National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gev melting point

  1. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  2. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-11-09

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  3. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph G. (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-04-12

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid comprising a mixture of LiNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.3, KNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.2 and KNO.sub.2 salts where the Li, Na and K cations are present in amounts of about 20-33.5 mol % Li, about 18.6-40 mol % Na, and about 40-50.3 mol % K and where the nitrate and nitrite anions are present in amounts of about 36-50 mol % NO.sub.3, and about 50-62.5 mol % NO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures between 70.degree. C. and 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  4. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-15

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  5. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ? A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ? The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ? The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 ?{sup 3} for bulk to 57 ?{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  6. Liquid Phase 3D Printing for Quickly Manufacturing Metal Objects with Low Melting Point Alloy Ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Conventional 3D printings are generally time-consuming and printable metal inks are rather limited. From an alternative way, we proposed a liquid phase 3D printing for quickly making metal objects. Through introducing metal alloys whose melting point is slightly above room temperature as printing inks, several representative structures spanning from one, two and three dimension to more complex patterns were demonstrated to be quickly fabricated. Compared with the air cooling in a conventional 3D printing, the liquid-phase-manufacturing offers a much higher cooling rate and thus significantly improves the speed in fabricating metal objects. This unique strategy also efficiently prevents the liquid metal inks from air oxidation which is hard to avoid otherwise in an ordinary 3D printing. Several key physical factors (like properties of the cooling fluid, injection speed and needle diameter, types and properties of the printing ink, etc.) were disclosed which would evidently affect the printing quality. In addit...

  7. A molecular dynamics simulation of the melting points and glass transition temperatures of myo-and neo-inositol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    A molecular dynamics simulation of the melting points and glass transition temperatures of myo transition temperature are calculated for myo- and neo-inositol, using the condensed-phase optimized temperatures for myo- and neo-inositol also compare very well to the experimentally obtained data. The glass

  8. Liquid Phase 3D Printing for Quickly Manufacturing Metal Objects with Low Melting Point Alloy Ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wang; Jing Liu

    2014-02-25

    Conventional 3D printings are generally time-consuming and printable metal inks are rather limited. From an alternative way, we proposed a liquid phase 3D printing for quickly making metal objects. Through introducing metal alloys whose melting point is slightly above room temperature as printing inks, several representative structures spanning from one, two and three dimension to more complex patterns were demonstrated to be quickly fabricated. Compared with the air cooling in a conventional 3D printing, the liquid-phase-manufacturing offers a much higher cooling rate and thus significantly improves the speed in fabricating metal objects. This unique strategy also efficiently prevents the liquid metal inks from air oxidation which is hard to avoid otherwise in an ordinary 3D printing. Several key physical factors (like properties of the cooling fluid, injection speed and needle diameter, types and properties of the printing ink, etc.) were disclosed which would evidently affect the printing quality. In addition, a basic route to make future liquid phase 3D printer incorporated with both syringe pump and needle arrays was also suggested. The liquid phase 3D printing method, which owns potential values not available in a conventional modality, opens an efficient way for quickly making metal objects in the coming time.

  9. The Estimation of Melting Points and Fusion Enthalpies Using Experimental Solubilities, Estimated Total Phase Change Entropies, and Mobile Order and Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    and enthalpies of fusion are important and useful thermochemical properties. Their estimation has provenThe Estimation of Melting Points and Fusion Enthalpies Using Experimental Solubilities, Estimated October 24, 2001 Melting points and fusion enthalpies are predicted for a series of 81 compounds

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979, page C5-63 Heat capacity of rare earth metals near the melting point and the vacancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of rare earth metals near the melting point and the vacancy mechanism of melting T. Gorecki (*) Max mesurtes par d'autres auteurs sur les mktaux des terres rares (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Dy, Tm). Abstract for the difference of the heat capacity of the liquid and solid metal in the neighbourhood of the melting point. From

  11. A study of the influence of isotopic substitution on the melting point and temperature of maximum density of water by means of path integral simulations of rigid models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, Carl; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos; 10.1039/C2CP42393F

    2012-01-01

    The melting point of ice Ih, as well as the temperature of maximum density (TMD) in the liquid phase, has been computed using the path integral Monte Carlo method. Two new models are introduced; TIP4PQ_D2O and TIP4PQ_T2O which are specifically designed to study D2O and T2O respectively. We have also used these models to study the "competing quantum effects" proposal of Habershon, Markland and Manolopoulos; the TIP4PQ/2005, TIP4PQ/2005 (D2O) and TIP4PQ/2005 (T2O) models are able to study the isotopic substitution of hydrogen for deuterium or tritium whilst constraining the geometry, while the TIP4PQ_D2O and TIP4PQ_T2O models, where the O-H bond lengths are progressively shortened, permit the study of the influence of geometry (and thus dipole moment) on the isotopic effects. For TIP4PQ_D2O - TIP4PQ/2005 we found a melting point shift of 4.9 K (experimentally the value is 3.68K) and a TMD shift of 6K (experimentally 7.2K). For TIP4PQ_T2O - TIP4PQ/2005 we found a melting point shift of 5.2 K (experimentally the ...

  12. Melt containment member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  13. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

  14. Behavior of melts during softening and melting down of iron ore sinter under load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y.H. [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    In order to achieve effective operation in the blast furnace, the distribution control and quality improvement of burden materials are very important. In spite of the difficulties in obtaining suitable samples and making direct observation, significant progress including the placement of probes into the stack, tuyere drilling and laboratory simulation studies has been made. Investigation of the behavior of melts during softening and melting down was carried out in the temperature range of 800 C to 1,515 C. In this report, emphasis is given to investigating the mineral formation and properties of melts during softening and melting down of the iron ore sinter. Sized coke layers were placed above and below the sample to maintain uniform upward flow of gas and insure a smooth downward flow of melts. When the temperature of the sample reached the set point during the test the power was shut off and the sample was cooled in the furnace air. The weight, the height, porosity and contraction of each sample were measured. Chemical composition, observation of microstructures, SEM analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis were conducted. Results are presented.

  15. Physics of polymer melts: A novel perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirish M. Chitanvis

    2000-02-25

    We have mapped the physics of polymer melts onto a time-dependent Landau-Ginzburg $|\\psi|^4$ field theory using techniques of functional integration. Time in the theory is simply a label for the location of a given monomer along the extent of a flexible chain. With this model, one can show that the limit of infinitesimal concentration of a polymer melt corresponds to a {\\em dynamic} critical phenomenon. The transition to the entangled state is also shown to be a critical point. For larger concentrations, when the role of fluctuations is reduced, a mean field approximation is justifiably employed to show the existence of tube-like structures reminiscent of Edwards' model.

  16. High pressure melt ejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent probabilistic risk assessments have identified the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure while the reactor coolant system is at elevated pressure. The analyses postulate that the blowdown of steam and hydrogen into the reactor cavity will cause the core material to be swept from the cavity region into the containment building. The High Pressure Melt Streaming (HIPS) program is an experimental study of the high pressure ejection of molten material and subsequent interactions within a concrete cavity. The program focuses on using prototypic system conditions and scaled models of reactor geometries to accurately simulate the ex-vessel processes during high-pressure accident sequences. Scaling analyses of the experiment show that the criteria established for core debris removal from the cavity are met or exceeded. Tests are performed at two scales, representing 1/10th and 1/20th linear reproductions of the Zion reactor plant. Results of the 1/20th scale tests are presented.

  17. 'Like cupcakes melting in the sun...' /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skaller, Philip Emmanuel; Skaller, Philip Emmanuel.

    2014-01-01

    cupcakes melting in the sun’ A Dissertation submitted incupcakes melting in the sun’ by Philip Emmanuel SkallerLike cupcakes melting in the sun ’ was a performance of 7

  18. Evaluation of melting process of the permafrost on Mars: Its implication for surface features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    . The point of our simulation is incorporation of thermal convection in porous media, which has not been in the melted zone causes drastic change in heat transfer, which results in focusing in the growth of the melt surface features around the outflow channels. INDEX TERMS: 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars

  19. Melting Objects M. W. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Mark W.

    both thermal flow and the latent heat during the phase change. The mechanism for energy transfer realistic animations of melting objects. The work presented here introduces a method that accurately models object and the method is particularly suited to rigid solids with complex surface geometry

  20. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, Bryan F

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATION OF SNOW MELTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATION OF SNOW MELTING ON HEATED HORIZONTAL SURFACES By SEAN INVESTIGATION OF SNOW MELTING ON HEATED HORIZONTAL SURFACES Thesis Approved: Dean of the Graduate College Thesis..............................................................................................................5 2.3 Snow/Ice Physical Properties

  2. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  3. DEGREE-SCALE GeV 'JETS' FROM ACTIVE AND DEAD TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Elyiv, A.

    2010-08-20

    We show that images of TeV blazars in the GeV energy band should contain, along with point-like sources, degree-scale jet-like extensions. These GeV extensions are the result of electromagnetic cascades initiated by TeV {gamma}-rays interacting with extragalactic background light and the deflection of the cascade electrons/positrons in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs). Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the spectral and timing properties of the degree-scale extensions in simulated GeV band images of TeV blazars. We show that the brightness profile of such degree-scale extensions can be used to infer the light curve of the primary TeV {gamma}-ray source over the past 10{sup 7} yr, i.e., over a time scale comparable to the lifetime of the parent active galactic nucleus. This implies that the degree-scale jet-like GeV emission could be detected not only near known active TeV blazars, but also from 'TeV blazar remnants', whose central engines were switched off up to 10 million years ago. Since the brightness profile of the GeV 'jets' depends on the strength and the structure of the EGMF, their observation provides additional information about the EGMF.

  4. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassbender, Alexander G. (Kennewick, WA); Walkup, Paul C. (Richland, WA); Mudge, Lyle K. (Richland, WA)

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  5. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  6. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanuel M. (42 Old Middlesex Rd., Belmont, MA 02178)

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  7. USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN of glacier ice as a substrate and generation of melt from the ice substrate when seasonal snow has melted for the entire domain. Therefore, regional variability in snow and glacier melting is computed. Outflow can

  8. Accurate freezing and melting equations for the Lennard-Jones system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey A. Khrapak; Gregor E. Morfill

    2011-04-14

    Analyzing three approximate methods to locate liquid-solid coexistence in simple systems, an observation is made that all of them predict the same functional dependence of the temperature on density at freezing and melting of the conventional Lennard-Jones system. The emerging equations can be written as $T={\\mathcal A}\\rho^4+{\\mathcal B}\\rho^2$ in normalized units. We suggest to determine the values of the coefficients ${\\mathcal A}$ at freezing and melting from the high-temperature limit, governed by the inverse twelfth power repulsive potential. The coefficients ${\\mathcal B}$ can be determined from the triple point parameters of the LJ fluid. This produces freezing and melting equations which are exact in the high-temperature limit and at the triple point, and show remarkably good agreement with numerical simulation data in the intermediate region.

  9. ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and...

  10. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

  11. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI���¢��������s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  13. Particle Production at 3 GeV X. Ding, UCLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    = 50m 0.02976 (neg: 0.01206, pos: 0.01770) Carbon 3 GeV, Z = 0m 0.03341 (neg: 0.01370, pos: 0.01971) Mercury 3 GeV, Z = 50 m 0.02096 (neg: 0.01070, pos: 0.01026) Mercury 3 GeV, Z = 0 m 0.02496 (neg: 0.01273, pos: 0.01223) Mercury 8 GeV, Z = 50 m 0.0263 (neg: 0.0136, pos: 0.0127) Mercury 8 GeV, Z = 0m 0

  14. Frustration and Melting of Colloidal Molecular Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Olson Reichhardt; C. Reichhardt

    2002-10-14

    Using numerical simulations we show that a variety of novel colloidal crystalline states and multi-step melting phenomena occur on square and triangular two-dimensional periodic substrates. At half-integer fillings different kinds of frustration effects can be realized. A two-step melting transition can occur in which individual colloidal molecules initially rotate, destroying the overall orientational order, followed by the onset of interwell colloidal hopping, in good agreement with recent experiments.

  15. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  16. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  17. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  18. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  19. THE CHOICE OF THE PROPER REFRACTORY FOR THE CASTING OF HIGH MELTING ELECTROPOSITIVE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Leo

    2008-01-01

    for the Casting of High Melting Electropositive Metals Leothe Casting of High Melting Electropositive Metals" (Report

  20. Method for producing melt-infiltrated ceramic composites using formed supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Brun, Milivoj Konstantin (Ballston Lake, NY); McGuigan, Henry Charles (Duanesburg, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A method for producing shaped articles of ceramic composites provides a high degree of dimensional tolerance to these articles. A fiber preform is disposed on a surface of a stable formed support, a surface of which is formed with a plurality of indentations, such as grooves, slots, or channels. Precursors of ceramic matrix materials are provided to the fiber preform to infiltrate from both sides of the fiber preform. The infiltration is conducted under vacuum at a temperature not much greater than a melting point of the precursors. The melt-infiltrated composite article substantially retains its dimension and shape throughout the fabrication process.

  1. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam

    2012-12-15

    This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

  2. A quasimechanism of melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, Bryan F

    2009-01-01

    It has been know for half a century that many crystalline organic solids undergo an acceleration in the rate of thermal decomposition as the melting temperature is approached. This acceleration terminates at the melting point, exhibiting an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence in the faster decomposition rate from the liquid phase. This observation has been modeled previously using various premelting behaviors based on e.g. freezing point depression induced by decomposition products or solvent impurities. These models do not, however, indicate a mechanism for liquid formation and acceleration which is an inherent function of the bulk thermodynamics of the molecule. Here we show that such an inherent thermodynamic mechanism for liquid formation exists in the form of the so-called quasi-liquid layer at the solid surface. We explore a kinetic mechanism which describes the acceleration of rate and is a function of the free energies of sublimation and vaporization. We construct a differential rate law from these thermodynamic free energies and a normalized progress variable. We further construct a reduced variable formulation of the model which is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and show that it is applicable to the observed melt acceleration in several common organic crystalline solids. A component of the differential rate law, zero order in the progress variable, is shown to be proportional to the thickness of the quasiliquid layer predicted by a recent thermodynamic theory for this phenomenon. This work therefore serves not only to provide new insight into thermal decomposition in a broad class or organic crystalline solids, but also further validates the underlying thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon of liquid formation on the molecular surface at temperatures below the melting point.

  3. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F. [Koc University, Rumelifeneriyolu, Sariyer, Istanbul TR-34450 (Turkey); LASIM, Universite de Lyon and CNRS UMR 5579, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, FR-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-05-15

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  4. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  5. Vacuum Arc Melting Unit Arc Melting is used for melting metals typically to form alloys. Heating is via an electric arc struck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Vacuum Arc Melting Unit Arc Melting is used for melting metals­ typically to form alloys. Heating unit is used as a power source. Heat generated by the electric arc struck between the electrode unit. The vacuum unit with rotary and diffusion pumps can attain a vacuum of 106 m bar. The cold

  6. Vanadate-sulfate melt thermochemistry relating to hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.L.

    1997-10-30

    The gas turbine industry is moving strongly toward the use of ZrO2-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on hot section vanes/blades to increase engine efficiency and durability. In some applications (e.g., ship propulsion or electricity generation), such TBCs may be corroded by molten vanadate-sulfate deposits from fuel impurities. This Report provides a synopsis of vanadate-sulfate thermochemistry relating to TBC hot corrosion, and summarizes research conducted on this topic at the Naval Research Laboratory. The interactions of Na2O, V2O5 and SO3, the melt components which determine the composition of the vanadate-sulfate deposits, were examined and clarified. Vanadate-sulfate melts were shown to be nonideal rather than ideal a point of some contention in the past literature and, for melts of Na/V = 1, to have a V205 activity coefficient (gamma) that ranges from 5 x 10(exp -4) up to essentially 1, depending on the S03 overpressure. Different NaVO3/Na2SO4 mixtures gave a detectable but small change in gamma(V2O5), suggesting that the Na/V ratio is relatively unimportant, for melts equilibrated with SO3, in determining gamma(V2O5). The reactions of several candidate ZrO2 stabilizers (MgO, CeO2, Sc2O3, In2O3, SnO2) with vanadate-sulfate melts are categorized and discussed.

  7. Method and apparatus for melting metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Alan F.; Schechter, Donald E.; Morrow, Marvin Stanley

    2006-03-14

    A method and apparatus for melting metals uses microwave energy as the primary source of heat. The metal or mixture of metals are placed in a ceramic crucible which couples, at least partially, with the microwaves to be used. The crucible is encased in a ceramic casket for insulation and placed within a microwave chamber. The chamber may be evacuated and refilled to exclude oxygen. After melting, the crucible may be removed for pouring or poured within the chamber by dripping or running into a heated mold within the chamber. Apparent coupling of the microwaves with softened or molten metal produces high temperatures with great energy savings.

  8. Pressurized melt ejection into scaled reactor cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Ross, J.W.; Gilbert, D.W.

    1986-10-01

    This report describes four tests performed in the High-Pressure Melt Streaming Program (HIPS) using linear-scaled cavities of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. These experiments were conducted to study the phenomena involved in high-pressure ejection of core debris into the cavity beneath the reactor pressure vessel. One-tenth and one-twentieth linear scale models of reactor cavities were constructed and instrumented. The first test used an apparatus constructed of alumina firebrick to minimize the potential interaction between the ejected melt and cavity material. The remaining three experiments used scaled representations of the Zion nuclear plant geometry, constructed of prototypic concrete composition.

  9. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  10. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted of: (1) comparison to an analytical solution for the dam break problem, (2) water spreading tests in a 1/10 linear scale model of the Mark I containment by Theofanous et al., and (3) steel spreading tests by Suzuki et al. that were also conducted in a geometry similar to the Mark I. The objective of this work was to utilize the MELTSPREAD code to check the assumption of uniform melt spreading in the EPR core catcher design. As a starting point for the project, the code was validated against the worldwide melt spreading database that emerged after the code was originally written in the very early 1990's. As part of this exercise, the code was extensively modified and upgraded to incorporate findings from these various analytical and experiment programs. In terms of expanding the ability of the code to analyze various melt simulant experiments, the options to input user-specified melt and/or substrate material properties was added. The ability to perform invisicid and/or adiabatic spreading analysis was also added so that comparisons with analytical solutions and isothermal spreading tests could be carried out. In terms of refining the capability to carry out reactor material melt spreading analyses, the code was upgraded with a new melt viscosity model; the capability was added to treat situations in which solid fraction buildup between the liquidus-solidus is non-linear; and finally, the ability to treat an interfacial heat transfer resistance between the melt and substrate was incorporated. This last set of changes substantially improved the predictive capability of the code in terms of addressing reactor material melt spreading tests. Aside from improvements and upgrades, a method was developed to fit the model to the various melt spreading tests in a manner that allowed uncertainties in the model predictions to be statistically characterized. With these results, a sensitivity study was performed to investigate the assumption of uniform spreading in the EPR core catcher that addressed parametric variations in: (1) melt pour mass, (2) melt composition, (3) me

  11. 6 GeV Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subedi, Ramesh R.; Deng Xiaoyan; Wang Diancheng; Zheng Xiaochao; Michaels, Robert; Pan Kai; Reimer, Paul E.

    2011-10-24

    The 6 GeV Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment has measured a 10{sup -4} level asymmetry through polarized electron scattering off a liquid deuterium target with a beam energy of 6 GeV. This experiment has a goal of measuring a combination of the product of the weak neutral couplings of the electron and the quark with a factor of six improvement in precision over world data. Precise data for the couplings are essential to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment took place in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) and data collection was completed in the end of 2009. A highly specialized counting data acquisition system with an inherent particle identification was developed and utilized. We have taken data at two Q{sup 2} points in order to possibly address the hadronic correction due to higher twist effects. An overview of the experiment will be presented.

  12. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  13. Nucleon Resonances Near 2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The nucleon resonances near 2 GeV are investigated through the $\\Sigma$(1385) and $\\Lambda(1520)$ photoproductions within a Regge-plus-resonance approach based on the new experimental data released by the CLAS Collaboration. The $\\Delta(2000)$ and the $N(2120)$ are found essential to reproduce the experimental data and should be assigned as second $[\\Delta 5/2^+]$ and third $[N3/2^-]$ in the constituent quark model, respectively. A calculation of the binding energy and decay pattern supports that the $N(1875)$, which is listed in the PDG as the third $N3/2^-$ nucleon resonance instead of the $N(2120)$, is from the $\\Sigma(1385)K$ interaction rather than a three quark state.

  14. Method for the melting of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR)

    1992-01-01

    A method of quantitatively determining the molten pool configuration in melting of metals. The method includes the steps of introducing hafnium metal seeds into a molten metal pool at intervals to form ingots, neutron activating the ingots and determining the hafnium location by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  15. Energy Savings in Electric Arc Furnace Melting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubbeck, W.

    1982-01-01

    Arc furnace melting which at one time was almost exclusively used to produce alloy steel and steel castings is now widely accepted in the industry as an efficient process to produce all types of steel and iron. Presently, about 28% of steel...

  16. Dynamics and pattern selection at the crystal-melt interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, H.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses: light scattering at the crystal-melt interface; morphological instability and pattern selection; and sidebranching.

  17. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi?_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  18. Ratio of jet cross sections at root s=630 GeV and 1800 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2001-03-01

    The DO Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section in (p) over barp collisions at roots = 630 GeV. The results for pseudorapidities \\ eta \\ < 0.5 are combined with our previous results at roots = 1800 GeV ...

  19. Specific heat in two-dimensional melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Deutschländer; Antonio M. Puertas; Georg Maret; Peter Keim

    2014-05-14

    We report the specific heat $c_N$ around the melting transition(s) of micrometer-sized superparamagnetic particles confined in two dimensions, calculated from fluctuations of positions and internal energy, and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. Since colloidal systems provide single particle resolution, they offer the unique possibility to compare the experimental temperatures of peak position of $c_N(T)$ and symmetry breaking, respectively. While order parameter correlation functions confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young melting scenario where translational and orientational order symmetries are broken at different temperatures with an intermediate so called hexatic phase, we observe a single peak of the specific heat within the hexatic phase, with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation. Thus, the peak is not associated with broken symmetries but can be explained with the total defect density, which correlates with the maximum increase of isolated dislocations. The absence of a latent heat strongly supports the continuous character of both transitions.

  20. Thermally efficient melting for glass making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Michael S. K. (Zionsville, PA); Painter, Corning F. (Allentown, PA); Pastore, Steven P. (Allentown, PA); Roth, Gary (Trexlertown, PA); Winchester, David C. (Allentown, PA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is an integrated process for the production of glass utilizing combustion heat to melt glassmaking materials in a glassmaking furnace. The fuel combusted to produce heat sufficient to melt the glassmaking materials is combusted with oxygen-enriched oxidant to reduce heat losses from the offgas of the glassmaking furnace. The process further reduces heat losses by quenching hot offgas from the glassmaking furnace with a process stream to retain the heat recovered from quench in the glassmaking process with subsequent additional heat recovery by heat exchange of the fuel to the glassmaking furnace, as well as the glassmaking materials, such as batch and cullet. The process includes recovery of a commercially pure carbon dioxide product by separatory means from the cooled, residual offgas from the glassmaking furnace.

  1. Topological Constraints in Directed Polymer Melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serna, Pablo; Nahum, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Polymers in a melt may be subject to topological constraints, as in the example of unlinked polymer rings. How to do statistical mechanics in the presence of such constraints remains a fundamental open problem. We study the effect of topological constraints on a melt of directed polymers using simulations of a simple quasi-2D model. We find that fixing the global topology of the melt to be trivial changes the polymer conformations drastically. Polymers of length $L$ wander in the transverse direction only by a distance of order $(\\ln L)^\\zeta$ with $\\zeta \\simeq 1.5$. This is strongly suppressed in comparison with the Brownian scaling $L^{1/2}$ which holds in the absence of the topological constraint. It is also much less than the prediction $L^{1/4}$ of a mean-field-like `array of obstacles' model: thus we rule out such a model in the present setting. Dynamics are also strongly affected by the constraints, and a tagged monomer in an infinite system performs logarithmically slow subdiffusion. To cast light on...

  2. Shallow melt apparatus for semicontinuous czochralski crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  3. 125 Gev Higgs-Boson as Scalar partner of 91 Gev $Z^{0}$-Weak-boson in Composite subquark model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeo Matsushima

    2012-07-10

    The composite subquark model previously proposed by us shows that the intermediate $Z^{0}$-weak-boson is realized as the composite particle and that its scalar partner has the mass value larger than $Z^{0}$-weak-boson mass. It is suggested that 125 Gev Higgs-boson found at LHC is a scalar partner of 91 Gev $Z^{0}$-weak-boson. We predict the existence of charged Higgs-bosons with the mass value around 100 to 120 Gev as the scalar partners of $W^{\\pm}$. We also discuss about Dark energy and Dark matter.

  4. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  5. ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. WAKEFIELD THEORY AND DESIGN CRITERIA 4 A. LINEAR THEORY 4 B. THE NON LINAC 19 D. FFTB 24 LAYOUT OF THE FFTB BEAM LINE AT 30 GEV 26 RADIATION SAFETY AND BEAM CONTAINMENT 29

  6. Perfluorooctanoic acid Melting point ~55 C, boiling point ~190 C, pKa ~ 2.5, sparingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    #12;Perfluorooctanoic acid · It concentrates on water surfaces as it is a fluoro-surfactant · Used in water and polar organic solvents · Stable at normal temperatures and pressures but avoid contact developmental and other adverse effects in laboratory animals. · Flammable and forms hazardous products like HF

  7. Melting a granular glass by cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Plagge; Claus Heussinger

    2013-02-05

    Driven granular systems readily form glassy phases at high particle volume fractions and low driving amplitudes. We use computer simulations of a driven granular glass to evidence a re-entrance melting transition into a fluid state, which, contrary to intuition, occurs by \\emph{reducing} the amplitude of the driving. This transition is accompanied by anomalous particle dynamics and super-diffusive behavior on intermediate time-scales. We highlight the special role played by frictional interactions, which help particles to escape their glassy cages. Such an effect is in striking contrast to what friction is expected to do: reduce particle mobility by making them stick.

  8. Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Thacker

    2008-10-22

    Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

  9. Microwave Melting | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection ofOctober10 Years2,2004Microwave Melting

  10. Partial melting and melt segregation in a convecting mantle Harro Schmeling*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeling, Harro

    Abstract Various causes for mantle melting (decompression, heating or release of water) combined that the earth is a giant heat engine powered partly by primordial heat and partly by the decay of long lived in a deforming medium are discussed with emphasis on the physical processes involved. To combine these processes

  11. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  12. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  13. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Quality Molten Aluminum itmdelivery.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the...

  14. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    radiation and some convec- tion. These furnaces are characterized by poor thermal efficien- cies ranging from approximately 20%-45%. The Energy Efficient Isothermal Melting...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - ESGCold Cap Melting (2) [Read-Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 d d eff p p T c c H + is the effective heat capacity cp is the true heat capacity H is the specific reaction enthalpy Feed density and foaming 8 Triple...

  16. Temperature control of some metallic conductors in the region of the melting point 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Arifur

    1961-01-01

    . The central aluminium bracket is a support for the thermocouple. a 1 / a J, ' 10 Vacuum Pump A Welch Duo-seal oil type vacuum pump was used to evacuate the chamber. According to the manufacturers of the pump, it is possible to obtain a pressure... amperes, (with a supply voltage of about 14 volts D. C. ) it was thought suitable to use t'wo 2N512A's in parallel. To overcome the problem of heat dissipation, the final stage transistors were mounted on an I/8" thick aluminium plate 10. 5" x 20...

  17. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puckett, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  18. Melting Alpine Glaciers Enrich High-Elevation Lakes with Reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    melt alone (SF lakes) and those fed by both glacial and snowpack meltwaters (GSF lakes). We foundMelting Alpine Glaciers Enrich High-Elevation Lakes with Reactive Nitrogen J A S M I N E E . S A R century in many regions of the world. Resulting changes in glacial runoff not only affect the hydrological

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc, orbital cycles, glacial isostatic adjustment and tectonics. Each of these elements contribute different it to be directly observed. This project examined the contribution to sea-level change due to melting of ice from

  20. DNA Melting in the Presence of Fluorescent Intercalating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    absorption characteristics that complicate conventional uv measurements of DNA melting. In this article, we was designed to be complementary to uv absorption measurements in that it reports the number of melted duplexes, Vol. 65, 40­44 (2002) © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 40 #12;conventional uv absorption measurements

  1. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa , Tolga Tasdizena,b, , Boya Songc. In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form on the sea ice surface. The transition of pond configurations from isolated structures to interconnected

  2. Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodd, Emma

    2011-11-24

    Melt pond coverage on sea ice is an important influence on sea ice albedo reduction during the summer and can also affect the monitoring of sea ice extent, sea ice models and sea ice forecasting. Techniques to estimate melt pond coverage from global...

  3. A Simple Recipe for the 111 and 128 GeV Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece

    2013-08-03

    Recently evidence for gamma ray lines at energies of approximately 111 and 128 GeV has been found in Fermi-LAT data from the center of the galaxy and from unassociated point sources. Many explanations in terms of dark matter particle pairs annihilating to gamma gamma and gamma Z have been suggested, but these typically require very large couplings or mysterious coincidences in the masses of several new particles to fit the signal strength. We propose a simple novel explanation in which dark matter is part of a multiplet of new states which all have mass near 260 GeV as a result of symmetry. Two dark matter particles annihilate to a pair of neutral particles in this multiplet which subsequently decay to gamma gamma and gamma Z. For example, one may have a triplet of pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, charged pions and a neutral pion, where the charged pions are stabilized by their charge under a new U(1) symmetry and the slightly lighter neutral pion state decays to gamma gamma and gamma Z. The symmetry structure of such a model explains the near degeneracy in masses needed for the resulting photons to have a line-like shape and the large observed flux. The tunable lifetime of the neutral state allows such models to go unseen at direct detection or collider experiments that can constrain most other explanations. However, nucleosynthesis constraints on the neutral pion lifetime fix a minimum necessary coupling between the new multiplet and the Standard Model. The spectrum is predicted to be not a line but a box with a width of order a few GeV, smaller than but on the order of the Fermi-LAT resolution.

  4. GeV Emission from Collisional Magnetized Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mészáros; M. J. Rees

    2011-04-26

    Magnetic fields may play a dominant role in gamma-ray bursts, and recent observations by the Fermi satellite indicate that GeV radiation, when detected, arrives delayed by seconds from the onset of the MeV component. Motivated by this, we discuss a magnetically dominated jet model where both magnetic dissipation and nuclear collisions are important. We show that, for parameters typical of the observed bursts, such a model involving a realistic jet structure can reproduce the general features of the MeV and a separate GeV radiation component, including the time delay between the two. The model also predicts a multi-GeV neutrino component.

  5. Evaluation of phenomenological one-phase criteria for the melting and freezing of softly repulsive particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz Saija; Santi Prestipino; Paolo V. Giaquinta

    2006-05-19

    We test the validity of some widely used phenomenological criteria for the localization of the fluid-solid transition thresholds against the phase diagrams of particles interacting through the exp-6, inverse-power-law, and Gaussian potentials. We find that one-phase rules give, on the whole, reliable estimates of freezing/melting points. The agreement is ordinarily better for a face-centered-cubic solid than for a body-centered-cubic crystal, even more so in the presence of a pressure-driven re-entrant transition of the solid into a denser fluid phase, as found in the Gaussian-core model.

  6. Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connors, John J.; McConnell, John F.; Henry, Vincent I.; MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B.; Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C.; Adams, Michael E.; Leadbetter, James M.; Tomasewski, Jack W.; Operacz, Walter J.; Houf, William G.; Davis, James W.; Marvin, Bart G.; Gunner, Bruce E.; Farrell, Rick G.; Bivins, David P.; Curtis, Warren; Harris, James E.

    2004-08-01

    The need for a Combustion and Melting Research Facility focused on the solution of glass manufacturing problems common to all segments of the glass industry was given high priority in the earliest version of the Glass Industry Technology Roadmap (Eisenhauer et al., 1997). Visteon Glass Systems and, later, PPG Industries proposed to meet this requirement, in partnership with the DOE/OIT Glass Program and Sandia National Laboratories, by designing and building a research furnace equipped with state-of-the-art diagnostics in the DOE Combustion Research Facility located at the Sandia site in Livermore, CA. Input on the configuration and objectives of the facility was sought from the entire industry by a variety of routes: (1) through a survey distributed to industry leaders by GMIC, (2) by conducting an open workshop following the OIT Glass Industry Project Review in September 1999, (3) from discussions with numerous glass engineers, scientists, and executives, and (4) during visits to glass manufacturing plants and research centers. The recommendations from industry were that the melting tank be made large enough to reproduce the essential processes and features of industrial furnaces yet flexible enough to be operated in as many as possible of the configurations found in industry as well as in ways never before attempted in practice. Realization of these objectives, while still providing access to the glass bath and combustion space for optical diagnostics and measurements using conventional probes, was the principal challenge in the development of the tank furnace design. The present report describes a facility having the requirements identified as important by members of the glass industry and equipped to do the work that the industry recommended should be the focus of research. The intent is that the laboratory would be available to U.S. glass manufacturers for collaboration with Sandia scientists and engineers on both precompetitive basic research and the solution of proprietary glass production problems. As a consequence of the substantial increase in scale and scope of the initial furnace concept in response to industry recommendations, constraints on funding of industrial programs by DOE, and reorientation of the Department's priorities, the OIT Glass Program is unable to provide the support for construction of such a facility. However, it is the present investigators' hope that a group of industry partners will emerge to carry the project forward, taking advantage of the detailed furnace design presented in this report. The engineering, including complete construction drawings, bill of materials, and equipment specifications, is complete. The project is ready to begin construction as soon as the quotations are updated. The design of the research melter closely follows the most advanced industrial practice, firing by natural gas with oxygen. The melting area is 13 ft x 6 ft, with a glass depth of 3 ft and an average height in the combustion space of 3 ft. The maximum pull rate is 25 tons/day, ranging from 100% batch to 100% cullet, continuously fed, with variable batch composition, particle size distribution, and raft configuration. The tank is equipped with bubblers to control glass circulation. The furnace can be fired in three modes: (1) using a single large burner mounted on the front wall, (2) by six burners in a staggered/opposed arrangement, three in each breast wall, and (3) by down-fired burners mounted in the crown in any combination with the front wall or breast-wall-mounted burners. Horizontal slots are provided between the tank blocks and tuck stones and between the breast wall and skewback blocks, running the entire length of the furnace on both sides, to permit access to the combustion space and the surface of the glass for optical measurements and sampling probes. Vertical slots in the breast walls provide additional access for measurements and sampling. The furnace and tank are to be fully instrumented with standard measuring equipment, such as flow meters, thermocouples, continuous gas composition

  7. The JLAB 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwood, Leigh H.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation should describe the progress of the 12GeV Upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The status of the upgrade should be presented as well as details on the construction, procurement, installation and commissioning of the magnet and SRF components of the upgrade.

  8. 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    During the past decade, synchrotron radiation emitted by circulating electron beams has come into wide use as a powerful, versatile source of x-rays for probing the structure of matter and for studying various physical processes. Several synchrotron radiation facilities with different designs and characteristics are now in regular operation throughout the world, with recent additions in this country being the 0.8-GeV and 2.5-GeV rings of NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, none of the operating facilities has been designed to use a low-emittance, high-energy stored beam, together with modern undulator devices, to produce a large number of hard x-ray beams of extremely high brilliance. This document is a proposal to the Department of Energy to construct and operate high-energy synchrotron radiation facility at Argonne National Laboratory. We have now chosen to set the design energy of this facility at 7.0 GeV, with the capability to operate at up to 7.5 GeV.

  9. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  10. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE...

  11. Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act funds help clean up the Hanford site, retrograde melting (melting as something cools) and how open-cell clouds could help predict climate change.

  12. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of...

  13. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouby, Johanna, E-mail: karoubyj@mit.edu [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachussetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  14. Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  15. Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

    2007-11-06

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  16. Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  17. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    S. M. Hooker, “Gev electron beams from a centimetre-scaleproducing monoenergetic electron beams,” Nature, vol. 431,GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator C. B.

  18. Beam On Target! - CEBAF Accelerator Achieves 12 GeV Commissioning...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an experimental hall, recording the first data of the 12 GeV era. The machine sent electrons around the racetrack three times (known as "3-pass" beam), resulting in 6.11 GeV...

  19. A new physics era at 12 GeV | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A new physics era at 12 GeV January 29, 2015 In several articles over the past years, we have written of progress with the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Since the beginning of...

  20. Discovery of GeV Emission tfrom the Circinus Galaxy with the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discovery of GeV Emission tfrom the Circinus Galaxy with the Fermi-Lat Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of GeV Emission tfrom the Circinus Galaxy with the...

  1. EA-0389: Proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at DOE's Argonne...

  2. Melting criteria for mesoscopic Yukawa crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonitz, Michael

    Machines. JoCP 21, 1087-1092, 1953 [8] F.A. Lindemann. The Calculation of Molecular Vibration Frequencies point is given by the relative distance fluctuations[8] a) b) Fig. 2. Vertical view through the center, e.g. the mean energy at a given finite temperature kB T has a standard deviation of less than 1

  3. Melt generation in the Earth's mantle at Convergent Plate Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Till, Christy B

    2011-01-01

    The five geologic studies presented in this thesis document how the recycling of tectonic plates at subduction zones has a profound effect on the melting behavior of the Earth's mantle. Two experimental studies (Chapters ...

  4. Effect of Alumina Source on the Rate of Melting Demonstrated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Effect of Alumina Source on the Rate of Melting Demonstrated with Nuclear Waste Glass Batch Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Alumina Source on...

  5. Building Icelandic Igneous Crust by Repeated Melt Injections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.

    2015-10-27

    Observations of microseismicity provide a powerful tool for mapping the movement of melt in the crust. Here we record remarkable sequences of earthquakes 20 km below the surface in the normally ductile crust in the vicinity of Askja volcano...

  6. Melt extrusion and continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Erin R

    2011-01-01

    Melt extrusion is an alternative processing technique that operates continuously, reduces the total number of unit operations, allows for incorporation of difficult-to-process drug substances, and has the potential to ...

  7. Why is GeV physics relevant in the age of the LHC?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, Michael R. [JLAB

    2014-02-01

    The contribution that Jefferson Lab has made, with its 6 GeV electron beam, and will make, with its 12 GeV upgrade, to our understanding of the way the fundamental interactions work, particularly strong coupling QCD, is outlined. The physics at the GeV scale is essential even in TeV collisions.

  8. Method and apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.; Hurd, J.L.

    1981-02-25

    An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

  9. Apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Hurd, Jeffery L. (Golden, CO)

    1986-01-01

    An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

  10. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  11. Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model and evolution of melt ponds. Melt ponds accumulate on the surface of sea ice from snow and sea ice melt, melt ponds cover up to 50% of the sea ice surface. We have developed a melt pond evolution theory. Here

  12. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  13. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  14. GeV emission from Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Panaitescu

    2008-01-10

    We calculate the GeV afterglow emission expected from a few mechanisms related to GRBs and their afterglows. Given the brightness of the early X-ray afterglow emission measured by Swift/XRT, GLAST/LAT should detect the self-Compton emission from the forward-shock driven by the GRB ejecta into the circumburst medium. Novel features discovered by Swift in X-ray afterglows (plateaus and chromatic light-curve breaks) indicate the existence of a pair-enriched, relativistic outflow located behind the forward shock. Bulk and inverse-Compton upscattering of the prompt GRB emission by such outflows provide another source of GeV afterglow emission detectable by LAT. The large-angle burst emission and synchrotron forward-shock emission are, most likely, too dim at high photon energy to be observed by LAT. The spectral slope of the high-energy afterglow emission and its decay rate (if it can be measured) allow the identification of the mechanism producing the GeV transient emission following GRBs.

  15. Exclusive processes at JLab at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions provide a unique opportunity to probe the complex internal structure of the nucleon. They allow to access information about the correlations between parton transverse spatial and longitudinal momentum distributions from experimental observables. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out at Jefferson Lab using continuous electron beam with energies up to 6 GeV. Unpolarized cross sections, beam, target and double spin asymmetries have been measured for DVCS as well as for ?0 exclusive electroproduction. The data from Hall B provide a wide kinematic coverage with Q2=1-4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1-0.5, and ?t up to 2 GeV2. Hall A data have limited kinematic range partially overlapping with Hall B kinematics but provide a high accuracy measurements. Scaling tests of the DVCS cross sections provide solid evidence of twist-2 dominance, which makes chiral-even GPDs accessible even at modest Q2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) model. Successful description of the recent CLAS ?0 exclusive production data within the framework of the GPD-based model provides a unique opportunity to access the chiral-odd GPDs.

  16. Changing monsoon patterns, snow and glacial melt, its impacts and adaptation options in northern India: Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Editorial Changing monsoon patterns, snow and glacial melt, its impacts and adaptation options of northern India. Flows in such Himalayan rivers are derived from both contemporary precipitation and melting glacier melt, and in warmer drier summers through enhanced melt making up for reduced precipita- tion (e

  17. Large-Scale Oceanographic Constraints on the Distribution of Melting and Freezing under Ice Shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Large-Scale Oceanographic Constraints on the Distribution of Melting and Freezing under Ice Shelves experience asymmetric melting and freezing. Topography may constrain oceanic circulation (and thus basal melt­freeze patterns) through its influence on the potential vorticity (PV) field. However, melting and freezing induce

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for medical point of care diagnostics and drug delivery Ronen Polsky Department of Biosensors and Nanomaterials February 25, 2015 Sandia MedTech Showcase Sandia National...

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System (RapiDx) * Portable microfluidic in vitro diagnostic instrument for cancer and infectious disease biomarkers in human biological samples * Point-of-Care...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optic links will replace many hardwire connections - Remotely programmable set-points and monitoring for each klystron cart - Klystron collector over-temperature protection will...

  1. Web points of interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web points of interest ... JUGGLING CLUB; The Lafayette Citizens Band Home Page; Harold Boas' incredible list of math and life resources on the WEB.

  2. Curvature fluctuations and the Lyapunov exponent at melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehra, V.; Ramaswamy, R. [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)] [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    1997-09-01

    We calculate the maximal Lyapunov exponent in constant-energy molecular-dynamics simulations at the melting transition for finite clusters of 6{endash}13 particles (model rare-gas and metallic systems) as well as for bulk rare-gas solids. For clusters, the Lyapunov exponent generally varies linearly with the total energy, but the {ital slope} changes sharply at the melting transition. In the bulk system, melting corresponds to a jump in the Lyapunov exponent, and this corresponds to a singularity in the variance of the curvature of the potential-energy surface. In these systems there are two mechanisms of chaos{emdash}local instability and parametric instability. We calculate the contribution of the parametric instability toward the chaoticity of these systems using a recently proposed formalism. The contribution of parametric instability is a continuous function of energy in small clusters but not in the bulk where the melting corresponds to a decrease in this quantity. This implies that the melting in small clusters does not lead to enhanced local instability. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Device and method for skull-melting depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Heestand, R.L.

    1993-02-09

    A method of skull-melting comprises the steps of: (a) providing a vessel adapted for a skull-melting process, the vessel having an interior, an underside, and an orifice connecting the interior and the underside; (b) disposing a waveguide in the orifice so that the waveguide protrudes sufficiently into the interior to interact with the skull-melting process; (c) providing a signal energy transducer in signal communication with the waveguide; (d) introducing into the vessel a molten working material; (e) carrying out the skull-melting process so that a solidified skull of the working material is formed, the skull and the vessel having an interface therebetween, the skull becoming fused to the waveguide so the signal energy can be transmitted through the waveguide and the skull without interference from the interface; (f) activating the signal energy transducer so that a signal is propagated through the waveguide; and, (g) controlling at least one variable of the skull-melting process utilizing feedback information derived from the propagated signal energy.

  4. Critical fluctuations of the proton density in A+A collisions at $158A$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Anticic; B. Baatar; D. Barna; J. Bartke; J. Beck; L. Betev; H. Bia?kowska; C. Blume; M. Bogusz; B. Boimska; J. Book; M. Botje; P. Bun?i?; T. Cetner; P. Christakoglou; P. Chung; O. Chvala; J. Cramer; V. Eckardt; Z. Fodor; P. Foka; V. Friese; M. Ga?dzicki; K. Grebieszkow; C. Höhne; K. Kadija; A. Karev; V. I. Kolesnikov; M. Kowalski; D. Kresan; A. Laszlo; R. Lacey; M. van Leeuwen; M. Ma?kowiak-Paw?owska; M. Makariev; A. I. Malakhov; M. Mateev; G. L. Melkumov; M. Mitrovski; St. Mrówczy?ski; G. Pálla; A. D. Panagiotou; W. Peryt; J. Pluta; D. Prindle; F. Pühlhofer; R. Renfordt; C. Roland; G. Roland; A. Rustamov; M. Rybczy?ski; A. Rybicki; A. Sandoval; N. Schmitz; T. Schuster; P. Seyboth; F. Siklér; E. Skrzypczak; M. Slodkowski; G. Stefanek; R. Stock; H. Ströbele; T. Susa; M. Szuba; D. Varga; M. Vassiliou; G. I. Veres; G. Vesztergombi; D. Vrani?; Z. W?odarczyk; A. Wojtaszek-Szwar?; N. G. Antoniou; N. Davis; F. K. Diakonos

    2015-05-06

    We look for traces of the QCD critical point using an intermittency analysis in the transverse momentum phase space of protons produced around midrapidity in the 12.5\\% most central C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at the maximum SPS energy of 158$A$ GeV. We find evidence of power-law fluctuations for the Si+Si data. The fitted power-law exponent $\\phi_{2} = 0.96^{+0.38}_{-0.25}\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.16\\text{(syst.)}$ is consistent with the value expected for critical fluctuations. Power-law fluctuations had previously also been observed in low-mass $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ pairs in the same Si+Si collisions. Keywords: quark gluon plasma, QCD critical point, proton density fluctuations, transverse momentum, intermittency analysis, NA49 experiment

  5. Technical and economical considerations of new DRI melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Shuzo; Tokuda, Koji; Sammt, F.; Gray, R.

    1997-12-31

    The new DRI melting process can effectively and economically produce high quality molten iron. This process utilizes hot charging of DRI directly from a reduction furnace into a dedicated new melting furnace. The molten iron from this DRI premelter can be charged into a steelmaking furnace, such as an electric arc furnace (EAF), where the molten iron, together with other iron sources, can be processed to produce steel. Alternatively the molten iron can be pigged or granulated for off-site merchant sales. Comprehensive research and development of the new process has been conducted including operational process simulation, melting tests using FASTMET DRI, slag technology development, and refractory corrosion testing. This paper describes the process concept, its operational characteristics and further applications of the process.

  6. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  7. Melt processing of Bi--2212 superconductors using alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting articles and a method of forming them, where the superconducting phase of an article is Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.y (Bi-2212). Alumina is combined with Bi-2212 powder or Bi-2212 precursor powder and, in order to form an intimate mixture, the mixture is melted and rapidly cooled to form a glassy solid. The glassy solid is comminuted and the resulting powder is combined with a carrier. An alternative to melting is to form the mixture of nanophase alumina and material having a particle size of less than about 10 microns. The powder, with the carrier, is melt processed to form a superconducting article.

  8. Aerosol source term in high pressure melt ejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, J.E.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1984-11-01

    Pressurized ejection of melt from a reactor pressure vessel has been identified as an important element of a severe reactor accident. Copious aerosol production is observed when thermitically generated melts pressurized with nitrogen or carbon dioxide to 1.3 to 17 MPa are ejected into an air atmosphere. Aerosol particle size distributions measured in the tests have modes of about 0.5, 5, and > 10 ..mu..m. Mechanisms leading to formation of these multimodal size distributions are suggested. This aerosol is a potentially important fission product source term that has not been considered in previous severe accident analyses.

  9. Diffusive over-hydration of olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Margaret E.; Neave, David A.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Thordarson, Thor

    2015-06-11

    to co m fic en is Zh er an te Ce pi en se pr th at th pr pr W ou close to their centres as possible (which reduces the likelihood of mpositions into magma reservoirs where crystallisation is oc- rring (Maclennan, 2008; Rudge et al., 2013). Mixing... primary melts In order to assess the extent of diffusive re-equilibration in the Z inclusions, H2O/Ce must be determined for undegassed melts. olatile saturation models indicate that the Skuggafjöll magma upted under ice/water pressures of ?1.4 MPa...

  10. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more »the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  11. 12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

    2012-07-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

  12. Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

  13. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiang, Yi [JLAB] (ORCID:0000000170267841)

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  14. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  15. A Mechanism for Extrusion Instabilities in Polymer Melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiou, Georgios

    POLYMER ENGINEERINGAND SCIENCE, DECEMBER 1999, Vol. 39, No. 12 #12;A Mechanismfor ExtrusionA Mechanism for Extrusion Instabilities in Polymer Melts M.FWULLAS Faculty of Applied Physics Foundationfor Research and Technology-HeUas(Fo. R. T.H.) Znstitute of Electronic Structure and Laser,P.O. Box

  16. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Schneider, Ken C. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  17. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, D.W.; King, E.L.; Schneider, K.C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points. 8 figures.

  18. Shear wave attenuation and dispersion in melt-bearing olivine polycrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interpretation and seismological implications Ulrich H. Faul, John D. Fitz Gerald, and Ian Jackson Research: seismic wave attenuation, olivine, partial melting, grain boundary sliding, grain boundary structure and dispersion in melt-bearing olivine polycrystals: 2. Microstructural interpretation and seismological

  19. CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION BY ZINC CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermeulen, T.

    2012-01-01

    CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE T. Vermeulen, C.CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE T. Vermeulen, C.rather than by thermal pyrolysis which requires appreciably

  20. ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  1. Porous compaction in transient creep regime and implications for melt, petroleum, and CO2 circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Porous compaction in transient creep regime and implications for melt, petroleum, and CO2 in transient creep regime and implications for melt, petroleum, and CO2 circulation, J. Geophys. Res., 113, B

  2. A melting model for variably depleted and enriched lherzolite in the plagioclase and spinel stability fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Till, Christy B.

    Here we develop a lherzolite melting model and explore the effects of variations in mantle composition, pressure, temperature, and H[subscript 2]O content on melt composition. New experiments and a compilation of experimental ...

  3. Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-11-01

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  4. 2 Internal melting in Antarctic sea ice: Development of ``gap layers'' 3 S. F. Ackley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    accelerate melting by 63increasing the absorption of solar radiation within the sea 64ice. Algal blooms only in the Antarctic to date. 48 In contrast, massive surface melt, resulting in the complete 49 loss

  5. Pressure Safety of JLAB 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Gary [JLAB; Wiseman, Mark A. [JLAB; Daly, Ed [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews pressure safety considerations, per the US Department of Energy (DOE) 10CFR851 Final Rule [1], which are being implemented during construction of the 100 Megavolt Cryomodule (C100 CM) for Jefferson Lab’s 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The C100 CM contains several essential subsystems that require pressure safety measures: piping in the supply and return end cans, piping in the thermal shield and the helium headers, the helium vessel assembly which includes high RRR niobium cavities, the end cans, and the vacuum vessel. Due to the vessel sizes and pressure ranges, applicable national consensus code rules are applied. When national consensus codes are not applicable, equivalent design and fabrication approaches are identified and implemented. Considerations for design, material qualification, fabrication, inspection and examination are summarized. In addition, JLAB’s methodologies for implementation of the 10 CFR 851 requirements are described.

  6. GRB 131231A: IMPLICATIONS OF THE GeV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bin; Chen, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Shao, Lang, E-mail: liangyf@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: beizhou@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2014-05-20

    GRB 131231A was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Space Gamma-ray Telescope. The high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) afterglow emission spectrum is F {sub ?}??{sup –0.54} {sup ±} {sup 0.15} in the first ?1300 s after the trigger and the most energetic photon has an energy of ?62 GeV, arriving at t ? 520 s. With reasonable parameters of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow as well as the density of the circum-burst medium, the synchrotron radiation of electrons or protons accelerated at an external forward shock have difficulty accounting for the data. Rather, the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of the forward shock-accelerated electrons can account for both the spectrum and temporal behavior of the GeV afterglow emission. We also show that the prospect for detecting GRB 131231A-like GRBs with the Cherenkov Telescope Array is promising.

  7. Blazar Variability and Evolution in the GeV Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, S; Nishijima, K; Kodani, K

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important problem of the blazar astrophysics is to understand the physical origin of the blazar sequence. In this study, we focus on the GeV gamma-ray variability of blazars and evolution perspective we search the relation between the redshift and the variability amplitude of blazars for each blazar subclass. We analyzed the Fermi-LAT data of the TeV blazars and the bright AGNs (flux $\\geq$ 4$\\times10^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$) selected from the 2LAC (the 2nd LAT AGN catalog) data base. As a result, we found a hint of the correlation between the redshift and the variability amplitude in the FSRQs. Furthermore the BL Lacs which have relatively lower peak frequency of the synchrotron radiation and relatively lower redshift, have a tendency to have a smaller variability amplitude.

  8. UDC 552.161 MELTING OF ACID VOLCANITES IN CONTACT WITH A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    of Sciences, Moscow, and Sakhalin Pedagogic Institute, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk There is evidence of melting of acid

  9. Blast from the Past: Melting Glaciers as a Relevant Source for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    melting in the future (1). Glacial ice may contain significant amounts of chemicals deposited in earlierBlast from the Past: Melting Glaciers as a Relevant Source for Persistent Organic Pollutants C H R, 2009. Accepted August 31, 2009. In this study, the hypothesis that melting Alpine glaciers may

  10. Surface energy balance and melt thresholds over 11 years at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    , Antarctica, melting of glacial ice is the primary source of water to streams, lakes, and associated, 1981; Gooseff et al., 2006]. Consequently, glacial melt is the critically important water source an understanding of glacial melt- water production. [3] Past runoff modeling for the MDV has included both

  11. Freezing, melting, nonwetting, and coexistence in (KCl)32 John P. Rose and FL Stephen Berry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Freezing, melting, nonwetting, and coexistence in (KCl)32 John P. Rose and FL Stephen Berry that of homogeneousclusters. The melting and freezing, nonwetting, and the complexity of the potential surfaceof (KC1)33areCl clustersexhibit simpleisomerizationdynamics, large NaCl clusters exhibit freezing/melting behavior sim- ilar

  12. Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica Keith doubles. With tidal forcing, the spatial pattern and magnitude of basal melting and freezing generally), Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Geophys. Res. Lett

  13. Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen* Edward E. Adams examined sediment melt-migration dynamics in the ice cover of Lake Fryxell, Taylor Valley, McMurdo Dry. The specific objectives were to determine the thermal conditions required for sediment melt and how sediment

  14. A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 to generate meltwater that accumulates in ponds. The melt ponds reduce the albedo of the sea ice cover during), which simulates the formation and evolution of the melt pond cover. In order to be compatible

  15. A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface covered in melt ponds is essential for a realistic estimate of the albedo for global climate models. We

  16. Melting in an Enclosure with Discrete Heating at a Constant Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    - Melting in an Enclosure with Discrete Heating at a Constant Rate Yuwen Zhang Zhongqi Chen Qijie · The melting of n-octadecane that is discretely heated at a constant rate from one side of an enclosure- Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science 1993; 6:196-201 rate heating mode of the melting process

  17. Polymer crystal-melt interfaces and nucleation in polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott T. Milner

    2010-09-22

    Kinetic barriers cause polymers to crystallize incompletely, into nanoscale lamellae interleaved with amorphous regions. As a result, crystalline polymers are full of crystal-melt interfaces, which dominate their physical properties. The longstanding theoretical challenge to understand these interfaces has new relevance, because of accumulating evidence that polymer crystals often nucleate via a metastable, partially ordered "rotator" phase. To test this idea requires a theory of the bulk and interfacial free energies of the critical nucleus. We present a new approach to the crystal-melt interface, which represents the amorphous region as a grafted brush of loops in a self-consistent pressure field. We combine this theory with estimates of bulk free energy differences, to calculate nucleation barriers and rates via rotator versus crystal nuclei for polyethylene. We find rotator-phase nucleation is indeed favored throughout the temperature range where nucleation is observed. Our methods can be extended to other polymers.

  18. Extensional viscosity measurements of polyethylene using a melt flow indexer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffatt, Scott Gordon

    1999-01-01

    . . . . . . . . 142 APPENDIX C: CONSTANT STRESS RHEOMETER TESTING PROCEDURE. . . . . . APPENDIX D: MELT FLOW INDEXER DATA . . . . . 147 APPENDIX E: CAPILLARY RHEOMETER DATA. . . . . . 184 APPENDIX F: OSCILLATORY RHEOMETER DATA . . . . . . . . 213 APPENDIX G...) [Padmanabhan and Macosko (1997)] . . . . . 14 5 Bagley Correction Factor for the Capillary Rheometer. 23 6 Flow Index Determination. . . . . . . 28 7 Definitions of Lengths Used in the Darby Method. 8 Carreau-Yasuda Fit of Complex Viscosity Data for Resin E...

  19. Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using gas jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellerman, Peter L; Thronson, Gregory D; Sun, Dawei

    2014-04-01

    In one embodiment, a sheet production apparatus comprises a vessel configured to hold a melt of a material. A cooling plate is disposed proximate the melt and is configured to form a sheet of the material on the melt. A first gas jet is configured to direct a gas toward an edge of the vessel. A sheet of a material is translated horizontally on a surface of the melt and the sheet is removed from the melt. The first gas jet may be directed at the meniscus and may stabilize this meniscus or increase local pressure within the meniscus.

  20. Melt-spin processing of high {Tc} oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folkerts, T.J.; Wu, Hengning; Yoo, S.I.; Merkle, B.D.; Arrasmith, S.R.; Dennis, K.W.; Kramer, M.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1993-10-01

    Containerless techniques offer distinct advantages for the melt processing of oxide superconductors. The majority of these materials form liquids which are highly reactive with standard crucible materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt, resulting in non-negligible contamination. We have developed a containerless melt-spin processing technique where in 50--400 {mu}m particles of REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} high temperature oxide superconductors are melted in free fall through a vertical tube furnace and quenched onto a copper wheel. Previously this method has been successful in producing glasses of NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}. In this report we discuss the results for both stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (Y123). Thermal, microstructural, and superconducting characterization of both the as-quenched and the annealed materials will be presented.

  1. Many-body interactions and melting of colloidal crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dobnikar; Y. Chen; R. Rzehak; H. H. von Grünberg

    2008-01-25

    We study the melting behavior of charged colloidal crystals, using a simulation technique that combines a continuous mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann description for the microscopic electrolyte ions with a Brownian-dynamics simulation for the mesoscopic colloids. This technique ensures that many-body interactions between the colloids are fully taken into account, and thus allows us to investigate how many-body interactions affect the solid-liquid phase behavior of charged colloids. Using the Lindemann criterion, we determine the melting line in a phase-diagram spanned by the colloidal charge and the salt concentration. We compare our results to predictions based on the established description of colloidal suspensions in terms of pairwise additive Yukawa potentials, and find good agreement at high-salt, but not at low-salt concentration. Analyzing the effective pair-interaction between two colloids in a crystalline environment, we demonstrate that the difference in the melting behavior observed at low salt is due to many-body interactions.

  2. The compatibility of LHC Run 1 data with a heavy scalar of mass around 270\\,GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan von Buddenbrock; Nabarun Chakrabarty; Alan S. Cornell; Deepak Kar; Mukesh Kumar; Tanumoy Mandal; Bruce Mellado; Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; Robert G. Reed

    2015-11-15

    The first run of the LHC was successful in that it saw the discovery of the elusive Higgs boson, a particle that is consistent with the SM hypothesis. There are a number of excesses in Run 1 ATLAS and CMS results which can be interpreted as being due to the existence of another heavier scalar particle. This particle has decay modes which we have studied using LHC Run 1 data. Using a minimalistic model, we can predict the kinematics of these final states and compare the prediction against data directly. A statistical combination of these results shows that a best fit point is found for a heavy scalar having a mass of 272$^{+12}_{-9}$\\,GeV. This result has been quantified as a three sigma effect, based on analyses which are not necessarily optimized for the search of a heavy scalar. The smoking guns for the discovery of this new heavy scalar and the prospects for Run 2 are discussed.

  3. Effects of volatiles on melt production and reactive flow in the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Magmatism in the Earth interior has a significant impact on its dynamic, thermal and compositional evolution. Experimental studies of petrology of mantle melting find that small concentrations of water and carbon dioxide have a significant effect on the solidus temperature and distribution of melting in the upper mantle. However, it has remained unclear what effect small fractions of deep, volatile-rich melts have on melting and melt transport in the shallow asthenosphere. We present a method to simulate the thermochemical evolution of the upper mantle in the presence of volatiles. The method is based on a novel, thermodynamically consistent framework for reactive, disequilibrium, multi-component melting/crystallisation. This is coupled with a system of equations representing conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for a partially molten grain aggregate. Application of this method to upwelling-column models demonstrates that it captures leading-order features of hydrated and carbonated peridotite melting. ...

  4. Adjudication Concerning the Erection of Three Temporary Sectional Buildings for the Staff of the 300 GeV Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1971-01-01

    Adjudication Concerning the Erection of Three Temporary Sectional Buildings for the Staff of the 300 GeV Programme

  5. Adjudication of the Building Construction Work for the Laboratories and Offices of the 300 GeV Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1971-01-01

    Adjudication of the Building Construction Work for the Laboratories and Offices of the 300 GeV Programme

  6. Adjudication Concerning the Civil Engineering Work for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1972-01-01

    Adjudication Concerning the Civil Engineering Work for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  7. Production of isotopes in 1.A GeV $^{208}Pb$ on proton reactions relevant for accelerator-driven systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlazlo, W; Armbruster, P; Benlliure, J; Bernas, M; Boudard, A; Czajkowski, S; Farget, F; Legrain, R; Leray, S; Mustapha, B; Pravikoff, M S; Schmidt, K H; Stéphan, C; Taieb, J; Tassan-Got, L; Volant, C

    1999-01-01

    Production of isotopes in 1.A GeV $^{208}Pb$ on proton reactions relevant for accelerator-driven systems

  8. Energy policies avoiding a tipping point in the climate system Olivier Bahn a,, Neil R. Edwards b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    emission reduction from today's level, with transition to nuclear and/or renewable energy, possiblyEnergy policies avoiding a tipping point in the climate system Olivier Bahn a,Ã, Neil R. Edwards b rainforest, loss of Arctic summer sea ice, melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet, and a collapse

  9. Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

    1998-10-27

    Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

  10. Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

  11. ARM - Point Reyes News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMergedProductsVaisala CL51CaliforniaPoint

  12. Gamma-Ray Bursts Above 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew G. Baring

    1997-11-21

    One of the principal results obtained by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory relating to the study of gamma-ray bursts was the detection by the EGRET instrument of energetic ($>$100 MeV) photons from a handful of bright bursts. The most extreme of these was the single 18 GeV photon from the GRB940217 source. Given EGRET's sensitivity and limited field of view, the detection rate implies that such high energy emission may be ubiquitous in bursts. Hence expectations that bursts emit out to at least TeV energies are quite realistic, and the associated target-of-opportunity activity of the TeV gamma-ray community is well-founded. This review summarizes the observations and a handful of theoretical models for generating GeV--TeV emission in bursts sources, outlining possible ways that future positive detections could discriminate between different scenarios. The power of observations in the GeV--TeV range to distinguish between spectral structure intrinsic to bursts and that due to the intervening medium between source and observer is also discussed.

  13. Pion-proton correlations and asymmetry measurement in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ $GeV$ data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Zawisza; for the STAR Collaboration

    2010-12-30

    Correlations between non-identical particles at small relative velocity probe asymmetries in the average space-time emission points at freeze-out. The origin of such asymmetries may be from long-lived resonances, bulk collective effects, or differences in the freeze-out scenario for the different particle species. STAR has extracted pion-proton correlation functions from a dataset of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ $GeV$. We present correlation functions in the spherical harmonic decomposition representation, for different centralities and for different combinations of pions and (anti-)protons.

  14. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons at forward pseudorapidity in Au plus Au collisons at root s(NN)=62.4 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Blyth, SL; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, JH; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, HA; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cosentino, MR; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, KSF; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gorbunov, YG; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horner, MJ; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kim, BC; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, CH; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, MJ; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timmins, AR; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, IK; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zhong, C.

    2006-01-01

    gains for normalization and by studying the azimuthal dependence of the photon density of the detector in an ? window to be 13.5% for central and 15% for peripheral collisions. The total systematic error inN? is?17% for both central and peripheral... centrality classes inAu+Aucollisions at?sNN = 62.4GeV. Solid line is a straight line fit to the data points. have a characteristic shape with a steep rise that corresponds to the most peripheral events. The plateaus in the photon and charged particle...

  15. Production of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei in reactions induced by 136Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV on a beryllium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Benlliure; M. Fernandez-Ordonez; L. Audouin; A. Boudard; E. Casarejos; J. E. Ducret; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; D. Henzlova; V. Henzl; A. Kelic; S. Leray; P. Napolitani; J. Pereira; F. Rejmund; M. V. Ricciardi; K. -H. Schmidt; C. Schmitt; C. Stephan; L. Tassan-Got; C. Volant; C. Villagrasa; O. Yordanov

    2008-07-17

    Production cross sections of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei obtained in the fragmentation of 136Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) at GSI. 125Pd was identified for the first time. The measured cross sections are compared to 238U fission yields and model calculations in order to determine the optimum reaction mechanism to extend the limits of the chart of the nuclides around the r-process waiting point at N=82.

  16. Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system 136Xe + hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Napolitani; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Tassan-Got; P. Armbruster; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; V. Henzl; D. Henzlova; A. Kelic; R. Pleskac; M. V. Ricciardi; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov; L. Audouin; M. Bernas; A. Lafriaskh; F. Rejmund; C. Stephan; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; M. Fernandez Ordonez; J. Pereira; A. Boudard; B. Fernandez; S. Leray; C. Villagrasa; C. Volant

    2007-06-05

    We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of 136Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the FRagment Separator (GSI, Darmstadt). Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, 136Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modelling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterised by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

  17. Energy (GeV) dN/dE(ergcm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    Energy (GeV) -1 10 1 10 2 10 )-1 s-2 dN/dE(ergcm2 E -12 10 -11 10 -10 10 PSR J0007+7303 Full Band Fit (PLEC1) Energy Band Fits #12;Energy (GeV) -1 10 1 10 2 10 )-1 s-2 dN/dE(ergcm2 E -12 10 PSR J0023+0923 Full Band Fit (PLEC1) Energy Band Fits #12;Energy (GeV) -1 10 1 10 2 10 )-1 s-2 dN/dE(ergcm2 E -12 10

  18. *Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates in the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    of glacial melting. Models of mantle decompression following ice sheet removal predict the greatest melt], we model melt migration in the mantle during and after ice sheet removal (glacial unloading*Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates

  19. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system I. Sudakova,, S. A. Vakulenkob,c, K. M. Goldena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system I. Sudakova,, S. A. Vakulenkob,c, K. M Abstract Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a bifurcation analysis

  20. Photoproduction of eta mesons off protons for photon energies from 0.75 GeV to 3 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker Crede; Olivia Bartholomy; for the CB-ELSA Collaboration

    2004-10-20

    Total and differential cross sections for the reaction p(gamma, eta)p have been measured for photon energies in the range from 750 MeV to 3 GeV. The low-energy data are dominated by the S11 wave which has two poles in the energy region below 2 GeV. Eleven nucleon resonances are observed in their decay into p eta. At medium energies we find evidence for a new resonance N(2070)D15 with (mass, width) = (2068+-22, 295+-40) MeV. At photon energies above 1.5 GeV, a strong peak in forward direction develops, signalling the exchange of vector mesons in the t channel.

  1. Adjusting the melting point of a model system via Gibbs-Duhem integration: Application to a model of aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturgeon, Jess B.; Laird, Brian Bostian

    2000-12-01

    Model interaction potentials for real materials are generally optimized with respect to only those experimental properties that are easily evaluated as mechanical averages [e.g., elastic constants (atT=0K), static lattice ...

  2. Simultaneous feature selection and parameter optimisation using an artificial ant colony: case study of melting point prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Boyle, Noel M; Palmer, David S; Nigsch, Florian; Mitchell, John B O

    2008-10-29

    ,vdw_area,vdw_vol,logP(o/w),AM1_dipole,AM1_E,AM1_Eele,AM1_HF,AM1_HOMO,AM1_IP,AM1_LUMO,E,E_ang,E_ele,E_nb,E_oop,E_sol,E_stb,E_str,E_strain,E_tor,E_vdw,MNDO_dipole,MNDO_E,MNDO_Eele,MNDO_HF,MNDO_HOMO,MNDO_IP,MNDO_LUMO,dipole,pmi,rgyr,PM3_dipole,PM3_E,PM3_Eele,PM3_HF,PM3_HOMO,PM3_IP,PM... .184631,0,0,0,0,0,4.4170794,147.05885,0,0,0,0,0,1,0.74743664,0,0,0.25256336,0,202.66055,151.47592,0,0,51.184631,0,0.74400002,-0.74599999,0.74400002,-0.74599999,0.083333336,0.083109923,1,0.74743664,0,0,0.25256336,0,202.66055,151.47592,0,0,51.184631,0,0...

  3. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  4. Method to decrease loss of aluminum and magnesium melts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Calaway, Jr., Wallis F. (Woodridge, IL); Moore, Jerry F. (Naperville, IL); Krumdick, Gregory K. (Crete, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method to minimize oxidation of metal during melting processes is provided, the method comprising placing solid phase metal into a furnace environ-ment, transforming the solid-phase metal into molten metal phase having a molten metal surface, and creating a barrier between the surface and the environment. Also provided is a method for isolating the surface of molten metal from its environment, the method comprising confining the molten metal to a controlled atmos-phere, and imposing a floating substrate between the surface and the atmosphere.

  5. An Extendible Reconfigurable Robot Based on Hot Melt Adhesives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    liquid HMA from the nozzle of the HMA-supplier. The thermo-connector is covered by a flat copper connection surface (25mm× 30mm) that is heated and cooled to form or break bonds with the HMA in contact with the connection surface. A Peltier element (Cente... the experimental setup and robot platform, this section explains the experimental results on the me- chanical bounds of self-reconfiguration with our robotic (a) melting cavity HMA stick nozzle servo motor (b) connection surface peltier element power resisitor (c...

  6. Core melt/coolant interactions: modelling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; McGlaun, J.M.; Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If there is not adequate cooling water in the core of a light-water reactor (LWR), the fission product decay heat would eventually cause the reactor fuel and cladding to melt. This could lead to slumping of the molten core materials into the lower plenum of the reactor vessel, possibly followed by failure of the vessel wall and pouring of the molten materials into the reactor cavity. When the molten core materials enter either region, there is a strong possibility of molten core contacting water. This paper focuses on analysis of recent FITS experiments, mechanistic and probabilistic model development, and the application of these models to reactor considerations.

  7. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Mary Ann (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Bingert, Sherri A. (Jemez Springs, NM); Thoma, Dan J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process.

  8. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, M.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Bingert, S.A.; Thoma, D.J.

    1998-09-08

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process. 5 figs.

  9. ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow,ProductstoacessProductsrlprofrlprofmerge1turnPlainsVisitingWhat About Melting

  10. Sandia Energy - Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSampleLignin-Feasting MicrobeMesaAnalysisSuccessMelted

  11. Project planning workshop 6-GeV synchrotron light source: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A series of work sheets, graphs, and printouts are given which detail the work breakdown structure, cost, and manpower requirements for the 6 GeV Synchrotron Light Source. (LEW)

  12. Jefferson Lab to Mark the End of CEBAF 6 GeV Operations on May...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 CEBAFAerial.jpg Jefferson Lab will officially end 6 GeV operations of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility during a short ceremony planned for May 18 in the...

  13. GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wake?the generation of GeV-class electron beams using an intenseranges and high-quality electron beams with energy up to 1

  14. GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale laser-driven plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wake?the generation of GeV-class electron beams using an intenseranges and high-quality electron beams with energy up to 1

  15. The Capabilities of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer as GeV Gamma-rays Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Battiston

    1999-11-13

    The modeled performance of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) as a high-energy (0.3 to 100 GeV) gamma-ray detector is described, and its gamma-ray astrophysics objectives are discussed.

  16. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2008-01-01

    The main e-beam diagnostic, namely the GeV class electronof a diagnostic for the e-beam, namely an electronby the laser pulse diagnostics. Electron Beam Generation As

  17. Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanigaki, Nobuhiro; Manako, Kazutaka; Osada, Morihiro

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

  18. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator W. P. LEEMANS1 * , B. NAGLER1 , A. J-quality electron beam with 1 GeV energy by channelling a 40 TW peak-power laser pulse in a 3.3-cm-long gas-100 GV m-1 in laser-wakefield accelerators1,2 , until recently the electron beams (e-beams) from

  19. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator W. P. LEEMANS1 * , B. NAGLER1 , A. J be needed to reach GeV energies6,7 , here we demonstrate production of a high-quality electron beam with 1 in laser-wakefield accelerators1,2 , until recently the electron beams (e-beams) from such accelerators had

  20. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  1. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes ofmore »materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP m is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.« less

  2. Electrical charging during the sharkskin instability of a metallocene melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tonon; A. Lavernhe-Gerbier; F. Flores; A. Allal; C. Guerret-Piécourt

    2007-07-18

    Flow instabilities are widely studied because of their economical and theoretical interest, however few results have been published about the polymer electrification during the extrusion. Nevertheless the generation of the electrical charges is characteristic of the interaction between the polymer melt and the die walls. In our study, the capillary extrusion of a metallocene polyethylene (mPE) through a tungsten carbide die is characterized through accurate electrical measurements thanks a Faraday pail. No significant charges are observed since the extrudate surface remains smooth. However, as soon as the sharkskin distortion appears, measurable charges are collected (around 5 10-8 C/m2). Higher level of charges are measured during the spurt or the gross-melt fracture (g.m.f) defects. This work is focused on the electrical charging during the sharkskin instability. The variation of the electrical charges versus the apparent wall shear stress is investigated for different die geometries. This curve exhibits a linear increase, followed by a sudden growth just before the onset of the spurt instability. This abrupt charging corresponds also to the end of the sharkskin instability. It is also well-known that wall slip appears just at the same time, with smaller velocity values than during spurt flow. Our results indicate that electrification could be a signature of the wall slip. We show also that the electrification curves can be shifted according to the time-temperature superposition principle, leading to the conclusion that molecular features of the polymer are also involved in this process.

  3. Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, P. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make Cu–Al–Ni shape-memory wires and Ni–Nb–Sn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

  4. Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using elasticity and buoyancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellerman, Peter L.; Sun, Dawei; Helenbrook, Brian; Harvey, David S.

    2014-07-01

    Embodiments related to sheet production are disclosed. A melt of a material is cooled to form a sheet of the material on the melt. The sheet is formed in a first region at a first sheet height. The sheet is translated to a second region such that it has a second sheet height higher than the first sheet height. The sheet is then separated from the melt. A seed wafer may be used to form the sheet.

  5. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime ?^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Kijun [ODU, JLAB; et. al.,; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gar??on, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Joo, H.S.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati??, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.

  6. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  7. K[superscript *0] production in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    We report on K[superscript *0] production at midrapidity in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=62.4 and 200 GeV collected by the Solenoid Tracker at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider detector. The ...

  8. Energy dependence of K?, p? and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from ?sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical K?, p?, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies ?sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable ?dyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore »the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the K?, p?, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  9. Energy dependence of transverse momentum fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20A to 158A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anticic, T.; Kadija, K.; Nicolic, V.; Susa, T.; Baatar, B.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Malakhov, A. I.; Melkumov, G. L.; Barna, D.; Csato, P.; Fodor, Z.; Gal, J.; Hegyi, S.; Laszlo, A.; Levai, P.; Molnar, J.; Palla, G.; Sikler, F.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.

    2009-04-15

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momenta p{sub T} in central Pb+Pb interactions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. The analysis was performed for charged particles at forward center-of-mass rapidity (1.1point, and with the UrQMD model. Transverse momentum fluctuations, similar to multiplicity fluctuations, do not show the increase expected for freeze-out near the critical point of QCD.

  10. Energy dependence of transverse momentum fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20A to 158A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA49 Collaboration; Anticic, T.

    2009-04-15

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momenta p{sub T} in central Pb+Pb interactions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. The analysis was performed for charged particles at forward center-of-mass rapidity (1.1 < y*{sub {pi}} < 2.6). Three fluctuation measures were studied: the distribution of average transverse momentum M(p{sub T}) in the event, the {phi}{sub p{sub T}} fluctuation measure, and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. Fluctuations of p{sub T} are small and show no significant energy dependence in the energy range of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Results are compared with QCD-inspired predictions for the critical point, and with the UrQMD model. Transverse momentum fluctuations, similar to multiplicity fluctuations, do not show the increase expected for freeze-out near the critical point of QCD.

  11. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, S; Casanova, Sabrina; Dingus, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  12. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabrina Casanova; Brenda L. Dingus

    2006-09-12

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  13. Stress-structure relation in dense colloidal melt under forward and instantaneous reversal of shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Kumar Bhattacharjee

    2015-06-16

    Dense supercooled colloidal melt in forward shear from a quiescent state shows overshoot in shear stress at 10% strain with an unchanged fluid structure at equal stress before and after overshoot. In addition, we find overshoot in normal stress with a monotonic increase in osmotic pressure at an identical strain. The first and second normal stress become comparable in magnitude and opposite in sign. Functional dependence of the steady state stress and osmotic pressure with Peclet number demonstrate signature of crossover between Newtonian and nearly- Newtonian regime. Moreover, instantaneous shear reversal from steady state exhibit Bauschinger effect, where strong history dependence is observed depending on the time of flow reversal. The distribution of particulate stress and osmotic pressure at the point of flow reversal is shown to be a signature of the subsequent response. We link the history dependence of the stress-strain curves to changes in the fluid structure measured through the angular components of the radial distribution function. A uniform compression in transition from forward to reversed flowing state is found.

  14. $1/f$ noise on the brink of wet granular melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang

    2015-07-23

    The collective behavior of a two-dimensional wet granular cluster under horizontal swirling motions is investigated experimentally. Depending on the balance between the energy injection and dissipation, the cluster evolves into various nonequilibrium stationary states with strong internal structure fluctuations with time. Quantitative characterizations of the fluctuations with the bond orientational order parameter $q_{\\rm 6}$ reveal power spectra of the form $f^{\\alpha}$ with the exponent $\\alpha$ closely related to the stationary states of the system. In particular, $1/f$ type of noise with $\\alpha\\approx-1$ emerges as melting starts from the free surface of the cluster, suggesting the possibility of using $1/f$ noise as an indicator for phase transitions in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  15. Eutectic precipitation of melt quenched titanium-silicon-neodymium alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.P.; Liu, Y.Y.; Li, D.; Hu, Z.Q. . Inst. of Metal Research)

    1995-01-15

    Titanium based metallic glasses have attracted keen interest because of the promise of industrial applications owing to their improves corrosion resistance, better mechanical properties, occurrence of superconductivity and superior magnetic properties. The titanium alloy systems where metallic glass has been obtained include Ti-Cu, Ti-Be, Ti-Si, Ti-B. Polk et al. had reported that they were able to produce an amorphous phase in binary Ti[sub 80]Si[sub 20] alloy system by using an arc-melting piston and anvil apparatus. In the present study, the authors have investigated the effect of adding rare earth element Nd on eutective precipitation of the amorphous Ti[sub 80]Si[sub 20] alloy and the orientation relationship which exists between the [beta]-Ti and Ti[sub 5]Si[sub 3].

  16. Electrochemical reactions in a pure Na2SO4 melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, W.C.; Rapp, R.A.

    1983-12-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry were used to study the electrochemical reduction reactions of SO3 gas O2 and SO4S ions in a Na2SO4 melt at 900C. The reduction reaction of SO3 follows a ce mechanism: SO3 first reacts chemically with SO4S to form S2O7S and then proceeds via a one-electron electrochemical reduction reaction to form SO3 . The reduction of peroxide O2 ions forms either OS or both OS and superoxide O2S ions. Sulfate ions are subjected to decomposition at either very positive or very negative potentials. At very high positive potentials, sulfate ions decompose to evolve SO2 and O2 gases, in addition superoxide ions are also formed. At very negative potentials, sulfate ions decompose to form sulfide and peroxide. 24 references, 11 figures, 2 tables.

  17. On the theory of proton solid echo in polymer melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatkullin, N; Mattea, C; Stapf, S

    2015-01-01

    Based on a modified Anderson-Weiss approximation (N. Fatkullin, A. Gubaidullin, C. Mattea, S.Stapf, J. Chem. Phys. 137 (2012), 224907) an improved theory of proton spin solid echo in polymer melts is formulated, taking into account contribution from intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The solid echo build-up function defined by the relation , where , and are the respective signals arising from ( ),( ) and ( ) spin echo experiments, where is an operator rotating the spin system on the angle relatively axis , is investigated. It is shown that the intermolecular part of this function at short times , where is a characteristic time for flip-flop transitions between proton spins, contains information about the relative mean squared displacements of polymer segments at different macromolecules, opening up a new opportunity for obtaining information about polymer dynamics in the millisecond regime.

  18. IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: 4ME20 Abstract--Artificial welding of melt-textured YBCO blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amoros, Jaume

    1 IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: 4ME20 Abstract--Artificial welding of melt-textured YBCO blocks opens the superconducting quality of the welds, we have developed a Hall probe mapping system, able to record the local to characterize welded samples prepared with a new Ag induced surface melting joining technique. The magnetization

  19. Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon U. H. Faul,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon F. Nimmo,1 U. H. Faul,2 and E. J. Successful models can reproduce the dissipation factor (Q) measured at both tidal and seismic frequencies, and the tidal Love numbers h2 and k2, without requiring any mantle melting. However, the frequency

  20. DSC Evidence for Microstructure and Phase Transitions in Polyethylene Melts at High Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    DSC Evidence for Microstructure and Phase Transitions in Polyethylene Melts at High Temperatures polyethylenes of types HDPE, LDPE, and LLDPE. DSC data were obtained for a range of heating and cooling rates previous rheology findings of order and high-temperature transitions in polyethylene melts. Introduction

  1. Melting and crystallization in Ni nanoclusters: The mesoscale regime Yue Qi and Tahir C agin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Melting and crystallization in Ni nanoclusters: The mesoscale regime Yue Qi and Tahir C¸ agin to a mesoscale nanocrystal regime well-defined bulk and surface properties above 750 atoms 2.7 nm . We find that the mesoscale nanocrystals melt via surface processes, leading to Tm,N Tm,bulk N 1/3 , dropping from Tm

  2. Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean K. Aagaard. The high-latitude freezing and melting cycle can variously result in haline con- vection, freshwater of this process is that water distilled at the surface of the Arctic Ocean by freezing ends up at mid

  3. Detection of melting by X-ray imaging at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J.

    2014-06-15

    The occurrence of partial melting at elevated pressure and temperature is documented in real time through measurement of volume strain induced by a fixed temperature change. Here we present the methodology for measuring volume strains to one part in 10{sup ?4} for mm{sup 3} sized samples in situ as a function of time during a step in temperature. By calibrating the system for sample thermal expansion at temperatures lower than the solidus, the onset of melting can be detected when the melting volume increase is of comparable size to the thermal expansion induced volume change. We illustrate this technique with a peridotite sample at 1.5 GPa during partial melting. The Re capsule is imaged with a CCD camera at 20 frames/s. Temperature steps of 100 K induce volume strains that triple with melting. The analysis relies on image comparison for strain determination and the thermal inertia of the sample is clearly seen in the time history of the volume strain. Coupled with a thermodynamic model of the melting, we infer that we identify melting with 2 vol.% melting.

  4. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Space Center, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads Building 348, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3) supraglacial extent and timing with passive microwave, thermal and scatterometer satellite data and show melt

  5. Low-melting elemental metal or fusible alloy encapsulated polymerization initiator for delayed initiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    An encapsulated composition for polymerization includes an initiator composition for initiating a polymerization reaction, and a capsule prepared from an elemental metal or fusible alloy having a melting temperature from about 20.degree. C. to about 200.degree. C. A fluid for polymerization includes the encapsulated composition and a monomer. When the capsule melts or breaks open, the initiator is released.

  6. The Effect of Thermoplastics Melt Flow Behaviour on the Dynamics of Fire Growth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherratt, Jo

    of large-scale storage in warehouses, there is an uncertainty posed by large quantities of thermoplastic. Some forms of thermoplastic exhibit melt-flow behaviour when heated, and a large vertical array exposed to a fire may melt and ignite forming a pool...

  7. Investigation of residual stresses induced during the selective laser melting process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    jean-claude.boyer@insa-lyon.fr Keywords: Selective laser melting, layer additional method, Residual stresses. Abstract. The selective laser melting process (SLM), belonging to the family of additive manufacturing processes, can create complex geometry parts from a CAD file. Previously, only prototypes were

  8. Comparisons of numerical modelling of the Selective Laser Melting Laurent VAN BELLE1, 2, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and arc additive layer manufacturing (WAALM), laser metal deposition (LMD), selective laser melting (SLM laser melting (SLM) first developed for rapid prototyping (RP) is now used for rapid manufacturing is based upon a double meshing with a multi step birth and death technique of manufactured part

  9. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  10. ccsd-00001059(version1):26Jan2004 Continuous melting of compact polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ccsd-00001059(version1):26Jan2004 Continuous melting of compact polymers Jesper Lykke Jacobsen and bending rigidity in compact polymers can be ad- dressed within a lattice model introduced by P.J. Flory for polymers on surfaces, such as DNA adsorbed on a lipid bilayer. We predict a continuous melting transition

  11. Mullite Decomposition Kinetics and Melt Stabilization in the Temperature Range 19002000C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Brian S.

    of mullite is as fiber reinforce- ment in high-temperature ceramic-matrix composites. Inviscid melt spinning2 composition was thus obtained, setting the groundwork for inviscid melt spin- ning mullite fiber making of the component phases of traditional ceramics and refractory materials, it is also a strong candidate material

  12. Generation of CO2-rich melts during basalt magma ascent and degassing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to solubilities. In contrast, the rate of vesiculation controls the final melt CO2 concentration. HighGeneration of CO2-rich melts during basalt magma ascent and degassing Michel Pichavant . Ida Di magma degassing, continuous decompressions of volatile-bearing (2.7-3.8 wt% H2O, 600-1300 ppm CO2

  13. Partially melted, mica-bearing crust in Central Tibet B. R. Hacker1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Partially melted, mica-bearing crust in Central Tibet B. R. Hacker1 , M. H. Ritzwoller2 , and J in the west than the east. The depth of the Curie temperature for magnetite inferred from satellite magnetic to deep crust consists of a mica-bearing residue from which melt has been extracted or is being extracted

  14. New mapping of kilometric anisotropies over the granulitic continental crust of Madagascar: melt -fluid migration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the melt therefore Th spectrometric signal marks melt migration in the shear zone. The magnetic field is cause by magnetic mineral in the rocks. Low and high magnetic anomalies measured in nanotesla are associated with graphite mineralisations and disappearance of iron bearing minerals, high anomalies

  15. The anisotropic free energy of the Lennard-Jones crystal-melt interface James R. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    The anisotropic free energy of the Lennard-Jones crystal-melt interface James R. Morris Metal; accepted 22 May 2003 We have calculated the free energy of the crystal-melt interface for the Lennard are in good agreement with previous calculations of the free energies, based upon simulations used

  16. The matching of 3D Rolie-Poly viscoelastic numerical simulations with experimental polymer melt flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimack, Peter

    Kingdom J. Embery and D. Auhl IRC in Polymer Science and Technology, Department of Physics and AstronomyThe matching of 3D Rolie-Poly viscoelastic numerical simulations with experimental polymer melt of commercial viscoelastic polymer melts. Numerical simulation techniques have steadily advanced over the last

  17. An FTIR Study of Hydrogen in Anorthosite and Associated Melt Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman,S.; Dyar, M.; Marinkovic, N.; Dunbar, N.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to document the presence of hydrogen, to estimate its concentration, and to document its oxygen speciation in anorthoclase crystals and associated melt inclusions from Mount Erebus, Antarctica. Synchrotron-generated infrared radiation, 100 to 1000 times brighter than globar-generated infrared radiation, permits rapid collection of maps that depict relative intensities of a chosen FTIR band across the mapped area. Spectra and/or compositional maps showing variations in water concentration were collected from anorthoclase megacrysts and melt inclusions in the megacrysts. Studies of anorthoclase megacrysts involved collection of spectra from three mutually perpendicular sections cut from the crystals. FTIR spectra of anorthoclase crystals are characterized by a broad absorption band at approximately 3200 cm{sup -1} in the mid-IR range. The universal mass absorption coefficient for mid-IR range feldspar spectra, established by Johnson and Rossman (2003), was used for quantitative estimates of water concentrations in the feldspar crystals based on integrated area under the 3200 cm{sup -1} band. Water concentration in the anorthoclase sample was approximately 126 ppm, with an overall error of approximately {+-}30%. FTIR spectra of melt inclusions are characterized by a broad asymmetric absorption band at {approx}3550 cm{sup -1} that was used to calculate total water concentration. The absence of a band at 1630 cm{sup -1} suggests that water in the melt inclusions occurs as OH{sup -} rather than as molecular H{sub 2}O. Absorption coefficients established by Mandeville et al. (2002) for H species in glass were used to calculate water concentrations in the melt inclusions. Melt inclusions in the Mt. Erebus anorthoclase have water concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 0.39 wt%, with an overall error of approximately {+-}15%. The ratio of water in anorthoclase crystals to water in the melt from which the crystals formed, based on this study, and at these low melt water concentrations, is approximately 1:10. However, water concentration varies significantly from one melt inclusion to another, possibly suggesting initial melt water heterogeneity. Maps of water concentration show that variations in water concentration within melt inclusions are associated with fractures that cut the melt inclusions and in some cases do not extend out into surrounding crystals or into crystal inclusions. Thin ({approx}50 {micro}m thick) zones of elevated water concentrations on the boundaries of the crystals in contact with melt inclusions suggest that water has diffused into the crystals from the melt inclusions.

  18. Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  19. MEASUREMENT OF THE SHOCK-HEATED MELT CURVE OF LEAD USING PYROMETRY AND REFLECTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Partouche-Sebban and J. L. Pelissier, Commissariat a` l'Energie Atomique,; F. G. Abeyta, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. W. Anderson, Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. E. Byers, Los Alamos National Laboratory; D. Dennis-Koller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. S. Esparza, Los Alamos National Laboratory; S. D. Borror, Bechtel Nevada; C. A. Kruschwitz, Bechtel Nevada

    2004-01-01

    Data on the high-pressure melting temperatures of metals is of great interest in several fields of physics including geophysics. Measuring melt curves is difficult but can be performed in static experiments (with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells for instance) or dynamically (i.e., using shock experiments). However, at the present time, both experimental and theoretical results for the melt curve of lead are at too much variance to be considered definitive. As a result, we decided to perform a series of shock experiments designed to provide a measurement of the melt curve of lead up to about 50 GPa in pressure. At the same time, we developed and fielded a new reflectivity diagnostic, using it to make measurements on tin. The results show that the melt curve of lead is somewhat higher than the one previously obtained with static compression and heating techniques.

  20. Particle Production of Mercury Target with 15Tto2T5m Configuration at 6.75 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Particle Production of Mercury Target with 15Tto2T5m Configuration at 6.75 GeV X. Ding, UCLA beam with waist at z= 0 m and emittance of 5 m; · Production Collection: (50 m downstream, 40 MeV : 0.0145 GeV); EPSTAM: The star production threshold kinetic energy (Default: 0.03 GeV); EMCHR

  1. FERMI-LAT DETECTION OF PULSED GAMMA-RAYS ABOVE 50 GeV FROM THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Gene C. K.; Takata, J.; Ng, C. W.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y., E-mail: gene930@connect.hku.hk, E-mail: takata@hku.hk [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-20

    The first Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog of sources above 10 GeV reported evidence of pulsed emission above 25 GeV from 12 pulsars, including the Vela pulsar, which showed evidence of pulsation at >37 GeV energy bands. Using 62 months of Fermi-LAT data, we analyzed the gamma-ray emission from the Vela pulsar and searched for pulsed emission above 50 GeV. Having confirmed the significance of the pulsation in 30-50 GeV with the H test (p-value ?10{sup –77}), we extracted its pulse profile using the Bayesian block algorithm and compared it with the distribution of the five observed photons above 50 GeV using the likelihood ratio test. Pulsation was significantly detected for photons above 50 GeV with a p-value of =3 × 10{sup –5} (4.2?). The detection of pulsation is significant above 4? at >79 GeV and above 3? at >90 GeV energy bands, making this the highest energy pulsation significantly detected by the LAT. We explore the non-stationary outer gap scenario of the very high-energy emissions from the Vela pulsar.

  2. First results on Cosmic Ray electron spectrum below 20 GeV from the Fermi LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Designed to be a successor of the previous flown space based gamma ray detectors, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is also an electron detector. Taking advantage of its capability to separate electromagnetic and hadronic signals it is possible to accurately measure the Cosmic Ray electron spectrum. The spectra of primary cosmic ray electrons below 20 GeV is influenced by many local effects such as solar modulation and the geomagnetic cutoff. For energies below a few GeV it is possible to observe the albedo population of electrons which are controlled by the local magnetic field. In this paper we present the LAT electron analysis in particular event selection and validation as well as the first results on the measurement of the electron spectrum below 20 GeV.

  3. 5-10 GeV Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Burst Fireballs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Peter Meszaros

    2000-06-23

    A gamma-ray burst fireball is likely to contain an admixture of neutrons, in addition to protons, in essentially all progenitor scenarios. Inelastic collisions between differentially streaming protons and neutrons in the fireball produce muon neutrinos (antineutrinos) of ~ 10 GeV as well as electron neutrinos (antineutrinos) of ~ 5 GeV, which could produce ~ 7 events/year in kilometer cube detectors, if the neutron abundance is comparable to that of protons. Photons of ~ 10 GeV from pi-zero decay and ~ 100 MeV electron antineutrinos from neutron decay are also produced, but will be difficult to detect. Photons with energies < 1 MeV from shocks following neutron decay produce a characteristic signal which may be distinguishable from the proton-related MeV photons.

  4. The JLAB 3D program at 12 GeV (TMDs + GPDs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pisano, Silvia [Lab. Naz. Frascati, Frascati, Italy

    2015-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab CEBAF accelerator is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the beam energy up to 12 GeV. The three experimental Halls operating in the 6-GeV era are upgrading their detectors to adapt their performances to the new available kinematics, and a new Hall (D) is being built. The investigation of the three-dimensional nucleon structure both in the coordinate and in the momentum space represents an essential part of the 12-GeV physics program, and several proposals aiming at the extraction of related observables have been already approved in Hall A, B and C. In this proceedings, the focus of the JLab 3D program will be described, and a selection of proposals will be discussed.

  5. Higgs portal, fermionic dark matter, and a Standard Model like Higgs at 125 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Lopez-Honorez; Thomas Schwetz; Jure Zupan

    2012-07-09

    We show that fermionic dark matter (DM) which communicates with the Standard Model (SM) via the Higgs portal is a viable scenario, even if a SM-like Higgs is found at around 125 GeV. Using effective field theory we show that for DM with a mass in the range from about 60 GeV to 2 TeV the Higgs portal needs to be parity violating in order to be in agreement with direct detection searches. For parity conserving interactions we identify two distinct options that remain viable: a resonant Higgs portal, and an indirect Higgs portal. We illustrate both possibilities using a simple renormalizable toy model.

  6. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  7. Dynamics and pattern selection at the crystal-melt interface. Progress report No. 4, March 1, 1989--February 28, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, H.Z.

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses: light scattering at the crystal-melt interface; morphological instability and pattern selection; and sidebranching.

  8. Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

  9. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and Bubbles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and thermal structure in glass melting furnaces with a throat. The effects of the following parameters This is a second part of a study concerned with the three-dimensional natural circulation in glass melting furnaces

  10. Volume 107, number 3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 1 June 1984 UNEQUAL FREEZiNG AND MELTING TEMPERATURES FOR CLUSTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Volume 107, number 3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 1 June 1984 UNEQUAL FREEZiNG AND MELTING TEMPERATURES have sharp freezing and melting temperatures limiting the ranges of phase stability and thaf to exhibit sharp freezing tem- peratures Tr- below which no hquid-me form may exist, and sharp melting

  11. Melting, freezing, and coalescence of gold nanoclusters Laurent J. Lewis, (a) Pablo Jensen, and JeanLouis Barrat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Laurent J.

    Melting, freezing, and coalescence of gold nanoclusters Laurent J. Lewis, (a) Pablo Jensen We present a detailed molecular­dynamics study of the melting, freezing, and coalescence of gold to address two issues. First, we investigate the influence of size on the melting and freezing of gold

  12. Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew Houk, and Xueyu Song*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew-melt interfacial free energy calculations using capillary wave approach. Using this method, we have calculated the free energies of the fcc crystal-melt interfaces for the hard-sphere system as a function of crystal

  13. Investigation of platinum alloys for melting of inclusion free laser glass: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumitani, T.; Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.E.

    1986-02-28

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Pt alloys as crucible materials for melting LHG-8 phosphate laser glass. The tendency of forming metallic inclusions and ionic dissolution of alloy components in the glass is to be compared with that of pure Pt. Ionic Pt is introduced into the glass melt by direct dissolution of Pt at the crucible-melt interface and by vapor phase transport. It was felt that a Pt-alloy may behave sufficiently differently from Pt that a number of alloys should be studied. Pt inclusions may originate from Pt which reprecipitates from the glass melt on cooling or change in redox-conditions; from volatilized Pt which deposits in colder zones of the melting environment as crystallites which may drop back into the glass melt; and/or from Pt particles which are mechanically removed from the crucible and drop into the glass melt. Besides pure Pt, the following alloys have been tested: Pt//sup 10/Ir, Pt//sup 10/Rh, Pt//sup 5/Au, Pt-ZGS, Pt//sup 5/Au-ZGS, Pt//sup 10/Rh-ZGS.

  14. Study of Centrality Dependence of Transverse Momentum Spectra of Hadrons and the Freeze-out Parameters at root(sNN) of 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeed Uddin; Riyaz Ahmed Bhat; Inam-ul Bashir

    2014-12-05

    We attempt to describe the rapidity distribution of P, P-bar, K+ and K- for the most central Au+Au collisions at root(sNN) of 62.4 GeV,130 GeV and 200 GeV. The transverse momentum spectra of strange as well as non-strange hadrons e.g. P, P-bar, K+, K-, Lambda, Lambda-bar, Cascade,Cascade-bar and (Omega + Omega-bar) are studied for the whole centrality classes at all the three RHIC energies. The experimental data of the transverse momentum spectra and the rapidity distributions are well reproduced. This is done by using a statistical thermal freeze-out model which incorporates the rapidity (collision) axis as well as transverse direction boosts developed within an expanding hot and dense hadronic fluid (fireball) till the final freeze-out. We determine the thermo-chemical freeze-out conditions particularly in terms of temperature, baryon chemical potential and collective flow effect parameters for different particle species. The parameters indicate occurrence of freeze-out of the singly and doubly strange hyperon species at somewhat earlier times during the evolution of the fireball. Dependence of the freeze-out parameters on the degree of centrality is also described and it is found that the kinetic temperature increases and collective flow effect decreases with decreasing centrality at all energies studied. The nuclear transparency effect is also studied and it is clear from our model that the nuclear matter becomes more transparent at the highest RHIC energy compared to lower RHIC energies. The contribution of heavier hadronic resonance decay is taken into account.

  15. Experimental investigations at high temperatures and pressures on melting and mineral solubility in systems of feldspars with water, with special reference to the origin of granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makhluf, Adam Rafiq

    2015-01-01

    mixing properties of albite-water melts. Transactions of themelting and activities of water at high pressures. Americanfor determining the solubility of water in silicate melts.

  16. High-Pressure Melt Streaming (HIPS) program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.; Brockmann, J.; Pilch, M.

    1984-08-01

    The Zion Probabilistic Safety Study (ZPSS) envisions accident sequences that could lead to failure of the reactor vessel while the primary system is pressurized. The resulting ejection of molten core material into the reactor cavity followed by the blowdown of steam and hydrogen is shown to cause the debris to enter into the containment region. The High Pressure Melt Streaming (HIPS) program has been developed to provide an experimental and analytical investigation of the scenario described above. One-tenth linear scale models of the Zion cavity region will be used to investigate the debris dispersal phenomena. Smaller-scale experiments (SPIT-tests) are also used to study high-velocity jets, jet-water interactions, and 1/20th scale cavity geometries. Both matrices are developed using a factorial design approach. The document describes certain aspects of the ZPSS ex-vessel phenomena, the experimental matrices, test equipment, and instrumentation, and the program's analytical efforts. Preliminary data from SPIT testing are included.

  17. Hybrid Dynamic Density Functional Theory for Polymer Melts and Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Honda; Toshihiro Kawakatsu

    2006-09-05

    We propose a high-speed and accurate hybrid dynamic density functional theory for the computer simulations of the phase separation processes of polymer melts and blends. The proposed theory is a combination of the dynamic self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type theory with the random phase approximation (GRPA). The SCF theory is known to be accurate in evaluating the free energy of the polymer systems in both weak and strong segregation regions although it has a disadvantage of the requirement of a considerable amount of computational cost. On the other hand, the GRPA theory has an advantage of much smaller amount of required computational cost than the SCF theory while its applicability is limited to the weak segregation region. To make the accuracy of the SCF theory and the high-performance of the GRPA theory compatible, we adjust the chemical potential of the GRPA theory by using the SCF theory every constant time steps in the dynamic simulations. The performance of the GRPA and the hybrid theories is tested by using several systems composed of an A/B homopolymer, an AB diblock copolymer, or an ABC triblock copolymer. Using the hybrid theory, we succeeded in reproducing the metastable complex phase-separated domain structures of an ABC triblock copolymer observed by experiments.

  18. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  19. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inverselymore »with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.« less

  20. Energy dependence of multiplicity fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at 20A to 158A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alt, C.; Blume, C.; Bramm, R.; Dinkelaker, P.; Flierl, D.; Kliemant, M.; Kniege, S.; Lungwitz, B.; Mitrovski, M.; Renfordt, R.; Schuster, T.; Stock, R.; Strabel, C.; Stroebele, H.; Utvic, M.; Wetzler, A.; Anticic, T.; Kadija, K.; Nicolic, V.; Susa, T.

    2008-09-15

    Multiplicity fluctuations of positively, negatively, and all charged hadrons in the forward hemisphere were studied in central Pb+Pb collisions at 20A,30A,40A,80A, and 158A GeV. The multiplicity distributions and their scaled variances {omega} are presented as functions of their dependence on collision energy as well as on rapidity and transverse momentum. The distributions have bell-like shapes and their scaled variances are in the range from 0.8 to 1.2 without any significant structure in their energy dependence. No indication of the critical point in fluctuations are observed. The string-hadronic ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model significantly overpredicts the mean, but it approximately reproduces the scaled variance of the multiplicity distributions. The predictions of the statistical hadron-resonance gas model obtained within the grand-canonical and canonical ensembles disagree with the measured scaled variances. The narrower than Poissonian multiplicity fluctuations measured in numerous cases may be explained by the impact of conservation laws on fluctuations in relativistic systems.

  1. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, a finding in stark contrast to DAC data.

  2. Points

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Fluidic Energy, Inc.) 5,133,150 Tempe, AZ Energy Storage A new class of metal-air batteries using ionic liquids, with many times the energy density of today's lithium-ion...

  3. Particle Production of Carbon Target with 20Tto2T5m Configuration at 6.75 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Particle Production of Carbon Target with 20Tto2T5m Configuration at 6.75 GeV (Preliminary) Xm; · Production Collection: (1.2 m downstream, 40 MeV production threshold kinetic energy (Default:0.03 GeV); EMCHR: The threshold energy applied collectively

  4. Take Home Points Horticultural Prospective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    HLB Take Home Points Horticultural Prospective Stephen H. Futch Extension Agent, Multi County Co plants, ACP adults preferentially light on infected within first 48 hour but on uninfected after 7 days

  5. Join Point Encapsulation David Larochelle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    , behavior observation and modification are possible. We believe that it is undesirable to make all join points nec- essarily subject to behavioral observation and modification by aspects. To do so

  6. GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale channel guided laser wakefield acceleratora...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale channel guided laser wakefield acceleratora... K on the generation of GeV-class electron beams using an intense femtosecond laser beam and a 3.3 cm long preformed from 10­40 TW were guided over more than 20 Rayleigh ranges and high quality electron beams with energy

  7. GeV ELECTRON BEAMS FROM A CENTIMETER-SCALE LASER-DRIVEN PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    GeV ELECTRON BEAMS FROM A CENTIMETER-SCALE LASER-DRIVEN PLASMA ACCELERATOR A. J. Gonsalves, K discharge waveguide [1, 2]. Electron beams were not observed without a plasma channel, indicating that self of the electron beam spectra, and the dependence of the reliability of pro- ducing electron beams as a function

  8. $?_{DIS}(?N)$, NLO Perturbative QCD and O(1 GeV) Mass Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kretzer; M. H. Reno

    2004-10-13

    The deep-inelastic neutrino-nucleon cross section is one of the components of few GeV neutrino interactions. We present here our results for neutrino-isoscalar nucleon charged current scattering including perturbative next-to-leading order QCD corrections, target mass corrections, charm mass and lepton mass corrections.

  9. Forward Di-hadron Asymmetries from p + p at ?s = 200 GeV at STAR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drachenberg, James Lucas

    2012-07-16

    to Interference Fragmentation Functions (IFF) and the Sivers effect. In 2008, RHIC dedicated a portion of the run to transversely polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV. STAR was equipped with a Foward Meson Spectrometer (FMS) and a Forward Time...

  10. Higgs-Portal Dark Matter for GeV Gamma-Ray Excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ko; Wan-Il Park; Yong Tang

    2015-04-27

    We present Higgs-Portal dark matter (DM) models to explain the reported Galactic Center GeV gamma-ray excess. Naive effective theories are inconsistent with direct detection constraint for the relevant parameter range. Simple extended models with dark gauge symmetries can easily accommodate the gamma-ray excess through the Higgs-Portal coupling while satisfying various constraints.

  11. The 8-GeV transfer line injection into main ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Included in this report are a brief review of the design lattice of the 8-GeV beam transfer line and the Main Ring, the recent measurements on the 8-GeV line lattice function as well as that of the Main Ring at 8-GeV. The injection matching is a very important part of the MR operation. Mismatches such as energy, timing, or position are easily corrected because they cause oscillations which are visible on the Turn-By-Turn (TBT) TV monitor display. Mis-matches due to beta and dispersion functions are detected only by using the Flying Wire or by doing measurements during beam study. A new method which makes use of the available data from TBT hardware was used to obtain the beam phase space ellipse. Data taken from Main Ring at injection gives the beta function needed for transfer matching from 8-GeV line. The result of this measurement is also presented here.

  12. Measurements of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction From 1 to 50 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEAT Collaboration; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; J. J. Beatty; G. A. de Nolfo; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; C. J. Chaput; S. Coutu; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; J. Knapp; D. M. Lowder; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; S. L. Nutter

    1997-03-28

    Two measurements of the cosmic-ray positron fraction as a function of energy have been made using the High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) balloon-borne instrument. The first flight took place from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico in 1994, and yielded results above the geomagnetic cutoff energy of 4.5 GeV. The second flight from Lynn Lake, Manitoba in 1995 permitted measurements over a larger energy interval, from 1 GeV to 50 GeV. In this letter we present results on the positron fraction based on data from the Lynn Lake flight, and compare these with the previously published results from the Ft. Sumner flight. The results confirm that the positron fraction does not increase with energy above ~10 GeV, although a small excess above purely secondary production cannot be ruled out. At low energies the positron fraction is slightly larger than that reported from measurements made in the 1960's. This effect could possibly be a consequence of charge dependence in the level of solar modulation.

  13. ? cross section in p+p collisions at ?s=200??GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    We report on a measurement of the ?(1S+2S+3S)?e+e- cross section at midrapidity in p+p collisions at ?s=200??GeV. We find the cross section to be 114±38(stat+fit)-24+23(syst)??pb. Perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading ...

  14. Fabrication and Testing Status of CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marhauser, F; Davis, G K; Forehand, D; Grenoble, C; Hogan, J; Overton, R B; Reilly, A V; Rimmer, R A

    2011-09-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is under way. All cavities have been built by industry and are presently undergoing post-processing and final low and high power qualification before cryomodule assembly. The status is reported including fabrication-related experiences, observations and issues throughout production, post-processing and qualification.

  15. Continuum charged D* spin alignment at s?=10.5GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-07-29

    A measurement of the spin alignment of charged D* mesons produced in continuum e+e-?cc¯ events at s?=10.5GeV is presented. This study using 4.72fb(-1) of CLEO II data shows that there is little evidence of any D* spin alignment.

  16. Strange particle production in p+p collisions at root s=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured at midrapidity in root s = 200 GeV proton-proton (p + p) collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass (m...

  17. Phenomenology of ``inos'' in the Light Gaugino Scenario and Possible Evidence for a $\\sim 53$ GeV Chargino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1996-12-13

    The tree-level-massless gaugino scenario predicts that the lighter chargino mass is less than m_W and that gluino and lightest neutralino masses are $\\lsi 1$ GeV. In this case the dominant decay mode of charginos and non-LSP neutralinos is generically to three jets. The excess of "4j" events with total invariant mass $\\sim 105$ GeV observed in LEP running at 130-136 GeV is noted to be consistent with pair production of $\\sim 53$ GeV charginos. Data at 161 and 172 GeV from Fall, 1996, cannot conclusively test this hypothesis (because cuts to eliminate $W^+W^-$ background reduce the efficiency significantly) but is suggestive that the signal persists.

  18. HBT puzzle at RHIC AMPT model with String Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    /RsideSmall radii Small duration time dt by Stephen Johnson at RWW02 One way out: Hydro Softest point in EOS Measured extensively in heavy ion collisions reasonably described by models (hydro-ph/01120062 recent hydro studies: #12;HIJING energy in strings(soft) and minijet partons(hard) ZPC (Zhang

  19. The Use of Induction Melting for the Treatment of Metal Radioactive Waste - 13088

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Pastushkov, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Smelova, Tatiana; Shadrin, Andrey

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the work is to assess the efficacy of induction melting metal for recycling radioactive waste in order to reduce the volume of solid radioactive waste to be disposed of, and utilization of the metal. (authors)

  20. THE CHOICE OF THE PROPER REFRACTORY FOR THE CASTING OF HIGH MELTING ELECTROPOSITIVE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Leo

    2008-01-01

    Hefractory for the Casting of High Melting Electropositiveof the Proper Hefractor'""y" for the Casting of High Meltingof one mole percent o If the casting is done quickly so that

  1. Simulation of the binary hard-sphere crystal/melt interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidchack, Ruslan L.; Laird, Brian Bostian

    1996-12-01

    We report results of molecular-dynamics simulations on a planar binary hard-sphere disordered facecentered-cubic [100] crystal/melt interface. From the analysis of the single-particle density and diffusion profiles for the separate components...

  2. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1997-04-15

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

  3. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Grose, Stephen M. (Glenwood, WV)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

  4. Hydroxyl and molecular H2O diffusivity in a haploandesitic melt Huaiwei Ni a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    Hydroxyl and molecular H2O diffusivity in a haploandesitic melt Huaiwei Ni a,b, , Zhengjiu Xu c) rather than hydroxyl group (OH), water diffusivity has been experimentally determined for a variety

  5. Migration of carbon in tempered martensitic steel during excimer laser melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirvonen, J.P.; Jervis, T.R.; Zocco, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    The migration of ion implanted {sup 13}C in tempered martensitic steel (nominal composition 1.05 wt. % C, 0.2 wt. % Si, and 0.3 wt. % Mn) during excimer laser melting was examined utilizing the resonance of the {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N reaction at Ep = 1747.6 keV. Depth concentration profiles after five and ten laser pulses of 1 J/cm{sup 2} revealed deviation from random walk diffusion in a homogeneous media. This was modelled by using the solubility controlled flow of carbon in iron-carbon melt. A diffusion length of 2{radical}D{tau} 34 {plus minus} 2 nm during a period {tau} of the melted phase was deduced. Significant amorphous to crystalline transformation occurred during the rapid self quenching following laser melting. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

  7. Analysis of impact melt and vapor production in CTH for planetary applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Quintana, S. N.; Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    2015-05-19

    This study explores impact melt and vapor generation for a variety of impact speeds and materials using the shock physics code CTH. The study first compares the results of two common methods of impact melt and vapor generation to demonstrate that both the peak pressure method and final temperature method are appropriate for high-speed impact models (speeds greater than 10 km/s). However, for low-speed impact models (speeds less than 10 km/s), only the final temperature method is consistent with laboratory analyses to yield melting and vaporization. Finally, a constitutive model for material strength is important for low-speed impacts because strengthmore »can cause an increase in melting and vaporization.« less

  8. Molecular H2O as carrier for oxygen diffusion in hydrous silicate melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    enriched water diffused into doubly polished rhyolitic glass wafers. H2O profiles were analyzed by infrared or melt, and 18 O diffuses into the condensed phase. After the experiment, the isotopic ratio R (18 O/(16

  9. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main objective is demonstrating a technology that will eliminate melting and holding furnaces at the casting cell and move these operations to centralized and optimized off-site facilities.

  10. Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Ark, Emily M

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting: Processing, Post-Processing, & Mechanical Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sames, William

    2015-05-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical...

  12. Mathematical modeling of cold cap: Effect of bubbling on melting rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-12-31

    The rate of melting is a primary concern in the vitrification of radioactive wastes because it directly influences the life cycle of nuclear waste cleanup efforts. To increase glass melting performance, experimental and industrial all-electric waste glass melters employ various melt-rate enhancement techniques, the most prominent being the application of bubblers submerged into molten glass. This study investigates various ways in which bubbling affects melting rate in a waste glass melter. Using the recently developed cold cap model, we suggest that forced convection of molten glass, which increases the cold cap bottom temperature, is the main factor. Other effects, such as stirring the feed into molten glass or reducing the insulating effect of foaming, also play a role.

  13. Retrograde melting in transition metal-silicon systems : thermodynamic modeling, experimental verification, and potential application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical framework is presented in this work for retrograde melting in silicon driven by the retrograde solubility of low-concentration metallic solutes at temperatures above the binary eutectic. High enthalpy of ...

  14. CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION BY ZINC CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermeulen, T.

    2012-01-01

    for possible extraction of coal liquids from the melt by aLiquid- phase catalysts have proved effective for opening chemical linkages in subbituminous coal andby the coal. A slow internal flow of liquid upward at the

  15. Chemistry modification of high oxygen-carbon powder by plasma melting: Follow up to complete the story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, P.S.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Garcia, F.G.; Michaluk, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    State of the art melting of tantalum and tantalum alloys has relied on electron beam (EB) or vacuum arc remelting (VAR) for commercial ingot production. Plasma arc melting (PAM) provides an alternative for melting tantalum that contains very high levels of interstitials where other melting techniques can not be applied. Previous work in this area centered on plasma arc melt quality and final interstitial content of tantalum feedstock containing excessive levels of interstitial impurities as a function of melt rate and plasma gas. This report is an expansion of this prior study and provides the findings from the analysis of second phase components observed in the microstructure of the PAM tantalum. In addition, results from subsequent EB melting trials of PAM tantalum are included.

  16. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giachetti, R.T. (Giachetti (Richard T.), Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

    1989-09-01

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs.

  17. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • We recovered Pb from cathode ray tube funnel glass using reduction melting process. • We modified the melting process to achieve Pb recovery with low energy consumption. • Pb in the funnel glass is efficiently recovered at 1000 °C by adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • Pb remaining in the glass after reduction melting is extracted with 1 M HCl. • 98% of Pb in the funnel glass was recovered by reduction melting and HCl leaching. - Abstract: Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900–1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1 g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1 M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  18. Investigation of MSWI fly ash melting characteristic by DSC-DTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rundong Wang, Lei; Yang, Tianhua; Raninger, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    The melting process of MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) fly ash has been studied by high-temperature DSC-DTA experiments. The experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-1450 deg. C, and the considerable variables included atmosphere (O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), heating rates (5 deg. C/min, 10 deg. C/min, 20 deg. C/min) and CaO addition. Three main transitions were observed during the melting process of fly ash: dehydration, polymorphic transition and fusion, occurring in the temperature range of 100-200 deg. C, 480-670 deg. C and 1101-1244 deg. C, respectively. The apparent heat capacity and heat requirement for melting of MSWI fly ash were obtained by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). A thermodynamic modeling to predict the heat requirements for melting process has been presented, and it agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, a zero-order kinetic model of fly ash melting transition was established. The apparent activation energy of MSWI fly ash melting transition was obtained.

  19. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime ?^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted atmore »different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 « less

  20. A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

    2013-09-01

    This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for using cerium, which is rather easy to analyze using passive nondestructive analysis gamma-ray spectrometry, as a surrogate for plutonium in the final analysis of TMI-2 melted fuel debris. The generation of this report is motivated by the need to perform nuclear material accountancy measurements on the melted fuel debris that will be excavated from the damaged nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, which were destroyed by the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Lessons may be taken from prior U.S. work related to the study of the TMI-2 core debris to support the development of new assay methods for use at Fukushima Daiichi. While significant differences exist between the two reactor systems (pressurized water reactor (TMI-2) versus boiling water reactor (FD), fresh water post-accident cooing (TMI-2) versus salt water (FD), maintained containment (TMI-2) versus loss of containment (FD)) there remain sufficient similarities to motivate these comparisons.

  1. 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06 Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid Waves of Climate Refugees Green Options 06/04/2009 in the news Peterborough Examiner, The 06

  2. Peruvian glaciers melting at an alarming rate http://www.mcgill.ca/notesfromthefield/mckenzie/ 1 of 3 8/16/2007 1:50 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    and quantify different sources of water (such as glacial melt) combined with synoptic sampling, a method where season runoff comes from glacial melt water, and that the amount of glacial melt water is increasingPeruvian glaciers melting at an alarming rate http://www.mcgill.ca/notesfromthefield/mckenzie/ 1

  3. Energy dependence of transverse momentum fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20A to 158A GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anticic, T.

    2010-01-01

    at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. The analysis wascollisions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. It extends awere recorded at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV projectile

  4. Reaction of Inconel 690 and 693 in Iron Phosphate Melts: Alternative Glasses for Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Delbert E.

    2005-09-13

    The corrosion resistance of candidate materials used for the electrodes (Inconel 690 & 693) and the melt contact refractory (Monofrax K-3) in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) has been investigated at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) during the period from June 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (DE-FG02-04ER63831). The unusual properties and characteristics of iron phosphate glasses, as viewed from the standpoint of alternative glasses for vitrifying nuclear and hazardous wastes which contain components that make them poorly suited for vitrification in borosilicate glass, were recently discovered at UMR. The expanding national and international interest in iron phosphate glasses for waste vitrification stems from their rapid melting and chemical homogenization which results in higher furnace output, their high waste loading that varies from 32 wt% up to 75 wt% for the Hanford LAW and HLW, respectively, and the outstanding chemical durability of the iron phosphate wasteforms which meets all present DOE requirements (PCT and VHT). The higher waste loading in iron phosphate glasses, compared to the baseline borosilicate glass, can reduce the time and cost of vitrification considerably since a much smaller mass of glass will be produced, for example, about 43% less glass when the LAW at Hanford is vitrified in an iron phosphate glass according to PNNL estimates. In view of the promising performance of iron phosphate glasses, information is needed for how to best melt these glasses on the scale needed for practical use. Melting iron phosphate glasses in a JHM is considered the preferred method at this time because its design could be nearly identical to the JHM now used to melt borosilicate glasses at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Therefore, it is important to have information for the corrosion of candidate electrode and refractory materials in iron phosphate melts in a JHM. During the period from June 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005, the corrosion resistance of coupons of Inconel 690 & 693 metals and Monofrax K-3 refractory, partially submerged in several iron phosphate melts at 950-1200?C, has been investigated to determine whether iron phosphate glasses could be melted in a JHM equipped with such electrodes and refractory in the same manner as now being used to melt borosilicate glass. These representative iron phosphate melts, which contained 30 wt% Hanford LAW and 40 wt% Idaho SBW simulants, did not corrode the Inconel 690 to any greater extent than what has been reported for Inconel 690 in the borosilicate melt in the JHM at DWPF. Inconel 693 appeared to be an even better candidate for use in iron phosphate melts since its corrosion rate (1.8 to 25.4 ?m/day) was only about one half that (5.4 to 45.4 ?m/day) of Inconel 690. The dynamic corrosion measured for the candidate refractory, Monofrax K-3, by iron phosphate melts is quite encouraging since the measured corrosion (0.011 to 0.132 mm/day at 9.2 rpm) is less than the corrosion (0.137 mm/day) that has been reported in the JHM used to melt borosilicate glass at DWPF. During the period covered by this final report, the results of the research on iron phosphate glasses have been described in seven technical papers and have been presented at one national meeting. In addition to the principal investigator, one research professor and one undergraduate research aide were supported by this project.

  5. Measuring 10-1000 GeV Cosmic Ray Electrons with GLAST/LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander A. Moiseev; Jonathan F. Ormes; Igor V. Moskalenko

    2007-06-06

    We present here the capabilities of the GLAST Large Area Telescope to detect cosmic ray high-energy (HE) electrons in the energy range from 10 GeV to 1 TeV. We also discuss the science topics that can be investigated with HE electron data and quantify the results with LAT instrument simulations. The science topics include CR propagation, calibration of the IC gamma-ray model, testing hypotheses regarding the origin of HE energy cosmic-ray electrons, searching for any signature of Kaluza Klein Dark Matter annihilation, and measuring the HE electron anisotropy. We expect to detect ~ 107 electrons above 20 GeV per year of LAT operation.

  6. Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70-GeV IHEP accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonin, A G; Britvich, G I; Chepegin, V N; Chesnokov, Yu A; Kotov, V I; Maisheev, V A; Terekhov, V I; Yazynin, I A

    2011-01-01

    This report overviews studies accomplished in the U70 proton synchrotron of IHEP-Protvino during the recent two decades. Major attention is paid to a routine application of bent crystals for beam extraction from the machine. It has been confirmed experimentally that efficiency of beam extraction with a crystal deflector of around 85% is well feasible for a proton beam with intensity up to 1012 protons per cycle. Another trend is to use bent crystals for halo collimation in a high energy collider. New promising options emerge for, say, LHC and ILC based on the "volume reflection" effect, which has been discovered recently in machine study runs at U70 of IHEP (50 GeV) and SPS of CERN (400 GeV).

  7. Precision Electron-Beam Polarimetry using Compton Scattering at 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, A; Cornejo, J C; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; Dutta, D; Gaskell, D; Martin, J W; Paschke, K D; Tvaskis, V; Asaturyan, A; Benesch, J; Cates, G; Cavness, B S; Dillon-Townes, L A; Hays, G; Ihloff, E; Jones, R; Kowalski, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lee, L; McCreary, A; McDonald, M; Micherdzinska, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Nelyubin, V; Page, S; Ramsay, W D; Solvignon, P; Storey, D; Tobias, A; Urban, E; Vidal, C; Wang, P; Zhamkotchyan, S

    2015-01-01

    We report on the highest precision yet achieved in the measurement of the polarization of a low energy, $\\mathcal{O}$(1 GeV), electron beam, accomplished using a new polarimeter based on electron-photon scattering, in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab. A number of technical innovations were necessary, including a novel method for precise control of the laser polarization in a cavity and a novel diamond micro-strip detector which was able to capture most of the spectrum of scattered electrons. The data analysis technique exploited track finding, the high granularity of the detector and its large acceptance. The polarization of the $180~\\mu$A, $1.16$~GeV electron beam was measured with a statistical precision of $future low-energy experiments require polarization uncertainty $<$~0.4\\%, and this result represents an important de...

  8. SRF CAVITY PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW FOR THE 12 GeV UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    The CEBAF accelerator, a recirculating CW electron accelerator that is currently operating at Jefferson Laboratory, is in the process of having 10 new cryomodules installed to allow for the maximum beam energy to be increased from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This upgrade required the fabrication, processing and RF qualification of 80, seven cell elliptical SRF cavities, a process that was completed in February 2012. The RF performance achieve in the vertical testing dewars has exceeded the design specification by {approx}25% and is a testament to the cavity design and processing cycle that has been implemented. This paper will provide a summary of the cavity RF performance in the vertical tests, as well as review the overall cavity processing cycle and duration for the project.

  9. The MAGIC Telescope Project for Gamma Astronomy above 10 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Magnussen

    1998-05-14

    A project to construct a 17 m diameter imaging air Cherenkov telescope, called the MAGIC Telescope, is described. The aim of the project is to close the observation gap in the gamma-ray sky extending from 10 GeV as the highest energy measurable by space-borne experiments to 300 GeV, the lowest energy measurable by the current generation of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. The MAGIC Telescope will incorporate several new features in order to reach the very low energy threshold. At the same time the new technology will yield an improvement in sensitivity in the energy region where current Cherenkov telescopes are measuring by about an order of magnitude.

  10. Lattice study of an electroweak phase transition at m{sub h} ? 126 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laine, M.; Nardini, G.; Rummukainen, K. E-mail: germano@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2013-01-01

    We carry out lattice simulations of a cosmological electroweak phase transition for a Higgs mass m{sub h} ? 126 GeV. The analysis is based on a dimensionally reduced effective theory for an MSSM-like scenario including a relatively light coloured SU(2)-singlet scalar, referred to as a right-handed stop. The non-perturbative transition is stronger than in 2-loop perturbation theory, and may offer a window for electroweak baryogenesis. The main remaining uncertainties concern the physical value of the right-handed stop mass which according to our analysis could be as high as m{sub t-tilde{sub R}} ? 155 GeV; a more precise effective theory derivation and vacuum renormalization than available at present are needed for confirming this value.

  11. Dirac gauginos, R symmetry and the 125 GeV Higgs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Frugiuele, Claudia; Grégoire, Thomas; Pontón, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    We study a supersymmetric scenario with a quasi exact R-symmetry in light of the discovery of a Higgs resonance with a mass of 125 GeV. In such a framework, the additional adjoint superfields, needed to give Dirac masses to the gauginos, contribute both to the Higgs mass and to electroweak precision observables. We analyze the interplay between the two aspects, finding regions in parameter space in which the contributions to the precision observables are under control and a 125 GeV Higgs boson can be accommodated. We estimate the fine-tuning of the model finding regions of the parameter space still unexploredmore »by the LHC with a fine-tuning considerably improved with respect to the minimal supersymmetric scenario. In particular, sizable non-holomorphic (non-supersoft) adjoints masses are required to reduce the fine-tuning.« less

  12. Dirac gauginos, R symmetry and the 125 GeV Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Frugiuele, Claudia; Grégoire, Thomas; Pontón, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    We study a supersymmetric scenario with a quasi exact R-symmetry in light of the discovery of a Higgs resonance with a mass of 125 GeV. In such a framework, the additional adjoint superfields, needed to give Dirac masses to the gauginos, contribute both to the Higgs mass and to electroweak precision observables. We analyze the interplay between the two aspects, finding regions in parameter space in which the contributions to the precision observables are under control and a 125 GeV Higgs boson can be accommodated. We estimate the fine-tuning of the model finding regions of the parameter space still unexplored by the LHC with a fine-tuning considerably improved with respect to the minimal supersymmetric scenario. In particular, sizable non-holomorphic (non-supersoft) adjoints masses are required to reduce the fine-tuning.

  13. ?? correlation function in Au + Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ?? correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ?? correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  14. Optics solutions for pp operation with electron lenses at 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2014-07-12

    Electron lenses for head-on compensation are currently under commissioning and foreseen to be operational for the 2015 polarized proton run. These devices will provide a partial compensation of head-on beam-beam effects and allow to double the RHIC proton luminosity. This note reviews the optics constraints related to beam-beam compensation and summarizes the current lattice options for proton operation at 100 GeV.

  15. ?? correlation function in Au + Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-01-01

    We present ?? correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ?? correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  16. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    ) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 to achieve 10 GeV electron beams from meter-scale accelerator structures using a PW-class laser system, which

  17. On the origin of GeV emission in gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hascoët, Romain; Vurm, Indrek, E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The most common progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are massive stars with strong stellar winds. We show that the GRB blast wave in the wind should emit a bright GeV flash. It is produced by inverse-Compton cooling of the thermal plasma behind the forward shock. The main part of the flash is shaped by scattering of the prompt MeV radiation (emitted at smaller radii) which streams through the external blast wave. The inverse-Compton flash is bright due to the huge e {sup ±} enrichment of the external medium by the prompt radiation ahead of the blast wave. At late times, the blast wave switches to normal synchrotron-self-Compton cooling. The mechanism is demonstrated by a detailed transfer simulation. The observed prompt MeV radiation is taken as an input of the simulation; we use GRB 080916C as an example. The result reproduces the GeV flash observed by the Fermi telescope. It explains the delayed onset, the steep rise, the peak flux, the time of the peak, the long smooth decline, and the spectral slope of GeV emission. The wind density required to reproduce all these features is typical of Wolf-Rayet stars. Our simulation predicts strong TeV emission 1 minute after the burst trigger; then a cutoff in the observed high-energy spectrum is expected from absorption by extragalactic background light. In addition, a bright optical counterpart of the GeV flash is predicted for plausible values of the magnetic field; such a double (optical+GeV) flash has been observed in GRB 130427A.

  18. Future Spin Physics at JLab; 12 GeV and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kees de Jager

    2006-12-21

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  19. Study of the dp-elastic scattering at 2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Terekhin; Yu. V. Gurchin; A. Yu. Isupov; A. N. Khrenov; A. K. Kurilkin; P. K. Kurilkin; V. P. Ladygin; N. B. Ladygina; S. M. Piyadin; S. G. Reznikov; I. E. Vnukov

    2015-03-27

    The results on the measurements of dp-elastic scattering cross section at the energy 2 GeV at Internal Target Station at the Nuclotron JINR are reported. The data were obtained for the angular range of 70-107 deg. in the c.m.s. by using CH2 and C targets. The results are compared with the existing data and with the theoretical calculations based on the relativistic multiple scattering theory.

  20. ON THE ORIGIN OF > 10 GeV PHOTONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiangyu; Liu Ruoyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lemoine, Martin [Institut d'Astrophysique de paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-07-10

    Fermi/LAT has detected long-lasting high-energy photons (>100 MeV) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the highest energy photons reaching about 100 GeV. One proposed scenario is that they are produced by high-energy electrons accelerated in GRB forward shocks via synchrotron radiation. We study the maximum synchrotron photon energy in this scenario, considering the properties of the microturbulence magnetic fields behind the shock, as revealed by recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical analyses of relativistic collisionless shocks. Due to the small-scale nature of the microturbulent magnetic field, the Bohm acceleration approximation, in which the scattering mean free path is equal to the particle Larmor radius, breaks down at such high energies. This effect leads to a typical maximum synchrotron photon of a few GeV at 100 s after the burst and this maximum synchrotron photon energy decreases quickly with time. We show that the fast decrease of the maximum synchrotron photon energy leads to a fast decay of the synchrotron flux. The 10-100 GeV photons detected after the prompt phase cannot be produced by the synchrotron mechanism. They could originate from the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the early afterglow if the circumburst density is sufficiently large, or from the external inverse Compton process in the presence of central X-ray emission, such as X-ray flares and prompt high-latitude X-ray emission.

  1. A Search for Pulsations from Geminga Above 100 GeV with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliu, E; Archer, A; Aune, T; Barnacka, A; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Dumm, J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hakansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weinstein, A; Williams, D A; Zajczyk, A; Zitzer, B

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of 71.6 hours of observations of the Geminga pulsar (PSR J0633+1746) with the VERITAS very-high-energy gamma-ray telescope array. Data taken with VERITAS between November 2007 and February 2013 were phase-folded using a Geminga pulsar timing solution derived from data recorded by the XMM-\\emph{Newton} and \\emph{Fermi}-LAT space telescopes. No significant pulsed emission above 100 GeV is observed, and we report upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the integral flux above 135 GeV (spectral analysis threshold) of 4.0$\\times10^{-13}$ s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and 1.7$\\times10^{-13}$ s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ for the two principal peaks in the emission profile. These upper limits, placed in context with phase-resolved spectral energy distributions determined from five years of data from the \\emph{Fermi}-LAT, constrain possible hardening of the Geminga pulsar emission spectra above $\\sim$50 GeV.

  2. Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John Martin

    1968-01-01

    . At this point, the bellows valve, E, was closed and the thermocouple pressure elements monitored for an increase in pressure; and if after several hours no increase in pressure was registered, the system was considered thoroughly out-gassed and free of leaks... PPM 0. 5 PPM Figure 3 is a block diagram of the system into which methane was admitted. From the storage cylinder the methane passed through a Hoke-Phoenix gas-ballast high purity regulator. From needle valve, A, the integrity of the methane...

  3. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

  4. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  5. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Reactor Safety Experiments Dept.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  6. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  7. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  8. Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K.; Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D.

    2013-07-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

  9. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Sheng Xu; Karl F. Freed

    2015-06-26

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction $\\phi$ or temperature $T$ is high, but opposes self-assembly when both $\\phi$ and $T$ are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the $\\phi$-$T$ plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  10. Precision measurements of $g_1$ of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Prok; P. Bosted; N. Kvaltine; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; H. Baghdasaryan; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; W. J. Briscoe; J. Brock; W. K. Brooks; S. Bültmann; V. D. Burkert; C. Carlin; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; L. Colaneri; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; D. Crabb; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; R. Fersch; J. A. Fleming; T. A. Forest; M. Garcon; N. Gevorgyan; Y. Ghandilyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; F. X. Girod; K. L. Giovanetti; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; B. Guegan; N. Guler; K. Haffidi; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; S. Jawalkar; X. Jiang; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; N. Kalantarians; C. Keith; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; S. V. Kuleshov; P. Lenisa; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I . J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayee; B. McKinnon; D. Meekins; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; H. Moutarde; A Movsisyan; E. Munevar; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; P. Peng; J. J. Phillips; J. Pierce; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; B. A. Raue; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatié; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; C. Smith; G. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; I. I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; V. Sytnik; M. Taiuti; W. Tang; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; B . Vernarsky; A. V. Vlassov; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D . P. Watts; L. B. Weinstein; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta; for the CLAS collaboration

    2014-04-24

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  11. Pion femtoscopy in p?+?p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic ...

  12. Jet-Hadron Correlations in ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV p + p and Central Au + Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Justin

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au + Au and p + p collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population ...

  13. Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (M&O) Contract Competition Starting Points Starting Points Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Summary Kansas City Plant Home Page Kansas City Plant Contracts DOE Directives...

  14. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  15. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2009-09-01

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  16. Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts of energy E 10 GeV with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts of energy E 10 GeV with the ARGO-YBJ detector ARGO-YBJ Collaboration of high energy gamma-ray bursts can be performed by large area air shower arrays operating at very high is the study of gamma-ray bursts of energies E 10 GeV. This can be achieved using the "single particle

  17. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structure in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent; Zhao, Guochang; Viskanta, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    properties of soda-lime solicate glass of composition 74 SiOwas retained for ?H melt for soda-lime silicate glass having

  18. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-04-07

    A method is described for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term. 4 figs.

  19. Systematic prediction of high-pressure melting curves of transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieu, Ho Khac, E-mail: hieuhk@duytan.edu.vn [Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, K7/25 Quang Trung, Danang (Viet Nam)

    2014-10-28

    The pressure effects on melting temperatures of transition metals have been studied based on the combination of the modified Lindemann criterion with statistical moment method in quantum statistical mechanics. Numerical calculations have been performed for five transition metals including Cu, Pd, Pt, Ni, and Mn up to pressure 100?GPa. Our results are in good and reasonable agreements with available experimental data. This approach gives us a relatively simple method for qualitatively calculating high-pressure melting temperature. Moreover, it can be used to verify future experimental and theoretical works. This research proposes the potential of the combination of statistical moment method and the modified Lindemann criterion on predicting high-pressure melting of materials.

  20. Chromium Phase Behavior in a Multi-Component Borosilicate Glass Melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.; Wilson, B. K.; Plaisted, Trevor J.; Heald, Steve M.

    2006-07-31

    This paper reports the phase behavior of a multicomponent borosilicate glass melt with 0?3 mass% Cr2O3 at 800?1500°C in equilibrium with air. Both upper and lower liquidus temperatures were observed. When the temperature was between the upper and lower liquidus temperatures, eskolaite (Cr2O3) formed in melts with >2 mass% Cr2O3. Below the lower liquidus temperature, a dispersed chromate phase appeared in the melt that eventually became macroscopically segregated. The chemical durability of the glasses was virtually unaffected by chromium concentration. The particular glass studied was prototypic for the vitrification of high-Cr high-level radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site. The results suggest a significant potential cost benefit for Hanford tank waste cleanup.

  1. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

  2. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, amore »finding in stark contrast to DAC data.« less

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation of Dense Polymer Melts Using Event Chain Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Alexander Kampmann; Horst-Holger Boltz; Jan Kierfeld

    2015-07-23

    We propose an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm for the off-lattice simulation of dense hard sphere polymer melts using cluster moves, called event chains, which allow for a rejection-free treatment of the excluded volume. Event chains also allow for an efficient preparation of initial configurations in polymer melts. We parallelize the event chain Monte Carlo algorithm to further increase simulation speeds and suggest additional local topology-changing moves ("swap" moves) to accelerate equilibration. By comparison with other Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, we verify that the event chain algorithm reproduces the correct equilibrium behavior of polymer chains in the melt. By comparing intrapolymer diffusion time scales, we show that event chain Monte Carlo algorithms can achieve simulation speeds comparable to optimized molecular dynamics simulations. The event chain Monte Carlo algorithm exhibits Rouse dynamics on short time scales. In the absence of swap moves, we find reptation dynamics on intermediate time scales for long chains.

  4. Cold Crucible Induction Melting Technology for Vitrification of High Level Waste: Development and Status in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugilal, G.; Sengar, P.B.S. [Nuclear Recycle Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2008-07-01

    Cold crucible induction melting is globally emerging as an alternative technology for the vitrification of high level radioactive waste. The new technology offers several advantages such as high temperature availability with long melter life, high waste loading, high specific capacity etc. Based on the laboratory and bench scale studies, an engineering scale cold crucible induction melter was locally developed in India. The melter was operated continuously to assess its performance. The electrical and thermal efficiencies were found to be in the range of 70-80 % and 10-20 % respectively. Glass melting capacities up to 200 kg m{sup -2} hr{sup -1} were accomplished using the ESCCIM. Industrially adaptable melter operating procedures for start-up, melting and pouring operations were established (author)

  5. The melting behavior of lutetium aluminum perovskite LuAlO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimm, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    DTA measurements with mixtures of aluminum oxide and lutetium oxide around the 1:1 perovskite composition were performed up to 1970 deg. C. A peak with onset 1901 deg. C was due to the melting of the eutectic Lu4Al2O9 (monoclinic phase) and LuAlO3 (perovskite). Neither peritectic melting of the perovskite nor its decomposition in the solid phase could be resolved experimentally. The maximum of the eutectic peak size near x=0.44, on the Lu-rich side of the perovskite, leads to the conclusion that LuAlO3 melts peritectically at ca. 1907 deg. C as proposed by Wu, Pelton, J. Alloys Compd. 179 (1992) 259. Under strongly reducing conditions (oxygen partial pressure <10^{-13} bar) aluminum(III) oxide can be reduced to suboxides or even Al metal. It is shown that under such conditions a new phase field with liquid Al can appear.

  6. Incorporation and distribution of rhenium in a borosilicate glass melt heat treated in a sealed ampoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2013-07-25

    We investigated a mass balance of rhenium (used as a surrogate for technetium-99) in a borosilicate glass that was mixed with excess Re source (KReO4) beyond its solubility and heat treated in a vacuum-sealed fused silica ampoule. Distribution of Re in the bulk of the glass, in a salt phase formed on the melt surface, and in condensate material deposited on the ampoule wall was evaluated to understand the Re migration into different phases during the reaction between the molten glass and KReO4. The information gained from this study will contribute to an effort to understand the mechanism of technetium retention in or escape from glass melt during early stages of glass batch melting, which is a goal of the present series of studies.

  7. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  8. Breaking Points in Quartic Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Romera; G. Pastor; M. -F. Danca; A. Martin; A. B. Orue; F. Montoya

    2014-12-18

    Dynamical systems, whether continuous or discrete, are used by physicists in order to study non-linear phenomena. In the case of discrete dynamical systems, one of the most used is the quadratic map depending on a parameter. However, some phenomena can depend alternatively of two values of the same parameter. We use the quadratic map $x_{n+1} =1-ax_{n}^{2} $ when the parameter alternates between two values during the iteration process. In this case, the orbit of the alternate system is the sum of the orbits of two quartic maps. The bifurcation diagrams of these maps present breaking points where abruptly change their evolution.

  9. Capital Point | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas: EnergyCounty,NewHatteras ElecPoint Jump to:

  10. Points of Contact - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformancePi Day Pi Day Pi DayPlasmaandAbout UsPoints of

  11. High pressure ejection of melt from a reactor pressure vessel. The discharge phase. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.M.

    1985-09-01

    Recent probabilistic risk-assessment studies identified potential accident sequences in which reactor vessel failure occurs while the primary system is at elevated pressure. The phenomenology of the discharge phase is reviewed here. We propose an improved model for hole ablation following vessel failure, and we compare the model with experiment data. Gas blowthrough is identified as a mechanism that allows steam to escape through the vessel breach before melt ejection is complete. Gas blowthrough leads to pneumatic atomization of the remaining melt before significant depressurization of the primary system occurs.

  12. Aerosol source term in high-pressure-melt ejection. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, J.E.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    Pressurized ejection of melt from a reactor pressure vessel has been identified as an important element of a severe reactor accident. Copious aerosol production is observed when thermitically generated melts pressurized with nitrogen or carbon dioxide to 1.3 to 17 MPa are ejected into an air atmosphere. Aerosol particle size distributions measured in the tests have modes of about 0.5, 5, and > 10..mu..m. Mechanisms leading to formation of these multimodal size distributions are suggested. This aerosol is a potentially important fission product source term which has not been considered in previous severe accident analyses.

  13. Primary arm spacing in chill block melt spun Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, S.N.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Chill block melt spun ribbons of Ni-Mo binary alloys containing 8.0 to 41.8 wt % Mo have been prepared under carefully controlled processing conditions. The growth velocity has been determined as a function of distance from the quench surface from the observed ribbon thickness dependence on the melt puddle residence time. Primary arm spacings measured at the midribbon thickness locations show a dependence on growth velocity and alloy composition which is expected from dendritic growth models for binary alloys directionally solidified in a positive temperature gradient.

  14. Time scale of the thermal multifragmentation in p(3.6 GeV) + Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Avdeyev; V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simonenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; P. A. Rukoyatkin; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; B. Czech; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

    2006-03-14

    The relative angle correlation of intermediate mass fragments has been studied for p+Au collisions at 3.6 GeV. Strong suppression at small angles is observed caused by IMF-IMF Coulomb repulsion. Experimental correlation function is compared to that obtained by the multi-body Coulomb trajectory calculations with the various decay time of fragmenting system. The combined model including the empirically modified intranuclear cascade followed by statistical multifragmentation was used to generate starting conditions for these calculations. The model dependence of the results obtained has been carefully checked. The mean decay time of fragmenting system is found to be 85 +- 50 fm/c.

  15. Higgs portal vector dark matter for GeV scale ?-ray excess from galactic center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, P.; Park, Wan-Il; Tang, Yong E-mail: wipark@kias.re.kr

    2014-09-01

    We show that the GeV scale ?-ray excess from the direction of the Galactic Center can be naturally explained by the pair annihilation of Abelian vector dark matter (VDM) into a pair of dark Higgs bosons (VV? ? ?), followed by the subsequent decay of ? into b b-bar or ? ?-bar  . All the processes are described by a renormalizable VDM model with the Higgs portal, which is naturally flavor-dependent. Some parameter space of this scenario can be tested at the near future direct dark matter search experiments such as LUX and XENON1T.

  16. Study of 50 GeV proton beam focusing by novel crystal device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonin, A G; Baranov, V T; Britvich, G I; Bugorskiy, A P; Bulgakov, M K; Chesnokov, Yu A; Chirkov, P N; Durum, A A; Lobanov, I S; Lunkov, A N; Lutchev, A V; Maisheev, V A; Sandomirskiy, Yu E; Skleznev, A V; Yanovich, A A; Yazynin, I A

    2012-01-01

    The bent crystals are applied on large accelerators to deflect particle beams in process of extraction and collimation. Recently the proposals of fixed target researches in the LHC are formulated. For realization of this program not only deflection but also focusing the LHC beam by bent crystals can be used. In the given work experimental results on 50 GeV proton beam focusing with the help of novel crystal device are reported. The positive property of this device is opportunity to work near the circulating beam of an accelerator, including the LHC.

  17. FMEA on the superconducting torus for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV accelerator upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghoshal, Probir K.; Biallas, George H.; Fair, Ruben J.; Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Schneider, William J.; Legg, Robert A.; Kashy, David H.; Hogan, John P.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Luongo, Cesar; et al

    2015-01-16

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, Hall B requires two conduction cooled superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. Both magnets are to be wound with Superconducting Super Collider-36 NbTi strand Rutherford cable soldered into a copper channel. This paper describes the various failure modes in torus magnet along with the failure modes that could be experienced by the torus and its interaction with the solenoid which is located inmore »close proximity.« less

  18. Young Pulsars and the Galactic Center GeV Gamma-ray Excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan M. O'Leary; Matthew D. Kistler; Matthew Kerr; Jason Dexter

    2015-04-09

    Studies of Fermi data indicate an excess of GeV gamma rays around the Galactic center (GC), possibly due to dark matter. We show that young gamma-ray pulsars can yield a similar signal. First, a high concentration of GC supernovae naturally leads to a population of kicked pulsars symmetric about the GC. Second, while very-young pulsars with soft spectra reside near the Galactic plane, pulsars with spectra that have hardened with age accumulate at larger angles. This combination, including unresolved foreground pulsars, traces the morphology and spectrum of the Excess.

  19. Young Pulsars and the Galactic Center GeV Gamma-ray Excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Ryan M; Kerr, Matthew; Dexter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Studies of Fermi data indicate an excess of GeV gamma rays around the Galactic center (GC), possibly due to dark matter. We show that young gamma-ray pulsars can yield a similar signal. First, a high concentration of GC supernovae naturally leads to a population of kicked pulsars symmetric about the GC. Second, while very-young pulsars with soft spectra reside near the Galactic plane, pulsars with spectra that have hardened with age accumulate at larger angles. This combination, including unresolved foreground pulsars, traces the morphology and spectrum of the Excess.

  20. Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, G. Kirk; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Powers, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

  1. A Bunch Length Monitor for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Mohamad Ali; Freyberger, Arne P.; Gubeli, Joseph F.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2013-12-01

    A continuous non-invasive bunch length monitor for the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab will be used to determine the bunch length of the beam. The measurement will be done at the fourth dipole of the injector chicane at 123 MeV using the coherent synchrotron light emitted from the dipole. The estimated bunch length is 333 fs. A vacuum chamber will be fabricated and a Radiabeam real time interferometer will be used. In this paper, background, the estimated calculations and the construction of the chamber will be discussed.

  2. SPIN Effects, QCD, and Jefferson Laboratory with 12 GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudin, Alexey

    2013-11-01

    QCD and Spin physics are playing important role in our understanding of hadron structure. I will give a short overview of origin of hadron structure in QCD and highlight modern understanding of the subject. Jefferson Laboratory is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the energy of electron beam up to 12 GeV. JLab is one of the leading facilities in nuclear physics studies and once operational in 2015 JLab 12 will be crucial for future of nuclear physics. I will briefly discuss future studies in four experimental halls of Jefferson Lab.

  3. Higgs mass 125 GeV and g-2 of the muon in Gaugino Mediation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-01-01

    Gaugino mediation is very attractive since it is free from the serious flavor problem in the supersymmetric standard model. We show that the observed Higgs boson mass at around 125 GeV and the anomaly of the muon g-2 can be easily explained in gaugino mediation models. It should be noted that no dangerous CP violating phases are generated in our framework. Furthermore, there are large parameter regions which can be tested not only at the planned International Linear Collider but also at the coming 13-14 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Higgs mass 125 GeV and g-2 of the muon in Gaugino Mediation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keisuke Harigaya; Tsutomu T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki

    2015-01-29

    Gaugino mediation is very attractive since it is free from the serious flavor problem in the supersymmetric standard model. We show that the observed Higgs boson mass at around 125 GeV and the anomaly of the muon g-2 can be easily explained in gaugino mediation models. It should be noted that no dangerous CP violating phases are generated in our framework. Furthermore, there are large parameter regions which can be tested not only at the planned International Linear Collider but also at the coming 13-14 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Pion femtoscopy in p plus p collisions at root s=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; de la Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.

    2011-01-01

    REVIEW C 83, 064905 (2011) Pion femtoscopy in p+ p collisions at ? s = 200 GeV M. M. Aggarwal,31 Z. Ahammed,22 A. V. Alakhverdyants,18 I. Alekseev,16 J. Alford,19 B. D. Anderson,19 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,18 J. Balewski,23 L. S. Barnby,2 S.... Baumgart,53 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,51 M. J. Betancourt,23 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,17 A. K. Bhati,31 H. Bichsel,50 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 B. E. Bonner,37 J. Bouchet,19 E. Braidot,28 A. V. Brandin,26 A. Bridgeman,1 E...

  6. Strangelet search in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D. D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, N. S.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Szeliga, B.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 76, 011901(R) (2007) Strangelet search in Au+Au collisions at?sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,9 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,45 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 Y. Bai,28 J. Balewski,17 O. Barannikova,9 L. S.... Barnby,2 J. Baudot,18 S. Baumgart,50 V. V. Belaga,12 A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen,40 R. Bellwied,48 F. Benedosso,28 R. R. Betts,9 S. Bhardwaj,35 A. Bhasin,19 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,47 J. Bielcik,50 J. Bielcikova,50 L. C. Bland,3 S-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara...

  7. Pion femtoscopy in p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; 3 B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal. B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevsky; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev

    2011-09-22

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic analysis of the correlations, though this analysis is complicated by the presence of strong non-femtoscopic effects. Our results are put into the context of the world dataset of femtoscopy in hadron-hadron collisions. We present the first direct comparison of femtoscopy in p+p and heavy ion collisions, under identical analysis and detector conditions.

  8. Melting of the Patagonian Ice Sheet and deglacial perturbations of the nitrogen cycle in the eastern South Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattin, Rodolphe

    Melting of the Patagonian Ice Sheet and deglacial perturbations of the nitrogen cycle; published 18 February 2006. [1] We report the last glacial-interglacial transition of marine denitrification denitrification changes are in close agreement with the fresh-water pulses that resulted from the melting

  9. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part I. Effects of the Heat Flux Distribution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part I. Effects in the molten glass bath of a typical glass melting furnace with a throat but without air bubblers or electric constant. The main purpose of the work is to evaluate the capability of the furnace operators to control

  10. Effect of Pressure Relaxation on the Mechanisms of Short-Pulse Laser Melting Dmitriy S. Ivanov and Leonid V. Zhigilei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    of providing new insights into the melting mechanisms and kinetics. The extremely high heating rates of 1014 K opportunities for investigation of the kinetic lim- its of achievable superheating. While the time-resolved pump on the melting process. A hybrid computational model that combines classical MD method for simulation

  11. Vacuum Induction Melting Unit Induction heating is a process wherein induced eddy currents heat conductive materials. This heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Vacuum Induction Melting Unit Induction heating is a process wherein induced eddy currents heat can be melted at a time. There are three main parts to the system: chiller, power unit and vacuum unit. The vacuum unit with rotary and diffusion pumps can attain a vacuum of 106 m bar. The power can deliver

  12. The Influences of Fiber Feature and Polymer Melt Index on Mechanical Properties of Sugarcane Fiber/Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Influences of Fiber Feature and Polymer Melt Index on Mechanical Properties of Sugarcane Fiber/Polymer.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: The fiber characteristics (i.e., the fiber type, morphology, and dimension) and polymer melt flow sugarcane fiber/polymer composites, the HDPE resins with a low MFI value presented high tensile and impact

  13. Searching for onset of quark deconfinement and critical point of QGP phase transition from rapidity distribution in high energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental results of the rapidity distributions of negatively charged pions produced in proton-proton (p-p) and beryllium-beryllium (Be-Be) collisions at different beam momentums, measured by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the super proton synchrotron (SPS), are described by a revised (three-source) Landau hydrodynamic model. The squared speed-of-sound parameter c^2_s is then extracted from the width of rapidity distribution. There is a knee point appearing at about 40A GeV/c (or 8.8 GeV) in the dependence of c^2_s on incident beam momentum (or center-of-mass energy). This knee point can be possibly regarded as the onset of deconfinement of the quarks and gluons in proton-proton collisions, and the critical point of phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is possible that the quark deconfinement and QGP phase transition happen initially in collisions at 8.8 GeV.

  14. Did melting glaciers cause volcanic eruptions in eastern California? Probing the mechanics of dike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Did melting glaciers cause volcanic eruptions in eastern California? Probing the mechanics of dike significant cross correlations between changes in eruption frequency and the first derivative of the glacial volume. Moreover, calculated time lags for the effects of glacial unloading on silicic and basaltic

  15. MODELING OF HYDRONIC AND ELECTRIC-CABLE SNOW-MELTING SYSTEMS FOR PAVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart Bridge Research Project at the Oklahoma State University with the close cooperationMODELING OF HYDRONIC AND ELECTRIC-CABLE SNOW-MELTING SYSTEMS FOR PAVEMENTS AND BRIDGE DECKS By XIA FOR PAVEMENTS AND BRIDGE DECKS Thesis Approved: _______________________________________________ Thesis Advisor

  16. A mantle melting profile across the Basin and Range, SW USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wange, K.; Plank, T.; Walker, J. Douglas; Smith, E. I.

    2002-01-01

    The major and trace element composition of late Cenozoic basalts (0–10 Ma) across the Basin and Range province (B&R) preserve a clear signal of mantle melting depth variations. FeO, Fe8.0, and Tb/Yb increase, whereas Si8.0 and Al8.0 decrease, from...

  17. Europa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    ; Pappalardo and Head, 2001], and 3) a seafloor plume model in which tidal energy focused in the silicate ice in the shallow crust of Europa. We show that tidal energy can be preferentially focused in risingEuropa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

  18. Substrate Effect on the Melting Temperature of Thin Polyethylene Films M. Rafailovich,1,* J. Sokolov,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Substrate Effect on the Melting Temperature of Thin Polyethylene Films Y. Wang,1 M. Rafailovich,1 polyethylene thin films. The Tm decreases with the film thickness decrease when the film is thinner than that the degree of crystal- linity of polyethylene (PE) remained high even in films as thin as 15 nm [5]. A novel

  19. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 88 (2005) 6573 Investigation of pulsed non-melt laser annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 88 (2005) 65­73 Investigation of pulsed non-melt laser annealing on the film properties and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells Xuege Wanga , Sheng S. Lia,Ã, C time to modify near- surface defects and related junction properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells

  20. Interpretation of seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow when melt is present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Interpretation of seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow when melt is present E. Kaminski scale. Citation: Kaminski, E. (2006), Interpretation of seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow when of seismic anisotropy to image upper mantle flow is usually based on the assumption that the direction

  1. On the Effect of Porous Layers on Melting Heat Transfer in an Enclosure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    : melting, porous media, thermal energy storage, natural convection INTRODUCTION Latent heat thermal energy-change materials used in such thermal energy storage devices have a relatively low thermal conductivity, means investigated in detail. The presence of the porous medium can considerably reduce the thermal energy storage

  2. Odd-even effect of melting finite polymer film on square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tieyan Si

    2015-03-24

    Two dimensional film system bears many exotic thermodynamics behaviors. We proposed a mathematical physics model to explore how the melting temperature of a two dimensional mathematical dimer film depends on the odd-eveness of the finite width of dimer film. A weak external bond between dimers is introduced into the classical dimer model in this dimer film. We derived a general equation of melting temperature and applied it for computing the melting temperature of a dimer film covering a finite square lattice. The melting temperature is proportional to the external bonding energy that we assume it binds neighboring dimers together and proportional to the inverse of entropy per site. Further more, it shows fusing two small rectangular dimer film with odd number of length into one big rectangular film gains more entropy than fusing two small rectangles with even number of length into the same big rectangle. Fusing two small toruses with even number of length into one big torus reduces entropy. Fusing two small toruses with odd number of length increases the entropy. Thus two dimer films with even number of length repel each other, two dimer films with odd length attract each other. The odd-even effect is also reflected on the correlation function of two topologically distinguishable loops in a torus surface. The entropy of finite system dominates odd-even effect. This model has straightforward extension to longer polymers and three dimensional systems.

  3. Quantitative estimates of velocity sensitivity to surface melt variations at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, M. L.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh

    2011-09-01

    , marine-terminating outlet glaciers that drain the ice sheet. We use a validated model of meltwater input and GPS-derived surface velocities to quantify the sensitivity of glacier flow speed to changes in surface melt at Helheim Glacier during two summer...

  4. Conductivity enhancement of carbon nanotube and nanofiber-based polymer nanocomposites by melt annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    , their conductivity can be lost. Here, it is shown that conductivities can be recovered through melt annealing 1 S/m have been realized with loadings of just ca. 2 wt.% of MWCNTs [6,7] or 5 wt.% of CNFs [8 that a rather wide range of conductivity values have been reported, sometimes much lower than might be expected

  5. Calculations of crystal-melt interfacial free energies by nonequilibrium work measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    Calculations of crystal-melt interfacial free energies by nonequilibrium work measurements Yan Mu perturbation method to compute the interfacial free energies by nonequilibrium work measurements with cleaving potential procedure. Using this method, we calculated the interfacial free energies of different crystal

  6. MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS AND DNA TAXONOMY The use of high-resolution melting analysis for genotyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a closed-tube, rapid and sensitive technique able to detect DNA variations evaluated the effectiveness of HRM as a tool to rapidly and precisely genotype monotypic Symbiodinium compared to HRM genotypes. Results showed that twenty cultures were correctly genotyped in HRM

  7. Genesis of the Iceland Melt Anomaly by Plate Tectonic G. R. Foulger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Don L.

    Genesis of the Iceland Melt Anomaly by Plate Tectonic Processes G. R. Foulger1 , James H. Natland3 252-21, Pasadena, CA 91125, dla@gps.caltech.edu Abstract Iceland is the best-studied, currently erupted in Iceland has geochemistry little different from normal mid-ocean ridge basalt and the detailed

  8. A comparison of neutron scattering studies and computer simulations of polymer melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    A comparison of neutron scattering studies and computer simulations of polymer melts G.D. Smith a; in ®nal form 22 May 2000 Abstract Neutron scattering and computer simulations are powerful tools in particular. When neutron scattering studies and quan- titative atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

  9. Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer(L-lactic acid) is promising in drug delivery applications because it allows for drug release in a controlled manner. In a polymer-based drug delivery system, drug release is controlled by polymer degradation

  10. Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    1 Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable The biodegradable polymer such as poly(L-lactic acid) is promising in drug delivery applications because it allows for drug release in a controlled manner. In a polymer-based drug delivery system, drug release

  11. Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III for 3D printing comprises different waxes, tackifier and plasticizer resins, rheology modifiers, and UV rheological (or flow) behavior. 1 3D printing, direct ink-jet printing, and related approaches such as hot

  12. Melt Scheduling to Trade-Off Material Waste and Shipping Performance Kedar S. Naphade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, David

    Laboratories, Lucent Technologies S. David Wu and Robert H. Storer Manufacturing Logistics Institute, Lehigh University Bhavin J. Doshi CAPS Logistics ABSTRACT The ingot formation or "melt" process is the first step configuration, maintenance plan, resource availability, and rail transportation constraints. Our study herein

  13. ELSEVIER Physica A 247 (1997) 235-246 Melting of a colloidal crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Yan

    1997-01-01

    Plfflllgl ELSEVIER Physica A 247 (1997) 235-246 Melting of a colloidal crystal P.S. Kuhn, A. Diehl is reasonably well understood, it is fair to say that our understanding of charge stabilized colloids is very charged colloidal particles still remains controversial [ 1-13]. One thing, however, seems to be well

  14. Treatment of Asbestos Wastes Using the GeoMelt Vitrification Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finucane, K.G. [AMEC Nuclear Holdings Ltd., GeoMelt Div., Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, L.E. [Capto Group LLC, Dallas, TX (United States); Abuku, T. [ISV Japan Ltd., Yokohama-city (Japan); Nakauchi, H. [Mie Chuo Kaihatsu Co. Ltd., Hachiya, Iga City (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The disposal of waste asbestos from decommissioning activities is becoming problematic in countries which have limited disposal space. A particular challenge is the disposal of asbestos wastes from the decommissioning of nuclear sites because some of it is radioactively contaminated or activated and disposal space for such wastes is limited. GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification is being developed as a treatment method for volume and toxicity minimization and radionuclide immobilization for UK radioactive asbestos mixed waste. The common practice to date for asbestos wastes is disposal in licensed landfills. In some cases, compaction techniques are used to minimize the disposal space requirements. However, such practices are becoming less practical. Social pressures have resulted in changes to disposal regulations which, in turn, have resulted in the closure of some landfills and increased disposal costs. In the UK, tens of thousands of tonnes of asbestos waste will result from the decommissioning of nuclear sites over the next 20 years. In Japan, it is estimated that over 40 million tonnes of asbestos materials used in construction will require disposal. Methods for the safe and cost effective volume reduction of asbestos wastes are being evaluated for many sites. The GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification process is being demonstrated at full-scale in Japan for the Japan Ministry of Environment and plans are being developed for the GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning-related asbestos wastes. The full-scale treatment operations in Japan have also included contaminated soils and debris. The GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification process result in the maximum possible volume reduction, destroys the asbestos fibers, treats problematic debris associated with asbestos wastes, and immobilizes radiological contaminants within the resulting glass matrix. Results from recent full-scale treatment operations in Japan are discussed and plans for GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning-related asbestos wastes are outlined. (authors)

  15. Tradeoff between Efficiency and Melting for a High-Performance Electromagnetic Rail Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William C. McCorkle; Thomas B. Bahder

    2010-08-11

    We estimate the temperature distribution in the rails of an electromagnetic rail gun (EMG) due to the confinement of the current in a narrow surface layer resulting from the skin effect. In order to obtain analytic results, we assume a simple geometry for the rails, an electromagnetic skin effect boundary edge that propagates with the accelerating armature, and a current carrying channel controlled by magnetic field diffusion into the rails. We compute the temperature distribution in the rails at the time that the armature leaves the rails. For the range of exit velocities, from 1500 m/s to 5000 m/s, we find the highest temperatures are near the gun breech. After a single gun firing, the temperature reaches the melting temperature of the metal rails in a layer of finite thickness near the surface of the rails, for rails made of copper or tantalum. We plot the thickness of the melt layer as a function of position along the rails. In all cases, the thickness of the melt layer increases with gun velocity, making damage to the gun rails more likely at higher velocity. We also calculate the efficiency of the EMG as a function of gun velocity and find that the efficiency increases with increasing velocity, but only if the length of the gun is sufficiently long. The thickness of the melted layer also decreases with increasing rail length. Therefore, there is a tradeoff: for rails of sufficient length, the gun efficiency increases with increasing velocity but the melted layer thickness in the rails also increases.

  16. Plasma Sprayed Pour Tubes and Other Melt Handling Components for Use in Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, David; Rieken, Joel; Heidloff, Andy; Besser, Matthew; Anderson, Iver

    2011-04-01

    Ames Laboratory has successfully used plasma sprayed ceramic components made from yttria stabilized zirconia as melt pouring tubes for gas atomization for many years. These tubes have proven to be strong, thermal shock resistant and versatile. Various configurations are possible both internally and externally. Accurate dimensions are achieved internally with a machined fugitive graphite mandrel and externally by diamond grinding. The previous study of the effect of spray parameters on density was extended to determine the effect of the resulting density on the thermal shock characteristics on down-quenching and up-quenching. Encouraging results also prompted investigation of the use of plasma spraying as a method to construct a melt pour exit stopper that is mechanically robust, thermal shock resistant, and not susceptible to attack by reactive melt additions. The Ames Laboratory operates two close-coupled high pressure gas atomizers. These two atomizers are designed to produce fine and coarse spherical metal powders (5{mu} to 500{mu} diameter) of many different metals and alloys. The systems vary in size, but generally the smaller atomizer can produce up to 5 kg of powder whereas the larger can produce up to 25 kg depending on the charge form and density. In order to make powders of such varying compositions, it is necessary to have melt systems capable of heating and containing the liquid charge to the desired superheat temperature prior to pouring through the atomization nozzle. For some metals and alloys this is not a problem; however for some more reactive and/or high melting materials this can pose unique challenges. Figure 1 is a schematic that illustrates the atomization system and its components.

  17. Polarization components in ?0 photoproduction at photon energies up to 5.6 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, W; Brash, E J; Gilman, R; Jones, M K; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A.J.R.; Punjabi,; Wesselmann, F R; et al

    2012-05-31

    We present new data for the polarization observables of the final state proton in the 1H(? ?, ? p)?0 reaction. These data can be used to test predictions based on hadron helicity conservation (HHC) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). These data have both small statistical and systematic uncertainties, and were obtained with beam energies between 1.8 and 5.6 GeV and for ?0 scattering angles larger than 75{sup o} in center-of-mass (c.m.) frame. The data extend the polarization measurements data base for neutral pion photoproduction up to E? = 5.6 GeV. The results show non-zero induced polarization above the resonance region. Themore »polarization transfer components vary rapidly with the photon energy and ?0 scattering angle in the center-of-mass frame. This indicates that HHC does not hold and that the pQCD limit is still not reached in the energy regime of this experiment.« less

  18. Environmental assessment of the proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The potential environmental impacts of construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory were evaluated. Key elements considered include on- and off-site radiological effects; socioeconomic effects; and impacts to aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna, wetlands, water and air quality, cultural resources, and threatened or endangered species. Also incorporated are the effects of decisions made as a result of the preliminary design (Title I) being prepared. Mitigation plans to further reduce impacts are being developed. These plans include coordination with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and other responsible agencies to mitigate potential impacts to wetlands. This mitigation includes providing habitat of comparable ecological value to assure no net loss of wetlands. These mitigation actions would be permitted and monitored by COE. A data recovery plan to protect cultural resources has been developed and approved, pursuant to a Programmatic Agreement among the US Department of Energy, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office. Applications for National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and air emissions permits have been submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), respectively. 71 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  20. Spectral analysis of Fermi-LAT blazars above 50 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the intrinsic (unattenuated by the extragalactic background light, EBL) power-law spectral indices of 128 extragalactic sources detected up to z~2 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) at very high energies (VHEs, E>50 GeV). The median of the intrinsic index distribution is 2.20 (versus 2.54 for the observed distribution). We also analyze the observed spectral breaks (i.e., the difference between the VHE and high energy, HE, 100 MeVGeV, spectral indices). The LAT has now provided a large sample of sources detected both at VHE and HE with comparable exposure that allows us to test models of extragalactic gamma-ray photon propagation. We find that our data are compatible with simulations that include intrinsic blazar curvature and EBL attenuation. There is also no evidence of evolution with redshift of the physics that drives the photon emission in high-frequency synchrotron peak (HSP) blazars. This makes HSP blazars excellent probes of the EBL.

  1. Precision Electron-Beam Polarimetry using Compton Scattering at 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Narayan; D. Jones; J. C. Cornejo; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; D. Dutta; D. Gaskell; J. W. Martin; K. D. Paschke; V. Tvaskis; A. Asaturyan; J. Benesch; G. Cates; B. S. Cavness; L. A. Dillon-Townes; G. Hays; E. Ihloff; R. Jones; S. Kowalski; L. Kurchaninov; L. Lee; A. McCreary; M. McDonald; A. Micherdzinska; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; V. Nelyubin; S. Page; W. D. Ramsay; P. Solvignon; D. Storey; A. Tobias; E. Urban; C. Vidal; P. Wang; S. Zhamkotchyan

    2015-09-22

    We report on the highest precision yet achieved in the measurement of the polarization of a low energy, $\\mathcal{O}$(1 GeV), electron beam, accomplished using a new polarimeter based on electron-photon scattering, in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab. A number of technical innovations were necessary, including a novel method for precise control of the laser polarization in a cavity and a novel diamond micro-strip detector which was able to capture most of the spectrum of scattered electrons. The data analysis technique exploited track finding, the high granularity of the detector and its large acceptance. The polarization of the $180~\\mu$A, $1.16$~GeV electron beam was measured with a statistical precision of $<$~1\\% per hour and a systematic uncertainty of 0.59\\%. This exceeds the level of precision required by the \\qweak experiment, a measurement of the vector weak charge of the proton. Proposed future low-energy experiments require polarization uncertainty $<$~0.4\\%, and this result represents an important demonstration of that possibility. This measurement is also the first use of diamond detectors for particle tracking in an experiment.

  2. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T > 160 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-12-01

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g ? 2/3) in relativistic (M ? ?T) and non-relativistic regimes (M >> ?T), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M ?< gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1 ? 2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around (M ? g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  3. K*0 production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; Daniel Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev

    2010-06-10

    We report on K*0 production at mid-rapidity in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62.4 and 200 GeV collected by the Solenoid Tracker at RHIC (STAR) detector. The K*0 is reconstructed via the hadronic decays K*0 \\to K+ pi- and \\bar{K*0} \\to K-pi+. Transverse momentum, pT, spectra are measured over a range of pT extending from 0.2 GeV/c to 5 GeV/c. The center of mass energy and system size dependence of the rapidity density, dN/dy, and the average transverse momentum, , are presented. The measured N(K*0)/N(K) and N(\\phi)/N(K*0) ratios favor the dominance of re-scattering of decay daughters of K*0 over the hadronic regeneration for the K*0 production. In the intermediate pT region (2.0 < pT < 4.0 GeV/c), the elliptic flow parameter, v2, and the nuclear modification factor, RCP, agree with the expectations from the quark coalescence model of particle production.

  4. K* production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_{NN}) = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV in STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadhana Dash; for the STAR Collaboration

    2008-05-01

    We report the measurements of $p_T$ spectra of $K^*$ up to intermediate $p_T$ region in mid-rapidity through its hadronic decay channel using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}$= 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV. Particle ratios such as $K^{*}/K$ and $K^{*}/\\phi$ is used to understand the rescattering and regeneration effect on $K^{*}$ production in the hadronic medium. The $K^*$ $v_{2}$ measurement using a high statistics Au+Au 200 GeV dataset and nuclear modification factor measurement supports the quark coalescence model of particle production in the intermediate $p_T$ range.

  5. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model of land surface water and energy ?uxes for GSMs, J.glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributedglacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed

  6. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsing, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Strategies and Point-Source Photometry Johan Samsing DARK-The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends onobjects in a single source photometry (Lauer 1999a) and the

  7. VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floater, Michael S.

    VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS Tim Volodine KULeuven, Department: meshing, surface reconstruction, volumetric grid, contouring, point clouds. Abstract: We propose, a volumetric method that does not rely on a signed distance function was proposed recently by Hornung

  8. Depleted uranium dioxide melting in cold crucible melter and production of granules from the melt for use in casks for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Seredenko, V.A.; Shatalov, V.V.; Mironov, B.S.; Kaplenkov, V.N.; Seredenko, A.V.; Saranchin, V.K.; Shulgin, A.S. [All-Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology (ARRICT), Moscow (Russian Federation); Haire, M.J.; Forsberg, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a joint research program between the Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States to develop new radiation shielding materials for use in the construction of casks for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive wastes. Research and development is underway to develop SNF storage, transport, and disposal casks using shielding made with two new depleted uranium dioxide (DUO{sub 2}) materials: a DUO{sub 2}-steel cermet, and, DUCRETE with DUAGG (DUO{sub 2} aggregate). Melting the DUO{sub 2} and allowing it to freeze will produce a near 100% theoretical density product and assures that the product produces no volatile materials upon subsequent heating. Induction cold-crucible melters (ICCM) are being developed for this specific application. An ICCM is, potentially, a high throughput low-cost process. Schematics of a pilot facility were developed for the production of molten DUO{sub 2} from DU{sub 3}O{sub 8} to produce granules <1 mm in diameter in a continuous mode of operation. Thermodynamic analysis was conducted for uranium-oxygen system in the temperature range from 300 to 4000 K in various gas mediums. Temperature limits of stability for various uranium oxides were determined. Experiments on melting DUO{sub 2} were carried out in a high frequency ICCM in a cold crucible with a 120 mm in diameter. The microstructure of molten DUO{sub 2} was studied and lattice parameters were determined. It was experimentally proved, and validated by X-ray analysis, that an opportunity exists to produce molten DUO{sub 2} from mixed oxides (primarily DU{sub 3}O{sub 8}) by reduction melting in ICCM. This will allow using DU{sub 3}O{sub 8} directly to make DUO{sub 2}-a separate unit operation to produce UO{sub 2} feed material is not needed. Experiments were conducted concerning the addition of alloying components, gadolinium et al. oxides, into the DUO{sub 2} melt while in the crucible. These additives improve neutron and gamma radiation shielding and operation properties of the final solids. Cermet samples of 50 wt % DUO{sub 2} were produced. (authors)

  9. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1972-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  10. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of False Floors for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of False Floors for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  11. Information Concerning the Contract for the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1974-01-01

    Information Concerning the Contract for the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  12. Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of a Building for the Electricity Sub-Station of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of a Building for the Electricity Sub-Station of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  13. Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1976-01-01

    Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator

  14. Addendum to the Contract for the Supply of 18 kV Switchgear for the North Experimental Area of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1976-01-01

    Addendum to the Contract for the Supply of 18 kV Switchgear for the North Experimental Area of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  15. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of 18 kV Switchgear for the North Experimental Area of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1976-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of 18 kV Switchgear for the North Experimental Area of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  16. Other Purdue Web points of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Other Purdue Web points of interest. Purdue University Home Page --- Schedule of Classes · Graduate School · Agronomy · Computer Science --- CS & E ...

  17. CenterPoint Energy New Homes Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program is only available to electric Customers in CenterPoint Energy's service territory (greater Houston area, Texas).

  18. pi0 photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 0.675 to 2.875-GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Dugger; Barry Ritchie; Jacques Ball; Patrick Collins; Evgueni Pasyuk; Richard Arndt; William Briscoe; Igor Strakovski; Ron Workman; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Gerard Audit; Harutyun Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; John Cummings; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; John Ficenec; Tony Forest; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; D. Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; J. Hu; Marco Huertas; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Kui Kim; Kinney Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; Valery Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Viacheslav Kuznetsov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ana Lima; Kenneth Livingston; K. Lukashin; Joseph Manak; Claude Marchand; Leonard Maximon; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Valeria Muccifora; James Mueller; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K Park; Craig Paterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; J. Shaw; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Xue kai Wang; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; Jae-Chul Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang

    2007-07-23

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^0$ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged photon beam with energies from 0.675 to 2.875 GeV. The results reported here possess greater accuracy in the absolute normalization than previous measurements. They disagree with recent CB-ELSA measurements for the process at forward scattering angles. Agreement with the SAID and MAID fits is found below 1 GeV. The present set of cross sections has been incorporated into the SAID database, and exploratory fits have been extended to 3 GeV. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations.

  19. A natural SM-like 126 GeV Higgs via non-decoupling D-terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Bertuzzo; Claudia Frugiuele

    2014-12-08

    Accommodating both a 126 GeV mass and Standard Model (SM) like couplings for the Higgs has a fine tuning price in supersymmetric models. Examples are the MSSM, in which SM-like couplings are natural, but raising the Higgs mass up to 126 GeV requires a considerable tuning, or the NMSSM, in which the situation is reversed: the Higgs is naturally heavier, but being SM-like requires some tuning. We show that models with non-decoupling D-terms alleviate this tension - a 126 GeV SM-like Higgs comes out basically with no fine tuning cost. In addition, the analysis of the fine tuning of the extended gauge sector shows that naturalness requires the heavy gauge bosons to likely be within the LHC run II reach.

  20. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds rsted-DTU, Electromagnetic Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds M. Lu¨thje Ørsted-DTU, Electromagnetic of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface rate beneath the melt ponds, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized

  1. A study into effects of CO{sub 2} laser melting of nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, M.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Hashmi, M.S.J. [Dublin City Univ. (Ireland); Yilbas, B.S. [KFDUPM, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1997-10-01

    Multiple treatment of engineering surfaces can provide improved surface properties that cannot be obtained by a single surface treatment. Consequently, this study investigates the effects of laser melting on the microstructures of plasma nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The study consists of two parts. In the first part, governing equations pertinent to the laser melting process are developed, and temperature variation across the melted zone is predicted. In the second, an experiment is conducted to nitride the surface of the alloy through plasma nitriding process and to melt the plasma nitrided and the untreated alloy surfaces with a CO{sub 2} laser beam. The resulting metallurgical changes are examined using x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. It is shown that three distinct nitride layers are formed in the vicinity of the alloy surface prior to the laser melting process, and that after the melting process nitrided species are depleted while cellular and dendritic structures are formed. In addition, the structure consisting of transformed {beta} containing coarse and fine acicular {alpha} is observed in the melted regions.

  2. Exclusive Photoproduction of Charged Pions in Hydrogen and Deuterium from 1 to 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingyan Zhu

    2004-02-28

    The study of the transition region in the description of exclusive processes and hadron structure, from the nucleon-meson degrees of freedom in meson-exchange models at low energy to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom in pQCD at high energy, is essential for us to understand the strong interaction. The differential cross section measurements for exclusive reactions at fixed center-of-mass angles enable us to investigate the constituent counting rule, which explicitly connects the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to the energy dependence of differential cross sections. JLab Experiment E94-104 was carried out in Hall A with two high resolution spectrometers. It included the coincidence cross section measurement for the [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] process with a deuterium target and the singles measurement for the [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process with a hydrogen target. The untagged real photons were generated by the electron beam impinging on a copper radiator. The photon energies ranged from 1.1 to 5.5 GeV, corresponding to the center-of-mass energies from 1.7 to 3.4 GeV. The pion center-of-mass angles were fixed at 50 deg, 70 deg, 90 deg, and also 100 deg, 110 deg at a few energies. The JLab E94-104 data presented in this thesis contain four interesting features. The data exhibit a global scaling behavior for both [pi]{sup -} and [pi]{sup +} photoproduction at high energies and high transverse momenta, consistent with the constituent counting rule and the existing [pi]{sup +} photoproduction data. This implies that the quark-gluon degrees of freedom start to play a role at this energy scale. The data suggests possible substructure of the scaling behavior, which might be oscillations around the scaling value. There are several possible mechanisms that can cause oscillations, for example the one associated with the generalized constituent counting rule involving quark orbital angular momentum. The data show an enhancement in the scaled cross section at center-of-mass energy near 2.2 GeV, where baryon resonances are not as well known as those at low energies. The differential cross section ratios for exclusive [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] to [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process at [theta]{sub cm} = 90 deg start to show consistency with the prediction based on one-hard-gluon-exchange diagrams at high energies.

  3. A proposal to extend the intensity frontier of nuclear and particle physics to 45 GeV (LAMPF 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    It is proposed to construct and operate a high-intensity, medium energy synchrotron addition to the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The addition is to consist of a 6-GeV, 170-..mu..A booster and a 45-GeV, 34-..mu..A, 3-Hz main synchrotron with 50% duty factor. The physics of strong and electroweak interactions to be studied at the facility is discussed, as well as accelerator design, scope of experimental area facilities, and cost estimates and schedule. (LEW)

  4. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R.; Kusdiantara, Rudy Puspita, Dila Sidarto, Kuntjoro A. Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y.

    2014-03-24

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  5. Hadron production in e(+)e(-) annihilation at ?s =29 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Derrick, M.; Fernandez, Eduardo H.; Gan, K. K.; Fries, R.; Hyman, L.; Kooijman, P.; Loos, J. S.; Musgrave, B.; Price, L. E.; Schlereth, J.

    1987-05-01

    - greement in all c ber obtained from TOF ases was well within the er- 2642 M. DERRICK et al. 35 0 i i i » f t ] f i » ) i t i i I i i I1. CO CO CO 200 150 100 0 —, , 0 (~) 0.5 ( p ( 0.7 M~Sr~~JL 0.5 (Gev/c) 1.5 C0 x I c5 0.8 0.4 l- 0.2 I 0.0 ~'0.6 0.8 ( & K... covers 90% of 4m sr with 15 layers of wires located between radii of 0.21 and 1.03 m. The outer chamber covers 60%%uo of 4m. with two layers of drift tubes at a mean radius of 1.89 m. The average drift-chamber resolution of 200 pm, combined with the 1...

  6. Exclusive pi^0 electroproduction at W > 2 GeV with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K.P.; Anderson, M.D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A.S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Carman, D.S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guegan, B.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Isupov, E.L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.Y.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.A.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Procureur, S.; Puckett, A.J.R.; Raue, B.A.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B.G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y.G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-08-01

    Exclusive neutral-pion electroproduction (ep-->e'p'pi0) was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4sigma/dtdQ2dxBdphipi and structure functions sigmaT+epsilonsigmaL,sigmaTT and ?LT as functions of t were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The data are compared with Regge and handbag theoretical calculations. Analyses in both frameworks find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. For the Regge analysis it is found that the inclusion of vector meson rescattering processes is necessary to bring the magnitude of the calculated and measured structure functions into rough agreement. In the handbag framework, there are two independent calculations, both of which appear to roughly explain the magnitude of the structure functions in terms of transversity generalized parton distributions.

  7. A 750 GeV Portal: LHC Phenomenology and Dark Matter Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Panci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We study the effective field theory obtained by extending the Standard Model field content with two singlets: a 750 GeV (pseudo-)scalar and a stable fermion. Accounting for collider productions initiated by both gluon and photon fusion, we investigate where the theory is consistent with both the LHC diphoton excess and bounds from Run 1. We analyze dark matter phenomenology in such regions, including relic density constraints as well as collider, direct, and indirect bounds. Scalar portal dark matter models are very close to limits from direct detection if gluon fusion dominates, and not constrained at all otherwise. Pseudo-scalar models are challenged by photon line limits in most of the parameter space.

  8. A 750 GeV Portal: LHC Phenomenology and Dark Matter Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco D'Eramo; Jordy de Vries; Paolo Panci

    2016-01-07

    We study the effective field theory obtained by extending the Standard Model field content with two singlets: a 750 GeV (pseudo-)scalar and a stable fermion. Accounting for collider productions initiated by both gluon and photon fusion, we investigate where the theory is consistent with both the LHC diphoton excess and bounds from Run 1. We analyze dark matter phenomenology in such regions, including relic density constraints as well as collider, direct, and indirect bounds. Scalar portal dark matter models are very close to limits from direct detection if gluon fusion dominates, and not constrained at all otherwise. Pseudo-scalar models are challenged by photon line limits in most of the parameter space.

  9. Production and Testing Experience with the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, F. Marhauser, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

    2011-09-01

    The CEBAF recirculating CW electron linear accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently undergoing a major upgrade to 12 GeV. This project includes the fabrication, preparation, and testing of 80 new 7-cell SRF cavities, followed by their incorporation into ten new cryomodules for subsequent testing and installation. In order to maximize the cavity Q over the full operable dynamic range in CEBAF (as high as 25 MV/m), the decision was taken to apply a streamlined preparation process that includes a final light temperature-controlled electropolish of the rf surface over the vendor-provided bulk BCP etch. Cavity processing work began at JLab in September 2010 and will continue through December 2011. The excellent performance results are exceeding project requirements and indicate a fabrication and preparation process that is stable and well controlled. The cavity production and performance experience to date will be summarized and lessons learned reported to the community.

  10. Parameter choices for a muon recirculating linear accelerator from 5 to 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S.

    2014-06-19

    A recirculating linear accelerator (RLA) has been proposed to accelerate muons from 5 to 63 GeV for a muon collider. It should be usable both for a Higgs factory and as a stage for a higher energy collider. First, the constraints due to the beam loading are computed. Next, an expression for the longitudinal emittance growth to lowest order in the longitudinal emittance is worked out. After finding the longitudinal expression, a simplified model that describes the arcs and their approximate expression for the time of flight dependence on energy in those arcs is found. Finally, these results are used to estimate the parameters required for the RLA arcs and the linac phase.

  11. Commissioning of helium compression system for the 12 GeV refrigerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Arenius, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    The compressor system used for the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade, also known as the CHL-2 compressor system, incorporates many design changes to the typical compressor skid design to improve the efficiency, reliability and maintainability from previous systems. These include a considerably smaller bulk oil separator design that does not use coalescing elements/media, automated control of cooling oil injection based on the helium discharge temperature, a helium after-cooler design that is designed for and promotes coalescing of residual oil and a variable speed bearing oil pump to reduce oil bypass. The CHL-2 helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels that supports the three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review several of these improvements and discuss some of the recent commissioning results.

  12. Progress on Neutron-Target Multipoles above 1 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. I. Strakovsky; W. Chen; H. Gao; W. J. Briscoe; D. Dutta; A. E. Kudryavtsev; M. Mirazite; M. Paris; P. Rossi; S. Stepanyan; V. E. Tarasov; R. L. Workman

    2012-08-05

    We report a new extraction of nucleon resonance couplings using pi- photoproduction cross sections on the neutron. The world database for the process gn-->pi-p above 1 GeV has quadrupled with the addition of new differential cross sections from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. Differential cross sections from CLAS have been improved with a new final-state interaction determination using a diagrammatic technique taking into account the SAID phenomenological NN and piN final-state interaction amplitudes. Resonance couplings have been extracted and compared to previous determinations. With the addition of these new cross sections, significant changes are seen in the high-energy behavior of the SAID cross sections and amplitudes.

  13. Annex to 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Annex to the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report updates the Conceptual Design Report of 1987 (CDR-87) to include the results of further optimization and changes of the design during the past year. The design changes can be summarized as affecting three areas: the accelerator system, conventional facilities, and experimental systems. Most of the changes in the accelerator system result from inclusion of a positron accumulator ring (PAR), which was added at the suggestion of the 1987 DOE Review Committee, to speed up the filling rate of the storage ring. The addition of the PAR necessitates many minor changes in the linac system, the injector synchrotron, and the low-energy beam transport lines. 63 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Observation of Polarization in Bottomonium Production at sqrt(s)=38.8 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. N. Brown; T. C. Awes; M. E. Beddo; M. L. Brooks; J. D. Bush; T. A. Carey; T. H. Chang; W. E. Cooper; C. A. Gagliardi; G. T. Garvey; D. F. Geesaman; E. A. Hawker; X. C. He; L. D. Isenhower; D. M. Kaplan; S. B. Kaufman; D. D. Koetke; G. Kyle; W. M. Lee; M. J. Leitch; N. Makins; P. L. McGaughey; J. M. Moss; B. A. Mueller; P. M. Nord; V. Papavassiliou; B. K. Park; J. C. Peng; G. Petitt; P. E. Reimer; M. E. Sadler; P. W. Stankus; R. S. Towell; R. E. Tribble; M. A. Vasiliev; J. C. Webb; G. R. Young

    2000-11-09

    We present a measurement of the polarization observed for bottomonium states produced in p-Cu collisions at sqrt(s)=38.8 GeV. The angular distribution of the decay dimuons of the Upsilon(1S) state show no polarization at small xF and pT but significant positive transverse production polarization for either pT > 1.8 GeV/c or for xF > 0.35. The Upsilon(2S+3S) unresolved states show a large transverse production polarization at all values of xF and pT measured. These observations are compared with an NRQCD calculation that predicts a transverse polarization in bottomonium production arising from quark-antiquark fusion and gluon-gluon fusion diagrams.

  15. JLab High Efficiency Klystron Baseline Design for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovater, J.; Delayen, Jean; Harwood, Leigh; Nelson, Richard; Wang, Haipeng

    2003-05-01

    A computer design of a 13.5 kW, 1497 MHz, CW type, 55% efficiency, 0.8 microPv beam perveance, ~40 dB gain, 5-cavity klystron has been developed for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade project.The design uses TRICOMP codes to simulate the gun, mod-anode section, solenoid focus channel and beam dump. The klystron tube was designed by JPNDISK (1D) code initially and then optimized by MASK (2D) code for the baseline parameters. All of these codes have been bunch marked by JLab 5 kW operational klystrons. The details of design parameters and the simulations by MAFIA (3D) for the cavity couplings tuners, and window are also going to be presented.

  16. The 750 GeV Diphoton Excess as a First Light on Supersymmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Casas; J. R. Espinosa; J. M. Moreno

    2015-12-24

    One of the most exciting explanations advanced for the recent diphoton excess found by ATLAS and CMS is in terms of sgoldstino decays: a signal of low-energy supersymmetry-breaking scenarios. The sgoldstino, a scalar, couples directly to gluons and photons, with strength related to gaugino masses, that can be of the right magnitude to explain the excess. However, fitting the suggested resonance width, Gamma ~ 45 GeV, is not so easy. In this paper we explore efficient possibilities to enhance the sgoldstino width, via the decay into two Higgses, two Higgsinos and through mixing between the sgoldstino and the Higgs boson. In addition, we present an alternative and more efficient mechanism to generate a mass splitting between the scalar and pseudoscalar components of the sgoldstino, which has been suggested as an interesting alternative explanation to the apparent width of the resonance.

  17. Upsilon cross section in p+p collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; M. Kopytine; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; J. M. Rehberg; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; E. Wingfield; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu

    2010-05-10

    We report on a measurement of the Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) -> e+e- cross section at midrapidity in p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV. We find the cross section to be 114 +/- 38 (stat.) +23,-24 (syst.) pb. Perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order in the Color Evaporation Model are in agreement with our measurement, while calculations in the Color Singlet Model underestimate it by 2 sigma. Our result is consistent with the trend seen in world data as a function of the center-of-mass energy of the collision and extends the availability of Upsilon data to RHIC energies. The dielectron continuum in the invariant mass range near the Upsilon is also studied to obtain a combined cross section of Drell-Yan plus (b b-bar) -> e+e-.

  18. ? meson production in d+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured ? meson production in d+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The ? meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 T) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|T range below 7 GeV/c. The ? meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of ? meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more »and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  19. Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuhiro Shigyo; Toshiya Sanami; Tsuyoshi Kajimoto; Yosuke Iwamoto; Masayuki Hagiwara; Kiwamu Saito; Kenji Ishibashi; Hiroshi Nakashima; Yukio Sakamoto; Hee-Seock Lee; Erik Ramberg; Aria A. Meyhoefer; Rick Coleman; Doug Jensen; Anthony F. Leveling; David J. Boehnlein; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2012-02-07

    Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target was measured at the Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The data allows for evaluation of neutron production process implemented in theoretical simulation codes. It also helps exploring the reasons for some disagreement between calculation results and shielding benchmark data taken at high energy accelerator facilities, since it is evaluated separately from neutron transport. The experiment was carried out using a 120 GeV proton beam of 3E5 protons/spill. Since the spill duration was 4 seconds, proton-induced events were counted pulse by pulse. The intensity was maintained using diffusers and collimators installed in the beam line to MTBF. The protons hit a copper block target the size of which is 5cm x 5cm x 60 cm long. The neutrons produced in the target were measured using NE213 liquid scintillator detectors, placed about 5.5 m away from the target at 30^{\\circ} and 5 m 90^{\\circ} with respect to the proton beam axis. The neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique using timing difference between the NE213 and a plastic scintillator located just before the target. Neutron detection efficiency of NE213 was determined on basis of experimental data from the high energy neutron beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum was compared with the results of multi-particle transport codes to validate the implemented theoretical models. The apparatus would be applied to future measurements to obtain a systematic data set for secondary particle production on various target materials.

  20. Determination of the fundamental softening and melting characteristics of blast furnace burden materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakker, T.; Heerema, R.H. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering

    1996-12-31

    An experimental technique to investigate the fundamental mechanisms taking place on a microscale in the softening and melting zone in the blast furnace, is presented. In the present paper, attention is focused on determination of the softening viscosity of porous wustite. The technique may be potentially useful to investigate more complex samples of ironbearing material, as occurring in the blast furnace. In comparison with the results obtained by other researchers the viscosity of porous wustite found in the present work is substantially higher than reported elsewhere for sinter and pellets. This may be an indication that softening is not merely a reflection of the solid state deformation under load of wustite. An important factor may be local melting of some of the phases present within the sinter and pellet structures.

  1. Flow-History-Dependent Behavior in Entangled Polymer Melt Flow with Multiscale Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Murashima; Takashi Taniguchi

    2011-10-05

    Polymer melts represent the flow-history-dependent behavior. To clearly show this behavior, we have investigated flow behavior of an entangled polymer melt around two cylinders placed in tandem along the flow direction in a two dimensional periodic system. In this system, the polymer states around a cylinder in downstream side are different from the ones around another cylinder in upstream side because the former ones have a memory of a strain experienced when passing around the cylinder in upstream side but the latter ones do not have the memory. Therefore, the shear stress distributions around two cylinders are found to be different from each other. Moreover, we have found that the averaged flow velocity decreases accordingly with increasing the distance between two cylinders while the applied external force is constant. While this behavior is consistent with that of the Newtonian fluid, the flow-history-dependent behavior enhances the reduction of the flow resistance.

  2. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  3. Numerical study of a slip-link model for polymer melts and nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Delbiondo; Elian Masnada; Samy Merabia; Marc Couty; Jean-Louis Barrat

    2013-06-10

    We present a numerical study of the slip link model introduced by Likhtman for describing the dy- namics of dense polymer melts. After reviewing the technical aspects associated with the implemen- tation of the model, we extend previous work in several directions. The dependence of the relaxation modulus with the slip link density and the slip link stiffness is reported. Then the nonlinear rheolog- ical properties of the model, for a particular set of parameters, are explored. Finally, we introduce excluded volume interactions in a mean field such as manner in order to describe inhomogeneous systems, and we apply this description to a simple nanocomposite model. With this extension, the slip link model appears as a simple and generic model of a polymer melt, that can be used as an alternative to molecular dynamics for coarse grained simulations of complex polymeric systems.

  4. Three dimensional finite element analysis of the flow of polymer melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimack, Peter

    Three dimensional finite element analysis of the flow of polymer melts R. Tencheva , T. Goughb , O.G, LS2 9JT, UK. b School of Engineering, Design & Technology, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP.g.harlen@leeds.ac.uk (O.G. Harlen), p.k.jimack@leeds.ac.uk (P.K. Jimack), h.klein@leeds.ac.uk (D.H. Klein), m

  5. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  6. Mixed Waste Treatment Cost Analysis for a Range of GeoMelt Vitrification Process Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L. E.

    2002-02-27

    GeoMelt is a batch vitrification process used for contaminated site remediation and waste treatment. GeoMelt can be applied in several different configurations ranging from deep subsurface in situ treatment to aboveground batch plants. The process has been successfully used to treat a wide range of contaminated wastes and debris including: mixed low-level radioactive wastes; mixed transuranic wastes; polychlorinated biphenyls; pesticides; dioxins; and a range of heavy metals. Hypothetical cost estimates for the treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste were prepared for the GeoMelt subsurface planar and in-container vitrification methods. The subsurface planar method involves in situ treatment and the in-container vitrification method involves treatment in an aboveground batch plant. The projected costs for the subsurface planar method range from $355-$461 per ton. These costs equate to 18-20 cents per pound. The projected cost for the in-container method is $1585 per ton. This cost equates to 80 cents per pound. These treatment costs are ten or more times lower than the treatment costs for alternative mixed waste treatment technologies according to a 1996 study by the US Department of Energy.

  7. Computer simulation study of surface wave dynamics at the crystal--melt interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

    2014-10-01

    We study, by means of computer simulations, the crystal-melt interface of three different systems: hard-spheres, Lennard Jones and the TIP4P/2005 water model. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of surface waves. We observe that the processes involved in the relaxation of surface waves are characterized by distinct time scales: a slow one related to the continuous recrystallization and melting, that is governed by capillary forces; and a fast one which we suggest to be due to a combination of processes that quickly cause small perturbations to the shape of the interface (like e. g. Rayleigh waves, subdiffusion, or attachment/detachment of particles to/from the crystal). The relaxation of surface waves becomes dominated by the slow process as the wavelength increases. Moreover, we see that the slow relaxation is not influenced by the details of the microscopic dynamics. In a time scale characteristic for the diffusion of the liquid phase, the relaxation dynamics of the crystal-melt interface of water is around one order of magnitude slower than that of Lennard Jones or hard spheres, which we ascribe to the presence of orientational degrees of freedom in the water molecule. Finally, we estimate the rate of crystal growth from our analysis of the capillary wave dynamics and compare it with previous simulation studies and with experiments for the case of water.

  8. Enhanced power factor of higher manganese silicide via melt spin synthesis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiaoya; Shi, Xun; Li, Yulong; He, Ying; Chen, Lidong; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-30

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of the Higher Manganese Silicide MnSi?.?? (HMS) synthesized by means of a one-step non-equilibrium method. The ultrahigh cooling rate generated from the melt-spin technique is found to be effective in reducing second phases, which are inevitable during the traditional solid state diffusion processes. Aside from being detrimental to thermoelectric properties, second phases skew the revealing of the intrinsic properties of this class of materials, for example the optimal level of carrier concentration. With this melt-spin sample, we are able to formulate a simple model based on a single parabolic band that can well describe the carrier concentration dependence of the Seebeck coefficient and power factor of the data reported in the literature. An optimal carrier concentration around 5x10²? cm?³ at 300 K is predicted according to this model. The phase-pure melt-spin sample shows the largest power factor at high temperature, resulting in the highest zT value among the three samples in this paper. And the maximum value is superior to those reported in the literatures.

  9. Enhanced power factor of higher manganese silicide via melt spin synthesis method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Xiaoya; Shi, Xun; Li, Yulong; He, Ying; Chen, Lidong; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-30

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of the Higher Manganese Silicide MnSi?.?? (HMS) synthesized by means of a one-step non-equilibrium method. The ultrahigh cooling rate generated from the melt-spin technique is found to be effective in reducing second phases, which are inevitable during the traditional solid state diffusion processes. Aside from being detrimental to thermoelectric properties, second phases skew the revealing of the intrinsic properties of this class of materials, for example the optimal level of carrier concentration. With this melt-spin sample, we are able to formulate a simple model based on a single parabolic band that can well describemore »the carrier concentration dependence of the Seebeck coefficient and power factor of the data reported in the literature. An optimal carrier concentration around 5x10²? cm?³ at 300 K is predicted according to this model. The phase-pure melt-spin sample shows the largest power factor at high temperature, resulting in the highest zT value among the three samples in this paper; the maximum value is superior to those reported in the literatures.« less

  10. Enhanced power factor of higher manganese silicide via melt spin synthesis method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Xiaoya [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shi, Xun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Li, Yulong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); He, Ying [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Li, Qiang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-28

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of the Higher Manganese Silicide MnSi?.?? (HMS) synthesized by means of a one-step non-equilibrium method. The ultrahigh cooling rate generated from the melt-spin technique is found to be effective in reducing second phases, which are inevitable during the traditional solid state diffusion processes. Aside from being detrimental to thermoelectric properties, second phases skew the revealing of the intrinsic properties of this class of materials, for example the optimal level of carrier concentration. With this melt-spin sample, we are able to formulate a simple model based on a single parabolic band that can well describe the carrier concentration dependence of the Seebeck coefficient and power factor of the data reported in the literature. An optimal carrier concentration around 5x10²? cm?³ at 300 K is predicted according to this model. The phase-pure melt-spin sample shows the largest power factor at high temperature, resulting in the highest zT value among the three samples in this paper. And the maximum value is superior to those reported in the literatures.

  11. Weak chaos and the 'melting transition' in a confined microplasma system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonopoulos, Chris; Basios, Vasileios [Interdisciplinary Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems (CeNoLi), Service de Physique des Systemes Complexes et Mecanique Statistique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Bountis, Tassos [Center for Research and Applications of Nonlinear Systems (CRANS), Department of Mathematics, University of Patras, 26500 Patras (Greece)

    2010-01-15

    We present results demonstrating the occurrence of changes in the collective dynamics of a Hamiltonian system which describes a confined microplasma characterized by long-range Coulomb interactions. In its lower energy regime, we first detect macroscopically the transition from a 'crystallinelike' to a 'liquidlike' behavior, which we call the 'melting transition'. We then proceed to study this transition using a microscopic chaos indicator called the smaller alignment index (SALI), which utilizes two deviation vectors in the tangent dynamics of the flow and is nearly constant for ordered (quasiperiodic) orbits, while it decays exponentially to zero for chaotic orbits as exp[-(lambda{sub 1}-lambda{sub 2})t], where lambda{sub 1}>lambda{sub 2}>0 are the two largest Lyapunov exponents. During the melting phase, SALI exhibits a peculiar stairlike decay to zero, reminiscent of 'sticky' orbits of Hamiltonian systems near the boundaries of resonance islands. This alerts us to the importance of the DELTAlambda=lambda{sub 1}-lambda{sub 2} variations in that regime and helps us identify the energy range over which 'melting' occurs as a multistage diffusion process through weakly chaotic layers in the phase space of the microplasma. Additional evidence supporting further the above findings is given by examining the GALI{sub k} indices, which generalize SALI (=GALI{sub 2}) to the case of k>2 deviation vectors and depend on the complete spectrum of Lyapunov exponents of the tangent flow about the reference orbit.

  12. Segregated structure of ring polymer melts near the surface: Molecular dynamics simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eunsang Lee; YounJoon Jung

    2015-10-20

    We study structural properties of a ring polymeric melt confined in a film in comparison to a linear counterpart using molecular dynamics simulations. Local structure orderings of ring and linear polymers in the vicinity of the surface are similar to each other because the length scale of surface-monomer excluded volume interaction is smaller than the size of an ideal blob of the ring. In a long length scale, while the Silberberg hypothesis can be used to provide a physical origin of confined linear polymer results, it no longer holds for a ring polymer case. We also present different structural properties of ring and linear polymers in a melt, including the size of polymers, an adsorbed amount, and the coordination number of a polymer. Our observation reveals that a confined ring in a melt adopts highly segregated conformation due to a topological excluded volume repulsion, which may provide a new perspective to understand the nature of biological processes, such as territorial segregation of chromosomes in eukaryotic nuclei.

  13. PURE STRATEGY NASH EQUILIBRIUM POINTS AND THE LEFSCHETZ FIXED POINT THEOREM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    PURE STRATEGY NASH EQUILIBRIUM POINTS AND THE LEFSCHETZ FIXED POINT THEOREM by Leigh Tesfatsion of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 #12;ABSTRAcr A pure strategy Nash equilibrium point existence theorem cases of the existence theorem are also discussed. #12;PURE STRATEGY NASH EQUILIBRIUM POINTS

  14. arXiv:hepex/0306028 Coherent pair production by photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range incident on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arXiv:hep­ex/0306028 v2 24 Jun 2004 Coherent pair production by photons in the 20-170 GeV energy: June 24, 2004) The cross section for coherent pair production by linearly polarised photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range was measured for photon aligned incidence on ultra-high quality diamond and germa

  15. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ to 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Jamel, A; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bai, X; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Black, D; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bryslawskyj, J; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Cronin, N; Crossette, N; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Ge, H; Germain, M; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Hayashi, S; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isinhue, A; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khandai, P K; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y -S; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kofarago, M; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, G H; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Maruyama, T; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Midori, J; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of midrapidity charged particle multiplicity distributions, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, $dE_T/d\\eta$, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ and 62.4 GeV, Cu$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, U$+$U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=193$ GeV, $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, $^{3}$He$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, and $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. Centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity are presented in terms of the number of nucleon participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, and the number of constituent quark participants, $N_{q{\\rm p}}$. For all $A$$+$$A$ collisions down to $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7$ GeV, it is observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with $N_{q{\\rm p}}$ than scalin...

  16. Physics of vacuum polarization ... Lectures on the physics of vacuum polarization: from GeV to TeV scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röder, Beate

    Physics of vacuum polarization ... Lectures on the physics of vacuum polarization: from GeV to Te Frascati, Frascati, Italy ­ November 9-13, 2009 ­ #12;Physics of vacuum polarization ... Outline of Lecture: x Introduction, theory tools, non-perturbative and perturbative aspects y Vacuum Polarization in Low

  17. Simulation of the deflection of 200- and 450-GeV protons by a bent germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshcheev, V. P. Kholodov, A. K.; Morgun, D. A.

    2009-04-15

    It is shown that the result obtained by numerically solving the kinetic Fokker-Planck equation in the transverse-energy space on the basis of computer simulations of channeled-particle trajectories describes well the results of an experiment that studied the deflection of 200- and 450-GeV protons by a bent germanium crystal.

  18. Proposed structure for a crossed-laser beam, GeV per meter gradient, vacuum electron linear accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Proposed structure for a crossed-laser beam, GeV per meter gradient, vacuum electron linear We propose a dielectric-based, multistaged, laser-driven electron linear accelerator structure operating in a vacuum that is capable of accelerating electrons to 1 TeV in 1 km. Our study shows that a Ge

  19. Direct photons in 200 GeV p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au from PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Bathe; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2005-11-22

    Direct photons were measured with the PHENIX experiment in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. To tackle the p_T region below 5 GeV/c, direct photons were measured through their internal conversion into e^+e^- in Au+Au collisions.

  20. Direct photons in d+Au collisions at s_(NN)**(1/2)=200GeV with STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR collaboration

    2007-01-15

    Results are presented of an ongoing analysis of direct photon production in s_(NN)=200GeV deuteron-gold collisions with the STAR experiment at RHIC. A significant excess of direct photons is observed near mid-rapidity 0photons.

  1. Carbon Target Optimization for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory with a 6.75 GeV Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Carbon Target Optimization for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory with a 6.75 GeV Proton Driver X. Ding, UCLA MAP Spring 2014 Meeting 2731 May 2014 Fermilab 15/29/14 #12;OUTLINE · Carbon Target Configuration, Fieldmap and Setting · Carbon target optimization (tilt beam) · Carbon target yield comparison

  2. Measurement of D* mesons in jets from p+p collisions at sqrt [s]=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, M.

    We report the measurement of charged D[superscript *] mesons in inclusive jets produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy sqrt [s]=200??GeV with the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. ...

  3. Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz booster simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 130405 (2007)] allows direct and e#14;fficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted and beam loaded laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV (parameters not computationally accessible otherwise). This verifies the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated electron beam transverse dynamics and energy spread. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively. Agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference for a 0.1 GeV class stage. Obtaining these speedups and levels of accuracy was permitted by solutions for handling data input (in particular particle and laser beams injection) and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference, as well as mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness.

  4. Kaon and Pion Production in Central Au+Au Collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to its own anti-particle as well as to pion production in wide rapidity and energy ranges showsKaon and Pion Production in Central Au+Au Collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV$ I.C.Arsene,k , INiels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark gTexas A&M University, College Station

  5. Rapidity Dependence of Charged AntiparticletoParticle Ratios in Au+Au Collisions at # s NN = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark 8 Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 17843, USA 9 University­nucleus collisions [1, 2]. At the energy of # s NN =200 GeV considerable transparency is ex­ pected for Au­ tion mechanisms other than particle­antiparticle pair production play a substantial role. Therefore � p

  6. Identified particle transverse momentum distributions from AU + AU collisions at 62.4 GeV per nucleon pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Conor, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    Transverse momentum (PT) distributions for pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons have been measured near mid-rapidity for Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider ...

  7. Studies of nucleon-gold collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon pair using tagged d+Au interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Corey (Corey James)

    2006-01-01

    The spectra of charged hadrons produced near mid-rapidity in d+Au, p+Au and n+Au collisions at - = 200 GeV are presented as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. These measurements were performed using the ...

  8. PowerPoint Template white background_class 2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    , SiO 2 or other phases not related to arc melting or milling impurities were found. * Pellets >94% Theoretical density have been made (objective is 95.5%) using the conventional...

  9. Experimental investigation of frictional melting of argillite at high slip rates: Implications for seismic slip in subduction-accretion complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialko, Yuri

    of the melt layer. Our experimental results suggest that viscous braking can be efficient at shallow depths recently found in exhumed subduction thrusts, roof thrusts of duplex struc- tures [Ikesawa et al., 2003

  10. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk; Li, Delin

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using the lip pouring method. It was observed again that gating designs greatly influenced the melt filling velocity and the number of inclusion defects. The radial choked gating showed improvements in casting cleanliness and yield over the other gatings, even though no mold filters were used in the gating system.

  11. Freezing and Melting of 3D Complex Plasma Structures under Microgravity Conditions Driven by Neutral Gas Pressure Manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Klumov, B. A.; Huber, P.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Malentschenko, Yu.; Volkov, S.

    2011-05-20

    Freezing and melting of large three-dimensional complex plasmas under microgravity conditions is investigated. The neutral gas pressure is used as a control parameter to trigger the phase changes: Complex plasma freezes (melts) by decreasing (increasing) the pressure. The evolution of complex plasma structural properties upon pressure variation is studied. Theoretical estimates allow us to identify the main factors responsible for the observed behavior.

  12. Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. VPP Points of Contact web version 07092015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Updated 792015 VPP POINTS OF CONTACT Organization DOE POC Contractor DOE Federal POC Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL)222-S Laboratory Analytical...

  14. SIMPLE EXPLICIT FORMULA FOR COUNTING LATTICE POINTS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-02-14

    by a simple formula involving the evaluation of ? zx over the integral points of those ... different) formula from a decomposition of the generating function into.

  15. HOLOMORPHIC ONE FORMS, INTEGRAL AND RATIONAL POINTS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-23

    Abstract The first goal of this paper is to study the question of finiteness of integral points on a cofinite non-compact complex two dimensional ball quotient ...

  16. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  17. New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Wolf Point Substation, Roosevelt County, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western), an agency of the United States Department of Energy, is proposing to construct the 115-kV Wolf Point Substation near Wolf Point in Roosevelt County, Montana (Figure 1). As part of the construction project, Western's existing Wolf Point Substation would be taken out of service. The existing 115-kV Wolf Point Substation is located approximately 3 miles west of Wolf Point, Montana (Figure 2). The substation was constructed in 1949. The existing Wolf Point Substation serves as a Switching Station'' for the 115-kV transmission in the region. The need for substation improvements is based on operational and reliability issues. For this environmental assessment (EA), the environmental review of the proposed project took into account the removal of the old Wolf Point Substation, rerouting of the five Western lines and four lines from the Cooperatives and Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, and the new road into the proposed substation. Reference to the new proposed Wolf Point Substation in the EA includes these facilities as well as the old substation site. The environmental review looked at the impacts to all resource areas in the Wolf Point area. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  19. GeoMelt{sup R} ICV{sup TM} Treatment of Sellafield Pond Solids Waste - 13414

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, Keith; Woosley, Steve; Campbell, Brett [Kurion, Inc., GeoMelt Division, 3015 Horn Rapids Road, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Kurion, Inc., GeoMelt Division, 3015 Horn Rapids Road, Richland, Washington (United States); Wong, Martin; Hill, Joanne [AMEC Inc., Birchwood Park, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)] [AMEC Inc., Birchwood Park, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Kurion, Inc., in partnership with AMEC Ltd., is demonstrating its GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} Technology to Sellafield Ltd. (SL). SL is evaluating the proposition of directly converting a container (skip/box/drum) of raw solid ILW into an immobilized waste form using thermal treatment, such that the resulting product is suitable for interim storage at Sellafield and subsequent disposal at a future Geological Disposal Facility. Potential SL feed streams include sludges, ion-exchange media, sand, plutonium contaminated material, concrete, uranium, fuel cladding, soils, metals, and decommissioning wastes. The solid wastes have significant proportions of metallic constituents in the form of containers, plant equipment, structural material and swarf arising from the nuclear operations at Sellafield. GeoMelt's proprietary ICV process was selected for demonstration, with the focus being high and reactive metal wastes arising from solid ILW material. A composite surrogate recipe was used to demonstrate the technology towards treating waste forms of diverse types and shapes, as well as those considered difficult to process; all the while requiring few (if any) pre-treatment activities. Key strategic objectives, along with their success criterion, were established by SL for this testing, namely: 1. Passivate and stabilize the raw waste simulant, as demonstrated by the entire quantity of material being vitrified, 2. Immobilize the radiological and chemo-toxic species, as demonstrated via indicative mass balance using elemental analyses from an array of samples, 3. Production of an inert and durable product as evidenced by transformation of reactive metals to their inert oxide forms and satisfactory leachability results using PCT testing. Two tests were performed using the GeoMelt Demonstration Unit located at AMEC's Birchwood Park Facilities in the UK. Post-melt examination of the first test indicated some of the waste simulant had not fully processed, due to insufficient processing time and melt temperature. A second test, incorporating operational experience from the first test, was performed and resulted in all of the 138 kg of feed material being treated. The waste simulant portion, at 41 kg, constituted 30 wt% of the total feed mass, with over 90% of this being made up of various reactive and non-reactive metals. The 95 liters of staged material was volume reduced to 41 liters, providing a 57% overall feed to product volume reduction in a fully passivated two-phase glass/metal product. The GeoMelt equipment operated as designed, vitrifying the entire batch of waste simulant. Post-melt analytical testing verified that 91-99+% of the radiological tracer metals were uniformly distributed within the glass/cast refractory/metal product, and the remaining fraction was captured in the offgas filtration systems. PCT testing of the glass and inner refractory liner showed leachability results that outperform the DOE regulatory limit of 2 g/m{sup 2} for the radiological species of interest (Sr, Ru, Cs, Eu, Re), and by more than an order of magnitude better for standard reference analytes (B, Na, Si). (authors)

  20. On Robust Regression in Photogrammetric Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Konrad

    On Robust Regression in Photogrammetric Point Clouds Konrad Schindler and Horst Bischof Institute,bischof}@icg.tu-graz.ac.at Abstract. Many applications in computer vision require robust linear regression on photogrammetrically for robust regression are based on distance measures from the regression surface to the points

  1. Traveling water waves with point vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-03-20

    We construct small-amplitude solitary traveling gravity-capillary water waves with a finite number of point vortices along a vertical line, on finite depth. This is done using a local bifurcation argument. The properties of the resulting waves are also examined: We find that they depend significantly on the position of the point vortices in the water column.

  2. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  3. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  4. Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01

    We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  5. Energy peak: back to the Galactic Center GeV gamma-ray excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Doojin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism enabling us to have a continuum bump as a signature of gamma-ray excess in indirect detection experiments of dark matter (DM), postulating a generic dark sector having (at least) two DM candidates. With the assumption of non-zero mass gap between the two DM candidates, the heavier one directly communicates to the partner of the lighter one. Such a partner then decays into a lighter DM particle along with a dark "pion" or "axion-like" particle (ALP), which further decays into a pair of photons, via a more-than-one step cascade decay process. Since the cascade is initiated by the dark partner obtaining a non-trivial fixed boost factor, a continuum gamma-ray energy spectrum naturally arises. We apply the main idea to the energy spectrum of the GeV gamma-rays from around the Galactic Center (GC), and find that the relevant observational data is well-reproduced by the theory expectation predicted by the proposed mechanism. Remarkably, the relevant energy spectrum has a robust peak at h...

  6. Exclusive $?^0$ electroproduction at $W>2$ GeV with CLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bedlinskiy; V. Kubarovsky; S. Niccolai; P. Stoler; K. P. Adhikari; M. D. Anderson; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; A. S. Biselli; S. Boiarinov; J. Bono; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; L. Colaneri; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; J. A. Fleming; T. A. Forest; B. Garillon; M. Gar\\c con; G. Gavalian; N. Gevorgyan; Y. Ghandilyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; B. Guegan; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; D. Jenkins; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; S. E. Kuhn; S. V. Kuleshov; P. Lenisa; W. I. Levine; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I . J . D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; C. I. Moody; H. Moutarde; A Movsisyan; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. L. Pappalardo; K. Park; S. Park; E. Pasyuk; E. Phelps; W. Phelps; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; J. W. Price; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; S. Procureur; A. J. R. Puckett; B. A. Raue; M. Ripani; B. G. Ritchie; A. Rizzo; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatié; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; I. Senderovich; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; V. Sytnik; W. Tang; Ye Tian; M. Ungaro; A. V. Vlassov; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D. Watts; X. Wei; L. B. Weinstein; M. Yurov; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta; for the CLAS Collaboration

    2014-05-05

    Exclusive neutral-pion electroproduction ($ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\pi^0$) was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections $d^4\\sigma/dtdQ^2dx_Bd\\phi_\\pi$ and structure functions $\\sigma_T+\\epsilon\\sigma_L, \\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ as functions of $t$ were obtained over a wide range of $Q^2$ and $x_B$. The data are compared with Regge and handbag theoretical calculations. Analyses in both frameworks find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. For the Regge analysis it is found that the inclusion of vector meson rescattering processes is necessary to bring the magnitude of the calculated and measured structure functions into rough agreement. In the handbag framework, there are two independent calculations, both of which appear to roughly explain the magnitude of the structure functions in terms of transversity generalized parton distributions.

  7. Light Stops, Light Staus and the 125 GeV Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; Gori, Stefania; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-08-01

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments have recently announced the discovery of a Higgs-like resonance with mass close to 125 GeV. Overall, the data is consistent with a Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs boson. Such a particle may arise in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM with average stop masses of the order of the TeV scale and a sizable stop mixing parameter. In this article we discuss properties of the SM-like Higgs production and decay rates induced by the possible presence of light staus and light stops. Light staus can affect the decay rate of the Higgs into di-photons and, in the case of sizable left-right mixing, induce an enhancement in this production channel up to $\\sim$ 50% of the Standard Model rate. Light stops may induce sizable modifications of the Higgs gluon fusion production rate and correlated modifications to the Higgs diphoton decay. Departures from SM values of the bottom-quark and tau-lepton couplings to the Higgs can be obtained due to Higgs mixing effects triggered by light third generation scalar superpartners. We describe the phenomenological implications of light staus on searches for light stops and non-standard Higgs bosons. Finally, we discuss the current status of the search for light staus produced in association with sneutrinos, in final states containing a $W$ gauge boson and a pair of $\\tau$s.

  8. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  9. Performance Testing of Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Helium Screw Compressors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2015-08-10

    Oil injected screw compressors have essentially superseded all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, reliability, minimal vibration, and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression. At the present state of compressor system designs for helium refrigeration systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. It is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design the compression system to match the refrigeration process. It is also important to identify those primary compressor skid exergetic loss mechanisms which maymore »be reduced, thereby offering the possibility of significantly reducing the input power to helium refrigeration processes which are extremely energy intensive. This paper summarizes the results collected during the commissioning of the new compressor system for Jefferson Lab's (JLab's) 12 GeV upgrade. The compressor skid packages were designed by JLab and built to print by industry. They incorporate a number of modifications not typical of helium screw compressor packages and most importantly allow a very wide range of operation so that JLab's patented Floating Pressure Process can be fully utilized. This paper also summarizes key features of the skid design that allow this process and facilitate the maintenance and reliability of these helium compressor systems.« less

  10. Evidence for the direct decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a new boson with a mass of approximately 125 GeV in 2012 at the LHC has heralded a new era in understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and possibly completing the standard model of particle physics. Since the first observation in decays to gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ boson pairs, an extensive set of measurements of the mass and couplings to W and Z bosons, as well as multiple tests of the spin-parity quantum numbers, have revealed that the properties of the new boson are consistent with those of the long-sought agent responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. An important open question is whether the new particle also couples to fermions, and in particular to down-type fermions, since the current measurements mainly constrain the couplings to the up-type top quark. Determination of the couplings to down-type fermions requires direct measurement of the corresponding Higgs boson decays, as recently reported by the CMS experiment in the study of Higgs decays to bottom quarks and...

  11. Discovery of a GeV Blazar Shining Through the Galactic Plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandenbroucke, J.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellini, A.; /Padua U., Astron. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Bolte, M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Cheung, C.C.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NAS, Washington, D.C.; Civano, F.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Donato, D.; /NASA, Goddard; Fuhrmann, L.; /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron.; Funk, S.; Healey, S.E.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Hill, A.B.; /Joseph Fourier U.; Knigge, C.; /Southampton U.; Madejski, G.M.; Romani, R.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Santander-Garcia, M.; /IAC, La Laguna /Isaac Newton Group /Laguna U., Tenerife; Shaw, M.S.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Steeghs, D.; /Warwick U.; Torres, M.A.P.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Van Etten, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovered a new gamma-ray source near the Galactic plane, Fermi J0109+6134, when it flared brightly in 2010 February. The low Galactic latitude (b = -1.2{sup o}) indicated that the source could be located within the Galaxy, which motivated rapid multi-wavelength follow-up including radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We report the results of analyzing all 19 months of LAT data for the source, and of X-ray observations with both Swift and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We determined the source redshift, z = 0.783, using a Keck LRIS observation. Finally, we compiled a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) from both historical and new observations contemporaneous with the 2010 February flare. The redshift, SED, optical line width, X-ray obsorption, and multi-band variability indicate that this new Gev source is a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Because several of the optical emission lines have equivalent width > 5 {angstrom}, this blazar belongs in the flat-spectrum radio quasar category.

  12. Contribution of GRB Emission to the GeV Extragalactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Casanova; B. L. Dingus; Bing Zhang

    2006-11-03

    TeV gamma rays emitted by GRBs are converted into electron-positron pairs via interactions with the extragalactic infrared radiation fields. In turn the pairs produced, whose trajectories are randomized by magnetic fields, will inverse Compton scatter off the cosmic microwave background photons. The beamed TeV gamma ray flux from GRBs is thus transformed into a GeV isotropic gamma ray flux, which contributes to the total extragalactic gamma-ray background emission. Assuming a model for the extragalactic radiation fields, for the GRB redshift distribution and for the GRB luminosity function, we evaluate the contribution of the GRB prompt and scattered emissions to the measured extragalactic gamma-ray flux. To estimate this contribution we optimistically require that the energy flux at TeV energies is about 10 times stronger than the energy flux at MeV energies. The resulting gamma-ray diffuse background is only a small fraction of what is observed, allowing blazars and other sources to give the dominant contribution.

  13. Overview of Nucleon Form Factor Experiments with 12 GeV at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisbani, Evaristo [INFN/Sanita, Roma, ITALY

    2014-06-01

    Since the R. Hofstadter pioneering experiments in the '50s, the measurements of the electromagnetic space-like nucleon form factors (FF's) have been a precious source of information for the understanding of the internal structure of the nucleons. In the last 15 years, the polarization transfer experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) have undermined our view of the mechanism of the electron scattering and renewed critical interest in the FF measurements. In the coming years, JLab, with its upgraded 12 GeV polarized, high intensity, electron beam combined to new targets and readout equipments, will offer unprecedented opportunities to extend the current proton and neutron FF's measurements to higher momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and to improve statistical and uncertainties at lower Q{sup 2}, where the nucleon size can be accurately investigated. The measurements at high Q{sup 2} will provide also new insights on the elusive quark orbital angular momenta, will contribute to constraint two of the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions that are expected to describe more consistently the nucleon structure, and in general will test the validity of quite a few fundamental nucleon models in a region of transition between perturbative and non perturbative regimes. A selection of the relevant properties of the FF's, and the main results of JLab are shortly reviewed; the new proposed and approved experiments on FF's at JLab are presented addressing some key details, the expected experimental achievements and the new equipment designed for them.

  14. Chemical non-equilibrium and deconfinement in 200 A GeV Sulphur induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean Letessier; Johann Rafelski

    1998-10-06

    We interpret hadronic particle abundances produced in S--Au/W/Pb 200 A GeV reactions in terms of the final state hadronic phase space model and determine by a data fit of the chemical hadron freeze-out parameters. Allowing for the flavor abundance non-equilibrium a highly significant fit to experimental particle abundance data emerges, which supports possibility of strangeness distillation. We find under different strategies stable values for freeze-out temperature T_f=143\\pm3 MeV, baryochemical potential \\mu_B= 173\\pm6 MeV, ratio of strangeness (\\gamma_s) and light quark (\\gamma_q) phase space occupancies \\gamma_s/\\gamma_q=0.60\\pm0.02, and \\gamma_q=1.22\\pm0.05 without accounting for collective expansion (radial flow). When introducing flow effects which allow a consistent description of the transverse mass particle spectra, yielding |v_c|=0.49\\pm0.01c, we find \\gamma_s/\\gamma_q=0.69\\pm0.03, \\gamma_q=1.41\\pm0.08. The strange quark fugacity is fitted at \\lambda_s=1.00\\pm0.02 suggesting chemical freeze-out directly from the deconfined phase.

  15. Photoproduction of eta-mesons off nuclei for Eg < 2.2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mertens; I. Jaegle; P. Muehlich; J. C. S. Bacelar; B. Bantes; O. Bartholomy; D. E. Bayadilov; R. Beck; Y. A. Beloglazov; R. Castelijns; V. Crede; H. Dutz; A. Ehmanns; D. Elsner; K. Essig; R. Ewald; I. Fabry; K. Fornet-Ponse; M. Fuchs; C. Funke; R. Gothe; R. Gregor; A. B. Gridnev; E. Gutz; S. Hoeffgen; P. Hoffmeister; I. Horn; J. Junkersfeld; H. Kalinowsky; S. Kammer; V. Kleber; Frank Klein; Friedrich Klein; E. Klempt; M. Konrad; M. Kotulla; B. Krusche; M. Lang; J. Langheinrich; H. Loehner; I. V. Lopatin; J. Lotz; S. Lugert; D. Menze; J. G. Messchendorp; V. Metag; C. Morales; U. Mosel; M. Nanova; D. V. Novinski; R. Novotny; M. Ostrick; L. M. Pant; H. van Pee; M. Pfeiffer; A. K. Radkov; A. Roy; S. Schadmand; C. Schmidt; H. Schmieden; B. Schoch; S. Shende; V. Sokhoyan; A. Suele; V. V. Sumachev; T. Szczepanek; U. Thoma; D. Trnka; R. Varma; D. Walther; C. Weinheimer; C. Wendel

    2008-10-15

    Photoproduction of $\\eta$ mesons off $^{12}$C, $^{40}$Ca, $^{93}$Nb, and $^{nat}$Pb nuclei has been measured with a tagged photon beam with energies between 0.6 and 2.2 GeV. The experiment was performed at the Bonn ELSA accelerator with the combined setup of the Crystal Barrel and TAPS calorimeters. It aimed at the in-medium properties of the S$_{11}$(1535) nucleon resonance and the study of the absorption properties of nuclear matter for $\\eta$ mesons. Careful consideration was given to contributions from $\\eta\\pi$ final states and secondary production mechanisms of $\\eta$-mesons e.g. from inelastic $\\pi N$ reactions of intermediate pions. The analysis of the mass number scaling shows that the nuclear absorption cross section $\\sigma_{N\\eta}$ for $\\eta$ mesons is constant over a wide range of the $\\eta$ momentum. The comparison of the excitation functions to data off the deuteron and to calculations in the framework of a BUU-model show no unexplained in-medium modifications of the S$_{11}$(1535).

  16. Measurement of mechanical vibrations excited in aluminium resonators by 0.6 GeV electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. D. van Albada; E. Coccia; V. Fafone; H. van der Graaf; G. Heijboer; J. W. van Holten; W. J. Kasdorp; J. B. van der Laan; L. Lapikas; G. Mazzitelli; G. J. L. Nooren; C. W. J. Noteboom; J. E. J. Oberski; G. Pallottino; H. Z. Peek; F. Ronga; A. Schimmel; T. G. B. W. Sluijk; P. Steman; J. Venema; P. K. A. de Witt Huberts

    2000-01-11

    We present measurements of mechanical vibrations induced by 0.6 GeV electrons impinging on cylindrical and spherical aluminium resonators. To monitor the amplitude of the resonator's vibrational modes we used piezoelectric ceramic sensors, calibrated by standard accelerometers. Calculations using the thermo-acoustic conversion model, agree well with the experimental data, as demonstrated by the specific variation of the excitation strengths with the absorbed energy, and with the traversing particles' track positions. For the first longitudinal mode of the cylindrical resonator we measured a conversion factor of 7.4 +- 1.4 nm/J, confirming the model value of 10 nm/J. Also, for the spherical resonator, we found the model values for the L=2 and L=1 mode amplitudes to be consistent with our measurement. We thus have confirmed the applicability of the model, and we note that calculations based on the model have shown that next generation resonant mass gravitational wave detectors can only be expected to reach their intended ultra high sensitivity if they will be shielded by an appreciable amount of rock, where a veto detector can reduce the background of remaining impinging cosmic rays effectively.

  17. Confined bilayer water melts like two highly correlated layers of Lennard-Jones particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jon Zubeltzu; Fabiano Corsetti; M. -V. Férnandez-Serra; Emilio Artacho

    2015-10-20

    A confined bilayer of water is studied at different temperatures and densities by classical and {\\em ab initio} molecular dynamics simulations. At high density, hydrogen disorder is found to be behind the reported continuous phase transition. We observe the existence of a hexatic phase, suggesting that the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory of a defect-mediated 2D crystal melting occurs. The liquid at different densities maintains the basic structure of the triangular ice. The two layers of liquid at high density show a strong correlation between one another without exchange of matter.

  18. Tunable mega-ampere electron current propagation in solids by dynamic control of lattice melt

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    MacLellan, D.? A.; Carroll, D.? C.; Gray, R.? J.; Booth, N.; Burza, M.; Desjarlais, M.? P.; Du, F.; Neely, D.; Powell, H.? W.; Robinson, A.? P.?L.; et al

    2014-10-31

    The influence of lattice-melt-induced resistivity gradients on the transport of mega-ampere currents of fast electrons in solids is investigated numerically and experimentally using laser-accelerated protons to induce isochoric heating. Tailoring the heating profile enables the resistive magnetic fields which strongly influence the current propagation to be manipulated. This tunable laser-driven process enables important fast electron beam properties, including the beam divergence, profile, and symmetry to be actively tailored, and without recourse to complex target manufacture.

  19. Chemical stability of melt-cast refractories in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abanin, V.I.; Federov, A.A.; Malyavin, A.G.; Ketov, A.N.

    1983-02-20

    Melts based on V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ are promising as catalysts for conversion of sulfur dioxide and thermocatalytic decomposition of spent sulfuric acid. The high chemical activity of such media with respect to metallic materials necessitates development of new materials of construction not based on metals. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence the composition and structure of melt-cast refractories on their chemical stability in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melts. The chemical stability of refractories based on SiO/sub 2/ in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt is raised by the presence of chain calcium silicates with pyroxene and pyroxenoid chains, and lowered in presence of the oxides of zirconium, zinc, and cobalt in the materials. Fused quartz, cor-93, cast stone of diopside composition, and basalt-dolomite cast stone have high chemical stability in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt and can be recommended as construction materials for equipment used for thermocatalytic decomposition of spent sulfuric acid.

  20. AGN observations with a less than 100 GeV threshold using H.E.S.S. II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaborov, Dmitry; Taylor, Andrew M; Lenain, Jean-Philippe; Sanchez, David; Parsons, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The recent addition of the 28 m Cherenkov telescope (CT5) to the H.E.S.S. array extended the experiment's sensitivity towards low energies. The lowest energy threshold is obtained using monoscopic observations with CT5, providing access to gamma-ray energies below 100 GeV. This is particularly beneficial for studies of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with soft spectra and located at redshifts >= 0.5. Stereoscopic measurements with the full array (CT1-5) provide a better background rejection than CT5 Mono, at a cost of a higher threshold. We report on the analysis employing the CT5 data for AGN observations with a < 100 GeV threshold. In particular, the spectra of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 are presented.