (1) molybdenum or tungsten, (2) a 50% blend by weight of the metal powder and calcia-stabilized zirconium oxide, and (3) calcia-stabilized zirconia followed by painting a final coating of nonstabilized zirconia on top of the plasma-sprayed coating system. Zirconium was melted in argon using both laminating systems without any degradation of the graphite crucible and with only a minimal amount of carbon absorption. This novel approach that is being proposed as an alternative method of melting zirconium alloys offers substantial cost savings over the standard practice of electric arc melting using a consumable electrode.

Bird, E.L.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

Kinetic coefficient for hard-sphere crystal growth from the melt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we determine the magnitude and anisotropy of the kinetic coefficient (mu) for the crystal growth from the melt for the hard-sphere system through an analysis of equilibrium capillary ...

Laird, Brian Bostian; Amini, M.

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Boron isotopic variations in hydrous rhyolitic melts: a case study from Long Valley, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present boron isotope analyses of variably degassed rhyolitic glasses from Long Valley, California. The following results indicate that...2O-rich (~3 wt%) melt inclusions from late erupted Bisho...

A. K. Schmitt; J. I. Simon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Optimization method for obtaining nearest-neighbour DNA entropies and enthalpies directly from melting temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......require the knowledge of total sequence entropies and enthalpies which are not always available. Results: Here we implement and test a new melting temperature optimization method (MTO) where we obtain the NN parameters directly from the temperatures. In this......

Gerald Weber

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

Aldrich, David C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Theoretical description of laser melt pool dynamics, Task order number B239634, Quarter 3 report  

SciTech Connect

Melting of solid matter under laser radiation is realized in almost every process of laser technology. The present paper addresses melted material flows in cases when melt zones are shallow, i.e., the zone width is appreciably greater than or of the same order as its depth. Such conditions are usually realized when hardening, doping or perforating thin plates or when using none-deep penetration. Melted material flowing under conditions of deep penetration, drilling of deep openings and cutting depends on a number of additional factors (as compared to the shallow-pool case), namely, formation of a vapor and gas cavern in the sample and propagation of the laser beam through the cavern. These extra circumstances complicate hydrodynamic consideration of the liquid bath and will be addressed is the paper to follow.

Dykhne, A.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

The origin of melt-texture crystal growth process in a simple tube furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The melt-texture growth (MTG) method has been shown to be effective...T csuperconducting bulk samples with highly oriented layers of single crystals. The critical current densityJ

P. C. W. Fung; J. C. L. Chow; T. F. Yu; Z. L. Du

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

Van Ark, Emily M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION BY ZINC CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3% Zn and 14% CH oH (50 g coal 9 300 g melt) Atomic TempVermeulen, "High-Yield Coal Conversion in a Zinc Chloride/H. Shinn, and T. Vermeulen, "Coal Lic;uefaction Catalysis by

Vermeulen, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline melts beneath Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

et al. 2001), mac alkaline magmas... , it is not coincident that the mac rock at Bingham Canyon is alkaline (Waite et al. 1997) and the basaltic mac melt... specia- tion...

288

Crystal structure and interaction dependence of the crystal-melt interfacial free energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine via molecular simulation the dependence of the crystal-melt interfacial free energy gamma on molecular interaction and crystal structure (fcc vs bcc) for systems interacting with inverse-power repulsive potentials, ...

Davidchack, R. L.; Laird, Brian Bostian

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

290

ChargePoint America | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ChargePoint America ChargePoint America 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

291

Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

(M&O) Contract Competition Starting Points Starting Points Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Summary Kansas City Plant Home Page Kansas City Plant Contracts DOE Directives...

292

Vacuum-induction melting, refining, and casting of uranium and its alloys  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum-induction melting (VIM), refining, and casting of uranium and its alloys are discussed. Emphasis is placed on historical development, VIM equipment, crucible and mold design, furnace atmospheres, melting parameters, impurity pickup, ingot quality, and economics. The VIM procedures used to produce high-purity, high-quality sound ingots at the US Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant are discussed in detail.

Jackson, R.J.

1989-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

293

Temperature dependence of the crystal-liquid interfacial free energy and the endpoint of the melting line  

SciTech Connect

The crystal–liquid interfacial free energy ? has been calculated as a function of the crystal orientation in a molecular dynamics experiment in a system of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles with a cutoff radius of the potential r{sub c}{sup *}=r{sub c}/?=6.78 at a triple-point temperature T{sub t}{sup *}=k{sub B}T{sub t}/?=0.692 and temperatures above (in the region of the stable coexistence of liquid and solid phases) and below (metastable continuation of the coexistence curve of liquid and solid phases) the temperature T{sub t}{sup *}. At T{sup *}=T{sub t}{sup *}, for determining ? use was made of the method of cleaving potential. The temperature dependence of ? on the crystal–liquid coexistence curve has been determined by the Gibbs-Cahn thermodynamic integration method. In the region of stable phase coexistence (T{sup *}>T{sub t}{sup *}) good agreement with the data of Davidchack and Laird [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7651 (2003)] has been obtained with respect to the character of the temperature dependence of ? and the orientation anisotropy. In the region of metastable phase coexistence (T{sup *}melting line (T{sub K}{sup *}=0.529) (the existence of which was established first by Baidakov and Protsenko [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 015701 (2005)]) the interfacial free energy decreases, approaching at T{sup *}=T{sub K}{sup *} the orientation-averaged value ?{sub 0K}{sup *}=?{sub 0K}?{sup 2}/?=0.365. The paper discusses the behavior of the excess interfacial energy, excess interfacial entropy and excess interfacial stress on the metastable extension of the melting line and close to T{sup *}=T{sub K}{sup *}.

Baidakov, Vladimir G., E-mail: bai@itp.uran.ru; Protsenko, Sergey P.; Tipeev, Azat O. [Institute of Thermophysics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Amundsen Street 106, 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Thermophysics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Amundsen Street 106, 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

NREL Scientists Reveal Origin of Diverse Melting Behaviors of Aluminum Nanoclusters (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Research reveals active role of cluster symmetries on the size-sensitive, diverse melting behaviors of metallic nanoclusters, providing insight to understanding phase changes of nanoparticles for thermal energy storage. Unlike macroscopic bulk materials, intermediate-sized nanoclusters with around 55 atoms inherently exhibit size-sensitive melting changes: adding just a single atom to a nanocluster can cause a dramatic change in melting behavior. Microscopic understanding of thermal behaviors of metal nanoclusters is important for nanoscale catalysis and thermal energy storage applications. However, it is a challenge to obtain a structural interpretation at the atomic level from measured thermodynamic quantities such as heat capacity. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) revealed a clear correlation between the diverse melting behaviors of aluminum nanoclusters and cluster core symmetries. These simulations reproduced, for the first time, the size-sensitive heat capacities of aluminum nanoclusters, which exhibit several distinctive shapes associated with the diverse melting behaviors of the clusters. The size-dependent, diverse melting behaviors of the aluminum clusters are attributed to the reduced symmetry (from Td {yields} D2d {yields} Cs) with increasing the cluster sizes and can be used to help design thermal storage materials.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Theory of melt fracture instabilities in the capillary flow of polymer melts Joel D. Shore,1,* David Ronis,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occur when a poly- mer melt is extruded through a capillary or ``die'' is a longstanding problem pressure, respectively. The inset in Fig. 1 is a cartoon of a typical experimental setup: a piston or screw regimes 2,3,6 : At the lowest flow rates, the extrudate is smooth and regular. Next, one encounters a re

Grant, Martin

296

Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation documents the development of a broadband electron spectrometer (ESM) for GeV class Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), the production of high quality GeV electron beams (e-beams) for the first time in a LWFA by using a capillary discharge guide (CDG), and a statistical analysis of CDG-LWFAs. An ESM specialized for CDG-LWFAs with an unprecedented wide momentum acceptance, from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, has been developed. Simultaneous measurement of e-beam spectra and output laser properties as well as a large angular acceptance (> {+-} 10 mrad) were realized by employing a slitless scheme. A scintillating screen (LANEX Fast back, LANEX-FB)--camera system allowed faster than 1 Hz operation and evaluation of the spatial properties of e-beams. The design provided sufficient resolution for the whole range of the ESM (below 5% for beams with 2 mrad divergence). The calibration between light yield from LANEX-FB and total charge, and a study on the electron energy dependence (0.071 to 1.23 GeV) of LANEX-FB were performed at the Advanced light source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Using this calibration data, the developed ESM provided a charge measurement as well. The production of high quality electron beams up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale accelerator was demonstrated. The experiment used a 310 {micro}m diameter gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide that channeled relativistically-intense laser pulses (42 TW, 4.5 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) over 3.3 centimeters of sufficiently low density ({approx_equal} 4.3 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma. Also demonstrated was stable self-injection and acceleration at a beam energy of {approx_equal} 0.5 GeV by using a 225 {micro}m diameter capillary. Relativistically-intense laser pulses (12 TW, 1.3 x 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) were guided over 3.3 centimeters of low density ({approx_equal} 3.5 x 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma in this experiment. A statistical analysis of the CDG-LWFAs performance was carried out. By taking advantage of the high repetition rate experimental system, several thousands of shots were taken in a broad range of the laser and plasma parameters. An analysis program was developed to sort and select the data by specified parameters, and then to evaluate performance statistically. The analysis suggested that the generation of GeV-level beams comes from a highly unstable and regime. By having the plasma density slightly above the threshold density for self injection, (1) the longest dephasing length possible was provided, which led to the generation of high energy e-beams, and (2) the number of electrons injected into the wakefield was kept small, which led to the generation of high quality (low energy spread) e-beams by minimizing the beam loading effect on the wake. The analysis of the stable half-GeV beam regime showed the requirements for stable self injection and acceleration. A small change of discharge delay t{sub dsc}, and input energy E{sub in}, significantly affected performance. The statistical analysis provided information for future optimization, and suggested possible schemes for improvement of the stability and higher quality beam generation. A CDG-LWFA is envisioned as a construction block for the next generation accelerator, enabling significant cost and size reductions.

Nakamura, Kei

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

Circumstantial evidence for transverse flow in 200A GeV S+S collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hadronic spectra of 200A GeV S+S collisions are analyzed assuming thermal emission of particles including resonance decays. While the rapidity distributions suggest a longitudinal flow almost independent of the temperature, the transverse momentum spectra exhibit an ambiguity between transverse flow and temperature, which cannot be resolved by the spectra of the heavier particles. However, in a theoretical model for the global hydrodynamic expansion with a dynamical freeze-out criteron, we find that almost inevitably a sizable transverse flow develops, which is in quantitative agreement with the data.

E. Schnedermann and U. Heinz

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

On the deficit of calculated muon flux at sea level for energies $>100$ GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the problem, why the use of the direct data on primary nuclei spectra together with the modern hadronic interaction models leads to significant deficit of computed vertical muon flux at sea level for energies $>100$ GeV. We suggest, that to find out the source of this inconsistency it is necessary to perform an analysis of sensitivity of emulsion chamber data to variations of hadron-nucleus interaction characteristics. Such analysis will give more ground for discussion of adequacy of the up-to-date interaction models and of mutual compatibility of primary nuclei spectra, obtained in direct and EAS experiments.

A. A. Lagutin; A. G. Tyumentsev; A. V. Yushkov

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Charm-Production in e^+e^- Annihilation Around 4 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured inclusive and exclusive cross sections for the production of $D^+$, $D^0$ and $D_s^+$ mesons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilations at thirteen center-of-mass energies between 3.97 and 4.26 GeV. Exclusive cross sections are presented for final states consisting of two charmed mesons ($D\\bar{D}$, $D^{*}\\bar{D}$, $D^{*}\\bar{D}^{*}$, $D_s^+ D_s^-$, $D_s^{*+} D_s^-$, and $D_s^{*+} D_s^{*-}$) and for processes in which the charmed meson pair is accompanied by a pion.

B. W. Lang

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU  

SciTech Connect

The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Casagrande, F. [MSU-FRIB, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Calculated Cosmic-Ray Muon Spectra at High Energies (>20 GeV)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculations of sea-level cosmic-ray muon spectra have been made at 75°, 80°, 85°, and 88.75° between 20 and 1000 GeV, and compared with measurements made at Argonne National Laboratory. Although the experimental results are a consistent 60% of the calculated values, leading to too few muons being found at high zenith angles, it is felt that this does not support the Utah anomaly, as the discrepancy is energy- and angle-independent. Similarly, no exotic processes, such as the failure of special relativity, seem to be operating.

Keran O'Brien

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

Davis, G. Kirk; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Powers, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Factorial correlator study in Ag32/Br interaction at 200A GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present an analysis of our induced32 interaction data at 200A GeV in terms of factorial correlators. The correlated moments are found to increase with decreasing bin-bin separation, D. This increase follows a power law within the region D?1. Bin-size independence of the factorial correlators is observed for the values of D=0.4 and D=0.8. Our data are consistent with the dimension-independent scaling relation proposed by Seixas, which gives a way out of the ‘‘intermittent’’-‘‘nonintermittent’’ ambiguity.

Dipak Ghosh; Madhumita Lahiri; Argha Deb; Susobhan Das; Krishnadas Purkait; Biswanath Biswas; Jayanta Roychoudhury; Rini Chatterjee; Abdul Kayum Zafri

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

$?$ meson reconstruction in pp reactions at 2.2 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HADES spectrometer installed at GSI Darmstadt is devoted to study the production of di-electron pairs from proton, pion and nucleus induced reactions at 1-2 AGeV. In pp collisions at 2.2 GeV we have focused mainly on exclusive reconstruction of the $\\eta$ meson decays in the hadronic ($\\eta\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$) and the electromagnetic channels ($\\eta\\to e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$). We present analysis techniques and discuss first results on $\\eta$ production, with the main focus on comparisons of reconstructed distributions to results obtained by other experiments and theoretical predictions.

S. Spataro; for the HADES Collaboration

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

$\\eta$ meson reconstruction in pp reactions at 2.2 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HADES spectrometer installed at GSI Darmstadt is devoted to study the production of di-electron pairs from proton, pion and nucleus induced reactions at 1-2 AGeV. In pp collisions at 2.2 GeV we have focused mainly on exclusive reconstruction of the $\\eta$ meson decays in the hadronic ($\\eta\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$) and the electromagnetic channels ($\\eta\\to e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$). We present analysis techniques and discuss first results on $\\eta$ production, with the main focus on comparisons of reconstructed distributions to results obtained by other experiments and theoretical predictions.

Spataro, S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy Dependence of $K/\\pi$, $p/\\pi$, and $K/p$ Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions from $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy-ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical $K/\\pi$, $p/\\pi$, and $K/p$ fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0-5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable $\\rm \

Abdelwahab, N M; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Microsoft PowerPoint - NEILS for HTF page 1_ebf.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A good HTF must be able to absorb a substantial amount of energy in a given volume, a property known as volumetric heat capacity. Physical properties such as viscosity, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity must also be considered. Ionic liquids (IL) were discovered more than 30 years ago and are organic compounds with negligible vapor pressure. ILs are molten salts with low melting points below 100°C, high liquid range above 400°C, in some cases, freezing points below 0°C. For example, experiments conducted at SRNL examined the ionic liquid known as [C 4 mmim][NTf 2 ] due to commercial availability, good thermal stability, and tolerable viscosity. The studies indicate that the addition of Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles to the ionic liquid can increase density of the liquid by 10%, and increase volumetric heat capacity by 40% compared to neat ILs and 70% compared to traditional volatile

308

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2004 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council July 12, 2004 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your reference is the abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. This document is designed to correct information and further explain what was provided in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-megawatt gas-fired combined cycle cogeneration facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional

309

Theory of Polymer Chains in Poor Solvent: Single-Chain Structure, Solution Thermodynamics and Theta Point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the language of the Flory chi parameter, we develop a theory that unifies the treatment of the single-chain structure and the solution thermodynamics of polymers in poor solvents. The structure of a globule and its melting thermodynamics is examined using the self-consistent filed theory. Our results show that the chain conformation involves three states prior to the globule-to-coil transition: the fully-collapsed globule, the swollen globule and the molten globule, which are distinguished by the core density and the interfacial thickness. By examining the chain-length dependence of the melting of the swollen globule, we find universal scaling behavior in the chain properties near the Theta point. The information of density profile and free energy of the globule is used in the dilute solution thermodynamics to study the phase equilibrium of polymer solution. Our results show different scaling behavior of the solubility of polymers in the dilute solution compared to the F-H theory, both in the chi dependence and the chain-length dependence. From the perspectives of single chain structure and solution thermodynamics, our results verifies the consistency of the Theta point defined by different criteria in the limit of infinite chain length: the disappearance of the second viral coefficient, the abrupt change in chain size and the critical point in the phase diagram of the polymer solution. Our results show the value of chi at the Theta point is 0.5 (for the case of equal monomer and solvent volume), which coincides with the value predicted from the F-H theory.

Rui Wang; Zhen-Gang Wang

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

Calibrating the energy of a 50 X 50 GeV muon collider using spin precession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutral Higgs boson is expected to have a mass in the region 90-150 GeV in various schemes within the Minimal Supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model. A first generation Muon Collider is uniquely suited to investigate the mass, width and decay modes of the Higgs boson, since the coupling of the Higgs to muons is expected to be strong enough for it to be produced in the s channel mode in the muon collider. Due to the narrow width of the Higgs, it is necessary to measure and control the energy of the individual muon bunches to a precision of a few parts in a million. We investigate the feasibility of determining the energy scale of a muon collider ring with circulating muon beams of 50 GeV energy by measuring the turn by turn variation of the energy deposited by electrons produced by the decay of the muons. This variation is caused by the existence of an average initial polarization of the muon beam and a non-zero value of g-2 for the muon. We demonstrate that it is feasible to determine the energy scale of the machine with this method to a few parts per million using data collected during 1000 turns.

Rajendran Raja; Alvin Tollestrup

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

Measurement of the nucleon structure function in iron using 215- and 93-GeV muons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93- and 215-GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the multimuon spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. Using the known form of the radiatively corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F2(x,Q2) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5GeV2/c2. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best-fit value of the QCD scale parameter ?LO=230±40(stat)±80(syst) MeV/c, assuming R=0 and without applying Fermi-motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R=-0.06±0.06(stat)±0.11(syst). Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others.

P. D. Meyers; A. R. Clark; K. J. Johnson; L. T. Kerth; S. C. Loken; T. W. Markiewicz; W. H. Smith; M. Strovink; W. A. Wenzel; R. P. Johnson; C. Moore; M. Mugge; R. E. Shafer; G. D. Gollin; F. C. Shoemaker; P. Surko

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Simple Transition-Free Lattice of an 8 GeV Proton Synchroton  

SciTech Connect

A transition-free lattice is a basic requirement of a high-intensity medium-energy (several GeV) proton synchrotron in order to eliminate beam losses during transition crossing. An 8 GeV synchrotron is proposed as a principal component in an alternative hybrid design of Project-X [1]. This machine would be housed in the Fermilab antiproton source enclosure replacing the present Debuncher. A simple doublet lattice with high transition gamma has been designed. It uses just one type of dipoles and one type of quadrupoles (QF and QD are of the same length). It has no transition crossing. It has a triangular shape with three zero dispersion straight sections, which can be used for injection, extraction, RF and collimators. The beta-functions and dispersion are low. This lattice has plenty of free space for correctors and diagnostic devices, as well as good optical properties including large dynamic aperture, weak dependence of lattice functions on amplitude and momentum deviation.

Chou, W.; /Fermilab

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nucleon-Nucleon Optical Model for Energies to 3 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several nucleon-nucleon potentials, Paris, Nijmegen, Argonne, and those derived by quantum inversion, which describe the NN interaction for T-lab below 300$ MeV are extended in their range of application as NN optical models. Extensions are made in r-space using complex separable potentials definable with a wide range of form factor options including those of boundary condition models. We use the latest phase shift analyses SP00 (FA00, WI00) of Arndt et al. from 300 MeV to 3 GeV to determine these extensions. The imaginary parts of the optical model interactions account for loss of flux into direct or resonant production processes. The optical potential approach is of particular value as it permits one to visualize fusion, and subsequent fission, of nucleons when T-lab above 2 GeV. We do so by calculating the scattering wave functions to specify the energy and radial dependences of flux losses and of probability distributions. Furthermore, half-off the energy shell t-matrices are presented as they are readily deduced with this approach. Such t-matrices are required for studies of few- and many-body nuclear reactions.

A. Funk; H. V. von Geramb; K. A. Amos

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Inferring the nature of the boson at 125-126 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a bosonic resonance near 125 GeV has been firmly established at the Large Hadron Collider. Understanding the exact nature of this boson is a priority. The task now is to verify whether the boson is indeed the scalar Higgs as proposed in the Standard Model of particle physics, or something more esoteric as proposed in the plethora of extensions to the Standard Model. This requires a verification that the boson is a $J^{PC}=0^{++}$ state with couplings precisely as predicted by the Standard Model. Since a non Standard Model boson can in some cases mimic the Standard Model Higgs in its couplings to gauge bosons, it is essential to rule out any anomalous behavior in its gauge couplings. We present a step by step methodology to determine the properties of this resonance without making any assumptions about its couplings. We present the analysis in terms of uni-angular distributions which lead to angular asymmetries that allow for the extraction of the couplings of the 125-126 GeV resonance to Z bosons. We show analytically and numerically, that these asymmetries can unambiguously confirm whether the new boson is indeed the Standard Model Higgs boson.

Arjun Menon; Tanmoy Modak; Dibyakrupa Sahoo; Rahul Sinha; Hai-Yang Cheng

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system  

SciTech Connect

Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D. [Inspection Development Company, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs  

SciTech Connect

The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Rheological Signatures of Gelation and Effect of Shear Melting on Aging Colloidal Suspension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colloidal suspensions that are out of thermodynamic equilibrium undergo physical aging wherein their structure evolves to lower the free energy. In aqueous suspension of Laponite, physical aging accompanies increases of elastic and viscous moduli as a function of time. In this work we study temporal evolution of elastic and viscous moduli at different frequencies and observe that freshly prepared aqueous suspension of Laponite demonstrates identical rheological behavior reported for the crosslinking polymeric materials undergoing chemical gelation. Consequently at a certain time tan{\\delta} is observed to be independent of frequency. However, for samples preserved under rest condition for longer duration before applying the shear melting, the liquid to solid transition subsequent to shear melting shows greater deviation from classical gelation. We also obtain continuous relaxation time spectra from the frequency dependence of viscous modulus. We observe that, with increase in the rest time, continuous relaxation time spectrum shows gradual variation from negative slope, describing dominance of fast relaxation modes to positive slope representing dominance of slow relaxation modes. We propose that the deviation from gelation behavior for the shear melted suspensions originates from inability of shear melting to completely break the percolated structure thereby creating unbroken aggregates. The volume fraction of such unbroken aggregates increases with the rest time. For small rest times presence of fewer number of unbroken aggregates cause deviation from the classical gelation. On the other hand, at high rest times presence of greater fraction of unbroken aggregates subsequent to shear melting demonstrate dynamic arrest leading to inversion of relaxation time spectra.

Shweta Jatav; Yogesh M Joshi

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of Spare Excitation Coils for the 25 GeV Proton Synchroton Main Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of Spare Excitation Coils for the 25 GeV Proton Synchroton Main Magnet

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Certain rules of formation of the block in melting brucite in an OKB-955N smelting furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certain rules of columnar crystallization of periclase and of formation of the block in melting of brucite in an OKB-955N smelting furnace are...

K. V. Simonov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

pi0 photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.675 to 2.875-GeV  

SciTech Connect

Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^0$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.675 to 2.875 GeV. The results reported here possess greater accuracy in the absolute normalization than previous measurements. They disagree with recent CB-ELSA measurements for the process at forward scattering angles. Agreement with the SAID and MAID fits is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been extended to 3 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations.

Michael Dugger; Barry Ritchie; Jacques Ball; Patrick Collins; Evgueni Pasyuk; Richard Arndt; William Briscoe; Igor Strakovski; Ron Workman; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Gerard Audit; Harutyun Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; John Cummings; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; John Ficenec; Tony Forest; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; D. Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; J. Hu; Marco Huertas; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Kui Kim; Kinney Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; Valery Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Viacheslav Kuznetsov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ana Lima; Kenneth Livingston; K. Lukashin; Joseph Manak; Claude Marchand; Leonard Maximon; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Valeria Muccifora; James Mueller; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K Park; Craig Paterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; J. Shaw; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Xue kai Wang; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; Jae-Chul Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

BROUWER'S FIXED POINT THEOREM JASPER DEANTONIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BROUWER'S FIXED POINT THEOREM JASPER DEANTONIO Abstract. In this paper we prove Brouwer's Fixed be used to make three sequences which all have p as their limit point. Date: July 27, 2009. 1 #12;2 JASPER

May, J. Peter

323

Cold Crucible Induction Melting Technology for Vitrification of High Level Waste: Development and Status in India  

SciTech Connect

Cold crucible induction melting is globally emerging as an alternative technology for the vitrification of high level radioactive waste. The new technology offers several advantages such as high temperature availability with long melter life, high waste loading, high specific capacity etc. Based on the laboratory and bench scale studies, an engineering scale cold crucible induction melter was locally developed in India. The melter was operated continuously to assess its performance. The electrical and thermal efficiencies were found to be in the range of 70-80 % and 10-20 % respectively. Glass melting capacities up to 200 kg m{sup -2} hr{sup -1} were accomplished using the ESCCIM. Industrially adaptable melter operating procedures for start-up, melting and pouring operations were established (author)

Sugilal, G.; Sengar, P.B.S. [Nuclear Recycle Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs  

SciTech Connect

Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Study on LiCl waste salt treatment process by layer melt crystallization  

SciTech Connect

Layer melt crystallization operated in a static mode has been applied to separate Group I and II chlorides from surrogate LiCl waste salt. The effects of operating conditions such as crystal growing rate(or flux) and initial impurity concentration on separation (or concentration) of cesium, strontium and barium involved in a LiCl melts were analyzed. In a layer crystallization process, separation was impaired by occlusion of impurities and by residual melt adhering to LiCl crystal after at the end of the process. The crystal growth rate strongly affects the crystal structure, therefore the separation efficiency, while the effect of the initial Cs and Sr concentration in LiCl molten salt was nearly negligible. (authors)

Cho, Yung-Zun; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Choi, Jung-Hoon; Eun, Hee-Chul; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, In-Tae; Park, Geun-Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

Krupa, J.F.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

A parametric model for analysis of melt progression in U-A1 assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A computational model has been developed that calculates the thermal degradation of the reactor core of the production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) under postulated severe accident conditions. This model addresses heatup and degradation of the U-Al fuel and Li-Al or U-metal target assemblies and neighboring structures. Models included are those for assembly heatup due to decay heat generation, material melting and relocation, volume expansion of fuel due to foaming and melt/debris accumulation in assembly bottom end-fittings. Sample results are presented that illustrate the effect of alternative assumptions regarding the temperature at which U-Al alloy melts and relocates and the extent to which fuel foaming thermally couples adjacent fuel and target tubes. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Paik, I.K. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Kim, S.H.; Leonard, M.T.; Amos, C.N. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, Carol M. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Incorporation and distribution of rhenium in a borosilicate glass melt heat treated in a sealed ampoule  

SciTech Connect

We investigated a mass balance of rhenium (used as a surrogate for technetium-99) in a borosilicate glass that was mixed with excess Re source (KReO4) beyond its solubility and heat treated in a vacuum-sealed fused silica ampoule. Distribution of Re in the bulk of the glass, in a salt phase formed on the melt surface, and in condensate material deposited on the ampoule wall was evaluated to understand the Re migration into different phases during the reaction between the molten glass and KReO4. The information gained from this study will contribute to an effort to understand the mechanism of technetium retention in or escape from glass melt during early stages of glass batch melting, which is a goal of the present series of studies.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

331

Other Purdue Web points of Interest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other Purdue Web points of interest. Purdue University Home Page --- Schedule of Classes · Graduate School · Agronomy · Computer Science --- CS & E ...

332

Is the 130 GeV line real? A search for systematics in the Fermi-LAT data  

SciTech Connect

Our recent claims of a Galactic center feature in Fermi-LAT data at approximately 130 GeV have motivated a large number of papers proposing explanations ranging from dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic pulsar winds. Because of the importance of such interpretations for physics and astrophysics, a discovery will require not only additional data, but a thorough investigation of possible LAT systematics. While we do not have access to the details of each event reconstruction, we do have information about each event from the public event lists and spacecraft parameter files. These data allow us to search for suspicious trends that could indicate a spurious signal. We consider several hypotheses that might make an instrumental artifact more apparent at the Galactic center, and find them implausible. We also search for an instrumental signature in the Earth limb photons, which provide a smooth reference spectrum for null tests. We find no significant 130 GeV feature in the Earth limb sample. However, we do find a marginally significant 130 GeV feature in Earth limb photons with a limited range of detector incidence angles. This raises concerns about the 130 GeV Galactic center feature, even though we can think of no plausible model of instrumental behavior that connects the two. A modest amount of additional limb data would tell us if the limb feature is a statistical fluke. If the limb feature persists, it would raise doubts about the Pass 7 processing of E > 100 GeV events. At present we find no instrumental systematics that could plausibly explain the excess Galactic center emission at 130 GeV.

Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Su, Meng [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Weniger, Christoph, E-mail: dfinkbeiner@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mengsu@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: weniger@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

Duncan, James S.

334

Check Point NGX R65 Security Administration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Check Point NGX R65 is the next major release of Check Point's flagship firewall software product, which has over 750,000 registered users. Check Point's NGX is the underlying security software platform for all of the company's enterprise firewall, VPN ... Keywords: Operating Systems, Security

Ralph Bonnell

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Point-based multiscale surface representation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article we present a new multiscale surface representation based on point samples. Given an unstructured point cloud as input, our method first computes a series of point-based surface approximations at successively higher levels of smoothness, ... Keywords: Surface representations, geometric modeling, morphing, scale space, shape modeling, spectral filtering

Mark Pauly; Leif P. Kobbelt; Markus Gross

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Range Monitoring with Photo-points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo-points provide a way for owners/managers to monitor rangeland health with a minimum of time and expense. This publication explains when, where and how often to photograph rangeland points, how to set up a photo point, and how to interpret...

McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nesting points in the sphere Dan Archdeacon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nesting points in the sphere Dan Archdeacon Dept. of Computer Science University of Vermont) Abstract Let G be a graph embedded in the sphere. A k-nest of a point x not in G is a collection C 1 nested if each point not on the graph has a k-nest. In this paper we

Archdeacon, Dan

338

Measurement of D* Mesons in Jets from p + p Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We report the measurement of charged D* mesons in inclusive jets produced in proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR experiment at RHIC. For D* mesons with fractional momenta 0.2 < z < 0.5 in inclusive jets with 11.5 GeV mean transverse energy, the production rate is found to be N(D*{sup +} + D*{sup -})/N(jet) = 0.015 {+-} 0.008(stat) {+-} 0.007(sys). This rate is consistent with perturbative QCD evaluation of gluon splitting into a pair of charm quarks and subsequent hadronization.

STAR Coll

2009-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect

A collaborative study has been established under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management International Program between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, to investigate potential improvements in melt rate via chemical additions to the glass frit. Researchers at KRI suggested a methodology for selecting frit additives based on empirical coefficients for optimization of glass melting available in the Russian literature. Using these coefficients, KRI identified B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, and MnO as frit additives that were likely to improve melt rate without having adverse effects on crystallization of the glass or its chemical durability. The results of the melt rate testing in the SMK melter showed that the slurry feed rate (used as a gauge of melt rate) could be significantly increased when MnO or CuO were added to Frit 550 with the SMR-2 sludge. The feed rates increased by about 27% when MnO was added to the frit and by about 26% when CuO was added to the frit, as compared to earlier results for Frit 550 alone. The impact of adding additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the frit was minor when added with CuO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed a more significant, 39% improvement in melt rate when added with MnO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} also reduced the viscosity of the glasses during pouring. Samples of the glasses from the melt rate testing characterized at SRNL showed that there were no significant impacts on crystallization of the glasses. All of the glasses had very good chemical durability. Chemical composition measurements showed that the frit additives were present in concentrations below the targeted values in some of the glasses. Therefore, it is possible that higher concentrations of these additives may further improve melt rate, although the impacts of higher concentrations of these components on crystallization and durability would need to be determined. Overall, the results show an excellent potential for these additives to significantly improve waste throughput for DOE vitrification facilities. A complete report from KRI is included as an appendix to this document.

Fox, K.; Marra, J.

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

PRELIMINARY FRIT DEVELOPMENT AND MELT RATE TESTING FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 (SB6)  

SciTech Connect

The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) with a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) composition projection in March 2009. Based on this projection, frit development efforts were undertaken to gain insight into compositional effects on the predicted and measured properties of the glass waste form and to gain insight into frit components that may lead to improved melt rate for SB6-like compositions. A series of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) based glasses was selected, fabricated and characterized in this study to better understand the ability of frit compositions to accommodate uncertainty in the projected SB6 composition. Acceptable glasses (compositions where the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) predicted acceptable properties, good chemical durability was measured, and no detrimental nepheline crystallization was observed) can be made using Frit 418 with SB6 over a range of Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. However, the ability to accommodate variation in the sludge composition limits the ability to utilize alternative frits for potential improvements in melt rate. Frit 535, which may offer improvements in melt rate due to its increased B2O3 concentration, produced acceptable glasses with the baseline SB6 composition at waste loadings of 34 and 42%. However, the PCCS MAR results showed that it is not as robust as Frit 418 in accommodating variation in the sludge composition. Preliminary melt rate testing was completed in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) with four candidate frits for SB6. These four frits were selected to evaluate the impacts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O concentrations in the frit relative to those of Frit 418, although they are not necessarily candidates for SB6 vitrification. Higher concentrations of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the frit relative to that of Frit 418 appeared to improve melt rate. However, when a higher concentration of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was coupled with a lower concentration of Na{sub 2}O relative to Frit 418, melt rate did not appear to improve. It is expected that a SB6 composition projection with less uncertainty will be received during analysis of the Tank 51 E-1 sample, which will be pulled after the completion of aluminum dissolution in August 2009. At that time, additional frit development work will be performed to seek improved melt rates while maintaining viable projected operating windows. This later work will ultimately lead to a frit recommendation for SB6.

Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Edwards, T.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos spreading center near 95 degree W: A leaser decrepitation mass spectrometry study  

SciTech Connect

Volatile ratios (primarily of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}) in individual silicate melt (glass) inclusions in minerals have been analyzed using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry. A Nd-glass laser was used to produce 50-micrometer diameter pits in silicate melt inclusions. Released volatiles were analyzed directly with a computer-controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer. The mean CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O from the propagating rift (0.245 {plus minus} 0.068) silicate glass inclusions is significantly lower than that of the actively failing rift (0.641 {plus minus} 0.241); this difference probably reflects different degrees of degassing during contrasting magmatic histories for the two regions. Relatively undifferentiated failing rift magmas must have relatively short crustal residence time prior to eruption and, therefore, have not undergone significant degassing of CO{sub 2}, as would appear to be the case for the more highly fractionated propagating rift magmas. The laser-mass spectrometric system described herein has the ability to act as a point-source probing device that can differentiate between the various volatile sites in minerals and rocks (as well as synthetic materials) on a micrometer scale.

Yonover, R.N.; Sinton, J.M. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Gibson, E.K. (NASA/Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (USA)); Sommer, M.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Pion correlations for 1.2A GeV lanthanum on lanthanum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are presented for pion interferometry measurements of 1.2A GeV La+La at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Heavy Ion Spectrometer System. The experiment’s acceptance is at forward angles in the center-of-mass system. The fit parameters R, ?, ?, R?, and R? are presented. The extracted shape of the pion source is oblate. The correlation between the extracted size of the pion source and the centrality of the collision is investigated as well as the dependence of the source size on the mean momentum of the pion pairs. We conclude that the fitted radius parameters scale with mass for symmetric systems. We observe a dependence of the fitted size of the pion source on the mean momentum of the pion pairs. Comparisons are made with previous results.

W. B. Christie; D. L. Olson; C. E. Tull; F. P. Brady; G. P. Grim; J. H. Osborne; M. L. Partlan; J. L. Romero; J. Chang; S. Y. Fung; J. Kang; S. Zhang; D. Keane; D. Beavis; Y. Dardenne

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

1 GeV CW nonscaling FFAG for ADS, and magnet parameters  

SciTech Connect

Multi-MW proton driver capability remains a challenging, critical technology for many core HEP programs, particularly the neutrino ones such as the Muon Collider and Neutrino factory, and for high-profile energy applications such as Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADS) and Accelerator Transmutation of Waste for nuclear power and waste management. Work is focused almost exclusively on an SRF linac, as, to date, no re-circulating accelerator can attain the 10-20 MW capability necessary for the nuclear applications. Recently, the concept of isochronous orbits has been explored and developed for nonscaling FFAGs using powerful new methodologies in FFAG accelerator design. Work is progressing on a stable, high-intensity, 1 GeV isochronous FFAG. Initial specifications of novel magnets with the nonlinear radial fields required to support isochronous operation are also reported here.

Johnstone C.; Meot, F.; Snopok, P.; Weng, W.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Soft QCD Measurements at 900 GeV and 7 TeV with ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results on charged hadron production in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider and center of mass energies ps = 900 GeV and 7 TeV in the ATLAS Detector. Charged tracks are measured with high precision in the inner tracking system; track multiplicities, transverse momentum spectrum and the average track transverse momentum as a function of track multiplicity are compared to phenomenological models describing the soft QCD processes participating in the interaction. Although all models approximately describe the data, none show complete agreement, with the deviation between data and Monte Carlo becoming more significant at the the higher center of mass energy and for higher track transverse momentum. These data have been used in the determination of a new optimised model which provides a much improved description of the data.

Proudfoot, J; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Exclusive pi^0 electroproduction at W > 2 GeV with CLAS  

SciTech Connect

Exclusive neutral-pion electroproduction (ep-->e'p'pi0) was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4sigma/dtdQ2dxBdphipi and structure functions sigmaT+epsilonsigmaL,sigmaTT and ?LT as functions of t were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The data are compared with Regge and handbag theoretical calculations. Analyses in both frameworks find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. For the Regge analysis it is found that the inclusion of vector meson rescattering processes is necessary to bring the magnitude of the calculated and measured structure functions into rough agreement. In the handbag framework, there are two independent calculations, both of which appear to roughly explain the magnitude of the structure functions in terms of transversity generalized parton distributions.

Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K.P.; Anderson, M.D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A.S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Carman, D.S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guegan, B.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Isupov, E.L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.Y.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.A.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Procureur, S.; Puckett, A.J.R.; Raue, B.A.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B.G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y.G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.W.; Zonta, I.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

On the Production of $?^+?^+$ Pairs in pp Collisions at 0.8 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data accumulated recently for the exclusive measurement of the $pp\\to pp\\pi^+\\pi^-$ reaction at a beam energy of 0.793 GeV using the COSY-TOF spectrometer have been analyzed with respect to possible events from the $pp \\to nn\\pi^+\\pi^+$ reaction channel. The latter is expected to be the only $\\pi\\pi$ production channel, which contains no major contributions from resonance excitation close to threshold and hence should be a good testing ground for chiral dynamics in the $\\pi\\pi$ production process. No single event has been found, which meets all conditions for being a candidate for the $pp \\to nn \\pi^+\\pi^+$ reaction. This gives an upper limit for the cross section of 0.16 $\\mu$b (90% C.L.), which is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the cross sections of the other two-pion production channels at the same incident energy.

S. Abd El-Samad; R. Bilger; K. -Th. Brinkmann; H. Clement; M. Dietrich; E. Doroshkevich; S. Dshemuchadse; K. Ehrhardt; A. Erhardt; W. Eyrich; A. Filippi; H. Freiesleben; M. Fritsch; R. Geyer; A. Gillitzer; J. Hauffe; D. Hesselbarth; R. Jaekel; B. Jakob; L. Karsch; K. Kilian; J. Kress; E. Kuhlmann; S. Marcello; S. Marwinski; R. Meier; K. Moeller; H. P. Morsch; L. Naumann; J. Ritman; E. Roderburg; P. Schoenmeier M. Schulte-Wissermann; W. Schroeder; F. Stinzing; G. Y. Sun; J. Waechter; G. J. Wagner M. Wagner; U. Weidlich; A. Wilms; S. Wirth; G. Zhang; P. Zupranski

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Permanent dipole magnets for the 8 GeV transfer line at FNAL  

SciTech Connect

The transfer line that will serve to transport 8 GeV protons from the Booster to the new Fermilab Main Injector has been built using permanent magnets. A total of 46 horizontal bend dipoles and 5 vertical bend dipoles were built for this beamline; 67 gradient magnets were also built. The magnets were built using magnetized strontium ferrite bricks. Thermal compensation of these bricks was effected by use of a nickel-iron alloy. The dipole magnets were built with a mean integrated strength of 0.56954 T-m, and an rms spread of 0.06%. The magnets were thermally cycled from 20{degrees}C to 0{degrees}C to condition the ferrite against irreversible thermal losses, and the compensation was measured with a flipcoil. The magnet strength was adjusted by varying the number of bricks installed at the magnet ends. Details of the assembly process and a summary of magnetic measurements are presented here.

Glass, H.D.; Brown, B.C.; Foster, G.W.; Fowler, W.B.; Haggard, J.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Medium effects in proton-induced $K^{0}$ production at 3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of the inclusive $K^{0}$ production in p+p and p+Nb collisions measured with the HADES detector at a beam kinetic energy of 3.5 GeV. Data are compared to the GiBUU transport model. The data suggest the presence of a repulsive momentum-dependent kaon potential as predicted by the Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). For the kaon at rest and at normal nuclear density, the ChPT potential amounts to $\\approx 35$ MeV. A detailed tuning of the kaon production cross sections implemented in the model has been carried out to reproduce the experimental data measured in p+p collisions. The uncertainties in the parameters of the model were examined with respect to the sensitivity of the experimental results from p+Nb collisions to the in-medium kaon potential.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Korcyl; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; T. Kunz; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; J. Michel; C. Müntz; R. Münzer; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; . T. Gaitanos; J. Weil

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

349

Study of the pp-> np+ reaction at 1.25 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In pp collisions at 1.25 GeV kinetic energy, the HADES collaboration aimed at investigating the di-electron production related to (1232) Dalitz decay ( + ! pe+e?). In order to constrain the models predicting the cross section and the production mechanisms of resonance, the hadronic channels have been measured and studied in parallel to the leptonic channels. The analyses of pp ! np + and pp ! pp 0 channels and the comparison to simulations are presented in this contribution, in particular the angular distributions being sensitive to production and decay. The accurate acceptance corrections have been performed as well, which could be tested in all the phase space region thanks to the high statistic data. These analyses result in an overall agreement with the one- exchange model and previous data.

Liu, T; Agakishiev, G; Agodi, C; Balanda, A; Bellia, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Grosse, E; Guber, F; Heilmann, M; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Kanaki, K; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Kozuch, A; Krása, A; Krížek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Marín, J; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Mishra, D; Morini?re, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Novotny, R; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pérez Cavalcanti, T; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Simon, R; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlustý, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Veretenkin, I; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhou, P; Zumbruch, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Study of the $pp \\to np?^+$ reaction at 1.25 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In pp collisions at 1.25 GeV kinetic energy, the HADES collaboration aimed at investigating the di-electron production related to $\\Delta$ (1232) Dalitz decay ($\\Delta^+ \\to pe^+e^-$). In order to constrain the models predicting the cross section and the production mechanisms of $\\Delta$ resonance, the hadronic channels have been measured and studied in parallel to the leptonic channels. The analyses of $pp\\to np\\pi^+$ and $pp\\to pp\\pi^0$ channels and the comparison to simulations are presented in this contribution, in particular the angular distributions being sensitive to $\\Delta$ production and decay. The accurate acceptance corrections have been performed as well, which could be tested in all the phase space region thanks to the high statistic data. These analyses result in an overall agreement with the one-$\\pi$ exchange model and previous data.

T. Liu; for the HADES collaboration

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram  

SciTech Connect

Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R. [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Kusdiantara, Rudy, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Puspita, Dila, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Sidarto, Kuntjoro A., E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y. [Department of Mathematics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

352

Melting of albite and dehydration of brucite in H2O–NaCl fluids to 9 kbars and 700–900°C: implications for partial melting and water activities during high pressure metamorphism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The melting reaction: albite(solid)+ H2O(fluid) =albite-H2O(melt) has been determined in the presence of H2O–NaCl fluids at 5 and 9.2?kbar, and results compared with those obtained in presence of H2O–CO2 fluids....

Kirill I. Shmulovich; C. M. Graham

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California Point Reyes Deployment AMF Home Point Reyes Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Experiment Planning MASRAD Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Outreach Posters Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (horizontal) Climate Research at Point Reyes National Seashore (vertical) News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco. Shelters: 38° 5' 30.51" N, 122° 57' 19.90" W Instrument Field: 38° 5' 27.6" N, 122° 57' 25.80" W Altitude: 8 meters Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM

354

Analysis of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass 58761v1 Page 1 White Paper - Analysis of Cross-Over Points for Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel and Amorphous Ribbon for the MVLT Superclass Cross-over points for the Medium Voltage Liquid Filled distribution transformer super-class have been analyzed based on the Engineering Analysis provided by the Department of Energy. For the purpose of this white paper, a cross-over point is defined as where the low-cost curve fitted to the point cloud for all of the transformers with M-3 grain-oriented electrical steel core designs crosses the low-cost curve fitted to the point cloud for all of the transformers with amorphous (SA1) core designs. This analysis is based on the data from the DOE Engineering Analysis. It excludes uncorroborated data

355

Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target was measured at the Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The data allows for evaluation of neutron production process implemented in theoretical simulation codes. It also helps exploring the reasons for some disagreement between calculation results and shielding benchmark data taken at high energy accelerator facilities, since it is evaluated separately from neutron transport. The experiment was carried out using a 120 GeV proton beam of 3E5 protons/spill. Since the spill duration was 4 seconds, proton-induced events were counted pulse by pulse. The intensity was maintained using diffusers and collimators installed in the beam line to MTBF. The protons hit a copper block target the size of which is 5cm x 5cm x 60 cm long. The neutrons produced in the target were measured using NE213 liquid scintillator detectors, placed about 5.5 m away from the target at 30^{\\circ} and 5 m 90^{\\circ} with respect to the proton beam axis. The neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique using timing difference between the NE213 and a plastic scintillator located just before the target. Neutron detection efficiency of NE213 was determined on basis of experimental data from the high energy neutron beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum was compared with the results of multi-particle transport codes to validate the implemented theoretical models. The apparatus would be applied to future measurements to obtain a systematic data set for secondary particle production on various target materials.

Nobuhiro Shigyo; Toshiya Sanami; Tsuyoshi Kajimoto; Yosuke Iwamoto; Masayuki Hagiwara; Kiwamu Saito; Kenji Ishibashi; Hiroshi Nakashima; Yukio Sakamoto; Hee-Seock Lee; Erik Ramberg; Aria A. Meyhoefer; Rick Coleman; Doug Jensen; Anthony F. Leveling; David J. Boehnlein; Nikolai V. Mokhov

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Exergy-based analysis and efficiency evaluation for an aluminum melting furnace in a die-casting plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of a natural gas-fired aluminum melting furnace in a die-casting plant is examined using energy and exergy methods, to improve understanding of the burner system in the furnace and so that potential improvements can be identified. Such ... Keywords: aluminum, die-casting, efficiency, energy, exergy, melting furnace

Marc A. Rosen; Dennis L. Lee

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Desert Glass Field, Egypt; and the Australasian...electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS...airburst with equivalent energy in terms of TNT, a cosmic...has greater melting efficiency. However, it does not...form when very high-energy lightning melts...

Ted E. Bunch; Robert E. Hermes; Andrew M.T. Moore; Douglas J. Kennett; James C. Weaver; James H. Wittke; Paul S. DeCarli; James L. Bischoff; Gordon C. Hillman; George A. Howard; David R. Kimbel; Gunther Kletetschka; Carl P. Lipo; Sachiko Sakai; Zsolt Revay; Allen West; Richard B. Firestone; James P. Kennett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Controls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry: regional contrasts and effects of river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first-year sea ice (FYI) are observed in the Eurasian Arctic using the C-band (5.3 GHz) European RemoteControls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry and Kolyma rivers. Melt onset of the sea ice surface is associated with abrupt changes in s0 40, with values

Smith, Laurence C.

359

Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic terrains on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic: T. Spohn Keywords: Mars chaotic terrain heat flux outflow channel Chaotic terrains if these features can form by melting and collapse of buried water ice in a confined basin. 2D thermal modelling

Utrecht, Universiteit

360

Stopping and radial flow in central 58Ni+58Ni collisions between 1A and 2A GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of charged pions, protons, and deuterons has been studied in central collisions of 58Ni on 58Ni at incident beam energies of 1.06A, 1.45A, and 1.93A GeV. The dependence of transverse-momentum and rapidity spectra on the beam energy and on the centrality of the collison is presented. It is shown that the scaling of the mean rapidity shift of protons established for between 10A and 200A GeV at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS accelerators energies is valid down to 1A GeV. The degree of nuclear stopping is discussed; quantum molecular dynamics calculations reproduce the measured proton rapidity spectra for the most central events reasonably well, but do not show any sensitivity between the soft and the hard equation of state. A radial flow analysis, using the midrapidity transverse-momentum spectra, delivers freeze-out temperatures T and radial flow velocities ?r which increase with beam energy up to 2A GeV; in comparison to the existing data of Au on Au over a large range of energies, only ?r shows a system size dependence.

B. Hong et al. ((FOPI Collaboration))

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Studies of nucleon-gold collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon pair using tagged d+Au interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectra of charged hadrons produced near mid-rapidity in d+Au, p+Au and n+Au collisions at - = 200 GeV are presented as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. These measurements were performed using the ...

Reed, Corey (Corey James)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz boosted simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz boosted simulations J.-L. Vay,1,a-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 130405 (2007 of plasma accelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

363

Multi-photon final states in e+e? collisions at ?s =130-172 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The process e+e? ?, ??(?) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb?1 taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130–172 GeV. ...

K. Ackerstaff; G. Alexander; J. Allison; N. Altekamp…

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

High-p(T) jets in p-barp collisions at s?=630 and 1800 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are presented from analyses of jet data produced in pp-bar collisions at s?=630 and 1800 GeV collected with the DØ detector during the 1994–1995 Fermilab Tevatron Collider run. We discuss the details of detector ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz booster simulations  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 130405 (2007)] allows direct and e#14;fficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted and beam loaded laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV (parameters not computationally accessible otherwise). This verifies the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated electron beam transverse dynamics and energy spread. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively. Agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference for a 0.1 GeV class stage. Obtaining these speedups and levels of accuracy was permitted by solutions for handling data input (in particular particle and laser beams injection) and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference, as well as mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness.

Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

COARSENING AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN DILUTE DIBLOCK COPOLYMER MELTS AND MIXTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COARSENING AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN DILUTE DIBLOCK COPOLYMER MELTS AND MIXTURES KARL GLASNER RUSTUM, on the other hand, is responsible for producing self-organized patterns. We construct approximations based upon incompatible [9]. Block copoly- mers, on the other hand, are inhomogeneous chain molecules composed of two

Glasner, Karl B.

367

A first order two-dimensional melting transition : methane adsorbed on (0001) graphite (*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-543 A first order two-dimensional melting transition : methane adsorbed on (0001) graphite (*) A. Abstract. 2014 The variation of long range order of a registered solid submonolayer of methane adsorbed for various solid mono- layers adsorbed on graphite indicates that solid- fluid phase transitions are more

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

Study on the melting and solidification in a glass block containing a phase change material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study on the melting and solidification in a glass block containing a phase change material.virgone@insa-lyon.fr and kevy.johannes@insa-lyon.fr Abstract This paper presents an experimental analysis of a phase change the phenomenon of phase change in an enclosure, focusing the research on the role of natural convection in liquid

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

369

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 88 (2005) 6573 Investigation of pulsed non-melt laser annealing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 88 (2005) 65­73 Investigation of pulsed non-melt laser annealing on the film properties and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells Xuege Wanga , Sheng S. Lia,�, C time to modify near- surface defects and related junction properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells

Anderson, Timothy J.

370

Fatigue and delayed brittle failure of vacuum melted and cadmium plated steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The detrimental effect of cyanide cadmium plating on fatigue strength and delayed brittle failure performance of an ultra high strength steel is reduced effectively by using vacuum melted steel as the basis metal. This phenomenon has been related predominantly to the increased tensile ductility of the steel with comparatively low hydrogen concentration.

W. Beck; E.J. Jankowsky; W.H. Golding

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Substrate Effect on the Melting Temperature of Thin Polyethylene Films M. Rafailovich,1,* J. Sokolov,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substrate Effect on the Melting Temperature of Thin Polyethylene Films Y. Wang,1 M. Rafailovich,1 polyethylene thin films. The Tm decreases with the film thickness decrease when the film is thinner than that the degree of crystal- linity of polyethylene (PE) remained high even in films as thin as 15 nm [5]. A novel

372

First-order disorder-driven transition and inverse melting of the vortex lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

`inverse' melting behavior. � 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Type-II superconductivity-order transition (FOT) [1±5] whereas at low temperatures the ordered vortex lattice transforms into a disordered open questions in the phase diagram of HTS is the thermodynamic nature of the disorder-dri- ven

Zeldov, Eli

373

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities for the twelfth quarter of work performed under this agreement. The design of the vessel for pressure testing has been finalized. We have initiated the purchasing process for the vessel and related equipment. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation completed computational fluid dynamics modeling and chemical reaction modeling of catalytic combustion of HyMelt product gases.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A comparison of neutron scattering studies and computer simulations of polymer melts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of neutron scattering studies and computer simulations of polymer melts G.D. Smith a; in ®nal form 22 May 2000 Abstract Neutron scattering and computer simulations are powerful tools in particular. When neutron scattering studies and quan- titative atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

Utah, University of

375

Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnances. Quarterly technical report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this program is the commercial demonstration of an efficient, environmentally acceptable coal firing process suitable for implementation on melting furnaces throughout the aluminum industry. To achieve this goal, the program has been divided into two phases. Phase I has begun with the design and construction of a 350 pound (coal) per hour staged slagging cyclone combustor (SSCC) attached to a 7-ft diameter aluminum melting ladle furnace. Process development will culminate with a 1000 pph prototype SSCC firing a 40,000 pound capacity open hearth melting furnace at the Alcoa Laboratories. Phase II implementation is currently planned for Alcoa's Lafayette, IN, Works, where two of the ingot plant's five open hearth melting furnaces will be converted to utilize coal. In addition to confirmation of data gathered in Phase I, the effect of extended production schedule operation on equipment and efficiencies will be determined. This work would begin in 1982 pursuant to technical and economic evaluation of the process development at that time.

West, C E

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. Second annual technical progress report, July 1979-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this program is the commercial demonstration of an efficient, environmentally acceptable coal firing process suitable for implementation on melting furnaces throughout the aluminum industry. To achieve this goal, the program has been divided into two phases. Phase I has proceeded through design and construction of a 350 pound (coal) per hour staged slagging cyclone combustor (SSCC) attached to a 7-ft diameter aluminum melting ladle furnace. Process development will culminate with a 1000 pph prototype SSCC firing a 40,000 pound capacity open hearth melting furnace at the Alcoa Laboratories. Phase II implementation is currently planned for Alcoa's Lafayette, IN, Works, where two of the ingot plant's five open hearth melting furnaces will be converted to utilize coal. In addition to confirmation of data gathered in Phase I, the effect of extended production schedule operation on equipment and efficiencies will be determined. This work would begin in 1982 pursuant to technical and economic evaluation of the process development at that time.

West, C E; Stewart, D L

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Melting of Iron under Earth's Core Conditions from Diffusion Monte Carlo Free Energy Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting of Iron under Earth's Core Conditions from Diffusion Monte Carlo Free Energy Calculations Ester Sola1 and Dario Alfe`1,2 1 Thomas Young Centre@UCL, and Department of Earth Sciences, UCL, Gower. Here we used quantum Monte Carlo techniques to compute the free energies of solid and liquid iron

Alfè, Dario

378

NorthNorth Sea ice and glaciers are melting, permafrost is thawing, tundra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], in which rising temperatures produce short- er winters and less extensive snow and ice cover, with ripple#12;NorthNorth in the Sea ice and glaciers are melting, permafrost is thawing, tundra scientists yielding to shrubs--and changes will affect not just the Arctic but the entire planet REDUCTION IN SEA ICE

Sturm, Matthew

379

Validity of the Sutherland-Lindemann law and melting temperatures in the Earth's interior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and R slopes but does not coincide with...making the correct calculation of the melting slope...examined: (a) Electronic terms (metals...conditions allow calculation of the temperatures...state of the art does not allow a full...F., 1966, in Handbook of Physical Constants......

Francesco Mulargia; Francesca Quareni

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The generation of martian floods by the melting of ground ice above dykes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... formed by extension. The surface has also been modified by enormous floods, probably of water, which often flowed out of valleys formed by the largest of these faults. By ... can provide a heat source to melt ground ice, and so provide a source of water for the floods that have been inferred to originate in some of the large valleys ...

Dan McKenzie; Francis Nimmo

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Bubble nucleation as a trigger for xenolith entrapment in mantle melts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubble nucleation as a trigger for xenolith entrapment in mantle melts Nadav G. Lensky a,b,, Ron W to partial crystallization. Following nucleation, the bubbles grow and, if magma volume is confined, the surrounding rock may fracture. We performed experiments on the nucleation of CO2 bubbles in mafic alkaline

Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

382

Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

OBSERVATION AND MODELING OF A BURIED MELT-FREEZE CRUST Michael Smith1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form throughout the winter in Western Canada as the result of rain, wet snow or solar insola- tion December melt-freeze crust that was present throughout much of Western Canada. The data gathered included. Dept. of Civil Engineer- ing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Tel 1+403-200-2904; email

Jamieson, Bruce

384

Transient Rheology of a Polypropylene Melt Reinforced with Long Glass Fibers Ortman, K.C.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of producing high strength materials used in energy demanding structures such as automobiles, buildings In an effort to produce lightweight energy efficient parts with high moduli, thermoplastics are reinforced glass fibers in polymeric melts5,7 , however #12;relatively few efforts have produced applicable models

Wapperom, Peter

385

Estimation of viscosities of ternary silicate melts using the excess gibbs energy of mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A correlation to predict the viscosities of ternary silicates using the Gibbs energies of mixing of the silicate melts has been developed....2, FeO-MgO-SiO2, CaO-FeO-SiO2, CaO-MnO-SiO2, and CaO-MgO-SiO2. The good...

S. Seetharaman; Du Sichen; F. -Z. Ji

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and CST were added to the feed. These reductions in melt rate are consistent with previous studies that showed a negative impact of increased TiO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of melting. The impact of agitating the melt pool via bubbling was not studied as part of this work, but may be of interest for further testing. It is recommended that additional melt rate testing be performed should a potential reduction in melt rate of 10-15% be considered an issue of concern, or should the anticipated composition of the glass with the addition of material from salt waste processing be modified significantly from the current projections, either due to changes in sludge batch preparation or changes in the composition or volume of SCIX and SWPF material.

Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

End Points Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management End Points Management The policy of the EM is that a formal project management approach be used for the planning, managing, and conducting of its projects. Specifying and achieving end points is a systematic, engineering way of proceeding from an existing condition to a stated desired final set of conditions in which the facility is safe and can be economically monitored and maintained. An end point method is a way to translate broad mission statements to explicit goals that are readily understood by engineers and craft personnel who do the work. (It should be recognized that while end points as addressed here are for a final set of conditions for deactivation, they may represent an interim point for the overall EM cleanup goal.) End Points Management

388

Tradeoff between Efficiency and Melting for a High-Performance Electromagnetic Rail Gun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate the temperature distribution in the rails of an electromagnetic rail gun (EMG) due to the confinement of the current in a narrow surface layer resulting from the skin effect. In order to obtain analytic results, we assume a simple geometry for the rails, an electromagnetic skin effect boundary edge that propagates with the accelerating armature, and a current carrying channel controlled by magnetic field diffusion into the rails. We compute the temperature distribution in the rails at the time that the armature leaves the rails. For the range of exit velocities, from 1500 m/s to 5000 m/s, we find the highest temperatures are near the gun breech. After a single gun firing, the temperature reaches the melting temperature of the metal rails in a layer of finite thickness near the surface of the rails, for rails made of copper or tantalum. We plot the thickness of the melt layer as a function of position along the rails. In all cases, the thickness of the melt layer increases with gun velocity, making damage to the gun rails more likely at higher velocity. We also calculate the efficiency of the EMG as a function of gun velocity and find that the efficiency increases with increasing velocity, but only if the length of the gun is sufficiently long. The thickness of the melted layer also decreases with increasing rail length. Therefore, there is a tradeoff: for rails of sufficient length, the gun efficiency increases with increasing velocity but the melted layer thickness in the rails also increases.

William C. McCorkle; Thomas B. Bahder

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

Plasma Sprayed Pour Tubes and Other Melt Handling Components for Use in Gas Atomization  

SciTech Connect

Ames Laboratory has successfully used plasma sprayed ceramic components made from yttria stabilized zirconia as melt pouring tubes for gas atomization for many years. These tubes have proven to be strong, thermal shock resistant and versatile. Various configurations are possible both internally and externally. Accurate dimensions are achieved internally with a machined fugitive graphite mandrel and externally by diamond grinding. The previous study of the effect of spray parameters on density was extended to determine the effect of the resulting density on the thermal shock characteristics on down-quenching and up-quenching. Encouraging results also prompted investigation of the use of plasma spraying as a method to construct a melt pour exit stopper that is mechanically robust, thermal shock resistant, and not susceptible to attack by reactive melt additions. The Ames Laboratory operates two close-coupled high pressure gas atomizers. These two atomizers are designed to produce fine and coarse spherical metal powders (5{mu} to 500{mu} diameter) of many different metals and alloys. The systems vary in size, but generally the smaller atomizer can produce up to 5 kg of powder whereas the larger can produce up to 25 kg depending on the charge form and density. In order to make powders of such varying compositions, it is necessary to have melt systems capable of heating and containing the liquid charge to the desired superheat temperature prior to pouring through the atomization nozzle. For some metals and alloys this is not a problem; however for some more reactive and/or high melting materials this can pose unique challenges. Figure 1 is a schematic that illustrates the atomization system and its components.

Byrd, David; Rieken, Joel; Heidloff, Andy; Besser, Matthew; Anderson, Iver

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

[0268] First Galley Proofs MULTIPLICITIES, BOUNDARY POINTS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, multiplicity, extreme point, sharp point, boundary point. c Ð , Zagreb Paper OaM-0268 1 #12;2 W.S. CHEUNG NUMERICAL RANGES WAI-SHUN CHEUNG, XUHUA LIU AND TIN-YAU TAM (Communicated by C.-K. Li) Abstract, XUHUA LIU AND T.Y. TAM Given W(A), Embry [8] introduced M = M (A) := {x Cn : x Ax = x x}. In general

Tam, Tin-Yau

391

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel† ... Despite the lack of accurate data for the cloud points of biodiesel, the results obtained here allow for an adequate evaluation of the model proposed, showing that it can produce good predictions of the cloud points of mixtures of fatty acid esters. ... Because of its environmental benefits, resulting from a decrease in CO2 emissions, its origin from renewable resources, and the increase in crude oil costs, biodiesel is become increasingly attractive. ...

J. C. A. Lopes; L. Boros; M. A. Krähenbühl; A. J. A. Meirelles; J. L. Daridon; J. Pauly; I. M. Marrucho; J. A. P. Coutinho

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

393

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

394

Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

395

Homework/Program #1 Solutions a) ( 1 point for each Hello*.java files (3 points), 1 point for each Hello*.class file (3 points)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homework/Program #1 Solutions 1. a) ( 1 point for each Hello*.java files (3 points), 1 point for each Hello*.class file (3 points) -rw-r--r--. 1 cs11xyz cs11sxyz 718 Oct 2 21:47 Hello2.class -rw-r--r--. 1 cs11xyz cs11sxyz 938 Oct 2 21:22 Hello2.java -rw-r--r--. 1 cs11xyz cs11sxyz 427 Oct 2 21:47 Hello

Papadopoulos, Philip M.

396

Inexact and accelerated proximal point algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 10, 2011 ... Abstract: We present inexact accelerated proximal point algorithms for minimizing a proper lower semicon- tinuous and convex function.

Saverio Salzo

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

The interaction of nuclear reactor core melt with oxide sacrificial material of localization device for a nuclear power plant with water-moderated water-cooled power reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic results are given of an experimental investigation of the interaction oxide corium melt containing unoxidized zirconium with the sacrificial material of the device for localization of the core melt o...

V. G. Asmolov; A. A. Sulatskii; S. V. Beshta; V. S. Granovskii…

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Lattice for a Hybrid Fast-Ramping Muon Accelerator to 750 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We describe a lattice for accelerating muons from 375 GeV to 750 GeV. The lattice is a fast-ramping synchrotron with a mixture of fixed-field superconducting dipoles and warm dipoles, so as to have a high average bending field while still being able to rapidly change the average bending field as the beam momentum increases. For a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider, muons must be rapidly accelerated to 750 GeV. To accomplish this efficiently, we wish to make as many passes through the RF cavities as possible, while keeping the average RF gradients sufficiently high to avoid excess muon decays. A synchrotron where the magnets are very rapidly ramped has been envisioned as one option to accomplish this. The entire acceleration cycle takes place in less than 1 ms, presenting a technological challenge for the magnets. Clearly superconducting magnets cannot be ramped on this time scale, so instead room-temperature magnets will be ramped. To keep losses low, dipoles can use grain-oriented silicon steel, but quadrupoles will probably need to use more conventional steel, giving a lower maximum field for these high ramping rates. If we want to have a large average RF gradient and simultaneously make a large number of passes through the RF cavities, the average bending field must be high. To achieve such a large bending field while rapidly ramping magnets, it has been proposed to use a hybrid lattice consisting of interleaved superconducting dipoles and bipolar ramped dipoles. Due to the large single-bunch current and the relatively small apertures we desire (both because we would like to use high-frequency RF, and because power requirements and heating will be more reasonable for smaller aperture ramped magnets), collective effects are expected to be very significant. To reduce their effects, we propose to have strong synchrotron oscillations (a synchrotron tune of over 1). To have such a high synchrotron tune, a large number of superperiods are needed. Putting together all of these requirements, a set of requirements for a final acceleration stage for a muon collider has been proposed in Table 1. These basic requirements and some basics of the lattice structure for such a machine were decided upon at a workshop in April 2011 at the University of Mississippi, Oxford. Each superperiod consists of 6 arc cells, two sets of 2-cell dispersion suppressors, and three straight cells, for a total of 13 cells. Every cell has a FODO lattice structure. Each cell has a phase advance of {pi}/2 in both the horizontal and vertical planes. The magnets will have their fields ramped with time so as to keep the cell tunes constant. All dipole magnets are rectangular. The quadrupoles are split into two pieces to allow the eventual insertion of sextupoles for chromaticity correction. The arc cell is described, and its lattice functions are plotted. In the arc cells, the fields will be set to keep the on-energy closed orbit centered in the quadrupoles and in the drift at the center of each half cell. The behavior of the off-energy orbits is shown. At the energy extremes, the ramped fields take on the values given in Table 3.

Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Form drag at Three Tree Point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form drag with bottom pressure sensors #12;Oscillatory dynamics tidal energy converted to internal waves, eddies and mixing no tidally averaged work done on system slack tide: background tilt flood & ebb Puget Sound, WA Point Three Tree Pressure sensors (PPODs) at Three Tree Point (TTP) PPODs #12;PPOD

Warner, Sally

400

The Control Point Policy Stanley B. Gershwin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://web.mit.edu/manuf-sys Massachusetts Institute of Technology Spring, 2012 The Control Point Policy 1/33 Copyright c 2012 Stanley B-time calculation. The purpose of real-time scheduling in a factory is to make decisions in response to random failures, change in demand, etc. The Control Point Policy 4/33 Copyright c 2012 Stanley B. Gershwin. All

Gershwin, Stanley B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Multiple Point Schemes for Corank 1 Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Multiple Point Schemes for Corank 1 Maps Washington Luiz Marar David Mond...MULTIPLE POINT SCHEMES FOR CORANK 1 MAPS WASHINGTON LUIZ MARAR AND DAVID...1). Finally, denote the map Cn "1+fc -> C*~m defined...g:(Cn -1+k ,0) *C\\gis G-invariant}. Then

Washington Luiz Marar; David Mond

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analysis of the parallel distinguished point tradeoff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryptanalytic time memory tradeoff algorithms are tools for quickly inverting one-way functions and many consider the rainbow table method to be the most efficient tradeoff algorithm. However, it was recently announced, mostly based on experiments, that ... Keywords: distinguished point, parallel distinguished point, rainbow table, time memory tradeoff

Jin Hong; Ga Won Lee; Daegun Ma

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Point-to-curve ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Point-to-curve Ray Tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

Hals, Kjetil M D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Definition: Point Absorber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Absorber Point Absorber Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Point Absorber Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front greater than the physical dimension of the device. There are floating and submerged models.[1] Related Terms Wave power; PowerBouy References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_power Poi LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ntabsorber.jpg Example of a Point Absorber A submerged pressure differential wave energy capturing device, which can be considered a fully submerged point absorber. A pressure differential is induced within the device as the wave passes, driving a fluid pump to create mechanical energy. Retrieved from

407

Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Of The Proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and (FONSI) OF THE PROPOSED and (FONSI) OF THE PROPOSED 7-GeV ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE Table of Contents LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ABSTRACT 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 PURPOSE 1.2 THE APS PROJECT AT ANL 1.3 SUMMARY OF THE PROPOSED ACTION 1.4 NEED FOR ACTION 2.0 THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF APS AND CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES (PROPOSED ACTION) 2.1.1 APS Facility Description 2.1.2 Utility Services 2.1.3 Gaseous Emissions, Liquid Effluents, and Wastes 2.1.4 Construction Activities 2.1.5 Decommissioning 2.2 ALTERNATIVES 2.2.1 No Action 2.2.2 Construction at Another ANL Site 3.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 3.2 CLIMATOLOGY AND AIR QUALITY 3.2.1 Climatology 3.2.2 Air Quality 3.3 DEMOGRAPHY AND SOCIOECONOMIC PROFILE 3.4 LAND USE 3.4.1 Site and Vicinity

408

Prompt muon production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at 29 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the production of prompt muons in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV with the PEP4-TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector. The muon p and p/sub t/ distributions are well described by a combination of bottom- and charm-quark decays, with fitted semimuonic branching fractions of (15.2 +- 1.9 +- 1.2)% and (6.9 +- 1.1 +- 1.1)%, respectively. The muon spectra imply hard fragmentation functions for both b and c quarks, with = 0.80 +- 0.05 +- 0.05 and = 0.60 +- 0.06 +- 0.04. We derive neutral-current axial-vector couplings of a(b quark) = -0.9 +- 1.1 +- 0.3 and a(c quark) = 1.5 +- 1.5 +- 0.5 from the forward-backward asymmetries.

Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Badtke, D.H.; Bakken, J.A.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, A.V.; Barnett, B.A.; Bengtsson, H.; Blumenfeld, B.J.; Bross, A.D.; Buchanan, C.D.; Chamberlain, O.; Chien, C.; Clark, A.R.; Cordier, A.; Dahl, O.I.; Day, C.T.; Derby, K.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Fancher, D.L.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Gabioud, B.; Gary, J.W.; Gorn, W.; Hadley, N.J.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hofmann, W.; Huth, J.E.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H.S.; Kenney, R.W.; Kerth, L.T.; Koda, R.I.; Kofler, R.R.; Kwong, K.K.; Layter, J.G.; Lindsey, C.S.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, X.; Lynch, G.R.; Madansky, L.; Madaras, R.J.; Maruyama, K.; Marx, J.N.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Melnikoff, S.O.; Moses, W.; Nemethy, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.J.; Park, D.A.; Pevsner, A.; Pripstein, M.; Robrish, P.R.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Sauerwein, R.R.; Shapiro, G.; Shapiro, M.D.; Shen, B.C.; Slater, W.E.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stork, D.H.; Ticho, H.K.; Toge, N.; van Daalen Wetters, R.F.; VanDalen, G.J.; van Tyen, R.; Wang, E.M.; Way

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Measurement of mechanical vibrations excited in aluminium resonators by 0.6 GeV electrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of mechanical vibrations induced by 0.6 GeV electrons impinging on cylindrical and spherical aluminium resonators. To monitor the amplitude of the resonator's vibrational modes we used piezoelectric ceramic sensors, calibrated by standard accelerometers. Calculations using the thermo-acoustic conversion model, agree well with the experimental data, as demonstrated by the specific variation of the excitation strengths with the absorbed energy, and with the traversing particles' track positions. For the first longitudinal mode of the cylindrical resonator we measured a conversion factor of 7.4 +- 1.4 nm/J, confirming the model value of 10 nm/J. Also, for the spherical resonator, we found the model values for the L=2 and L=1 mode amplitudes to be consistent with our measurement. We thus have confirmed the applicability of the model, and we note that calculations based on the model have shown that next generation resonant mass gravitational wave detectors can only be expected to reach their intended ultra high sensitivity if they will be shielded by an appreciable amount of rock, where a veto detector can reduce the background of remaining impinging cosmic rays effectively.

G. D. van Albada; E. Coccia; V. Fafone; H. van der Graaf; G. Heijboer; J. W. van Holten; W. J. Kasdorp; J. B. van der Laan; L. Lapikas; G. Mazzitelli; G. J. L. Nooren; C. W. J. Noteboom; J. E. J. Oberski; G. Pallottino; H. Z. Peek; F. Ronga; A. Schimmel; T. G. B. W. Sluijk; P. Steman; J. Venema; P. K. A. de Witt Huberts

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Studies of Nucleon Form Factors with 12 GeV CEBAF and SuperBigBite  

SciTech Connect

The elastic electromagnetic form factors are among the most fundamental quantities that describe the ground-state structure of the proton and neutron. Precision data of the form factors over a wide kinematical range provide a powerful test of current theories of hadron structure. A number of experiments aiming to measure the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the neutron, G{sub E}{sup n} and G{sub M}{sup n}, and proton, G{sub E}{sup p}, at very high momentum transfer, up to the range of Q{sup 2} = 10-14 (GeV/c){sup 2}, are planned to be carried out with the future 11 GeV electron beam of the upgraded CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. These experiments will determine the nucleon form factors with unprecedented precision to Q{sup 2}-values up to three times higher than those of existing data. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual design of a new spectrometer, SuperBigBite, that will be used in these and other future experiments at Jefferson Lab.

Jens-Ole Hansen

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Measuring W photon couplings in a 500 GeV e sup + e sup - collider  

SciTech Connect

The Standard Model gives definite predictions for the W-photon couplings. Measuring them would test an important ingredient of the model. In this work we study the capability of a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider to measure these couplings. We study the most general C and P conserving WW{lambda} vertex. This vertex contains two free parameters, {kappa} and {lambda}. We look at three processes: e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, e{lambda} {yields} W{nu} and {lambda}{lambda} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}. For each process we present analytical expressions of helicity amplitudes for arbitrary values of {kappa} and {lambda}. We consider three different sources for the initial photon(s). The first two are breamsstrahlung and beamstrahlung (photon radiation induced by the collective fields of the opposite bunch). Both occur naturally in the collider environment. The third is a photon beam generated by scattering low energy laser light off a high energy electron beam. We examine potential observables for each process, calculating their sensitivity to {kappa} and {lambda}, and estimating the accuracy with which they can be measured. Assuming Standard Model values are actually measured, we present the region in the {kappa}-{lambda} plane to which the W couplings can be restricted with a given confidence level. We find that combining the three processes, one can measure {kappa} and {lambda} with accuracy of 0.01--0.02.

Yehudai, E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Study of exclusive one-pion and one-eta production using hadron and dielectron channels in pp reactions at kinetic beam energies of 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of exclusive \\pi^{+,0} and \\eta\\ production in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV beam kinetic energy in hadron and dielectron channels. In the case of \\pi^+ and \\pi^0, high-statistics invariant-mass and angular distributions are obtained within the HADES acceptance as well as acceptance corrected distributions, which are compared to a resonance model. The sensitivity of the data to the yield and production angular distribution of \\Delta(1232) and higher lying baryon resonances is shown, and an improved parameterization is proposed. The extracted cross sections are of special interest in the case of pp \\to pp \\eta, since controversial data exist at 2.0 GeV; we find \\sigma =0.142 \\pm 0.022 mb. Using the dielectron channels, the \\pi^0 and \\eta\\ Dalitz decay signals are reconstructed with yields fully consistent with the hadronic channels. The electron invariant masses and acceptance corrected helicity angle distributions are found in good agreement with model predictions.

Agakishiev, G; Balanda, A; Bassini, R; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Eberl, T; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Iori, I; Ierusalimov, A; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Kanaki, K; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Kozuch, A; Krizek, F; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Maier, L; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Roy-Stephan, M; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Sailer, B; Salabura, P; Sánchez, M; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Toia, A; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Wisniowski, M; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Study of exclusive one-pion and one-eta production using hadron and dielectron channels in pp reactions at kinetic beam energies of 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of exclusive \\pi^{+,0} and \\eta\\ production in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV beam kinetic energy in hadron and dielectron channels. In the case of \\pi^+ and \\pi^0, high-statistics invariant-mass and angular distributions are obtained within the HADES acceptance as well as acceptance corrected distributions, which are compared to a resonance model. The sensitivity of the data to the yield and production angular distribution of \\Delta(1232) and higher lying baryon resonances is shown, and an improved parameterization is proposed. The extracted cross sections are of special interest in the case of pp \\to pp \\eta, since controversial data exist at 2.0 GeV; we find \\sigma =0.142 \\pm 0.022 mb. Using the dielectron channels, the \\pi^0 and \\eta\\ Dalitz decay signals are reconstructed with yields fully consistent with the hadronic channels. The electron invariant masses and acceptance corrected helicity angle distributions are found in good agreement with model predictions.

HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; H. Alvarez-Pol; A. Balanda; R. Bassini; M. Böhmer; H. Bokemeyer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Kozuch; F. Krizek; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Maier; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; E. Morinière; J. Mousa; M. Münch; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. Pérez Cavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; V. Pospísil; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; M. Sánchez; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; A. Toia; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; P. Zumbruch

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vitaly T. Gotovchikov a , Victor A. Seredenko a , Valentin V. Shatalov a , Vladimir N. Kaplenkov a , Alexander S. Shulgin a , Vladimir K. Saranchin a , Michail A. Borik a∗ , Charles W. Forsberg b , All-Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology (ARRICT) 33, Kashirskoe ave., Moscow, Russia, 115409, E-mail: chem.conv@ru.net Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Bethel Wall Road, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6165, Oak Ridge, TN, USA, 37831 Abstract - Induction cold crucible melters (ICCM) have the potential to be a very-low-cost high-throughput method for the production of DUO 2 for SNF casks. The proposed work would develop these melters for this specific application. If a

415

Hybridization of sugar alcohols into brucite interlayers via a melt intercalation process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the preparation of organic-brucite (BR) hybrids using harmless sugar alcohols (xylitol, XYL, and sorbitol, SOR). Since XYL and SOR are solid materials at room temperature, the hybridization was investigated by comparing two separate methods, hydrothermal treatment and melt mixing. BR-sugar alcohol hybrids were successfully prepared by a melt intercalation method at 175 °C. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses indicated that organic molecules were intercalated into the brucite layers, overcoming the barrier of hydroxyl bonds between the BR layers. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal analyses showed that the intercalated materials at 175 °C resulted in the formation of covalent Mg–O–C bond linkages on the interlayer surface of BR.

Kazuya Morimoto; Kenji Tamura; Tamao Hatta; Seiko Nemoto; Takuya Echigo; Jinhua Ye; Hirohisa Yamada

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that they were having difficulty with refractory vendors meeting specifications for the lining of the pressure vessel. EnviRes is working to resolve this issue.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Phenomenological model for a novel melt-freeze phase of sliding bilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations show that sliding bilayers of colloidal particles can exhibit a new phase, the ``melt-freeze'' phase, where the layers stochastically alternate between solidlike and liquidlike states. We introduce a mean field phenomenological model with two order parameters to understand the interplay of two adjacent layers while the system is in this remarkable phase. Predictions from our numerical simulations of a system in the melt-freeze phase include the tendency of two adjacent layers to be in opposite states (solid and liquid) and the difference between the fluctuation of the order parameter in one layer while the other layer is in the same phase compared to the fluctuation while the other layer is in the opposite phase. We expect this behavior to be seen in future simulations and experiments.

Trieu Mai

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Crystallization of beryllian indialite from its own melt under oxidizing conditions  

SciTech Connect

It is established that beryllian indialite (ideal formula Mg{sub 2}BeAl{sub 2}Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}) is formed spontaneously under oxidizing conditions in a wide range of relatively high cooling rates at small overheatings of its own melt and short overheating times. The significant difference in the growth rates of the prism and pinacoid faces of beryllian indialite from its own melt (0.08 and 0.40 mm/h, respectively) obtained by the Steber method is explained by the fact that the prism grows according to the tangential mechanism, while the pinacoid grows in the normal way. The face effect in these crystals manifests itself in the enrichment of the prism with beryllium and silicon as opposed to pinacoid.

Mikhailov, M. A., E-mail: mikmik@igc.irk.ru; Demina, T. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Vinogradov Institute of Geochemistry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Evidence for Narrow Resonant Structures at $W ~\\sim 1.68$ and $W \\sim 1.72$ GeV in Real Compton Scattering off the Proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First measurement of the beam asymmetry $\\Sigma$ for Compton scattering off the proton in the energy range $E_{\\gamma}=0.85 - 1.25$ GeV is presented. The data reveals two narrow structures at $E_{\\gamma}= 1.036$ and $E_{\\gamma}=1.119$ GeV. They may signal either narrow resonances with the masses near $1.68$ and $1.72$ GeV, or can be generated by the sub-threshold $K\\Lambda$ and $\\omega p$ production. Their decisive identification requires additional theoretical and experimental efforts.

Kuznetsov, V; Bellini, V; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Giardina, G; Kim, W; Mandaglio, G; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.02.002 Sulfur diffusion in basaltic melts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.02.002 Sulfur diffusion in basaltic melts CARMELA FREDA,1, * DON R. BAKER,1,2 February 3, 2005) Abstract--We measured the diffusion coefficients of sulfur in two different basaltic for sulfur diffusion in anhydrous basalts: D 2.19 10 4 exp 226.3 58.3 RT where D is the diffusion coefficient

Long, Bernard

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421

Fitting the Fermi-LAT GeV excess: on the importance of the propagation of electrons from dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An excess of gamma rays at GeV energies has been detected in the Fermi-LAT data. This signal comes from a narrow region around the Galactic Center and has been interpreted as possible evidence for light (30 GeV) dark matter particles. Focussing on the prompt gamma-ray emission, previous works found that the best fit to the data corresponds to annihilations proceeding into b quarks, with a dark matter profile going as r^{-1.2}. We show that this is not the only possible annihilation set-up. More specifically, we show how including the contributions to the gamma-ray spectrum from inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung from electrons produced in dark matter annihilations, and undergoing diffusion through the Galactic magnetic field, significantly affects the spectrum for leptonic final states. This drastically changes the interpretation of the excess in terms of dark matter.

Lacroix, Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Measuring sin^2 theta_W in PV-DIS with the Baseline Spectrometers at JLab 12 GeV  

SciTech Connect

The couplings of leptons to quarks are fundamental parameters of the electroweak interaction. Within the framework of the Standard Model, these couplings can be related to sin2 theta W. Parity violation (PV) in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is proportional to these couplings and hence sensitive sin2 theta W. PV-DIS, first measured at SLAC in the mid-1970¿s, was used to establish the Standard Model. The high quality and intensity of the upgraded 11 GeV CEBAF beam at Jefferson Laboratory will make it an ideal tool for PV studies. In DIS the asymmetry from parity violation is large (APV ~ 10^?4 Q^2), allowing precise measurements with modest beam-time. This talk will explore a PV-DIS measurement which can be made using the baseline spectrometers that will exist as part of the 12 GeV JLab upgrade.

Paul Reimer

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES 1426+428 at 100 GeV with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the gamma-ray fluxes of the blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 in the energy range between 50 and 350 GeV (1.2 to 8.3 x 10^25 Hz). The detector, called CELESTE, used first 40, then 53 heliostats of the former solar facility "Themis" in the French Pyrenees to collect Cherenkov light generated in atmospheric particle cascades. The signal from Mrk 421 is often strong. We compare its flux with previously published multi-wavelength studies and infer that we are straddling the high energy peak of the spectral energy distribution. The signal from Mrk 501 in 2000 was weak (3.4 sigma). We obtain an upper limit on the flux from 1ES 1426+428 of less than half that of the Crab flux near 100 GeV. The data analysis and understanding of systematic biases have improved compared to previous work, increasing the detector's sensitivity.

D. A. Smith; E. Brion; R. Britto; P. Bruel; J. Bussons Gordo; D. Dumora; E. Durand; P. Eschstruth; P. Espigat; J. Holder; A. Jacholkowska; J. Lavalle; R. Le Gallou; B. Lott; H. Manseri; F. Munz; E. Nuss; F. Piron; R. C. Rannot; T. Reposeur; T. Sako

2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES 1426+428 at 100 GeV with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the gamma-ray fluxes of the blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 in the energy range between 50 and 350 GeV (1.2 to 8.3 x 10^25 Hz). The detector, called CELESTE, used first 40, then 53 heliostats of the former solar facility "Themis" in the French Pyrenees to collect Cherenkov light generated in atmospheric particle cascades. The signal from Mrk 421 is often strong. We compare its flux with previously published multi-wavelength studies and infer that we are straddling the high energy peak of the spectral energy distribution. The signal from Mrk 501 in 2000 was weak (3.4 sigma). We obtain an upper limit on the flux from 1ES 1426+428 of less than half that of the Crab flux near 100 GeV. The data analysis and understanding of systematic biases have improved compared to previous work, increasing the detector's sensitivity.

Smith, D A; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Gordo, J B; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P; Espigat, P; Holder, J; Jacholkowska, A; Lavalle, J; Le Gallou, R; Lott, B; Manseri, H; Munz, F; Nuss, E; Piron, Frédéric; Reposeur, T; Sako, T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Melted Murataite Ceramics Containing Simulated Actinide/Rare Earth Fraction of High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

Murataite-based ceramics with three different chemical compositions containing simulated actinide/rare earth (RE) fraction of HLW were produced in a resistive furnace at a temperature of 1500 deg. C and two of them - in a cold crucible energized from a 5.28 MHz/10 kW high frequency generator. All the samples prepared in resistive furnace were composed of major murataite and minor perovskite, crichtonite, zirconolite, and pyrophanite/ilmenite. The samples produced in the cold crucible were composed of murataite, perovskite, crichtonite, and rutile. Higher content of perovskite and crichtonite in the cold crucible melted ceramic than in the ceramic with the same chemical composition but melted in resistive furnace may be due to higher temperature in the cold crucible (up to 1600-1650 deg. C) at which some fraction of murataite was subjected to decomposition yielding additional amount of perovskite and crichtonite. Method of melting may effect on elemental partitioning in the murataite-containing ceramics because light (Ce-group) REs enter preferably perovskite phase whereas Nd, Sm, and heavy (Y-group) REs are accommodated in the murataite polytypes. Thus, perovskite and murataite are major host phases for the Ce- and Y-group REs, respectively, whereas tetravalent actinides (U) enter murataite only.

Stefanovsky, S.V.; Ptashkin, A.G.; Knyazev, O.A.; Zen'kovskaya, M.S.; Stefanovsky, O.I. [State Unitary Enterprise SIA Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, S.V.; Nikonov, B.S.; Lapina, M.I. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Russian, Academy of Sciences (IGEM RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Computer simulation study of surface wave dynamics at the crystal--melt interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study, by means of computer simulations, the crystal-melt interface of three different systems: hard-spheres, Lennard Jones and the TIP4P/2005 water model. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of surface waves. We observe that the processes involved in the relaxation of surface waves are characterized by distinct time scales: a slow one related to the continuous recrystallization and melting, that is governed by capillary forces; and a fast one which we suggest to be due to a combination of processes that quickly cause small perturbations to the shape of the interface (like e. g. Rayleigh waves, subdiffusion, or attachment/detachment of particles to/from the crystal). The relaxation of surface waves becomes dominated by the slow process as the wavelength increases. Moreover, we see that the slow relaxation is not influenced by the details of the microscopic dynamics. In a time scale characteristic for the diffusion of the liquid phase, the relaxation dynamics of the crystal-melt interface of water is around one order of magnitude slower than that of Lennard Jones or hard spheres, which we ascribe to the presence of orientational degrees of freedom in the water molecule. Finally, we estimate the rate of crystal growth from our analysis of the capillary wave dynamics and compare it with previous simulation studies and with experiments for the case of water.

Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Interaction Studies of Ceramic Vacuum Plasma Spraying for the Melting Crucible Materials  

SciTech Connect

Candidate coating materials for re-usable metallic nuclear fuel crucibles, TaC, TiC, ZrC, ZrO2, and Y2O3, were plasmasprayed onto a niobium substrate. The microstructure of the plasma-sprayed coatings and thermal cycling behavior were characterized, and U-Zr melt interaction studies were carried out. The TaC and Y2O3 coating layers had a uniform thickness, and high density with only a few small closed pores showing good consolidation, while the ZrC, TiC, and ZrO2 coatings were not well consolidated with a considerable amount of porosity. Thermal cycling tests showed that the adhesion of the TiC, ZrC, and ZrO2 coating layers with niobium was relatively weak compared to the TaC and Y2O3 coatings. The TaC and Y2O3 coatings had better cycling characteristics with no interconnected cracks. In the interaction studies, ZrC and ZrO2 coated rods showed significant degradations after exposure to U-10 wt.% Zr melt at 1600 degrees C for 15 min., but TaC, TiC, and Y2O3 coatings showed good compatibility with U-Zr melt.

Jong Hwan Kim; Hyung Tae Kim; Yoon Myung Woo; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee; R. S. Fielding

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Melting of iron close to Earth's inner core boundary conditions and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several important geophysical features such as heat flux at the Core-Mantle Boundary or geodynamo production are intimately related with the temperature profile in the Earth's core. However, measuring the melting curve of iron at conditions corresponding to the Earth inner core boundary under pressure of 330 GPa has eluded scientists for several decades. Significant discrepancies in previously reported iron melting temperatures at high pressure have called into question the validity of dynamic measurements. We report measurements made with a novel approach using X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser source coupled to a laser shock experiment. We determine the state of iron along the shock Hugoniot up to 420 GPa (+/- 50) and 10800 K (+/- 1390) and find an upper boundary for the melting curve of iron by detecting solid iron at 130 GPa and molten at 260, 380 and 420 GPa along the shock Hugoniot. Our result establishes unambiguous agreement between dynamic measurement and recent extrapo...

Harmand, M; Mazevet, S; Bouchet, J; Denoeud, A; Dorchies, F; Feng, Y; Fourment, C; Galtier, E; Gaudin, J; Guyot, F; Kodama, R; Koenig, M; Lee, H J; Miyanishi, K; Morard, G; Musella, R; Nagler, B; Nakatsutsumi, M; Ozaki, N; Recoules, V; Toleikis, S; Vinci, T; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Is there Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling at Fermilab Tevatron collider energies (1600–2000 GeV)?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the parton branching distribution Pmn of m quarks and n gluons does not obey exact Kobu-Nielsen-Olesen scaling. When the quark evolution is neglected the probability distribution becomes wider as energy increases in agreement with experimental data. In this model it is predicted that the widening of the probability distribution will stop at Fermilab Tevatron Collider energies (1600–2000 GeV). Also given are theoretical predictions for the multiplicities and moments for Tevatron Collider energies.

Ina Sarcevic

1987-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radial Flow in Au+Au Collisions at E=0.25-1.15 A GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic study of energy spectra for light particles emitted at midrapidity from Au+Au collisions at E=0.25-1.15 A GeV reveals a significant non-thermal component consistent with a collective radial flow. This component is evaluated as a function of bombarding energy and event centrality. Comparisons to Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) and Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) models are made for different equations of state.

M. A. Lisa; S. Albergo; F. Bieser; F. P. Brady; Z. Caccia; D. A. Cebra; A. D. Chacon; J. L. Chance; Y. Choi; S. Costa; J. B. Elliott; M. L. Gilkes; J. A. Hauger; A. S. Hirsch; E. L. Hjort; A. Insolia; M. Justice; D. Keane; J. Kintner; H. S. Matis; M. McMahan; C. McParland; D. L. Olson; M. D. Partlan; N. T. Porile; R. Potenza; G. Rai; J. Rasmussen; H. G. Ritter; J. Romanski; J. L. Romero; G. V. Russo; R. Scharenberg; A. Scott; Y. Shao; B. K. Srivastava; T. J. M. Symons; M. Tincknell; C. Tuve; S. Wang; P. Warren; G. D. Westfall; H. H. Wieman; K. Wolf

1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

431

Meson-exchange calculation of the d(. gamma. ,p)n reaction in the GeV energy region  

SciTech Connect

We show that a meson-exchange model of the d({gamma},p) reaction can be constructed to reproduce the energy-dependence of the existing data for the differential cross section at 90{degree}. The prediction of the model in the GeV energy region is found to be radically different from the QCD prediction by Brodsky and Hiller. The results will be compared with the new data presented in a companion paper. 12 refs., 4 figs.

Lee, T.S.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=900 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the measurement of two-pion correlation functions from pp collisions at sqrt(s)=900 GeV performed by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Our analysis shows an increase of the HBT radius with increasing event multiplicity, in line with other measurements done in particle- and nuclear collisions. Conversely, the strong decrease of the radius with increasing transverse momentum, as observed at RHIC and at Tevatron, is not manifest in our data.

K. Aamodt; N. Abel; U. Abeysekara; A. Abrahantes Quintana; A. Abramyan; D. Adamova; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; R. Akimoto; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; E. Almaraz Avina; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; G. Anelli; V. Angelov; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; S. Antinori; K. Antipin; D. Antonczyk; P. Antonioli; A. Anzo; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshauser; S. Arcelli; R. Arceo; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Aysto; M. D. Azmi; S. Bablok; M. Bach; A. Badala; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Ban; R. Barbera; G. G. Barnafoldi; L. S. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; F. Barile; M. Basile; V. Basmanov; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; B. Becker; I. Belikov; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; A. Belogianni; L. Benhabib; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Bilandzic; L. Bimbot; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Boggild; M. Bogolyubsky; J. Bohm; L. Boldizsar; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; M. Bondila; H. Borel; A. Borisov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; L. Bosisio; F. Bossu; M. Botje; S. Bottger; G. Bourdaud; B. Boyer; M. Braun; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; G. Bruckner; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; P. Buncic; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Calvo; E. Camacho; P. Camerini; M. Campbell; V. Canoa Roman; G. P. Capitani; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova Diaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; V. Catanescu; E. Cattaruzza; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; V. Chambert; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; A. Charpy; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; K. Choi; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; F. Chuman; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; O. Cobanoglu; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; A. Colla; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; E. S. Conner; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; Y. Corrales Morales; T. M. Cormier; P. Cortese; I. Cortes Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; J. Cussonneau; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; I. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; M. De Gaspari; J. de Groot; D. De Gruttola; N. De Marco; S. De Pasquale; R. De Remigis; R. de Rooij; G. de Vaux; H. Delagrange; Y. Delgado; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Denes; A. Deppman; G. D'Erasmo; D. Derkach; A. Devaux; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; M. Dialinas; L. Diaz; R. Diaz; T. Dietel; R. Divia; O. Djuvsland; V. Dobretsov; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; B. Donigus; I. Dominguez; D. M. M. Don; O. Dordic; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; A. Enokizono; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; O. Fateev; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernandez Tellez; E. G. Ferreiro; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; Z. Fodor; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; F. Formenti; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; A. Frolov; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhoje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; C. Garcia Trapaga; J. Gebelein; R. Gemme; M. Germain; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; R. Glasow; P. Glassel; A. Glenn; R. Gomez Jimenez; H. Gonzalez Santos; L. H. Gonzalez-Trueba; P. Gonzalez-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; Y. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; H. Gottschlag; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; S. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; C. Guerra; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. -A. Gustafsson; H. Gutbrod; O. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. Hamblen; B. H. Han; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; A. Harutyunyan; D. Hasch

2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

Prompt GeV emission in the synchrotron self-Compton model for Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection in 10 bursts of an optical counterpart emission (i.e. during the prompt GRB phase) that is 10-10000 brighter than the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to optical frequencies suggests a synchrotron self-Compton origin for the GRB emission, synchrotron producing the optical counterpart emission. In this model, the second upscattering of the burst photons yields a prompt GeV-TeV emission, whose brightness depends strongly on an unknown quantity, the peak energy of the primary synchrotron spectrum. Measurements of the optical, gamma-ray, and GeV prompt fluxes can be used to test the synchrotron self-Compton model for GRBs and to determine directly the total radiative output of GRBs. For a set of 29 GRBs with optical counterpart detections, we find that the expected GeV photon flux should correlate with the fluence of the sub-MeV emission and should anticorrelate with the brightness of the optical counterpart, the strength of these correlations decreasing for an increasing width of the synchrotron peak energy distribution. The detection of a GeV prompt emission consistent with the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to higher energies would rule out the synchrotron self-Compton model if the sub-MeV burst emission were very bright and the (intrinsic) optical counterpart were very dim.

A. Panaitescu

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

A comparison of the Higgs sectors of the CMSSM and NMSSM for a 126 GeV Higgs boson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the LHC with a mass of 126 GeV has revived the interest in supersymmetric models, which predicted a Higgs boson mass below 130 GeV long before its discovery. We compare systematically the allowed parameter space in the constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) and the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Model (NMSSM) by minimizing the ? 2 function with respect to all known constraints from accelerators and cosmology using GUT scale parameters. For the CMSSM the Higgs boson mass at tree level is below the Z 0 boson mass and large radiative corrections are needed to obtain a Higgs boson mass of 126 GeV, which requires stop squark masses in the multi-TeV range. In contrast, for the NMSSM light stop quarks are allowed, since in the NMSSM at tree level the Higgs boson mass can be above the Z 0 boson mass from mixing with the additional singlet Higgs boson. Predictions for the scalar boson masses are given in both models with emphasis on the unique signatures of the NMSSM, where the heaviest scalar Higgs boson decays in the two lighter scalar Higgs bosons with a significant branching ratio, in which case one should observe double Higgs boson production at the LHC. Such a signal is strongly suppressed in the CMSSM. In addition, since the LSP is higgsino-like, Higgs boson decays into \\{LSPs\\} can be appreciable, thus leading to invisible Higgs decays.

C. Beskidt; W. de Boer; D.I. Kazakov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Point380 LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point380 LLC Point380 LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Point380, LLC Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80302 Sector Carbon Product Point380 provides carbon consulting and resource management solutions to a broad range of clients seeking energy related risk analysis and policy analysis. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

436

Cedar Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Wind Farm Point Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedar Point Wind Farm Facility Cedar Point Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Enbridge Inc. Developer RES Americas Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Elbert CO Coordinates 39.219417°, -104.537167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.219417,"lon":-104.537167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

End Points Specification Methods | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

End Points Specification Methods End Points Specification Methods End Points Specification Methods Two methods to develop end point specifications are presented. These have evolved from use in the field for deactivation projects. The hierarchical method is systematic, comprehensive, and completely defensible as to the basis for each specification. This method may appear complex to the uninitiated, but it is a straightforward application of a systematic engineering approach. It is labor intensive only during the final stage. This method is appropriate to the type of project involving a complex facility that contains process systems and a variety of contaminated areas or other hazards. The checklist method is an approach that is more appropriate to facilities which require less detailed planning, such as for industrial

438

Tribal Points of Contacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Points of Contacts Points of Contacts Tribal Points of Contacts US DOE-Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 ph: (202) 586-5944 fax: (202) 586-5000 Richland Operations Office- Hanford Indian Nations Program P.O. Box 550- MSIN A7-75 Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-6332 fax: (509) 376-1563 West Valley Demonstration Project Tribal Government Liaison P.O. Box 191- 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 14171 ph: (716) 942-4629 fax: (716) 942-2068 Albuquerque Operations Office Tribal Government Liaison P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 ph: (505) 845-5977 fax: (505) 845-4154 Tribal Points of Contact Richland Operations Office: Hanford Albuquerque Operations Office: Yakama Indian Nation Environmental Restoration/ Waste Management Program

439

Star Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Wind Farm Point Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Point Wind Farm Facility Star Point Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Modesto Irrigation District Location Near Moro OR Coordinates 45.474734°, -120.704412° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.474734,"lon":-120.704412,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

440

large-point | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge. Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge 6"(D) X...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Creating Your SharePoint Roadmap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, I focus on the process for creating a vision and a roadmap that describes what a SharePoint service will evolve into over time. I discuss approaches to building a timeline view of enhancements...

Steve Goodyear

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Saturation Point Analysis of Moist Convective Overturning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A unified approach to the thermodynamics of cloudy air, cloud-clear air mixing processes, atmospheric thermodynamic equilibrium structure and instability is formulated, using a new concept: the Saturation Point. This permits the representation of ...

Alan K. Betts

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A comparative study of polyethylene oxide/nanoclay composite preparation via supercritical carbon dioxide and melt processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO2...) treatment compared with conventional melt processing methods in preparing nanoclay composites from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)...2 processing yielded more ho...

Gordon Armstrong; Keith Fortune

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Influence of the batch's coke-ore ratio and distribution on the porosity of the melting zone  

SciTech Connect

The variation in gas permeability in the melting zone is considered as a function of the height and configuration of the coke packing and the ore component of the batch.

V.P. Tarasov; L.V. Bykov; P.V. Tarasov [Priazovsk State Technical University, Mariupol (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Dynamics of the egress of gas microbubbles from a melt under laser irradiation of a metal surface  

SciTech Connect

The results of a theoretical investigation of the efficiency of degassing of the near-surface region of a material exposed to laser radiation are presented. The case of a low volume concentration of the monodispersed gas phase representing microbubbles of size no greater than 10 {mu}m is considered. The principal parameters are revealed which determine the regimes of the egress of gas bubbles from a laser-produced melt, and analytical formulas are obtained for estimating the process rate. The analytical results are compared with the results of two-dimensional numerical simulations which include the laser heating of a solid sample, its melting, the development of thermocapillary melt convection, and the escape of gas bubbles from the melt. The analytical and numerical results are found to be in good agreement. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Likhanskii, V V; Loboiko, A I [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

Haghparast, Amin [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourimotlagh, Masoud [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alipour, Mohammad, E-mail: Alipourmo@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

7-GeV advanced photon source beamline initiative: Conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R&D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R&D.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Lambda hyperon production and polarization in collisions of p(3.5 GeV) + Nb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on $\\Lambda$ hyperon production are reported for collisions of p(3.5 GeV) + Nb, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18 at GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy-Ion Research, Darmstadt. The transverse mass distributions in rapidity bins are well described by Boltzmann shapes with a maximum inverse slope parameter of about $90\\,$MeV at a rapidity of $y=1.0$, i.e. slightly below the center-of-mass rapidity for nucleon-nucleon collisions, $y_{cm}=1.12$. The rapidity density decreases monotonically with increasing rapidity within a rapidity window ranging from 0.3 to 1.3. The $\\Lambda$ phase-space distribution is compared with results of other experiments and with predictions of two transport approaches which are available publicly. None of the present versions of the employed models is able to fully reproduce the experimental distributions, i.e. in absolute yield and in shape. Presumably, this finding results from an insufficient modelling in the transport models of the elementary processes being relevant for $\\Lambda$ production, rescattering and absorption. The present high-statistics data allow for a genuine two-dimensional investigation as a function of phase space of the self-analyzing $\\Lambda$ polarization in the weak decay $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p \\pi^-$. Finite negative values of the polarization in the order of $5-20\\,\\%$ are observed over the entire phase space studied. The absolute value of the polarization increases almost linearly with increasing transverse momentum for $p_t>300\\,$MeV/c and increases with decreasing rapidity for $y < 0.8$.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

A measurement of open charm using single muons at forward angles for p+p collisions at center of mass energy 200 GeV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation presents the measurement of single muons from the semi-leptonic decay of heavy quark mesons (charm and bottom) in ?s=200 GeV p+p collisions at… (more)

Hornback, Donald Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Observation of D[superscript 0] Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au + Au Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D[superscript 0]) production via the hadronic decay channel (D[superscript 0] ? K[superscript ?] + ?[superscript +]) in Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN] =200??GeV ...

Stevens, Justin

451

Rapidity dependence of antiproton-to-proton ratios in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements, with the BRAHMS detector, of the antiproton-to-proton ratio at midrapidities and forward rapidities, are presented for Au + Au reactions at roots(NN) = 130 GeV, and for three different collision centralities. ...

Sanders, Stephen J.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Inclusive jet and dijet production in polarized proton-proton collisions at [the square root of sigma] =200 GeV at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inclusive jet cross section, the dijet cross section, and the dijet longitudinal double spin asymmetry ALL in polarized proton-proton collisions at [square root of sigma] = 200 GeV are measured with a data sample of ...

Sakuma, Tai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Zone Melting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...four-turn induction coils of water-cooled copper tubing...by introducing a bit of water vapor into the hydrogen...apparatus (6). The water vapor combines with the...indium antimo-nide, gallium arsenide, gallium phos-phide...

W. G. Pfann

1962-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Study of the process e+e???? in the center-of-mass energy range 1.07–2.00 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The e+e???? cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1.07–2.00 GeV using the decay mode ??3?0, ?0???. The analysis is based on 36??pb?1 of integrated luminosity collected with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e? collider. The measured cross section of about 40 pb at 1.5 GeV is explained by decays of the ?(1450) and ?(1680) resonances.

M.?N. Achasov et al.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Search for 1-100 GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Search for 1-100 GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using one hundred gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2 spectra of gamma-ray bursts peak around a few hundred keV, EGRET has ob- served photons in the GeV energy

California at Santa Cruz, University of

456

PynPoint Code for Exoplanet Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We announce the public release of PynPoint, a Python package that we have developed for analysing exoplanet data taken with the angular differential imaging observing technique. In particular, PynPoint is designed to model the point spread function of the central star and to subtract its flux contribution to reveal nearby faint companion planets. The current version of the package does this correction by using a principal component analysis method to build a basis set for modelling the point spread function of the observations. We demonstrate the performance of the package by reanalysing publicly available data on the exoplanet beta Pictoris b, which consists of close to 24,000 individual image frames. We show that PynPoint is able to analyse this typical data in roughly 1.5 minutes on a Mac Pro, when the number of images is reduced by co-adding in sets of 5. The main computational work parallelises well as a result of a reliance on SciPy and NumPy functions. For this calculation the peak memory load is 6Gb, ...

Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

An X-point ergodic divertor  

SciTech Connect

A new ergodic divertor is proposed. It utilizes a system of external (n = 3) coils arranged to generate overlapping magnetic islands in the edge region of a diverted tokamak and connect the randomized field lines to the external (cold) divertor plate. The novel feature in the configuration is the placement of the external coils close to the X-point. A realistic design of the external coil set is studied by using the field line tracing method for a low aspect ratio (A {approx equal} 3) tokamak. Two types of effects are observed. First, by placing the coils close to the X-point, where the poloidal magnetic field is weak and the rational surfaces are closely packed only a moderate amount of current in the external coils is needed to ergodize the edge region. This ergodized edge enhances the edge transport in the X-point region and leads to the potential of edge profile control and the avoidance of edge localized modes (ELMs). Furthermore, the trajectories of the field lines close to the X-point are modified by the external coil set, causing the hit points on the external divertor plates to be randomized and spread out in the major radius direction. A time-dependent modulation of the currents in the external (n = 3) coils can potentially spread the heat flux more uniformly on the divertor plate avoiding high concentration of the heat flux. 10 refs., 9 figs.

Chu, M.S.; Jensen, T.H.; La Haye, R.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Evans, T.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microsoft PowerPoint - Project X Discussion_SDH.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne-Fermilab Collaboration on Argonne-Fermilab Collaboration on Project X (Accelerator) Steve Holmes projectx.fnal.gov Argonne-Fermilab Collaboration Meeting November 27, 2007 Page 2 ANL-FNAL Meeting, 11-27-07 - S. Holmes Outline * Project X Program - Steve H. - What is Project X? - November 12-13 Workshop - Areas of collaboration - Modes of collaboration * High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Program - Giorgio A. - Goals of the program - Areas of collaboration - Relationship to Project X Page 3 ANL-FNAL Meeting, 11-27-07 - S. Holmes What is Project X? ILC-style 8 GeV H - linac: 9mA x 1 msec x 5 Hz 8 GeV slow/fast spill 200 kW 2.25E14 protons/1.4 sec Stripping Foil Recycler 3 linac pulse/fill Main Injector 1.4 sec cycle 120 GeV fast extraction 2.3 MW 1.7E14 protons/1.4 sec Single turn transfer @ 8 GeV NOνA initially,

459

Tipping Point Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tipping Point Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tipping Point Renewable Energy Name Tipping Point Renewable Energy Place Columbus, Ohio Zip 43221 Sector Solar Website http://tipenergy.com/ Coordinates 40.0097883°, -83.0683519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0097883,"lon":-83.0683519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Midnight Point Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midnight Point Geothermal Project Midnight Point Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Midnight Point Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 43.548333333333°, -119.97611111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.548333333333,"lon":-119.97611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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461

Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prairie Pointe Townhomes Prairie Pointe Townhomes After a tornado destroyed most of Greensburg, Kansas, in 2007, the residents needed affordable housing. Prairie Pointe Townhomes is a low-income rental development that was completed in July 2008. Eight of the 16 units in this townhome complex were awarded the first residential U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum rating in Kansas and are estimated to use about 50% less energy than similar buildings built to existing building codes. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * Well-insulated 2 x 6 walls use blown-in cellulose insulation with an R-Value of 22.5 to prevent heat loss and save energy * Well-insulated roof with an R-value of R-38 prevents heat loss through the roof and helps keep building cool in summer

462

Symmetry and Dirac points in graphene spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existence and stability of Dirac points in the dispersion relation of operators periodic with respect to the hexagonal lattice is investigated for different sets of additional symmetries. The following symmetries are considered: rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and inversion, rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and horizontal reflection, inversion or reflection with weakly broken rotation symmetry, and the case where no Dirac points arise: rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and vertical reflection. All proofs are based on symmetry considerations and are elementary in nature. In particular, existence of degeneracies in the spectrum is proved by a transplantation argument (which is deduced from the (co)representation of the relevant symmetry group). The conical shape of the dispersion relation is obtained from its invariance under rotation by $2\\pi/3$. Persistence of conical points when the rotation symmetry is weakly broken is proved using a geometric phase in one case and parity of the eigenfunctions in the other.

Gregory Berkolaiko; Andrew Comech

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Generalized Attractor Points in Gauged Supergravity  

SciTech Connect

The attractor mechanism governs the near-horizon geometry of extremal black holes in ungauged 4D N=2 supergravity theories and in Calabi-Yau compactifications of string theory. In this paper, we study a natural generalization of this mechanism to solutions of arbitrary 4D N=2 gauged supergravities. We define generalized attractor points as solutions of an ansatz which reduces the Einstein, gauge field, and scalar equations of motion to algebraic equations. The simplest generalized attractor geometries are characterized by non-vanishing constant anholonomy coefficients in an orthonormal frame. Basic examples include Lifshitz and Schroedinger solutions, as well as AdS and dS vacua. There is a generalized attractor potential whose critical points are the attractor points, and its extremization explains the algebraic nature of the equations governing both supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric attractors.

Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Kallosh, Renata; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Shmakova, Marina; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreatPoint Energy GreatPoint Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name GreatPoint Energy Address 222 Third Street Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02142 Sector Biomass Product Converts coal, petroleum coke and biomass into natural gas Website http://www.greatpointenergy.co Coordinates 42.3672873°, -71.0814466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3672873,"lon":-71.0814466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Microsoft Word - CX-Harbour_Pointe_130621  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2013 5, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Toni L. Timberman Project Manager - TSE-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Harbour Pointe Small Generator Integration Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic Equipment Location: Mukilteo, Snohomish County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to integrate UniEnergy Technologies' (UET) 1.5-megawatt battery generation project into BPA's balancing authority (BA) in response to a UET small generator interconnection request. The proposed point of interconnection is at Snohomish Public Utility District's (SnoPUD) Harbour Pointe Substation. In order to integrate

466

Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

Medecki, H.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fragment Production in the Interaction of 5.5-GeV Protons with Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy spectra of nuclear fragments produced by the interaction of 5.5-GeV protons with uranium have been determined at several laboratory angles by means of dEdx-E measurements with semiconductor-detector telescopes. Individual isotopes of the elements from hydrogen to carbon were resolved, and from nitrogen to argon the study was continued for the elements without isotopic separation. The evaporation-like energy spectra were integrated to obtain angular distributions and total cross sections for the isotopes of helium through carbon. Total cross sections for many rare isotopes were also estimated. The yield surface constructed from these cross sections has a ridge-like shape positioned one neutron in excess of the line of ? stability. The yields fall off more steeply on the neutron-deficient side and exhibit odd-even effects reflecting those of the mass surface. The energy spectra of the neutron-deficient isotopes differ from the others in that the high-energy parts of the spectra are more pronounced and flatter, and the angular distributions are more forward peaked.Some of the energy spectra were fitted with calculated curves based on the isotropic evaporation of fragments from a system moving along the beam axis. The apparent Coulomb barriers obtained from this analysis were about one half the nominal Coulomb barriers, and the apparent nuclear temperatures fell in the 10- to 13-MeV range. For the highest-energy fragments observed at 90° the apparent temperatures rose to 20 MeV. From the forward-backward shifts in energy it was deduced that the average velocity of the moving system is about 0.006c and that there is a positive correlation between this velocity and the velocity of the fragments in the moving system. However, all of the data are more peaked forward in intensity than can be explained by this simple two-step model.Radiochemical cross sections are also presented for the production of Be7 from uranium, silver, and aluminum, and for Na22 from aluminum.

A. M. Poskanzer; Gilbert W. Butler; Earl K. Hyde

1971-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Fixed point theorems in ultrametric spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Point Theorems in Ultrametric Spaces. (May 1972) Steven E. Fullbright, B. A. , Texas A&M University M. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: L. F. Guseman, Jr. and Jack Bryant Let (X, d) be an ultrametric space and f a contractive selfmap of X.... It is shown that the existence of fixed points of f is related to simple properties of the metric d. iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I wish to thank the following people for their assistance and support in writing this thesis: Larry Guseman, who provided guidance...

Fullbright, Steven Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

Predictions of PuO{sub 2} and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. [Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Callow, R.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Predictions of PuO sub 2 and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. (Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Callow, R.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The influence of processing aids on the melt rheological properties of HDPE for film blowing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary role as internal lubricants due to their low molecular weight compared to the bulk polyiner. A polymer processing aid (PPA) can be added to a resin to directly influence the rheological propeixies of the melt by promoting slip between... package for film blowing may contain CaStz, ZnSt2 and a PPA. either alone or in some combination. The interactions betv'ecn these additives and the fundamental mechanisms by which they work are not fully understood. One way to evaluate thc effects...

Balmain, Jennifer Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Bose-Fermi solid and its quantum melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the quantum phase diagram of Bose-Fermi mixtures of ultracold dipolar particles trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices in the thermodynamic limit. With the presence of nearest-neighbor (NN) interactions, a long-ranged ordered crystalline phase (Bose-Fermi solid) is found stabilized in the limit of weak intersite tunneling (J). When J is increased, such a Bose-Fermi solid can be quantum melted into a Bose-Fermi liquid through different procedures, depending on whether the crystalline order is dominated by the NN interaction between fermions or bosons. These properties are qualitatively different from the classical picture of solid-liquid phase transition.

Bin Wang; Daw-Wei Wang; S. Das Sarma

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Comparison of melting level altitudes from the NCEP reanalysis with TRMM precipitation radar data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-thirds of the TRMM [TMI] swath. " 1. 3. Previous Studies Radar meteorologists use the term "melting layer" to describe the region (up to several hundred meters thick) just below the O' C isotherm where the bright band appears. Conversely, much... feature of Figure 3 is the large area of 5000 m enclosed in a dual-fingered shape centered on the equator in the central and western Pacific. An intrusion of lower heights centered on the equator from 125'E to 175'W divides the large area into two...

Harris, Gettys Nunn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Two-stage melting of solids in strongly interacting Rydberg atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the ground state properties of a one-dimensional cold atomic system in a lattice, where Rydberg excitations are created by an external laser drive. In the classical limit, the ground state is characterized by a complete devil's staircase for the commensurate solid structures of Rydberg excitations. Using perturbation theory and a mapping onto an effective low energy Hamiltonian, we find a transition of these commensurate solids into a floating solid with algebraic correlations. For stronger quantum fluctuations the floating solid eventually melts within a second quantum phase transition and the ground state becomes paramagnetic.

Weimer, Hendrik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Two-Stage Melting in Systems of Strongly Interacting Rydberg Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the ground state properties of a one-dimensional cold atomic system in a lattice, where Rydberg excitations are created by an external laser drive. In the classical limit, the ground state is characterized by a complete devil's staircase for the commensurate solid structures of Rydberg excitations. Using perturbation theory and a mapping onto an effective low energy Hamiltonian, we find a transition of these commensurate solids into a floating solid with algebraic correlations. For stronger quantum fluctuations the floating solid eventually melts within a second quantum phase transition and the ground state becomes paramagnetic.

Hendrik Weimer; Hans Peter Büchler

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

476

Two-Stage Melting in Systems of Strongly Interacting Rydberg Atoms  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the ground state properties of a one-dimensional cold atomic system in a lattice, where Rydberg excitations are created by an external laser drive. In the classical limit, the ground state is characterized by a complete devil's staircase for the commensurate solid structures of Rydberg excitations. Using perturbation theory and a mapping onto an effective low-energy Hamiltonian, we find a transition of these commensurate solids into a floating solid with algebraic correlations. For stronger quantum fluctuations the floating solid eventually melts within a second quantum phase transition and the ground state becomes paramagnetic.

Weimer, Hendrik; Buechler, Hans Peter [Institute of Theoretical Physics III, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

477

ATS 351, Spring 2010 Satellite 50 points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensor is a radar. Passive sensors do not emit any radiation, and only detect naturally occurring their own radiation, and measure the return signal that is sent back to them. A good example of an active radiation that is emitted. Most satellites are passive sensors. 3. (5 points). Label each of the following

Rutledge, Steven

478

Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4  

SciTech Connect

Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

479

Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry  

SciTech Connect

The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends on the point-spread function (PSF), detector pixelization, and observing strategy. The PSF and pixel response describe the spatial blurring of the source, the pixel scale describes the spatial sampling of a single exposure, and the observing strategy determines the set of dithered exposures with pointing offsets from which the source flux is inferred. In a wide-field imaging survey, sources of interest are randomly distributed within the field of view and hence are centered randomly within a pixel. A given hardware configuration and observing strategy therefore have a distribution of photometric uncertainty for sources of fixed flux that fall in the field. In this article we explore the ensemble behavior of photometric and position accuracies for different PSFs, pixel scales, and dithering patterns. We find that the average uncertainty in the flux determination depends slightly on dither strategy, whereas the position determination can be strongly dependent on the dithering. For cases with pixels much larger than the PSF, the uncertainty distributions can be non-Gaussian, with rms values that are particularly sensitive to the dither strategy. We also find that for these configurations with large pixels, pointings dithered by a fractional pixel amount do not always give minimal average uncertainties; this is in contrast to image reconstruction for which fractional dithers are optimal. When fractional pixel dithering is favored, a pointing accuracy of better than {approx}0.15 {approx}0.15 pixel width is required to maintain half the advantage over random dithers.

Samsing, Johan; Kim, Alex G

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gev melting point" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2  

SciTech Connect

Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon’s quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5??GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

Puckett, A J.R.; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvingnon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Vacuum performance of the Synchroton Radiation Research Center 1.3 GeV synchrotron light source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operation of the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center 1.3 GeV synchrotron light source vacuum system shows good features of quick beam self?cleaning low carbonaceous gas desorption and less dust. The phenomenon of the photon induced desorption (PID) has been studied. Recently a set of new vacuum chambers for wiggler were installed and the commissioning of the storage ring was restarted. The pressure rise and the PID coefficients during the beam running both in the straight and bending chambers were compared. The performance of the overall vacuum system is to be described.

G. Y. Hsiung; J. R. Huang; J. G. Shyy; D. J. Wang; J. R. Chen; Y. C. Liu

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING COMBINED FUNCTION MAGNETS FOR THE 50 GEV PROTON BEAM LINE FOR THE J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting combined function magnets will be utilized for the 50GeV-750kW proton beam line for the J-PARC neutrino experiment and an R and D program has been launched at KEK. The magnet is designed to provide a combined function with a dipole field of 2.59 T and a quadrupole field of 18.7 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm. A single layer coil is proposed to reduce the fabrication cost and the coil arrangement in the 2-D cross-section results in left-right asymmetry. This paper reports the design study of the magnet.

WANDERER,P.; ET AL.

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

{delta}{sup 0} resonance production in peripheral 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions  

SciTech Connect

The production of {delta}{sup 0}(1232){yields}p{pi}{sup -} resonance is studied in peripheral C+Ta collisions at 4.2A GeV using the 2-m propane bubble chamber exposed at JINR Dubna Synchrophasotron. Using an invariant mass distribution of p{pi}{sup -} pairs and additional kinematical constrains, the mass, width, and kinematical characteristics of {delta}{sup 0} resonance are determined. The ratio of the number of pions originated from {delta}{sup 0} resonance decay to the number of all pions (resonant and nonresonant) is estimated. The analogous ratio for protons is also determined.

Simic, Lj.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P. O. Box 68, 11081 Belgrade (Serbia); Krpic, D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P. O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Probing the scalar-pseudoscalar mixing in the 125 GeV Higgs particle with current data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LHC has found hints for a Higgs particle of 125 GeV. We investigate the possibility that such a particle is a mixture of scalar and pseudoscalar states. For definiteness, we concentrate on a two Higgs doublet model with explicit CP violation and soft Z2 violation. Including all Higgs production mechanisms, we determine the current constraints obtained by comparing h -> gamma gamma with h -> V V*, and comment on the information which can be gained by measurements of h -> b \\bar{b}. We find bounds |s_2| < 0.83 at one sigma, where |s_2|=0 (|s_2|=1) corresponds to a pure scalar (pure pseudoscalar) state.

A. Barroso; P. M. Ferreira; Rui Santos; João P. Silva

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

486

Blast Wave Fits to Elliptic Flow Data at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} =$ 7.7--2760 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present blast wave fits to elliptic flow ($v_{2}(p_{\\rm T})$) data in minimum bias collisions from the $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} =$ 7.7--200 GeV at RHIC, and 2.76 TeV at LHC. The fits are performed separately for particles and corresponding anti-particles. The mean transverse velocity parameter $\\beta$ shows an energy dependent difference between particles and corresponding anti-particles, which increases as the beam energy decreases. Possible effects of feed down, baryon stopping, anti-particle absorption, and early production times for anti-particles are discussed.

Sun, X; Poskanzer, A M; Schmah, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Single and double pion production in np collisions at 1.25 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The preliminary results on charged pion production in np collisions at an incident beam energy of 1.25 GeV measured with HADES are presented. The np reactions were isolated in dp collisions at 1.25 GeV/u using the Forward Wall hodoscope, which allowed to register spectator protons. The results for np -> pppi-, np -> nppi+pi- and np -> dpi+pi- channels are compared with OPE calculations. A reasonable agreement between experimental results and the predictions of the OPE+OBE model is observed.

The HADES Collaboration; A. K. Kurilkin; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; J. D\\'\\iaz; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; A. Gil; M. Golubeva; D. González-D\\'\\iaz; F. Guber; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; P. Huck; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; A. Kopp; G. Korcyl; GK. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Kozuch; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; P. Kurilkin; P. Khlitz; V. Ladygin; J. Lamas-Valverde; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; J. Roskoss; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

488

Single and double pion production in np collisions at 1.25 GeV with HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The preliminary results on charged pion production in np collisions at an incident beam energy of 1.25 GeV measured with HADES are presented. The np reactions were isolated in dp collisions at 1.25 GeV/u using the Forward Wall hodoscope, which allowed to register spectator protons. The results for np -> pppi-, np -> nppi+pi- and np -> dpi+pi- channels are compared with OPE calculations. A reasonable agreement between experimental results and the predictions of the OPE+OBE model is observed.

Kurilkin, A K; Balanda, A; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; D\\'\\iaz, J; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gil, A; Golubeva, M; González-D\\'\\iaz, D; Guber, F; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Huck, P; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kopp, A; Korcyl, G; Kornakov, GK; Kotte, R; Kozuch, A; Krása, A; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kuc, H; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Kurilkin, P; Khlitz, P; Ladygin, V; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Roskoss, J; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Search for a $??N-??N$ dibaryon in p+p@3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is dedicated to the search for a $\\pi\\Lambda N\\!-\\!\\pi\\Sigma N$ resonance $\\mathcal{Y}$ with the quantum numbers ($Y,I,J^P$) = (1,3/2,$2^+$). The double charged $\\Sigma(1385)N\\!-\\!\\Delta(1232)Y$ quasibound state was looked for in the reaction $pp\\rightarrow \\mathcal{Y}^{++}K^0$ with its unique decay into $\\Sigma^+$ and proton measured with the HADES setup at a kinetic beam energy of 3.5 GeV. The analysis including background determination and a description of the data with a $K^0_S$ Monte Carlo cocktail are presented.

J. C. Berger-Chen; L. Fabbietti

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

490

PowerPoint Posters 1 PowerPoint 2007 Creating Posters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PowerPoint Posters 1 PowerPoint 2007­ Creating Posters Description: This manual is designed to assist you in creating eye-catching, effective posters for presentation of research findings at scientific conferences and exhibits. You will learn the following elements of how to create a poster from

Collins, Gary S.

491

Cross-device gaze-supported point-to-point content transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within a pervasive computing environment, we see content on shared displays that we wish to acquire and use in a specific way i.e., with an application on a personal device, transferring from poi