National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for getters tested bone

  1. Scaled Testing of Hydrogen Gas Getters for Transuranic Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, J.; Mroz, E.; Haga, M.; Hollis, W. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States); Peterson, E.; Stone, M.; Orme, C.; Luther, T.; Benson, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage and shipment containers. Hydrogen forms a flammable mixture with air over a wide range of concentrations (5% to 75%), and very low energy is needed to ignite hydrogen-air mixtures. For these reasons, the concentration of hydrogen in waste shipment containers (Transuranic Package Transporter-II or TRUPACT-II containers) needs to remain below the lower explosion limit of hydrogen in air (5 vol%). Accident scenarios and the resulting safety analysis require that this limit not be exceeded. The use of 'hydrogen getters' is being investigated as a way to prevent the build up of hydrogen in TRUPACT-II containers. Preferred getters are solid materials that scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and chemically and irreversibly bind it into the solid state. In this study, two getter systems are evaluated: a) 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl)benzene or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds; and b) a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter, VEI or TruGetter, characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds. Carbon in both getter types may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. With oxygen present, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB and VEI performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests using small test volumes (ml-scale), high hydrogen generation rates, and short time spans of hours to days. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether DEB and VEI perform satisfactorily in actual drum-scale tests with realistic hydrogen generation rates and time frames. The two getter systems were evaluated in test vessels comprised of a Gas Generation Test Program-style bell-jar and a drum equipped with a composite drum filter. The vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the

  2. Design, fabrication, and testing of a getter-based atmosphere purification and waste treatment system for a nitrogen-hydrogen-helium glovebox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibeault, M. L.; Paglieri, S. N.; Tuggle, D. G.; Wermer, J. R.; Nobile Jr, A.

    2008-07-15

    A system containing a combination of getters (Zr-Mn-Fe, SAES St909; and Zr{sub 2}Fe, SAES St198) was used to process the nitrogen-hydrogen-helium atmosphere in a glovebox used for handling metal tritide samples. During routine operations, the glovebox atmosphere is recirculated and hydrogenous impurities (i.e. CQ{sub 4}, Q{sub 2}O, and NQ{sub 3}, where Q =H, D, T) are decomposed (cracked) and removed by Zr-Mn-Fe without absorbing elemental hydrogen isotopes. If the tritium content of the glovebox atmosphere becomes unacceptably high, the getter system can rapidly strip the glovebox atmosphere of all hydrogen isotopes by absorption on the Zr{sub 2}Fe, thus lessening the burden on the facility waste gas treatment system. The getter system was designed for high flowrate ( > 100 1/min), which is achieved by using a honeycomb support for the getter pellets and 1.27-cm diameter tubing throughout the system for reduced pressure drop. The novel getter bed design also includes an integral preheater and copper liner to accommodate swelling of the getter pellets, which occurs during loading with oxygen and carbon impurities. Non-tritium functional tests were conducted to determine the gettering efficiencies at different getter bed temperatures and flowrates by recirculating gas through the system from, a 6-m{sup 3} glovebox containing known concentrations of impurities. (authors)

  3. Complete Initial Scoping Tests on the Incorporation of Novel Loaded Iodine Getters into GCM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James

    2015-08-18

    This study encompasses initial scoping tests on the incorporation of a novel iodine loaded getter material into the Sandia developed low temperature sintering glass ceramic material (GCM) waste form. In particular, we studied the PNNL Ag-I-Aerogel. Optical microscopy indicates inhomogenous samples based on particle sizes and variations in color (AgI vs Ag/AgO on silica). TGA/MS data when heated in air indicates loss of iodine and organics (CO2) between 250-450°C a total of ~15wt% loss, with additional / small iodine loss when during 550°C hold for 1 hr. TGA/MS data when heated in N2 indicates less organic and slightly less iodine loss below 550°C, with no loss of iodine in 550°C 1 hour hold. Furthermore, a substantial mass loss of sulfur containing compounds is observed (m/e of 34 and 36) between 150 – 550°C in both air and N2 sintering atmospheres. In an effort to capture iodine lost to volatilization during heating (at temps below glass sintering temperature of 550°C), we added 5 wt% Ag flake to the AgIaerogel. Resulting data indicates the iodine is retained with the addition of the Ag flake, resulting in only a small iodine loss (< 1wt%) at ~350°C. No method of curtailing loss of sulfur containing compounds due to heating was successful in this scoping study.

  4. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  5. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, Larry A.; Mead, Keith E.; Smith, Henry M.

    1983-01-01

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  6. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  7. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  8. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  9. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  10. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device is disclosed. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500 C to about 700 C for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal. 1 fig.

  11. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully gettered by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in air

  12. Development of hydrogen gas getters for TRU waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, J. P. (John P.); Mroz, E. J. (Eugene J.); Peterson, E. (Eric); Stone, M. (Mark); Haga, M. J. (Marc J.)

    2004-01-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For this reason, the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in waste shipment containers (Transuranic Package Transporter-II or TP-II containers) is limited to the lower explosion limit of hydrogen in air (5 vol%). The use of hydrogen getters is being investigated to prevent the build up of hydrogen during storage and transport of the TP-II containers (up to 60 days). Preferred hydrogen getters are solid materials that scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and chemically and irreversibly bind it in the solid state. One proven getter, 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene or DEB, belongs to a class of compounds called alkynes, which are characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. These carbon atoms will, in the presence of suitable catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with hydrogen to form the corresponding saturated alkane compounds. Because DEB contains two triple bonds, one mole of DEB reacts with 4 moles of hydrogen. The standard formulation for the 'DEB getter' is a mixture of 75% DEB and 25% carbon catalyst (5% palladium on carbon). Certain chemicals such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are known to 'poison' and reduce the activity of the catalyst. Therefore, in addition to the standard formulation, a semi-permeable barrier that encapsulates and protects the getter and its catalyst from poisons was also developed. The uncoated and polymer coated getter formulations were subjected to tests that determined the performance of the getters with regard to capacity, operating temperature range (with hydrogen in nitrogen and in air), hydrogen concentration, poisons, aging, pressure, reversibility, and radiation effects. This testing program was designed to address the following performance requirements: (1) Minimum rate for hydrogen removal of 1.2E-5 moles hydrogen per second for 60 days; (2) Sufficient getter material within

  13. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2015-02-19

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 MΩ deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted

  14. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 MΩ deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted

  15. Low temperature, low pressure hydrogen gettering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D. Richard; Courtney, Robert L.; Harrah, Larry A.

    1976-06-15

    The invention relates to the gettering of hydrogen and its isotopes, the gettering materials being painted or coated onto, or otherwise disposed in an area or volume from which hydrogen is to be removed.

  16. Low temperature, low pressure hydrogen gettering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.R.; Courtney, R.L.; Harrah, L.A.

    1975-07-22

    A system is described for the gettering of hydrogen and its isotopes. The gettering materials are painted or coated onto, or otherwise disposed in an area or volume from which hydrogen is to be removed. (auth)

  17. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  18. Method for charging a hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C.E.; Keyser, M.A.; Benson, D.K.

    1998-09-15

    A method for charging a sample of either a permanent or reversible getter material with a high concentration of hydrogen while maintaining a base pressure below 10{sup {minus}4} torr at room temperature involves placing the sample of hydrogen getter material in a chamber, activating the sample of hydrogen getter material, overcharging the sample of getter material through conventional charging techniques to a high concentration of hydrogen, and then subjecting the sample of getter material to a low temperature vacuum bake-out process. Application of the method results in a reversible hydrogen getter which is highly charged to maximum capacities of hydrogen and which concurrently exhibits minimum hydrogen vapor pressures at room temperatures. 9 figs.

  19. Method for charging a hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Keyser, Matthew A.; Benson, David K.

    1998-01-01

    A method for charging a sample of either a permanent or reversible getter material with a high concentration of hydrogen while maintaining a base pressure below 10.sup.-4 torr at room temperature involves placing the sample of hydrogen getter material in a chamber, activating the sample of hydrogen getter material, overcharging the sample of getter material through conventional charging techniques to a high concentration of hydrogen, and then subjecting the sample of getter material to a low temperature vacuum bake-out process. Application of the method results in a reversible hydrogen getter which is highly charged to maximum capacities of hydrogen and which concurrently exhibits minimum hydrogen vapor pressures at room temperatures.

  20. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  1. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  2. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  3. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  4. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  5. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  6. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  7. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  8. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  9. Hydrogen and moisture getter and absorber for sealed devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, H.M.; Schicker, J.R.

    1999-03-30

    The present invention is a hydrogen getter and method for formulating and using the getter. This getter effectively removes hydrogen gas typically present in many hermetically-sealed electronic applications where the presence of such gas would otherwise be harmful to the electronics. The getter is a non-organic composition, usable in a wide range of temperatures as compared to organic getters. Moreover, the getter is formulated to be used without the need for the presence of oxygen. The getter is comprised of effective amounts of an oxide of a platinum group metal, a desiccant, and a gas permeable binder which preferably is cured after composition in an oxygen-bearing environment at about 150 to about 205 degrees centigrade.

  10. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  11. USE OF HYDROGEN GETTERS FOR ENSURING SAFE STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmall, T.; Hackney, B.; Traver, L.

    2010-05-20

    Plutonium oxide left over from the 3013 destructive surveillance process is ultimately disposed of as waste. Therefore, this material is not re-stabilized and packaged to meet the requirements of DOE-STD-3013. Instead, it is stored on an interim basis in compliance with the interim safe storage criteria issued by DOE in January 1996. One of the safe storage criteria requires actions to be taken to minimize the formation or accumulation of flammable gases inside the storage container. Personnel responsible for the safe storage of the material have chosen to use a polymer-based, ambient air compatible hydrogen 'getter' to prevent the formation of hydrogen gas inside the storage container and thus prevent the formation of a flammable gas mixture. This paper briefly describes the method in which the getter performs its functions. More importantly, this paper presents the results of the testing that has been performed to characterize the bounding effects of aging and demonstrate the use of the getter for long-term storage. In addition, the favorable results of a post-storage analysis of actual getter material are presented and compared with bounding predictions. To date, bounding test results have shown that after 18 months of continuous storage and 39 months of total storage at 70C, the getter is able to both recombine gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into water when oxygen is available, and irreversibly getter (i.e., scavenge) hydrogen from the vapor space when oxygen is not available, both under a CO{sub 2} environment. Further bounding testing has been deemed unnecessary, and continued post-storage testing will be conducted on a periodic basis. The first post-storage testing of deployed getter material after two years of service revealed that it still performed like new material.

  12. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0

  13. Engineering Report on the Fission Gas Getter Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, Lynne; Ghose, Sanjit; Gill, Simerjeet; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2012-11-01

    In 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested that a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)-led team research the possibility of using a getter material to reduce the pressure in the plenum region of a light water reactor fuel rod. During the first two years of the project, several candidate materials were identified and tested using a variety of experimental techniques, most with xenon as a simulant for fission products. Earlier promising results for candidate getter materials were found to be incorrect, caused by poor experimental techniques. In May 2012, it had become clear that none of the initial materials had demonstrated the ability to adsorb xenon in the quantities and under the conditions needed. Moreover, the proposed corrective action plan could not meet the schedule needed by the project manager. BNL initiated an internal project review which examined three questions: 1. Which materials, based on accepted materials models, might be capable of absorbing xenon? 2. Which experimental techniques are capable of not only detecting if xenon has been absorbed but also determine by what mechanism and the resulting molecular structure? 3. Are the results from the previous techniques useable now and in the future? As part of the second question, the project review team evaluated the previous experimental technique to determine why incorrect results were reported in early 2012. This engineering report is a summary of the current status of the project review, description of newly recommended experiments and results from feasibility studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS).

  14. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P.C.; Uribe, F.S.; Stevens, C.G.; Tsugawa, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP), a solid proton electrolyte, getters tritium gas and water vapor from air by DC electrical action. We have reduced the formation of residual tritiated water to less than 2%, and demonstrated that HUP can clean a 5.5 m/sup 3/ working glove box. Data are presented to illustrate the parameters of the gettering and a model is derived. Two other tritium gettering electrolytes have been discovered. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Wen L.

    1989-01-01

    A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm.sup.2. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000.degree. C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity.

  16. Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Wen Ling

    1987-10-14

    A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm/sup 2/. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000/degree/C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity. 2 figs.

  17. A Lithium Getter Pump System ---- nventors Richard Majeski, Eugene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Getter Pump System ---- nventors Richard Majeski, Eugene Kearns, and John Schmitt This invention is a device to pump volatile gases that bond to lithium in a high vacuum ...

  18. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  19. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Asmussen, Robert M.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most to the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.

  20. Gettering in multicrystalline silicon: A design-of-experiments approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, W.K.

    1994-07-01

    Design-of-experiment methods were used to study gettering due to phosphorus diffusion and aluminum alloying in four industrial multicrystalline silicon materials: Silicon-Film material from AstroPower, heat-exchanger method (HEM) material from Crystal Systems, edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) material from Mobil Solar, and cast material from Solarex. Time and temperature for the diffusion and alloy processes were chosen for a four-factor quadratic interaction experiment. Simple diagnostic devices were used to evaluate the gettering. Only EFG and HEM materials exhibited statistically significant gettering effects within the ranges used for the various parameters. Diffusion and alloying temperature were significant for HEM material; also there was a second-order interaction between the diffusion time and temperature. There was no interaction between the diffusion and alloying processes in HEM material. EFG material showed a first-order dependence on diffusion temperature and a second-order interaction between the diffusion temperature and the alloying time. Gettering recommendations for the HEM material were used to produce the best-yet Sandia cells on this material, but correlation with the gettering experiment was not strong. Some of the discrepancy arises from necessary processing differences between the diagnostic devices and regular solar cells. This issue and other lessons learned concerning this type of experiment are discussed.

  1. A comparison of gettering in single- and multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.L.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1996-05-01

    The differences in the impurity gettering between single and multicrystalline silicon are discussed. These differences arise from impurity-defect interactions that occur during thermal processing of multicrystalline material. A gettering model is proposed to explain the observed behaviour of gettering in multicrystalline cells.

  2. An issue paper on the use of hydrogen getters in transportation packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIGREY,PAUL J.

    2000-02-01

    The accumulation of hydrogen is usually an undesirable occurrence because buildup in sealed systems pose explosion hazards under certain conditions. Hydrogen scavengers, or getters, can avert these problems by removing hydrogen from such environments. This paper provides a review of a number of reversible and irreversible getters that potentially could be used to reduce the buildup of hydrogen gas in containers for the transport of radioactive materials. In addition to describing getters that have already been used for such purposes, novel getters that might find application in future transport packages are also discussed. This paper also discusses getter material poisoning, the use of getters in packaging, the effects of radiation on getters, the compatibility of getters with packaging, design considerations, regulatory precedents, and makes general recommendations for the materials that have the greatest applicability in transport packaging. At this time, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory composite getter, DEB [1,4-(phenylethylene)benzene] or similar polymer-based getters, and a manganese dioxide-based getter appear to be attractive candidates that should be further evaluated. These getters potentially can help prevent pressurization from radiolytic reactions in transportation packaging.

  3. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1998-11-24

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

  4. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Jr., Samuel M.; Bishop, Dawn M.; Follstaedt, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

  5. EFFECT OF THERMAL PROCESSES ON COPPER-TIN ALLOYS FOR ZINC GETTERING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Golyski, M.

    2013-11-01

    A contamination mitigation plan was initiated to address the discovery of radioactive zinc‐65 in a glovebox. A near term solution was developed, installation of heated filters in the glovebox piping. This solution is effective at retaining the zinc in the currently contaminated area, but the gamma emitting contaminant is still present in a system designed for tritium beta. A project was initiated to develop a solution to contain the {sup 65}Zn in the furnace module. Copper and bronze (a Cu/Sn alloy) were found to be candidate materials to combine with zinc‐65 vapor, using thermodynamic calculations. A series of binary Cu/Sn alloys were developed (after determining that commercial alloys were unacceptable), that were found to be effective traps of zinc vapor. The task described in this report was undertaken to determine if the bronze substrates would retain their zinc gettering capability after being exposed to simulated extraction conditions with oxidizing and reducing gases. Pure copper and three bronze alloys were prepared, exposed to varying oxidation conditions from 250 to 450{degree}C, then exposed to varying reduction conditions in He-H{sub 2} from 250-450{degree}C, and finally exposed to zinc vapor at 350{degree}C for four hours. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass change, and visual observation. It was observed that the as fabricated samples and the reduced samples all retained their zinc gettering capacity while samples in the "as-oxidized" condition exhibited losses in zinc gettering capacity. Over the range of conditions tested, i.e., composition, oxidation temperature, and reduction temperature, no particular sample composition appeared better. Samples reduced at 350{degree}C exhibited the greatest zinc capacity, although there were some testing anomalies associated with these samples. This work clearly demonstrated that the zinc gettering was not adversely

  6. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A. E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A. R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-08

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500 during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentra- tion of point defects (likely Pt) is “locked in” during fast (60 C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomeratesmore » at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. As a result, device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.« less

  7. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminatedmore » the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.« less

  8. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  9. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup } getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650?C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110?C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  10. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  11. Efficient combining of ion pumps and getter-palladium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paolini, C.; Mura, M.; Ravelli, F.

    2008-07-15

    Nonevaporable getters (NEGs) have been extensively studied in the last several years for their sorption properties toward many gases. In particular, an innovative alloy as a thin film by magnetron sputtering was developed and characterized at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It is composed of Ti-Zr-V and protected by an overlayer of palladium (Pd), according to a technology for which the authors got the licence. NEG-Pd thin films used in combination with ion getter pumps is a simple, easy way to handle pumping devices for ultrahigh and extremely high vacuum applications. To show how to apply this coating technology to the internal surface of different types of ion pumps, the authors carried out several tests on pumps of various shapes, sizes (in terms of nominal pumping speed), and types (diode, noble diode, and triode). Special care was taken during the thermal cycle of baking and activation of the pumps to preserve the internal film from sources of contamination and/or from the sputtering of the titanium cathodes of the pump. Some important remarks will be made about the most appropriate conditions of pressure and temperature. The performance of the NEG-Pd-coated ion pumps was evaluated in terms of ultimate pressure and hydrogen pumping speed. The contribution of the thin film is particularly relevant for the pumping of this gas, due to its high sticking factor on palladium and the great sorption capacity of the underlying getter. Finally, the possibility of further improvement by substituting palladium with other Pd-based alloys will also be evaluated.

  12. Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) Coatings for Vacuum Systems in Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manini, Paolo; Conte, Andrea; Raimondi, Stefano; Bonucci, Antonio

    2007-01-19

    Non evaporable Getter (NEG) films, sputter deposited onto the internal surfaces of vacuum chambers, have been proposed by CERN to substantially reduce the gas pressure in UHV-XHV systems. The NEG film acts as a conductance-free distributed pump inside a chamber. Being a barrier for gases it also reduces thermal out-gassing, thus allowing the achievement of very demanding pressure conditions. These features are ideal for very narrow, conductance limited chambers, like Insertion Devices, which cannot be always efficiently pumped by ordinary means. Recent investigations have also shown that NEG coatings do present additional interesting features, like low secondary electron yield and low gas de-sorption rates under ions, electrons and photons bombardment, compared to traditional technical surfaces. Experimental tests, carried out in several high energy machines and synchrotron radiations facilities have so far confirmed the benefits of NEG films in term of better vacuum, longer beam life time and stability, simplified machine design, reduced conditioning time and overall improved machine performances. For these reasons, NEG coating technology is now gaining increasing attention and it is seriously considered for upgrades in a number of machines and for future projects. In the present paper, we report SAES getters experience on NEG coating of chambers of different geometries, materials and sizes for a variety of projects related to synchrotron radiation facilities. Examples of applications in various machines, as well as typical issues related to chambers preparation, film deposition, quality control and characterization, are given.

  13. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, F.E.; Wasley, R.J.

    1982-06-22

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm[sup 2] or less of energy fluence.

  14. Method of gettering hydrogen under conditions of low pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.

    1983-08-09

    A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V[sub 1[minus]x]Cr[sub x])[sub 2] where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200 C, at pressures down to 10[sup [minus]6] Torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices. 3 figs.

  15. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less of energy fluence.

  16. Method of gettering hydrogen under conditions of low pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1983-01-01

    A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V.sub.1-x Cr.sub.x).sub.2 where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200.degree. C., at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  17. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, A.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S.; Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.

    2011-03-15

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 x 10{sup 17} H/(cm{sup 2}s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is {approx}0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  18. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibby, Ronald L.; Lawrence, Leo A.; Woodley, Robert E.; Wilson, Charles N.; Weber, Edward T.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1981-01-01

    A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

  19. Evaluation of RTV as a Moldable Matrix When Combined With Molecular Sieve and Organic Hydrogen Getter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    This work was undertaken in an effort to develop a combined RTV 615/3 molecular sieve/DEB molded component. A molded RTV 615/3? molecular sieve component is currently in production, and an RTV 615/DEB component was produced in the past. However, all three materials have never before been combined in a single production part, and this is an opportunity to create a new component capable of being molded to shape, performing desiccation, and hydrogen gettering. This analysis looked at weapons system parameters and how they might influence part design. It also looked at material processing and how it related to mixing, activating a dessicant, and hydrogen uptake testing.

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel element with vanadium getter on cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Carl E.; Carroll, Kenneth G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of vanadium as an oxygen getter on the inner surface of the cladding. The vanadium reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core to prevent the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is a method for coating the inner surface of small diameter tubes of cladding with a layer of vanadium.

  1. Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, D.E.; Herdt, G.C.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1997-01-07

    The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium. 9 figs.

  2. Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, David E.; Herdt, Gregory C.; Czanderna, Alvin W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium.

  3. Some aging aspects of DEB getters (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Some aging aspects of DEB getters Citation Details ... OSTI Identifier: 1116888 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-626255 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal ...

  4. Phosphorus and aluminum gettering - investigation of synergistic effects in single-crystal and multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, W.K.; Gee, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Synergistic effects from simultaneous phosphorus-diffusion/aluminium alloy gettering are investigated in three different crystalline- silicon substrates. The silicon materials, experimental design, characterization, and analysis are presented. Some evidence for synergism is observed in the finished cells on all three substrates types. These results are combined with complementary observations of the effects of oxidation on bulk properties of previously gettered substrates to suggest a high volume, low cost, process implementation which could give up to 9% relative increase in efficiency.

  5. Contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2014-05-27

    Methods for contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical semiconductor device comprises: a first step that includes gettering of impurities from a semiconductor wafer and forming a backsurface field; and a second step that includes forming a front contact for the semiconductor wafer, wherein the second step is performed after completion of the first step.

  6. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  7. Combined gettering and molten salt process for tritium recovery from lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, D.K.; Finn, P.A.; Bartlit, J.; Tanaka, S.; Teria, T.; Yamawaki, M.

    1988-02-01

    A new tritium recovery concept from lithium has been developed as part of the US/Japan collaboration on Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor Design Studies. This concept combines the ..gamma..-gettering process as the front end to recover tritium from the coolant, and a molten salt recovery process to extract tritium for fuel processing. A secondary lithium is used to regenerate the tritium from the gettering bed and, in the process, increases the tritium concentration by a factor of about 20. That way, the required size of the molten salt process becomes very small. A potential problem is the possible poisoning of the gettering bed by the salt dissolved in lithium. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Combined impurity gettering and defect passivation in polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhoef, L.A.; Michiels, P.; Sinke, W.C. ); Denisse, C.M.M.; Hendriks, M. ); van Zolingen, R.J.C. )

    1990-12-17

    Polycrystalline silicon wafers have been subjected to annealing (700 {degree}C, 1 h) and to a hydrogen plasma (350 {degree}C, 30 min) during the processing of solar cells. The annealing treatment enhances the bulk minority-carrier recombination lifetime by 19%, presumably by impurity gettering. The plasma treatment improves the lifetime by 26%; hydrogen passivation accounts for at least 2/3 of this improvement. Gettering and passivation are found to be complementary: application of both treatments results in a 43% increase in lifetime compared to standard.

  9. Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) Pumps: a Route to UHV-XHV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manini, Paolo

    2009-08-04

    Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) technology has been developed in the 1970's and since then adopted by industry, R and D labs, research centres and in large physics projects like accelerators, synchrotrons and fusion reactors. NEG pumps are very compact and vibration-free devices able to deliver very high pumping with minimal power requirement and electromagnetic interference. In the present paper, main features and performances of getter pumps are reviewed and discussed with a special focus to photocathode gun application, where UHV or XHV conditions are mandatory to ensure adequate gun life. NEG coating and future challenges for NEG technology are also discussed.

  10. Deposition and Characterization of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - Report on FY 14-15 Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen

    2015-10-15

    The goals of this work have been two-fold. First, to perform an initial, quantitative, optimization of getter performance, with the primary variables being DEB/Pd ratio and UV power. Second, to simplify the deposition process to make it more compatible with the DOE production environment.

  11. WORKSHOP ON DEVELOPMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE GETTERS FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN WASTE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Holt

    2006-03-13

    One of the important that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently undertaking is the development of a high-level nuclear waste repository to be located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concern is generated by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is due to potential releases as groundwater contamination, as described in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The dose to an off-site individual using this groundwater for drinking and irrigation is dominated by four radionuclides: Tc-99, I-127, Np-237, and U-238. Ideally, this dose would be limited to a single radionuclide, U-238; in other words, YMP would resemble a uranium ore body, a common geologic feature in the Western U.S. For this reason and because of uncertainties in the behavior of Tc-99, I-127, and Np-237, it would be helpful to limit the amount of Tc, I, and Np leaving the repository, which would greatly increase the confidence in the long-term performance of YMP. An approach to limiting the migration of Tc, I, and Np that is complementary to the existing YMP repository design plans is to employ sequestering agents or ''getters'' for these radionuclides such that their migration is greatly hindered, thus decreasing the amount of radionuclide leaving the repository. Development of such getters presents a number of significant challenges. The getter must have a high affinity and high selectivity for the radionuclide in question since there is approximately a 20- to 50-fold excess of other fission products and a 1000-fold excess of uranium in addition to the ions present in the groundwater. An even greater challenge is that the getters must function over a period greater than the half-life of the radionuclide (greater than 5 half-lives would be ideal). Typically, materials with a high affinity for Tc, I, or Np are not sufficiently durable. For example, strong-base ion exchange resins have a very high affinity for TcO{sub 4}{sup -} but are not expected to be durable. On the other hand, durable

  12. Method for absorbing hydrogen using an oxidation resisant organic hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2009-02-03

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably platinum, is disclosed. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently remove hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  13. Evaluation of H2 Getter Materials for Use in the TRUPACT-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.R.

    1999-11-15

    Savannah River Site (SRS) has many waste drums containing Pu-238 that exceed the currently allowed wattage for transportation in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). By eliminating layers of confinement in waste drums and using getters to remove hydrogen gas, the TRUPACT-II waste loading can be increased significantly, with the potential of reaching the package''s 40-watt thermal limit. The cost savings associated with increasing the waste loading are enormous, and can be measured by reduced numbers of shipments, required processing facilities, and years of effort. To support the decision-making process and provide a good starting point for future development efforts at SRTC, the design requirements for a getter system to be used in the TRUPACT-II were compiled and are discussed in detail in the Appendix.

  14. The effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area multicrystalline-silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.M.; Sopori, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) materials and cells feature large areal variations in material and junction quality. The regions with poor device quality have been predicted to have more recombination current at forward bias than a simple area-weighted average due to the parallel interconnection of the good and bad regions by the front junction. The authors have examined the effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area mc-Si cells. Cells with large areal inhomogeneities were found to have increased non-ideal recombination current, which is in line with theoretical predictions. Phosphorus-diffusion and aluminum-alloy gettering of mc-Si was found to reduce the areal inhomogeneities and improve large-area mc-Si device performance.

  15. Use of non evaporable getter pumps to ensure long term performances of high quantum efficiency photocathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sertore, Daniele Michelato, Paolo; Monaco, Laura; Manini, Paolo; Siviero, Fabrizio

    2014-05-15

    High quantum efficiency photocathodes are routinely used as laser triggered emitters in the advanced high brightness electron sources based on radio frequency guns. The sensitivity of “semiconductor” type photocathodes to vacuum levels and gas composition requires special care during preparation and handling. This paper will discuss the results obtained using a novel pumping approach based on coupling a 20 l s{sup −1} sputter ion getter pump with a CapaciTorr® D100 non evaporable getter (NEG) pump. A pressure of 8⋅10{sup −8} Pa was achieved using only a sputter ion pump after a 6 day bake-out. With the addition of a NEG pump, a pressure of 2⋅10{sup −9} Pa was achieved after a 2 day bake-out. These pressure values were maintained without power due to the ability of the NEG to pump gases by chemical reaction. Long term monitoring of cathodes quantum efficiencies was also carried out at different photon wavelengths for more than two years, showing no degradation of the photoemissive film properties.

  16. Characterization Of The Hydrogenation Products Of Bix (phenylethynyl) Benzene (DEB) Getter Using Combined GC/FTIR/MS, FT-Raman, and ATR Spectroscopies (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyrl, N. R.; Powell, G. L.

    2011-06-09

    Organic hydrogen getters are utilized to minimize hydrogen accumulation in sealed systems where such build up could produce either a safety problem from pressure build up or corrosion problem due the hydriding of metals contained in the sealed vessel. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) is a hydrogen getter that is based on the palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to single bonds in aromatic aryl compound. DEB is a getter mixed with 25% carbon and 1% Pd and pressed into pellets with some porosity. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reactions with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates.

  17. Workshop on development of radionuclide getters for the Yucca Mountain waste repository: proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Lukens, Wayne W. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

    2006-03-01

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository, located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility for permanent disposal of spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analysis has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are technetium, iodine, and neptunium, all of which are highly mobile in the environment. Containment of these radionuclides within the repository is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). These proceedings review current research and technology efforts for sequestration of the radionuclides with a focus on technetium, iodine, and neptunium. This workshop also covered issues concerning the Yucca Mountain environment and getter characteristics required for potential placement into the repository.

  18. Combined Impact of Heterogeneous Lifetime and Gettering on Solar Cell Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morishige, A.; Wagner, H.; Hofstetter, J.; Avci, I.; Canizo, C.; Buonassisi, T.

    2015-03-23

    We couple numerical process and device simulations to provide a framework for understanding the combined effects of as-grown wafer impurity distribution, processing parameters, and solar cell architecture. For this study, we added the Impurity-to-Efficiency simulator to Synopsys’ Sentaurus Process software using the Alagator Scripting Language. Our results quantify how advanced processing can eliminate differences in efficiency due to different as-grown impurity concentrations and due to different area fractions of defective wafer regions. We identify combinations of as-grown impurity distributions and process parameters that produce solar cells limited by point defects and those that are limited by precipitated impurities. Gettering targeted at either point defect or precipitate reduction can then be designed and applied to increase cell efficiency. We also visualize the post-processing iron and total recombination distributions in 2D maps of the wafer cross-section. PV researchers and companies can input their initial iron distributions and processing parameters into our software and couple the resulting process simulation results with a solar cell device design of interest to conduct their own analyses. The Alagator scripts we developed are freely available online at http://pv.mit.edu/impurity-to-efficiency-i2e-simulator-for-sentaurus-tcad/.

  19. OPERATION OF A TRITIUM GLOVEBOX CLEAN-UP SYSTEM USING ZIRCONIUM MANGANESE IRON AND ZIRCONIUM TWO IRON METAL GETTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. LARSON; K. COOK

    2000-08-01

    A metal hydride-based tritium clean-up system has been successfully operated for more than four years on an 11 m{sup 3} helium/nitrogen glovebox which was used for handling metal tritide powders. The clean-up system consists of two beds: (1) a Zr-Mn-Fe (in a 10% by weight Al binder, SAES ST909) bed operating at 675 C followed by (2) a Zr{sub 2}Fe (SAES ST198) bed operating at 250 C. The Zr-Mn-Fe bed serves to condition the gas stream by cracking hydrogenous impurities (such as H{sub 2}O and hydrocarbons) and absorbing oxygen and carbon. The Zr{sub 2}Fe bed absorbs the hydrogen isotopes from the flowing stream by forming a solid hydride compound. These beds contain 3 kilograms of Zr{sub 2}Fe and have been loaded routinely with 230-250 STP liters of hydrogen isotopes in earlier trials. The Zr-Mn-Fe alloy exhibits an anomaly during activation, namely an exotherm upon initial exposure to nitrogen. The purpose of this work is to better understand this reaction. Nitrogen absorption studies were done in order to quantify the nitrogen taken up by the getter and to characterize the reaction kinetics. In addition, ST909 phases before and after the reaction were studied with x-ray diffraction.

  20. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or

  1. Surface segregation as a means of gettering Cu in liquid-phase-epitaxy silicon thin layers grown from Al-Cu-Si solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.H.; Ciszek, T.F.; Reedy, R.; Asher, S.; King, D.

    1996-05-01

    The authors demonstrate that, by using the natural surface segregation phenomenon, Cu can be gettered to the surface from the bulk of silicon layers so that its concentrations in the liquid-phase-epitaxy (LPE) layers are much lower than its solubility at the layer growth temperature and the reported 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} degradation threshold for solar-cell performance. Secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis indicates that, within a micron-deep sub-surface region, Cu accumulates even in as-grown LPE samples. Slower cooling after growth to room temperature enhances this Cu enrichment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement shows as much as 3.2% Cu in a surface region of about 50 {Angstrom}. More surface-sensitive, ion-scattering spectroscopy (ISS) analysis further reveals about 7% of Cu at the top surface. These results translate to an areal gettering capacity of about 1.0 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2}, which is higher than the available total-area density of Cu in the layer and substrate (3.6 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}2} for a uniform 1.2 x 10{sup 17}cm{sup {minus}3} Cu throughout the layer and substrate with a total thickness of 300 {mu}m).

  2. Evaluation of Technetium Getters to Improve the Performance of Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lawter, Amanda R.; Stephenson, John R.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-11-01

    short-term (63 day) leach tests conducted on both LAW and secondary waste Cast Stone monoliths indicated that 99Tc diffusivities were at or near diffusivities where the groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well would exceed the allowable maximum permissible 99Tc concentrations. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of Tc in the Cast Stone waste form. One method to improve the performance of the Cast Stone waste form is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc inside Cast Stone.

  3. Application of Vacancy Injection Gettering to Improve Efficiency of Solar Cells Produced by Millinet Solar: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-417

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2012-07-01

    NREL will apply vacancy injection gettering (VIG) to Millinet solar cells and evaluate the performance improvement produced by this process step. The VIG will be done in conjunction with the formation of a back, Al-alloyed, contact. Millinet Solar will provide NREL with cells having AR coating on the front side and screen-printed Al on the backside, which will be processed in the NREL's optical furnace to perform simultaneous VIG and back contact alloying with deep BSF. These cells will be sent back to Millinet solar for a screen-printed front/side contact mask, followed by a second firing at NREL. Detailed analyses will be performed to determine improvements due to BSF and VIG.

  4. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in

  5. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in

  6. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in

  7. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in

  8. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in

  9. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in

  10. Method for fusing bone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mourant, Judith R.; Anderson, Gerhard D.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  11. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlin, Maria; Finnil, Mikko A.J.; Zioupos, Peter; Aula, Antti; Risteli, Juha; Miettinen, Hanna M.; Jms, Timo; Tuukkanen, Juha; Korkalainen, Merja; Hkansson, Helen; Viluksela, Matti

    2013-11-15

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr{sup ?/?}) and wild-type (Ahr{sup +/+}) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200 ?g/kg bw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr{sup +/+} mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr{sup ?/?} mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr{sup +/+} mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr{sup ?/?} mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr{sup +/+} mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations. - Highlights: TCDD disrupts bone remodeling resulting in altered cortical and trabecular bone. In trabecular bone an anabolic effect is observed. Cortical bone is thinner, more porous, harder, stiffer and mechanically weaker. AHR ablation results in increased

  12. Method for fusing bone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mourant, J.R.; Anderson, G.D.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1996-03-12

    The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  13. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao Yongtao; Xiang Lixin; Shao Jianzhong

    2007-10-26

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multi-functional growth factors belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. It has been demonstrated that BMPs had been involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. However, their hallmark ability is that play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites. In this review, we mainly concentrate on BMP structure, function, molecular signaling and potential medical application.

  15. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, E.A.; Rosen, V.; D'Alessandro, J.S.; Bauduy, M.; Cordes, P.; Harada, T.; Israel, D.I.; Hewick, R.M.; Kerns, K.M.; LaPan, P.; Luxenberg, D.P.; McQuaid, D.; Moutsatsos, I.K.; Nove, J.; Wozney, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 {mu}g of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans.

  16. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  17. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Even, Jr., William R.

    2000-01-01

    A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

  18. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  19. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  20. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  1. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falchook, Aaron D.; Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  2. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bone is made up of fibrous polymer collagen and hard mineral nanoparticals of hydroxyapatite that reinforce it. At the micron level, bone contains osteons - bone cylinders...

  3. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

  4. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic ...

  5. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong ...

  6. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-02-05

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO{sub 2} 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  7. Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2009-01-27

    Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

  8. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

  9. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their

  10. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ions from bioactive glasses reportedly activates the expression of osteogenic genes and stimulates bone growth, or angiogenesis. The ease and efficiency with which...

  11. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with cortical and trabecular bone and literature values of porous glass and hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Each style of point corresponds to a different literature value....

  12. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    necessary to promote bone regeneration while substituting for, at least temporarily, the tissue by maintaining these loads in vivo. Porous metallic implants used for replacement...

  13. Radioimmunoassay of bone morphogenetic protein in serum: a tissue-specific parameter of bone metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urist, M.R.; Hudak, R.T.

    1984-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), a paracrine agent inducing cartilage and bone cell differentiation, circulates in the blood and is detectable by BMP radioimmunoassay. Serum BMP levels are higher in growing children and patients with Paget's disease than in normal adults. These observations are interpreted as evidence of a BMP function in the physiology of bone in health and disease.

  14. Self regulating formulations for safe hydrogen gettering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2004-03-16

    A method and composition are disclosed for preventing uncontrolled exothermic reaction in the presence of a catalyst. A catalyst deployed as a finely divided powder which is attached to the surface of a low melting point wax or wax-like material which is utilized as a carrier for the catalyst. During operation should the catalyst overheat due to uncontrolled conditions brought about by a run-away reaction the heat of reaction melts the low melting point wax which would itself wet the surface of the catalyst and prevent further catalysis.

  15. Self regulating formulations for safe hydrogen gettering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition are disclosed for preventing uncontrolled exothermic reaction in the presence of a catalyst. A catalyst deployed as a finely divided powder which is attached to the surface of a low melting point wax or wax-like material which is utilized as a carrier for the catalyst. During operation should the catalyst overheat due to uncontrolled conditions brought about by a run-away reaction the heat of reaction melts the low melting point wax which would itself wet the surface of the catalyst and prevent further catalysis.

  16. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotman, Irena Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength “trabecular Nitinol” scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1–1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  17. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  18. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  19. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  20. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  1. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  2. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  3. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density

  4. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tereshchenko, V. P. Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  5. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  6. Bone fragments a body can make

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, S.D.; Ross, L.M. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Data obtained from various analytical techniques applied to a number of small bone fragments recovered from a crime scene were used to provide evidence for the occurrence of a fatality. Microscopic and histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the fragments were from a human skull. X-ray microanalysis of darkened areas on the bone fragments revealed a chemical signature that matched the chemical signature of a shotgun pellet recovered at the scene of the crime. The above findings supported the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fingerprint evidence which, along with other evidence, was used to convict a man for the murder of his wife, even though her body was never recovered.

  7. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  8. The Ductility of Human Jaw Bone Attached to a Tooth | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Ductility of Human Jaw Bone Attached to a Tooth Saturday, May 31, 2014 In a bone-tooth ... of the tooth root and alveolar bone (human jaw bone) of the socket is permitted by an ...

  9. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the formation of new bone mass. In children, vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets. In adults, vitamin D deficiency causes osteomalacia, a softening of the bones associated with...

  10. Prehistoric Animal Bones Found at Pantex | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home NNSA Blog Prehistoric Animal Bones Found at Pantex Prehistoric Animal Bones Found at Pantex Keck A sharp eye and a lot of luck led to an interesting discovery at Pantex ...

  11. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Wednesday, 30 April 2014 00:00 Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels

  12. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  13. Bone scintigraphy in evaluating the viability of composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and free non-revascularized periosteal grafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, A.; Weiland, A.J.; Ostrup, L.T.

    1982-07-01

    Researchers studied the value of bone scintigraphy in the assessment of anastomotic patency and bone-cell viability in free bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses in twenty-seven dogs. The dogs were divided into three different groups, and scintigraphy was carried out using technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate in composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and periosteal grafts placed in different recipient beds. The viability of the grafts were evaluated by histological examination and fluorescence microscopy after triple labeling with oxytetracycline on the first postoperative day, alizarin complexone on the fourth postoperative day, and DCAF on the eleventh postoperative day. A positive scintiscan within the first week following surgery indicated patent microvascular anastomoses, and histological study and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that bone throughout the graft was viable. A positive scintiscan one week after surgery or later does not necessarily indicate microvascular patency or bone-cell survival, because new bone formed by creeping substitution on the surface of a dead bone graft can result in this finding.

  14. Forklift Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forklift Safety Test Instructions: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ... A minimum passing score is 80% (8 out of 10) This test can only be taken once in a thirty ...

  15. Lustre Tests

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-31

    Lustre-tests is a package of regression tests for the Lustre file system containing I/O workloads representative of problems discovered on production systems.

  16. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  17. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  18. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  19. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  20. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  1. Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality Print Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the

  2. Fabrication of polylactide nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa J.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-05-22

    Highly porous three-dimensional polylactide (PLA) scaffolds were obtained from PLA incorporated with different amounts of chitosan-modified montmorillonite (CS-MMT), through solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The processed scaffolds were tested in vitro for their possible application in bone tissue engineering. Scaffolds were characterized by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to study their structure and intermolecular interactions. Bioresorbability tests in simulated body fluid (pH 7.4) were conducted to assess the response of the scaffolds in a simulated physiological condition. The FIB SEM images of the scaffolds showed a porous architecture with gradual change in morphology with increasing CS-MMT concentration. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of both PLA and CS-MMT particles on the surface of the scaffolds. XRD showed that the crystalline unit cell type was the same for all the scaffolds, and crystallinity decreased with an increase in CS-MMT concentration. The scaffolds were found to be bioresorbable, with rapid bioresorbability on the scaffolds with a high CS-MMT concentration.

  3. Effect of irradiation on bone remodelling and the structural integrity of the vertebral column. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, K.N.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of therapeutic levels of radiation on the axial properties of the primate vertebral column were studied. Seven male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were irradiated with a single does of 1300 cGy to the specific lumbar vertebrae of L2, L3, and L4. Three additional animals served as controls. Radiographs were taken before the radiation treatment and just prior to sacrifice to determine density changes in the bone. The animal subjects were sacrificed 105 days following the radiation exposure. Biomechanical testing was completed on lumbar levels 2 and 3 to identify changes in strength characteristics following radiation treatment. Histomorphometric analysis of lumbar vertebrae level 4 was completed to identify volume and surface density changes as well as cellular changes. Tetracycline, dicarbomethylaminomethyl fluorescein (DCAF), and xylenol orange were used as bone labeling agents to aid in the histomorphometry and to obtain dynamic parameter changes.

  4. Net Test

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-09-01

    Nettest is a secure, real-time network utility. The nettest framework is designed to incorporate existing and new network tests, and be run as a daemon or an interactive process. Requests for network tests are received via a SSL connection or the user interface and are authorized using a ACL list (in the future authorization using Akenti will also be supported). For tests that require coordination between the two ends of the test, Nettest establishes anmore » SSL connection to accomplish this coordination. A test between two remote computers can be requested via the user interlace if the Nettest daemon is running on both remote machines and the user is authorized. Authorization for the test is through a chain of trust estabtished by the nettest daemons. Nettest is responsible for determining if the test request is authorized, but it does nothing further to secure the test once the test is running. Currently the Nettest framework incorporates lperf-vl.2, a simple ping type test, and a tuned TCP test that uses a given required throughput and ping results to determine the round trip time to set a buffer size (based on the delay bandwidth product) and then performs an iperf TCP throughput test. Additional network test tools can be integrated into the Nettest framework in the future.« less

  5. An Orientation Distribution Function for Trabecular Bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-10-08

    We describe a new method for quantifying the orientation of trabecular bone from three-dimensional images. Trabecular lattices from five human vertebrae were decomposed into individual trabecular elements, and the orientation, mass, and thickness of each element were recorded. Continuous functions that described the total mass (M({var_phi},{theta})) and mean thickness ({tau}({var_phi},{theta})) of all trabeculae as a function of orientation were derived. The results were compared with experimental measurements of the elastic modulus in the three principal anatomic directions. A power law scaling relationship between the anisotropies in mass and elastic modulus was observed; the scaling exponent was 1.41 (R{sup 2} = 0.88). As expected, the preponderance of trabecular mass was oriented along the cranial-caudal direction; on average, there was 3.4 times more mass oriented vertically than horizontally. Moreover, the vertical trabeculae were 30% thicker, on average, than the horizontal trabeculae. The vertical trabecular thickness was inversely related to the connectivity (R{sup 2} = 0.70; p = 0.07), suggesting a possible organization into either few, thick trabeculae or many thin trabeculae. The method, which accounts for the mechanical connectedness of the lattice, provides a rapid way to both visualize and quantify the three-dimensional organization of trabecular bone.

  6. Protocadherin-7 induces bone metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ai-Min; Tian, Ai-Xian; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Ge, Jie; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Sun, Xuan; Cao, Xu-Chen; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: PCDH7 is overexpression in high bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. PCDH7 is up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues. Suppression of PCDH7 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. PCDH7 induces breast cancer bone metastasis in vivo. -- Abstract: Breast cancer had a propensity to metastasize to bone, resulting in serious skeletal complications associated with poor outcome. Previous study showed that Protocadherin-7 (PCDH7) play an important role in brain metastatic breast cancer, however, the role of PCDH7 in bone metastatic breast cancer has never been explored. In the present study, we found that PCDH7 expression was up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry assays. Furthermore, suppression of PCDH7 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro by MTT, scratch, and transwell assays. Most importantly, overexpression of PCDH7 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, and formation of bone metastasis in vivo. These data provide an important insight into the role of PCDH7 in bone metastasis of breast cancer.

  7. Reactive oxygen species on bone mineral density and mechanics in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smietana, Michael J.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; Program in Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 ; Faulkner, John A.; Brooks, Susan V.; Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 ; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be a factor in the onset of a number of age-associated conditions, including loss of BMD. {yields} Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) deficient mice have increased ROS, reduced bone mineral density, decreased bending stiffness, and decreased strength compared to WT controls. {yields} Increased ROS caused by the deficiency of Sod1, may be responsible for the changes in BMD and bone mechanics and therefore represent an appropriate model for studying mechanisms of age-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in a number of degenerative conditions including osteoporosis. Mice deficient in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) (Sod1{sup -/-} mice) have elevated oxidative stress and decreased muscle mass and strength compared to wild-type mice (WT) and appear to have an accelerated muscular aging phenotype. Thus, Sod1{sup -/-} mice may be a good model for evaluating the effects of free radical generation on diseases associated with aging. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the structural integrity of bone as measured by bending stiffness (EI; N/mm{sup 2}) and strength (MPa) is diminished in Sod1{sup -/-} compared to WT mice. Femurs were obtained from male and female WT and Sod1{sup -/-} mice at 8 months of age and three-point bending tests were used to determine bending stiffness and strength. Bones were also analyzed for bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cc) using micro-computed tomography. Femurs were approximately equal in length across all groups, and there were no significant differences in BMD or EI with respect to gender in either genotype. Although male and female mice demonstrated similar properties within each genotype, Sod1{sup -/-} mice exhibited lower BMD and EI of femurs from both males and females compared with gender matched WT mice. Strength of femurs was also lower in Sod1{sup -/-} mice compared to WT as well as between genders. These

  8. Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Holly; Zimmermann, Elizabeth; Schaible, Eric; Tang, Simon; Alliston, Tamara; Ritchie, Robert

    2011-08-19

    Bone comprises a complex structure of primarily collagen, hydroxyapatite and water, where each hierarchical structural level contributes to its strength, ductility and toughness. These properties, however, are degraded by irradiation, arising from medical therapy or bone-allograft sterilization. We provide here a mechanistic framework for how irradiation affects the nature and properties of human cortical bone over a range of characteristic (nano to macro) length-scales, following x-ray exposures up to 630 kGy. Macroscopically, bone strength, ductility and fracture resistance are seen to be progressively degraded with increasing irradiation levels. At the micron-scale, fracture properties, evaluated using in-situ scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography, provide mechanistic information on how cracks interact with the bone-matrix structure. At sub-micron scales, strength properties are evaluated with in-situ tensile tests in the synchrotron using small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction, where strains are simultaneously measured in the macroscopic tissue, collagen fibrils and mineral. Compared to healthy bone, results show that the fibrillar strain is decreased by ~40% following 70 kGy exposures, consistent with significant stiffening and degradation of the collagen. We attribute the irradiation-induced deterioration in mechanical properties to mechanisms at multiple length-scales, including changes in crack paths at micron-scales, loss of plasticity from suppressed fibrillar sliding at sub-micron scales, and the loss and damage of collagen at the nano-scales, the latter being assessed using Raman and Fourier-Transform-Infrared spectroscopy and a fluorometric assay.

  9. DISCOVERY AND RESEARCH ON JIAHU BONE FLUTES IN WUYANG, CHINA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUZHONG, Z.; HARBOTTLE, G.; XINGHUA, X.; CHANGSUI, W.

    2000-11-01

    The site of Jiahu is located in Jiahu village, Wuyang County, Henan province, on the Western edge of the broad plain of Huanhuaihai. On its north the site borders the Sha River, in the upper reaches of the Huai River; its latitude is 33{degree} 36 minutes North, longitude 113{degree} 40 minutes East, and it is 67.5 meters above sea level. Between 1983 and 1987, the Henan Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute carried out six campaigns of excavation here, revealing an area of 2400 square meters. Except for the trial excavation in the spring of 1983, Zhang Juzhong has been in charge of all the excavations. In early May 1986, while excavating tomb 78, Zhang Juzhong and Yang Zhenwei first discovered two funerary bone flutes. They soon found other, similar bone flutes in tombs 73, 94 and 121 respectively. Mr. Zhang's attention was instantly focused on these remarkable finds. In the campaign of autumn 1986, one or two more bone flutes were discovered in each of tombs 233,273, 263 and 270. Finally, in the spring of 1987, again one or two bone flutes were found in each of the tombs 282, 363,341,411,344 and 387. Up to the end of excavation in June 1987, altogether 25 bone flutes had been found, of which 17 were complete or almost complete, 6 broken or fragmentary and 2 were half-finished examples. Among the 17 complete bone flutes, there were 14 having seven holes, one five-hole, one six-hole and one eight-hole bone flute. In particular, the bone flute M282:20 was exquisitely made, and complete. Zhang Juzhong, the discoverer of the bone flutes, researcher Pei Mingxiang, the. ex-director of the division, who came to the digging site to see the progress of the work, and their coworkers were all understandably very excited.

  10. The effects of low environmental cadmium exposure on bone density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzcinka-Ochocka, M.; Jakubowski, M.; Szymczak, W.; Janasik, B.; Brodzka, R.

    2010-04-15

    Recent epidemiological data indicate that low environmental exposure to cadmium, as shown by cadmium body burden (Cd-U), is associated with renal dysfunction as well as an increased risk of cadmium-induced bone disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effects of low environmental cadmium exposure, at the level sufficient to induce kidney damage, on bone metabolism and mineral density (BMD). The project was conducted in the area contaminated with cadmium, nearby a zinc smelter located in the region of Poland where heavy industry prevails. The study population comprised 170 women (mean age=39.7; 18-70 years) and 100 men (mean age=31.9; 18-76 years). Urinary and blood cadmium and the markers of renal tubular dysfunction ({beta}{sub 2}M-U RBP, NAG), glomerular dysfunction (Alb-U and {beta}{sub 2}M-S) and bone metabolism markers (BAP-S, CTX-S) as well as forearm BMD, were measured. The results of this study based on simple dose-effect analysis showed the relationship between increasing cadmium concentrations and an increased excretion of renal dysfunction markers and decreasing bone density. However, the results of the multivariate analysis did not indicate the association between exposure to cadmium and decrease in bone density. They showed that the most important factors that have impact on bone density are body weight and age in the female subjects and body weight and calcium excretion in males. Our investigation revealed that the excretion of low molecular weight proteins occurred at a lower level of cadmium exposure than the possible loss of bone mass. It seems that renal tubular markers are the most sensitive and significant indicators of early health effects of cadmium intoxication in the general population. The correlation of urinary cadmium concentration with markers of kidney dysfunction was observed in the absence of significant correlations with bone effects. Our findings did not indicate any effects of environmental cadmium exposure on bone

  11. Processing of hydroxylapatite coatings on titanium alloy bone prostheses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nastasi, M.A.; Levine, T.E.; Mayer, J.W.; Pizziconi, V.B.

    1998-10-06

    Processing of hydroxylapatite sol-gel films on titanium alloy bone prostheses. A method utilizing non-line-of-sight ion beam implantation and/or rapid thermal processing to provide improved bonding of layers of hydroxylapatite to titanium alloy substrates while encouraging bone ingrowth into the hydroxylapatite layers located away from the substrate, is described for the fabrication of prostheses. The first layer of hydroxylapatite is mixed into the substrate by the ions or rapidly thermally annealed, while subsequent layers are heat treated or densified using ion implantation to form layers of decreasing density and larger crystallization, with the outermost layers being suitable for bone ingrowth.

  12. Processing of hydroxylapatite coatings on titanium alloy bone prostheses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nastasi, Michael A.; Levine, Timothy E.; Mayer, James W.; Pizziconi, Vincent B.

    1998-01-01

    Processing of hydroxylapatite sol-gel films on titanium alloy bone prostheses. A method utilizing non-line-of-sight ion beam implantation and/or rapid thermal processing to provide improved bonding of layers of hydroxylapatite to titanium alloy substrates while encouraging bone ingrowth into the hydroxylapatite layers located away from the substrate, is described for the fabrication of prostheses. The first layer of hydroxylapatite is mixed into the substrate by the ions or rapidly thermally annealed, while subsequent layers are heat treated or densified using ion implantation to form layers of decreasing density and larger crystallization, with the outermost layers being suitable for bone ingrowth.

  13. Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuru, Satoru; Tamai, Katsuto . E-mail: tamai@gts.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yamazaki, Takehiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-03-09

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of osteoblastic cells in the circulation, but the origin and role of these cells in vivo are not clear. Here, we examined how these cells contribute to osteogenesis in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced model of ectopic bone formation. Following lethal dose-irradiation and subsequent green fluorescent protein-transgenic bone marrow cell-transplantation (GFP-BMT) in mice, a BMP-2-containing collagen pellet was implanted into muscle. Three weeks later, a significant number of GFP-positive osteoblastic cells were present in the newly generated ectopic bone. Moreover, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from the BMP-2-implanted mouse were then shown to include osteoblast progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Passive transfer of the PBMNCs isolated from the BMP-2-implanted GFP-mouse to the BMP-2-implanted nude mouse led to GFP-positive osteoblast accumulation in the ectopic bone. These data provide new insight into the mechanism of ectopic bone formation involving bone marrow-derived OPCs in circulating blood.

  14. Crane Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crane Safety Test Instructions: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! Please enter your personal information in the spaces below. A minimum passing score is 80% (8 out of 10) This test can only be taken once in a thirty day period. All fields are required to be filled in. Login: Login First Name: Last Name: Phone Number: Contact: 1. The first thing you should do when using the crane is to: a. verify the battery power on the remote control. b. drag the load to the desired

  15. The bones of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Alyssa A.; Beaumont, Christopher N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Alves, Joo [University of Vienna, 1180 Vienna (Austria); Benjamin, Robert A. [University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States); Borkin, Michelle A. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Burkert, Andreas [University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Dame, Thomas M. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jackson, James [Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kauffmann, Jens [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Smith, Rowan J. [Institut fr Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universit Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-12-10

    The very long and thin infrared dark cloud 'Nessie' is even longer than had been previously claimed, and an analysis of its Galactic location suggests that it lies directly in the Milky Way's mid-plane, tracing out a highly elongated bone-like feature within the prominent Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm. Re-analysis of mid-infrared imagery from the Spitzer Space Telescope shows that this infrared dark cloud (IRDC) is at least two and possibly as many as five times longer than had originally been claimed by Nessie's discoverers; its aspect ratio is therefore at least 300:1 and possibly as large as 800:1. A careful accounting for both the Sun's offset from the Galactic plane (?25 pc) and the Galactic center's offset from the (l{sup II} , b{sup II} ) = (0, 0) position shows that the latitude of the true Galactic mid-plane at the 3.1 kpc distance to the Scutum-Centaurus Arm is not b = 0, but instead closer to b = 0.4, which is the latitude of Nessie to within a few parsecs. An analysis of the radial velocities of low-density (CO) and high-density (NH{sub 3}) gas associated with the Nessie dust feature suggests that Nessie runs along the Scutum-Centaurus Arm in position-position-velocity space, which means it likely forms a dense 'spine' of the arm in real space as well. The Scutum-Centaurus Arm is the closest major spiral arm to the Sun toward the inner Galaxy, and, at the longitude of Nessie, it is almost perpendicular to our line of sight, making Nessie the easiest feature to see as a shadow elongated along the Galactic plane from our location. Future high-resolution dust mapping and molecular line observations of the harder-to-find Galactic 'bones' should allow us to exploit the Sun's position above the plane to gain a (very foreshortened) view 'from above' the Milky Way's structure.

  16. Effects of microstructure and water on the electrical potentials in bone induced by ultrasound irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuneda, H.; Matsukawa, S.; Takayanagi, S.; Matsukawa, M.; Mizuno, K.; Yanagitani, T.

    2015-02-16

    The healing mechanism of bone fractures by low intensity pulse ultrasound is yet to be fully understood. There have been many discussions regarding how the high frequency dynamic stress can stimulate numerous cell types through various pathways. As one possible initial process of this mechanism, we focus on the piezoelectricity of bone and demonstrate that bone can generate electrical potentials by ultrasound irradiation in the MHz range. We have fabricated ultrasonic bone transducers using bovine cortical bone as the piezoelectric device. The ultrasonically induced electrical potentials in the transducers change as a function of time during immersed ultrasonic pulse measurements and become stable when the bone is fully wet. In addition, the magnitude of the induced electrical potentials changes owing to the microstructure in the cortical bone. The potentials of transducers with haversian structure bone are higher than those of plexiform structure bone, which informs about the effects of bone microstructure on the piezoelectricity.

  17. Experimental Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  18. Mechanical Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  19. On the mechanistic origins of toughness in bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Buehler, Markus J.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-10-07

    One of the most intriguing protein materials found in Nature is bone, a material composed out of assemblies of tropocollagen molecules and tiny hydroxyapatite mineral crystals, forming an extremely tough, yet lightweight, adaptive and multi-functional material. Bone has evolved to provide structural support to organisms, and therefore, its mechanical properties are of great physiological relevance. In this article, we review the structure and properties of bone, focusing on mechanical deformation and fracture behavior from the perspective of the multi-dimensional hierarchical nature of its structure. In fact, bone derives its resistance to fracture with a multitude of deformation and toughening mechanisms at many of these size-scales, ranging from the nanoscale structure of its protein molecules to its macroscopic physiological scale.

  20. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  1. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  2. PNNL STC Workshop Getter/Liner Tube Properties and Manufacturing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secondary Tracking of Tritium 4 He in Pellets - by Tritium Assay Method 3 He in ... X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy pellets Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry All ...

  3. Contact Formation and Gettering of Precipitated Impurities by Multiple

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us » Contact EM Contact EM For information about the Office of Environmental Management and its programs; for assistance in information on this website; or for general information purposes: By E-Mail: EM.WebContentManager@em.doe.gov By Mail: U.S. Department of Energy ATTENTION: Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 By Phone: 202-586-5000 (Main DOE Switchboard) 202-586-7709 (Office of Environmental Management) National DOE Phone Directory For

  4. On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Holly D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; McDowell, Alastair A.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-01-10

    In situ mechanical testing coupled with imaging using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction or tomography imaging is gaining in popularity as a technique to investigate micrometer and even sub-micrometer deformation and fracture mechanisms in mineralized tissues, such as bone and teeth. However, the role of the irradiation in affecting the nature and properties of the tissue is not always taken into account. Accordingly, we examine here the effect of x-ray synchrotron-source irradiation on the mechanistic aspects of deformation and fracture in human cortical bone. Specifically, the strength, ductility and fracture resistance (both work-of-fracture and resistance-curve fracture toughness) of human femoral bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation were evaluated following exposures to 0.05, 70, 210 and 630 kGy irradiation. Our results show that the radiation typically used in tomography imaging can have a major and deleterious impact on the strength, post-yield behavior and fracture toughness of cortical bone, with the severity of the effect progressively increasing with higher doses of radiation. Plasticity was essentially suppressed after as little as 70 kGy of radiation; the fracture toughness was decreased by a factor of five after 210 kGy of radiation. Mechanistically, the irradiation was found to alter the salient toughening mechanisms, manifest by the progressive elimination of the bone's capacity for plastic deformation which restricts the intrinsic toughening from the formation 'plastic zones' around crack-like defects. Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy indicated that this behavior could be related to degradation in the collagen integrity.

  5. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  6. PDGFBB promotes PDGFR{alpha}-positive cell migration into artificial bone in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Shigeyuki; Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 ; Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Kawana, Hiromasa; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582; Department of Integrated Bone Metabolism and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 ; Hoshi, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Mori, Tomoaki; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 ; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 ; Hao, Wu; and others

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined effects of PDGFBB in PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration in artificial bones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB was not expressed in osteoblastic cells but was expressed in peripheral blood cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB promoted PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration into artificial bones but not osteoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB did not inhibit osteoblastogenesis. -- Abstract: Bone defects caused by traumatic bone loss or tumor dissection are now treated with auto- or allo-bone graft, and also occasionally by artificial bone transplantation, particularly in the case of large bone defects. However, artificial bones often exhibit poor affinity to host bones followed by bony union failure. Thus therapies combining artificial bones with growth factors have been sought. Here we report that platelet derived growth factor bb (PDGFBB) promotes a significant increase in migration of PDGF receptor {alpha} (PDGFR{alpha})-positive mesenchymal stem cells/pre-osteoblastic cells into artificial bone in vivo. Growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF{beta}) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reportedly inhibit osteoblast differentiation; however, PDGFBB did not exhibit such inhibitory effects and in fact stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro, suggesting that combining artificial bones with PDGFBB treatment could promote host cell migration into artificial bones without inhibiting osteoblastogenesis.

  7. Harmine promotes osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Hibino, Ayaka; Asai, Midori; Hojo, Hironori; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Chung, Ung-Il; Yagasaki, Kazumi; and others

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Harmine promotes the activity and mRNA expression of ALP. {yields} Harmine enhances the expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and protein. {yields} Harmine induces osteoblastic mineralization. {yields} Harmine upregulates the mRNA expressions of BMPs, Runx2 and Osterix. {yields} BMP signaling pathways are involved in the actions of harmine. -- Abstract: Bone mass is regulated by osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We previously reported that harmine, a {beta}-carboline alkaloid, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of harmine on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Harmine promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells without affecting their proliferation. Harmine also increased the mRNA expressions of the osteoblast marker genes ALP and Osteocalcin. Furthermore, the mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was enhanced by treatment with harmine. Harmine also induced osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells. Structure-activity relationship studies using harmine-related {beta}-carboline alkaloids revealed that the C3-C4 double bond and 7-hydroxy or 7-methoxy group of harmine were important for its osteogenic activity. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist noggin and its receptor kinase inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 attenuated harmine-promoted ALP activity. In addition, harmine increased the mRNA expressions of Bmp-2, Bmp-4, Bmp-6, Bmp-7 and its target gene Id1. Harmine also enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and Osterix, which are key transcription factors in osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, BMP-responsive and Runx2-responsive reporters were activated by harmine treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that harmine enhances osteoblast differentiation probably by inducing the expressions of

  8. 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    understanding of healthy bone tissue and the changes that occur with aging and disease. ... imaging experiments of bone using the transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) on SSRL beam ...

  9. Benefit of Consolidative Radiation Therapy for Primary Bone Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Randa; Allen, Pamela K.; Rodriguez, Alma; Shihadeh, Ferial; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Arzu, Isadora; Reed, Valerie K.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Westin, Jason R.; Fayad, Luis E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) differ according to the site of presentation. With effective chemotherapy, the need for consolidative radiation therapy (RT) is controversial. We investigated the influence of primary bone presentation and receipt of consolidative RT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with DLBCL. Methods and Materials: We identified 102 patients with primary bone DLBCL treated consecutively from 1988 through 2013 and extracted clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics from the medical records. Survival outcomes were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors affecting survival determined by log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done with a Cox regression model. Results: The median age was 55 years (range, 16-87 years). The most common site of presentation was in the long bones. Sixty-five patients (63%) received R-CHOP–based chemotherapy, and 74 (72%) received rituximab. RT was given to 67 patients (66%), 47 with stage I to II and 20 with stage III to IV disease. The median RT dose was 44 Gy (range, 24.5-50 Gy). At a median follow-up time of 82 months, the 5-year PFS and OS rates were 80% and 82%, respectively. Receipt of RT was associated with improved 5-year PFS (88% RT vs 63% no RT, P=.0069) and OS (91% vs 68%, P=.0064). On multivariate analysis, the addition of RT significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.14, P=.014) with a trend toward an OS benefit (HR=0.30, P=.053). No significant difference in PFS or OS was found between patients treated with 30 to 35 Gy versus ≥36 Gy (P=.71 PFS and P=.31 OS). Conclusion: Patients with primary bone lymphoma treated with standard chemotherapy followed by RT can have excellent outcomes. The use of consolidative RT was associated with significant benefits in both PFS and OS.

  10. The Ductility of Human Jaw Bone Attached to a Tooth | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource The Ductility of Human Jaw Bone Attached to a Tooth Saturday, May 31, 2014 In a bone-tooth fibrous joint, the articulation between harder materials such as the cementum of the tooth root and alveolar bone (human jaw bone) of the socket is permitted by an intervening softer periodontal ligament. To investigate adaptations of the bony socket, basic principles from tribology, mechanics of materials, and materials science were used to postulate that the ductile nature of an

  11. Metastatic prostatic pulmonary nodules with normal bone image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petras, A.F.; Wollett, F.C.

    1983-11-01

    Asymptomatic prostatic caricnoma presented as multiple bilateral pulmonary modules in a patient without any evidence of skeletal involvement by normal bone image. Percutaneous biopsy provided the initial clue to diagnosis. The authors recommend that asymptomatic prostatic carcinoma be included in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary nodules, even when there is no evidence of skeletal metastasis.

  12. Partial growth plate closure: apex view on bone scan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howman-Giles, R.; Trochei, M.; Yeates, K.; Middleton, R.; Barrett, I.; Scougall, J.; Whiteway, D.

    1985-01-01

    A new technique of using /sup 99m/Tc bone scan to assess partial closure of the growth plate is described. The site and degree of osseous fusion can be obtained by using the apex view. The technique has the potential of assessing serially the growth of a plate before and after surgery.

  13. Celebrating Black History Month with DOE's Sheri Bone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Throughout the month of February, we're introducing some remarkable African Americans who are working to advance the President's clean energy agenda and help the Department of Energy achieve its mission. This week we're profiling Sheri Bone who is Senior Project Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Integration, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein-induced cartilage development in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, K.; Urist, M.R.

    1984-03-01

    Outgrowths of mesenchyme-type cells from explants of allogeneic rat muscle onto a substratum of bone matrix containing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) differentiate into cartilage. When BMP is chemically extracted from the bone matrix, the explanted cells develop only into fibrous tissue. When exogenous bovine BMP is introduced into the culture medium, either as a microsuspension or as a layer of particles between the matrix and the muscle cell tissue, cartilage develops at the interface between the matrix and the mesenchymal cell outgrowth. The chondrogenetic response is induced by as little as 2 micrograms of BMP; the optimum dose is 10 micrograms/40 mg (wet weight) of explant. The endogenous BMP equivalent for a comparable chondrogenetic response is about 0.6 micrograms/mg of allogeneic matrix. The minimum time for transfer of BMP to mesenchymal cell receptors is 1.0 hour, adequate time is 2.5 hours, and optimum time is approximately 5.0 hours. Measured in terms of incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into DNA and of /sup 35/S sulfate into glycosaminoglycan, there is a latent period of one to three days preceeding the differentiation of mesenchyme-type cells into cartilage. During this latent period BMP-modulated mesenchymal cells disaggregate, migrate, reaggregate, and proliferate on new surfaces and constitute the morphogenetic phase of bone development. By the fourth day cells simultaneously undergo mitotic division, synthesize extracellular cartilage matrix, and establish the cytodifferentiation phase of development.

  15. A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

  16. test | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    test test test test (510.91 KB) More Documents & Publications 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution

  17. Bone regeneration by implantation of adipose-derived stromal cells expressing BMP-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Huiwu; Dai Kerong . E-mail: krdai@163.com; Tang Tingting; Zhang Xiaoling; Yan Mengning; Lou Jueren

    2007-05-18

    In this study, we reported that the adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) genetically modified by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) healed critical-sized canine ulnar bone defects. First, the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of the ADSCs derived from canine adipose tissue were demonstrated. And then the cells were modified by the BMP-2 gene and the expression and bone-induction ability of BMP-2 were identified. Finally, the cells modified by BMP-2 gene were applied to a {beta}-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) carrier and implanted into ulnar bone defects in the canine model. After 16 weeks, radiographic, histological, and histomorphometry analysis showed that ADSCs modified by BMP-2 gene produced a significant increase of newly formed bone area and healed or partly healed all of the bone defects. We conclude that ADSCs modified by the BMP-2 gene can enhance the repair of critical-sized bone defects in large animals.

  18. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior in elk antler bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Chen, Po-Yu; McKittrick, Joanna; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-11-23

    Bone is an adaptative material that is designed for different functional requirements; indeed, bones have a variety of properties depending on their role in the body. To understand the mechanical response of bone requires the elucidation of its structure-function relationships. Here, we examine the fracture toughness of compact bone of elk antler which is an extremely fast growing primary bone designed for a totally different function than human (secondary) bone. We find that antler in the transverse (breaking) orientation is one of the toughest biological materials known. Its resistance to fracture is achieved during crack growth (extrinsically) by a combination of gross crack deflection/twisting and crack bridging via uncracked 'ligaments' in the crack wake, both mechanisms activated by microcracking primarily at lamellar boundaries. We present an assessment of the toughening mechanisms acting in antler as compared to human cortical bone, and identify an enhanced role of inelastic deformation in antler which further contributes to its (intrinsic) toughness.

  19. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  20. Beam Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Test Facility Beam Test Facility Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:36 Coming Soon

  1. Bone sarcoma in humans induced by radium: A threshold response?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, R.E.

    1996-08-01

    The radium 226 and radium 228 have induced malignancies in the skeleton (primarily bone sarcomas) of humans. They have also induced carcinomas in the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. There is no evidence that any leukemias or any other solid cancers have been induced by internally deposited radium. This paper discuses a study conducted on the dial painter population. This study made a concerted effort to verify, for each of the measured radium cases, the published values of the skeletal dose and the initial intake of radium. These were derived from body content measurements made some 40 years after the radium intake. Corrections to the assumed radium retention function resulted in a considerable number of dose changes. These changes have changed the shape of the dose response function. It now appears that the induction of bone sarcomas is a threshold process.

  2. Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Archaeopteryx specimens are important but extremely rare fossils. Due to their possession of both reptilian (jaws with teeth, long bony tail) and avian (feathered wings) characters, Archaeopteryx has been crucial in the development of Darwinian evolution. Despite their importance, no Archaeopteryx specimen has ever been chemically analyzed. This in large part may be explained by the analytical obstacles

  3. Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1986-01-01

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

  4. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience This presentation, which was the opening session of the NREL 2013 Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop ...

  5. Exposure to cadmium and persistent organochlorine pollutants and its association with bone mineral density and markers of bone metabolism on postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rignell-Hydbom, A.; Skerfving, S.; Lundh, T.; Lindh, C.H.; Elmstahl, S.; Bjellerup, P.; Juensson, B.A.G.; Struemberg, U.; Akesson, A.

    2009-11-15

    Environmental contaminants such as cadmium and persistent organochlorine pollutants have been proposed as risk factors of osteoporosis, and women may be at an increased risk. To assess associations between exposure to cadmium and two different POPs (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl CB-153, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene p,p'-DDE), on one hand, and bone effects, on the other, in a population-based study among postmenopausal (60-70 years) Swedish women with biobanked blood samples. The study included 908 women and was designed to have a large contrast of bone mineral densities, measured with a single photon absorptiometry technique in the non-dominant forearm. Biochemical markers related to bone metabolism were analyzed in serum. Exposure assessment was based on cadmium concentrations in erythrocytes and serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE. Cadmium was negatively associated with bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone, positively with the marker of bone resorption. However, this association disappeared after adjustment for smoking. The major DDT metabolite (p,p'-DDE) was positively associated with bone mineral density, an association which remained after adjustment for confounders, but the effect was weak. There was no evidence that the estrogenic congener (CB-153) was associated with any of the bone markers. In conclusion, no convincing associations were observed between cadmium and POPs, on one hand, and bone metabolism markers and BMD, on the other.

  6. LANSCE | Materials Test Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Office Contact Administrative nav background Materials Test Station dotline ... Materials Test Station: the Preferred Alternative When completed, the Materials Test ...

  7. CNP_TEST_SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002854MLTPL00 Automated Nuclear Data Test Suite file:///usr/gapps/CNP_src/us/RR/test_suite_cz/cnp_test_suite

  8. SLAC Accelerator Test Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FACET & TF Careers & Education Archived FACET User Facility Quick Launch About FACET & Test Facilities Expand About FACET & Test Facilities FACET & Test Facilities User Portal...

  9. ZiaTest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZiaTest ZiaTest Description This test executes a new proposed standard benchmark method ... Specifically, the test consists of the following steps: Record a time stamp for when the ...

  10. Jefferson Lab Man Donates Bone Marrow to Save 12-Year-Old Boy | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Man Donates Bone Marrow to Save 12-Year-Old Boy Jefferson Lab Man Donates Bone Marrow to Save 12-Year-Old Boy April 22, 2002 Leon Reynolds: son, husband, father, former Marine and teacher, accelerator operator and most recently, bone marrow donor. Last month, Reynolds became Jefferson Lab's first person in corporate memory to become a marrow donor. He entered the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) registry on Oct. 11, 2000, when the Lab sponsored a bone marrow registry drive in

  11. Bone mineral density and blood metals in premenopausal women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, A.Z.; Mumford, S.L.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Yeung, E.; Mendola, P.; Mattison, D.R.; Schisterman, E.F.

    2013-01-15

    Exposure to metals, specifically cadmium, lead, and mercury, is widespread and is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in older populations, but the associations among premenopausal women are unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between these metals in blood and BMD (whole body, total hip, lumbar spine, and non-dominant wrist) quantified by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 248 premenopausal women, aged 18-44. Participants were of normal body mass index (mean BMI 24.1), young (mean age 27.4), 60% were white, 20% non-Hispanic black, 15% Asian, and 6% other race group, and were from the Buffalo, New York region. The median (interquartile range) level of cadmium was 0.30 {mu}g/l (0.19-0.43), of lead was 0.86 {mu}g/dl (0.68-1.20), and of mercury was 1.10 {mu}g/l (0.58-2.00). BMD was treated both as a continuous variable in linear regression and dichotomized at the 10th percentile for logistic regression analyses. Mercury was associated with reduced odds of decreased lumbar spine BMD (0.66, 95% confidence interval: 0.44, 0.99), but overall, metals at environmentally relevant levels of exposure were not associated with reduced BMD in this population of healthy, reproductive-aged women. Further research is needed to determine if the blood levels of cadmium, lead, and mercury in this population are sufficiently low that there is no substantive impact on bone, or if effects on bone can be expected only at older ages.

  12. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  13. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  14. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system

  15. ZEST flight test experiments, Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii. Test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cenkci, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) is proposing to execute two ZEST flight experiments to obtain information related to the following objectives: validation of payload modeling; characterization of a high energy release cloud; and documentation of scientific phenomena that may occur as a result of releasing a high energy cloud. The proposed action is to design, develop, launch, and detonate two payloads carrying high energy explosives. Activities required to support this proposal include: (1) execution of component assembly tests at Space Data Division (SDD) in Chandler, Arizona and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and (2) execution of pre-flight flight test activities at Kauai Test Facility.

  16. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  17. Major Partner Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major Test Partners Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding ...

  18. Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Test Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided Report Number Test DOI Not Provided Check...

  19. CX-006390: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Testing of Pd-Ag Diffusers and Various Getter MaterialsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/07/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-010316: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Getter Testing for Savannah River National Laboratory/Defense Programs Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/22/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-014118: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Getter Testing for SRNL / Defense Programs Technology (DPT/HPG) CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 07/27/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. OMB MPI Tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OMB MPI Tests OMB MPI Tests Description The Ohio MicroBenchmark suite is a collection of independent MPI message passing performance microbenchmarks developed and written at The...

  3. Central Receiver Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Receiver Test Facility - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Applications National Solar Thermal Test Facility Nuclear Energy Systems ...

  4. Nevada Test Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in greater detail in the Nevada Test Site Environ- mental Report 2004 (DOENV11718-1080). ... mental programs and efforts Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004 Summary ...

  5. Limited Test Ban Treaty

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Detection System (USNDS), which monitors compliance with the international Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT). The LTBT, signed by 108 countries, prohibits nuclear testing in the...

  6. Test report for core drilling ignitability testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-08-08

    Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

  7. Growth plate closure: Apex view on bone scan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, P.H.; Trochei, M.; Yeates, K.

    1984-01-01

    Angular deformities of the extremities in children following premature closure of the growth plate are well known. The deformities depend on the position of an osseus bridge which forms between the epiphysis and metaphysis. Several surgical procedures including resection of the osseus bridge have been described, however, delineation of the site of fusion is difficult to define. The commonest site of growth plate arrest is the distal femoral or proximal tibial growth plate. A new technique using the bone scan has been developed which accurately defines the area and position of these osseus bridges. Two hours after injection of technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate apex views of the affected distal femoral growth plate were performed. The knee was flexed into its smallest angle. Using a pinhole collimator the gamma camera was angled to face the affected growth plate end on. The image was collected onto computer and analysed by: (I) regions of interest over segments of the growth plate to calculate the relative area of total growth plate affected: (II) generating histograms: (III) thresholding or performing isocontours to accentuate abnormal areas. The growth plate is normally uniformly increased when compared to the normal shaft of the bone. Fusion across the plate appears as an area of diminished uptake. The apex view gives a unique functional map of the growth plate such that abnormal areas are displayed, and the site, size and position of osseus fusion obtained. The technique has the potential for determining the metabolic activity of the growth plate before and after surgery. Serial studies will allow assessment of regneration of the plate and reformation of new osseus bridges.

  8. Dynamometer Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the dynamometer and its testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center.

  9. HICEV America Test Sequence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HICEV America TEST SEQUENCE Revision 0 November 1, 2004 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date: __________ Garrett Beauregard Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: _______________ Donald B. Karner HICEV America Test Sequence Page 1 2004 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved HICEV PERFORMANCE TEST PROCEDURE SEQUENCE The following test sequence shall be used for conduct of HICEV America

  10. NEV America Test Sequence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEVAmerica TEST SEQUENCE Revision 2 Effective February 1, 2008 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date: __________ Nick Fengler Approved by: _________ ________________________________ Date: _______________ ______ Donald B. Karner ©2008 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved NEVAmerica Test Sequence Rev 2 Page 1 NEV PERFORMANCE TEST PROCEDURE SEQUENCE The following test sequence shall be used for conduct of NEVAmerica

  11. Working testing process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparkman, D.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the process of testing security and intrusion detection software.

  12. NREL: Wind Research - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Photo of a large wind turbine blade sticking out of the structural testing laboratory; it is perpendicular to a building at the National Wind Technology Center. A multimegawatt wind turbine blade extends outside of the structural testing facility at the NWTC. PIX #19010 Testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) support the installation and testing of wind turbines that range in size from 400 watts to 5.0 megawatts. Engineers provide wind industry manufacturers,

  13. Solderability test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Fred; Hosking, Floyd M.; Jellison, James L.; Short, Bruce; Giversen, Terri; Reed, Jimmy R.

    1998-01-01

    A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

  14. Solderability test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

    1998-10-27

    A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

  15. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  16. Stratigraphy and depositional history, Bone Spring Formation, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, L.J. )

    1987-02-01

    The Bone Spring formation of the northern Delaware basin in southeastern New Mexico produces oil in Lea County from foreshelf detrital carbonate facies, such as in Scharb field. Production there comes from several intervals. Stratigraphic correlations between the various Bone Springs units and equivalent Leonardian facies of the Northwest shelf in Lea County suggest that the Bone Spring is correlative to the Yeso Formation of the Northwest shelf. The shelf facies there are divided into lower, middle, and upper Yeso. The upper part of what has generally been considered to be Wolfcamp in some areas, beneath the lowermost Bone Spring sandstone, is inferred to be lower Leonardian (lower Yeso) throughout the area studied. A model is proposed for the sedimentologic and reservoir evolution of the Bone Spring Formation in Lea County. Permian-Pennsylvanian tectonic activity provided the initial substrate for the development of a high-energy shelf edge in early Yeso time. In early middle Yeso time, the basin filled with sediments of the 3rd and 2nd Bone Spring units, and the shelf to basin transition was more subtle. As the basin subsided with infilling, a high-energy shelf edge again developed in late middle Yeso time. With continued basin infilling by 1st Bone Springs facies, the shelf to basin transition again evolved into a more subtle feature. Continued basin subsidence caused infilling by a thick sequence of upper Yeso carbonate, which was capped by progradational shelf carbonates of the upper Yeso.

  17. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  18. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  19. Sensitivity Test Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-20

    SENSIT,MUSIG,COMSEN is a set of three related programs for sensitivity test analysis. SENSIT conducts sensitivity tests. These tests are also known as threshold tests, LD50 tests, gap tests, drop weight tests, etc. SENSIT interactively instructs the experimenter on the proper level at which to stress the next specimen, based on the results of previous responses. MUSIG analyzes the results of a sensitivity test to determine the mean and standard deviation of the underlying population bymore » computing maximum likelihood estimates of these parameters. MUSIG also computes likelihood ratio joint confidence regions and individual confidence intervals. COMSEN compares the results of two sensitivity tests to see if the underlying populations are significantly different. COMSEN provides an unbiased method of distinguishing between statistical variation of the estimates of the parameters of the population and true population difference.« less

  20. Relationship between alveolar bone measured by /sup 125/I absorptiometry with analysis of standardized radiographs: 2. Bjorn technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortman, L.F.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1982-05-01

    The Bjorn technique is widely used in periodontal studies as a standardized measure of alveolar bone. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using /sup 125/I absorptiometry to measure bone mass. The purpose of this study was to compare /sup 125/I absorptiometry with the Bjorn technique in detecting small sequential losses of alveolary bone. Four periodontal-like defects of incrementally increasing size were produced in alveolar bone in the posterior segment of the maxilla of a human skull. An attempt was made to sequentially reduce the amount of bone in 10% increments until no bone remained, a through and through defect. The bone remaining at each step was measured using /sup 125/I absorptiometry. At each site the /sup 125/I absorptiometry measurements were made at the same location by fixing the photon source to a prefabricated precision-made occlusal splint. This site was just beneath the crest and midway between the borders of two adjacent teeth. Bone loss was also determined by the Bjorn technique. Standardized intraoral films were taken using a custom-fitted acrylic clutch, and bone measurements were made from the root apex to coronal height of the lamina dura. A comparison of the data indicates that: (1) in early bone loss, less than 30%, the Bjorn technique underestimates the amount of loss, and (2) in advanced bone loss, more than 60% the Bjorn technique overestimates it.

  1. test.eps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    test and evaluation NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range WASHINGTON - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed the third development flight test of a non-nuclear B61-12 nuclear gravity bomb at Tonopah Test Range in Nevada on October 20, 2015. "This demonstration of effective end-to-end system... Flight Test of Weapons System Body by Navy Successful Third Flight

  2. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  3. Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford's 300 Area Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed ...

  4. High Explosives Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1, 2013 The design and testing for "Little Boy" took place at Gun Site The design and testing for "Little Boy" took place at Gun Site. RELATED IMAGES http:...

  5. Radiation Safety Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Test. This form can also be picked up and filled out in the CAMD front office, rm. 107 A minimum passing score is 80% (24 out of 30) After completing the test, you will ...

  6. Resumption of Transient Testing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to re-establish the capability to conduct transient testing of nuclear fuels. Transient testing involves placing fuel or material into the core of a...

  7. Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desmond, M.

    2014-08-01

    As an invited guest speaker, Michael Desmond presented on NREL's NWTC structural testing methods and capabilities at the 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop held on August 26-28, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Although dynamometer and field testing capabilities were mentioned, the presentation focused primarily on wind turbine blade testing, including descriptions and capabilities for accredited certification testing, historical methodology and technology deployment, and current research and development activities.

  8. OMB MPI Tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OMB MPI Tests OMB MPI Tests Description The Ohio MicroBenchmark suite is a collection of independent MPI message passing performance microbenchmarks developed and written at The Ohio State University. It includes traditional benchmarks and performance measures such as latency, bandwidth and host overhead and can be used for both traditional and GPU-enhanced nodes. For the purposes of the Trinity / NERSC-8 acquisition this includes only the following tests: (name of OSU test: performance

  9. Coaxial test fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1984-03-30

    This invention pertains to arrangements for performing electrical tests on contact material samples, and in particular for testing contact material test samples in an evacuated environment under high current loads. Frequently, it is desirable in developing high-current separable contact material, to have at least a preliminary analysis of selected candidate conductor materials. Testing of material samples will hopefully identify materials unsuitable for high current electrical contact without requiring incorporation of the materials into a completed and oftentimes complex structure.

  10. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  11. On the multiscale origins of fracture resistance in human bone and its biological degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Barth, Holly D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2012-03-09

    Akin to other mineralized tissues, human cortical bone can resist deformation and fracture due to the nature of its hierarchical structure, which spans the molecular to macroscopic length-scales. Deformation at the smallest scales, mainly through the composite action of the mineral and collagen, contributes to bone?s strength or intrinsic fracture resistance, while crack-tip shielding mechanisms active on the microstructural scale contribute to the extrinsic fracture resistance once cracking begins. The efficiency with which these structural features can resist fracture at both small and large length-scales becomes severely degraded with such factors as aging, irradiation and disease. Indeed aging and irradiation can cause changes to the cross-link profile at fibrillar length-scales as well as changes at the three orders of magnitude larger scale of the osteonal structures, both of which combine to inhibit the bone's overall resistance to the initiation and growth of cracks.

  12. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

    1998-12-29

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

  13. Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Atkins, Harold L.

    1998-12-29

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  14. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers National Solar Thermal Test Facility HomeTag:National Solar Thermal Test Facility Permalink Air Force Research Laboratory Testing ...

  15. ZiaTest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZiaTest ZiaTest Description This test executes a new proposed standard benchmark method for MPI startup that is intended to provide a realistic assessment of both launch and wireup requirements. Accordingly, it exercises both the launch system of the environment and the interconnect subsystem in a specified pattern. Specifically, the test consists of the following steps: Record a time stamp for when the test started - this is passed to rank=0 upon launch. Launch a 100MB executable on a specified

  16. Drum drop test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBeath, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    Testing was performed to determine actual damage to drums when dropped from higher than currently stacked elevations. The drum configurations were the same as they are placed in storage; single drums and four drums banded to a pallet. Maximum drop weights were selected based on successful preliminary tests. Material was lost from each of the single drum tests while only a small amount of material was lost from one of the pelletized drums. The test results are presented in this report. This report also provides recommendations for further testing to determine the appropriate drum weight which can be stored on a fourth tier.

  17. Porous expandable device for attachment to bone tissue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rybicki, Edmund F.; Wheeler, Kenneth Ray; Hulbert, Lewis E.; Karagianes, Manuel Tom; Hassler, Craig R.

    1977-01-01

    A device for attaching to substantially solid living bone tissue, comprising a body member having an outer surface shaped to fit approximately into an empty space in the tissue and having pores into which the tissue can grow to strengthen the bond between the device and the tissue, and adjustable means for expanding the body member against the tissue to an extent such as to provide a compressive stress capable of maintaining a snug and stable fit and of enhancing the growth of the tissue into the pores in the body member. The expanding means is adjustable to provide a stress between the tissue and the body member in the range of about 150 to 750 psi, typically 150 to 350 psi. Typically the body member comprises an expandable cylindrical portion having at least one radial slit extending longitudinally from a first end to the vicinity of the opposite (second) end thereof, at least one radial slit extending longitudinally from the second end to the vicinity of the first end thereof, and a tapered cylindrical hole extending coaxially from a wider circular opening in the first end to a narrower circular opening communicating with the second end.

  18. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  19. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schreurs, A. -S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Truong, T. A.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Limoli, C. L.; Turner, N. D.; Halloran, B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-02-11

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or antiinflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss.more » Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.« less

  20. Tenascin-W inhibits proliferation and differentiation of preosteoblasts during endochondral bone formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko . E-mail: hakiyama@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nakamura, Takashi; Crombrugghe, Benoit de

    2007-05-18

    We identified a cDNA encoding mouse Tenascin-W (TN-W) upregulated by bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)2 in ATDC5 osteo-chondroprogenitors. In adult mice, TN-W was markedly expressed in bone. In mouse embryos, during endochondral bone formation TN-W was localized in perichondrium/periosteum, but not in trabecular and cortical bones. During bone fracture repair, cells in the newly formed perichondrium/periosteum surrounding the cartilaginous callus expressed TN-W. Furthermore, TN-W was detectable in perichondrium/periosteum of Runx2-null and Osterix-null embryos, indicating that TN-W is expressed in preosteoblasts. In CFU-F and -O cells, TN-W had no effect on initiation of osteogenesis of bone marrow cells, and in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells TN-W inhibited cell proliferation and Col1a1 expression. In addition, TN-W suppressed canonical Wnt signaling which stimulates osteoblastic differentiation. Our results indicate that TN-W is a novel marker of preosteoblasts in early stage of osteogenesis, and that TN-W inhibits cell proliferation and differentiation of preosteoblasts mediated by canonical Wnt signaling.

  1. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  2. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  3. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  4. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  5. Wind Technology Testing Center Acquires New Blade Fatigue Test...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act, the WTTC is one of the largest blade test facilities in the world, testing some of ... tests on the larger blades at higher test frequencies-and thus shorter testing ...

  6. Seawater magnetohydrodynamic test apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, J.

    1993-02-11

    Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a hydrodynamic test facility suitable for low turbulence and low radiated noise experiments. It is another object to provide a hydrodynamic test facility having no moving parts in the water flow path. It is yet another to provide a hydrodynamic test facility having a water flow powered by a magnetohydrodynamic pump. Accordingly, the invention is a hydrodynamic test facility using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drive unit to provide the force necessary to circulate water in the test loop section. The test loop is fed by water from a pretreatment section which mixes seawater and tapwater to provide the desired salinity. A post-treatment section neutralizes emitted chlorine gases.

  7. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  8. Automated Testing System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-09

    ATS is a Python-language program for automating test suites for software programs that do not interact with thier users, such as scripted scientific simulations. ATS features a decentralized approach especially suited to larger projects. In its multinode mode it can utilize many nodes of a cluster in order to do many test in parallel. It has features for submitting longer-running tests to a batch system and would have to be customized for use elsewhere.

  9. Testing of the structural evaluation test unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    In the evaluation of the safety of radioactive material transportation it is important to consider the response of Type B packages to environments more severe than that prescribed by the hypothetical accident sequence in Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations (NRC 1995). The impact event in this sequence is a 9-meter drop onto an essentially unyielding target, resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s. The behavior of 9 packages when subjected to impacts more severe than this is not well known. It is the purpose of this program to evaluate the structural response of a test package to these environments. Several types of structural response are considered. Of primary importance is the behavior of the package containment boundary, including the bolted closure and 0-rings. Other areas of concern are loss of shielding capability due to lead slump and the deceleration loading of package contents, that may cause damage to them. This type of information is essential for conducting accurate risk assessments on the transportation of radioactive materials. Currently very conservative estimates of the loss of package protection are used in these assessments. This paper will summarize the results of a regulatory impact test and three extra-regulatory impact tests on a sample package.

  10. Charcoal filter testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, J.

    1997-08-01

    In this very brief, informal presentation, a representative of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission outlines some problems with charcoal filter testing procedures and actions being taken to correct the problems. Two primary concerns are addressed: (1) the process to find the test method is confusing, and (2) the requirements of the reference test procedures result in condensation on the charcoal and causes the test to fail. To address these problems, emergency technical specifications were processed for three nuclear plants. A generic or an administrative letter is proposed as a more permanent solution. 1 fig.