Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Cation Geothermometers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cation Geothermometers Cation Geothermometers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cation Geothermometers Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Liquid Geothermometry Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Used to estimate reservoir temperatures. Dictionary.png Cation Geothermometers: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Introduction Some experts have stated that the factor that changes the risk assessment of a geothermal prospect the fastest is obtaining attractive chemical confirmation (geothermometry, gas analyses) that a thermal resource exists

2

Multicomponent Geothermometers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multicomponent Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Multicomponent Geothermometers Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Liquid Geothermometry Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Multicomponent Geothermometers: The multicomponent geothermometry method consists of using full chemical analyses of water samples to compute the saturation indices (log(Q/K)) of reservoir minerals over a range of temperatures. The saturation indices are graphed as a function of temperature, and the clustering of log(Q/K) curves

3

Silica Geothermometers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silica Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Silica Geothermometers Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Liquid Geothermometry Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Used to estimate reservoir temperatures. Dictionary.png Silica Geothermometers: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Introduction Some experts have stated that the factor that changes the risk assessment of a geothermal prospect the fastest is obtaining attractive chemical confirmation (geothermometry, gas analyses) that a thermal resource exists

4

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

5

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fluid temperature of feed water Notes Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate that the reservoir feeding water to the Coso Hot Spring well has a temperature of about 240 -250 C, and the reservoir feeding the CGEH well has a temperature of about 205 C. The variation in the chemical composition of water from the two wells suggests a model in which water-rock chemical equilibrium is maintained as a convecting solution cools from about 245-205 C by conductive heat loss. References Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M.; Austin, C.F. (10 May 1980)

6

Definition: Multicomponent Geothermometers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multicomponent Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Multicomponent Geothermometers The multicomponent geothermometry method consists of using full chemical analyses of water samples to compute the saturation indices (log(Q/K)) of reservoir minerals over a range of temperatures. The saturation indices are graphed as a function of temperature, and the clustering of log(Q/K) curves near zero at any specific temperature (for a group of certain reservoir minerals) is used to infer the reservoir temperature.[1] References ↑ Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division Website: GeoT: A Computer Program for Multicomponent Geothermometry and Geochemical Speciation Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from

7

Definition: Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geothermometry Chemical geothermometers are used to estimate reservoir temperatures for most of the systems. The geothermometers are based on temperature- dependent, water-rock reactions which control the chemical and isotopic composition of the thermal water. This method is applicable only to hot-water systems because the common chemical constituents of thermal water (SiO2, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, HCO3, and CO3) are soluble in liquid water but lack significant solubility in steam.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermobarometry is the science of measuring the previous pressure and temperature history of a metamorphic or intrusive igneous rocks.

8

Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Silica-geothermometer temperature estimates for the Casa Diablo and RDO-8 well samples ( 196-202 degrees C) are lower than the corresponding cation-geothermometer temperature estimates, indicating loss of silica with declining reservoir temperature or dilution with low-silica waters. At shallow depths in the caldera References Michael L. Sorey, Gene A. Suemnicht, Neil C. Sturchio, Gregg A. Nordquist (1991) New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And

9

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Shevenell & De Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=401374" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

10

Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermometer temperatures of shallow samples suggest significant re-equilibration at temperatures below those found in the deep wells. Silica geothermometer temperatures of water samples from the deep wells are in reasonable agreement with measured temperatures, whereas Na-K-Ca temperatures are significantly higher than measured temperatures. The chemical characteristics of the water, as indicated by chloride concentration, are extremely variable in shallow and deep samples. Chloride concentrations of the deep samples range from 580 to 2200 mg/kg.

11

Geothermometry At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemistry of the hot springs strongly suggests the existence of a neutral chloride reservoir with economically developable temperature. The fluid geothermometry tells a consistent story, with cation geothermometry detecting a >210degrees C reservoir temperature, probably near the fumarole, and silica geothermometry and presence of sinter suggesting that 160 to 180degrees C exists close to hot spring B. References

12

Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell & De Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=399607" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

13

Gas Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Geothermometry Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0)...

14

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. References Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Exploration Of The Upper Hot

15

Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of

16

Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geothermometry Details Activities (65) Areas (48) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: used to estimate reservoir temperatures Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD 0.03 kUSD 3.0e-5 MUSD 3.0e-8 TUSD / sample Median Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD 0.03 kUSD 3.0e-5 MUSD 3.0e-8 TUSD / sample High-End Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD 0.03 kUSD 3.0e-5 MUSD 3.0e-8 TUSD / sample Dictionary.png Geothermometry:

17

Geothermometry At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

18

Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Queen Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures of the reservoir at depth are estimated to be between 92-141 degrees C and were calculated using the δ18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer. It is unclear whether these temperatures reflect waters from the outflow zone of the Desert Peak geothermal system, or waters from a different reservoir at Desert Queen. Quartz, chalcedony, amorphous silica, Na-K-Ca, and δ18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer calculations were performed.

19

A CO2-Silica Geothermometer for Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Assessment, with Application to Resources in the Safford Basin, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermics is the study of the earth's heat energy, it's affect on subsurface temperature distribution, it's physical and chemical sources, and it's role in dynamic geologic processes. The term, geothermometry, is applied to the determination of equilibrium temperatures of natural chemical systems, including rock, mineral, and liquid phases. An assemblage of minerals or a chemical system whose phase composition is a function of temperature and pressure can be used as a geothermometer. Thus a geothermometer is useful to determine the formation temperature of rock or the last equilibrium temperature of a flowing aqueous solution such as ground water and hydrothermal fluids.

Witcher, James C.; Stone, Claudia

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Groundwater data are limited to a portion of NAFR; data are more plentiful beyond the range boundaries. Geothermometry yields calculated groundwater temperatures generally ranging from 30 to 105degrees C, with a rough correlation between the SiO2-chalcedony and the Na-K-Na (Mg-corrected) geothermometers. References A. E. Sabin, J. D. Walker, J. Unruh, F. C. Monastero (2004) Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The

22

A BASIC program for calculating subsurface water temperatures using chemical geothermometersimplication to geothermal reservoir estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: BASIC, Na-K-Ca geothermometer, Na/K ratio, geothermometer, silica geothermometer, subsurface temperature

Ali El-Naqa; Nasser Abu Zeid

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geothermometry At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Geothermometry At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1). Subsequent field verification and chemical analyses of well, spring and groundwater samples indicated the presence of hidden subsurface geothermal reservoirs. Cation and quartz geothermometry indicate subsurface reservoir temperatures between 118°C and 162°C at all three

24

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

25

Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

26

Geothermometry At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on the above discussion, we favor a model in which thermal water rises somewhere between Howard and Seigler Springs. At Howard Springs we see evidence for the most representative deep thermal water because the C1 is elevated (highest measured C1 concentrations occur at Howard Springs). Moreover, the Na-Li, Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers suggest temperatures greater than 240 degrees C. References J. M. Thompson, R. H. Mariner, L. D. White, T. S. Presser, W. C.

27

Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1). Subsequent field verification and chemical analyses of well, spring and groundwater samples indicated the presence of hidden subsurface geothermal reservoirs. Cation and quartz geothermometry indicate subsurface reservoir temperatures between 118°C and 162°C at all three areas based on results from waters sampled proximal to borate crusts. References Lisa Shevenell, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Chris

28

Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...

29

Geothermometry At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

30

Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

31

Category:Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the...

32

Geothermometry At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1). Subsequent field verification and chemical analyses of well, spring and groundwater samples indicated the presence of hidden subsurface geothermal reservoirs. Cation and quartz geothermometry indicate subsurface reservoir temperatures between 118°C and 162°C at all three areas based on results from waters sampled proximal to borate crusts.

33

Geothermometry At Honokowai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Honokowai Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Honokowai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Honokowai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Honokowai Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperature and groundwater chemistry analyses were performed on three wells along the alluvial fan above Honokowai. Water temperatures were approximately 20degrees C and normal basal aquifer water chemistry was observed (Table 4). References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Honokowai_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=387033"

34

Chemical Geothermometers And Mixing Models For Geothermal Systems | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers And Mixing Models For Geothermal Systems Geothermometers And Mixing Models For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemical Geothermometers And Mixing Models For Geothermal Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Qualitative chemical geothermometers utilize anomalous concentrations of various "indicator" elements in groundwaters, streams, soils, and soil gases to outline favorable places to explore for geothermal energy. Some of the qualitative methods, such as the delineation of mercury and helium anomalies in soil gases, do not require the presence of hot springs or fumaroles. However, these techniques may also outline fossil thermal areas that are now cold. Quantitative chemical geothermometers and mixing models can provide information about present probable minimum

35

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area...

36

Geothermometry At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful...

37

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine fluid origin in two exploratory wells Notes Collected water from original coso hot springs well (1967) and CGEH No. 1. and completed chemical analysis to determine fluid origin. The surface expression of fumarole and acid sulfate pools and shallow steam wells gives a false indication of an extensive vapor dominated system because upward convecting, boiling alkaline-chloride waters do not reach the surface.

38

Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

39

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

40

Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geothermometry At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

42

Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

43

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

44

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

45

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power...

46

Geothermometry At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power...

47

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

48

Geothermometry At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Yhe extensive set of groundwater chemical data compiled for the wells in the valley (Table 1) showed that two of the primary indicators that have been commonly used in Hawaii for identifying geothermal potential (i.e. silica concentration and chloride to magnesium ion ratios) were anomalous in the groundwater of this survey area (Cox and Thomas, 1979). Several wells located on the caldera boundaries were found to have both

49

Geothermometry At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kawaihae Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Groundwater chemical data are limited due to the small number of wells near Kawaihae; however, the data that are available strongly substantiate the presence of a thermal resource. A measured water temperature of 31 degrees C in one well is clearly above normal ambient temperatures, and the chloride/magnesium ion ratio in the same well is elevated substantially above the normal range (Table 8). Both of these data provide strong evidence that at least a low-level thermal anomaly is present in the area.

50

Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A reexamination of all groundwater sources in the Keaau area was undertaken in an effort to confirm the chemical and temperature anomalies that formed the primary basis on which the Keaau area was identified during the preliminary assessment survey. The data generated by this survey (Table 9) determined that all of the anomalous data present in the earlier data base were spurious and that the groundwater chemistry and temperatures in this

51

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Blackfoot Reservoir region in southeastern Idaho is recognized as a potential geothermal area because of the presence of several young rhyolite domes (50,000 years old), Quaternary basalt flows, and warm springs. North- to northwest-trending high-angle normal faults of Tertiary to Holocene age appear to be the dominant structural control of spring activity. Surface spring-water temperatures average 14°C except for a group of springs west of the Reservoir Mountains which average 33°C.

52

Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A new geothermometer model is proposed by applying data obtained from a known Na-K geothermometer to an artificial neural network. In this model, Na and K values were implemented as input signals and geothermometers as the output signal. Multi-layer perceptrons and back propagation were used as training algorithms for the artificial neural network. Reservoir temperatures of some geothermal fields in Turkey determined by this method are in accord with those determined from other methods.

53

Geothermometry At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lahaina-Kaanapali Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Groundwater temperature and chemistry surveys were similarly unable to identify any detectable thermal influence on the basal groundwaters. Silica concentrations and water temperatures (Table 4) were within the normal range expected for basal groundwaters receiving a limited amount of irrigation return water; chloride/magnesium ratios ranged downward from normal seawater values. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

54

Qrtzgeotherm: An ActiveX component for the quartz solubility geothermometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ActiveX component, QrtzGeotherm, to calculate temperature and vapor fraction in a geothermal reservoir using quartz solubility geothermometry was written in Visual Basic 6.0. Four quartz solubility equations along the liquid-vapor saturation curve: ... Keywords: ActiveX component, Computer program, QrtzGeotherm, QrtzGeothrm, Quartz geothermometry, Solubility equations, Visual Basic 6.0

Mahendra P. Verma

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: New...

56

Physicochemical basis of the Na-K-Ca geothermometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regular changes in solution composition were observed experimentally during granite reaction with dilute NaCl (+CaCl/sub 2/) solutions; these changes closely follow the empirical Na-K-Ca geothermometer relationship. Initial minerals forming the granite (quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, and biotite) were etched by the reactions. Alteration phases formed include calcium-zeolite at <300/sup 0/C, feldspar overgrowths at >300/sup 0/C, and minor amounts of clay and calcsilicate at all temperatures. Amphibole overgrowths were also found at 340/sup 0/C. Quartz is near saturation in all experiments, and preliminary calculations of aqueous species distributions and mineral affinities indicate that the solutions achieve super-saturation with feldspars as the temperature increase. A consistent variation attributable to pH differences was observed in the empirical geothermometer relationship for all experimental data. At 340/sup 0/C, the experimental solutions appear to have deviated slightly from the empirical Na-K-Ca relationship. Such deviations may also be found in natural systems that attain such temperatures.

Janecky, D.R.; Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Benjamin, T.M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A New Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A New Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A new Na/K geothermometer equation has been developed. The temperature function is:Concentrations are in mg/kg. The new improved geothermometer equation was developed by artificial neural networks. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) used in the new improved Na/K equation for temperatures ranging from 94 to 345°C is 0.179, which is lower than the corresponding NMSE 0.226, 0.598, 0.656, 0.268, 0.328 and 0.225 for the equations of Arnorsson et al. (1983; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 47, 567-577), Truesdell (1975; Proc. 2nd UN Symposium), Tonani (1980; Proc. Adv. Eur.

58

Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation,...

59

Geothermometry At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The brine from the drill holes, hot springs, seepages, and irrigation wells was sampled, as well as water from two nearby creeks, (total of 13 samples) and sent for analysis to Thermochem Inc. For sample locations refer to Figure 35; the geochemical data are presented in Appendix C. Geochemical results indicate the presence of two distinct waters in this group of samples (Tom Powell of Thermochem Inc., personal communication, 2005).

60

New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present new improved equations for three still widely used Na/K, Na/Li and SiO2 geothermometers (obtained by statistical treatment of the data and application of outlier detection and rejection as well as theory of error propagation) and compare them with those by Fournier and others. New equations are also developed for estimating errors associated with the use of these new geothermometric equations and comparing them with the performance of the original equations. The errors in the use of the new

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82oC at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Socorro_Mountain_Area_(Owens,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=389518

62

An Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An empirical method of estimating the last temperature of water-rock interaction has been devised. It is based upon molar Na, K and Ca concentrations in natural waters from temperature environments ranging from 4 to 340°C. The data for most geothermal waters cluster near a straight line when plotted as the function vs reciprocal of absolute temperature, where Β is either or depending upon whether the water equilibrated above or below 100°C. For most waters tested, the method gives better results than the methods suggested by other workers. The ratio

63

Geothermometry At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Geothermometry At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Four formation water samples were collected from well 56-4, during an airlift test which took place between November 11 and November 14, 2007. One sample was taken from the Steiner Well which was the source for drilling water for the drilling of 56-4 and for the short injection test. The samples were analyzed by Thermochem for chemical constituents and by Rafter Lab at GNS for isotope analysis. References

64

Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes There are no thermal springs within the Emigrant prospect area, but unambiguously indigenous hotwater samples were collected from boreholes 211 (see above) and 112 (Fig. 3). These samples were analyzed for major and selected minor chemical components (Table 1; Pilkington, 1984). Hot water at 96degrees C from borehole 211 was collected by airlifting from a depth of 123 m (water level) at a rate of 240 liters per minute. The

65

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 2004 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Adsorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and radiometric geophysical surveys were carried out in conjunction with geologic mapping to test the application of these ground-based techniques to geothermal exploration at three prospects in Nevada by Henkle Jr. et al. in 2005. Mercury soil vapor surveys were not widely used in geothermal exploration in the western US at the time, although the association of mercury vapors with geothermal

66

Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. Midwest Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Michigan "The silica heat flow estimator does provide estimates of surface heat flow which appear to be in good agreement with conventional estimates, but which are not entirely free from disturbances caused by groundwater movements. The technique should be more widely applied to areas where conventional heat flow measurements are lacking." References Raymond Vugrinovich (1987) Regional Heat Flow Variations In The

67

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 - 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980's that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare chemical and temperature data from known moderate- to high-temperature (>200°C) in the region, and (3) to comment on the

68

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order

69

Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison, Arrowhead, Red Hill, Monroe, Joseph, Castilla, Saratoga, Thermo, Crater, Wasatch, Beck, Deseret, Big Spring, Blue Warm, Crystal Madsen, Udy, Cutler, Garland, Utah, Ogden, Hooper, Newcastle Area References David R. Cole (1983) Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Cole,_1983)&oldid=4014

70

CO/sub 2/-silica geothermometer for low temperature geothermal resource assessment, with application to resources in the Safford Basin, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates silica-water reactions in low-temperature geothermal water in areas near Safford, southeastern Arizona, and derives a pCO2 correction for conductive silica geothermometers. Use and limitations of the technique are also discussed. Data collection, interpretation approach, and basic geochemistry, as it applies to this study, are outlined. In addition, the geology, thermal regime, geohydrology, and gross geochemistry of the Safford area are reviewed. Finally, geothermal potential, as indicated by this study and previous studies is discussed.

Witcher, J.C.; Stone, C.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Property:StratInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

StratInfo StratInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name StratInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 82 subproperties: 2 2-M Probe Survey A Active Seismic Methods Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cuttings Analysis D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Drilling Methods E Earth Tidal Analysis Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion F FLIR Flow Test Fluid Inclusion Analysis Fluid Lab Analysis Formation Testing Techniques Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey G Gas Geothermometry

73

Property:HydroInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HydroInfo HydroInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HydroInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 77 subproperties: 2 2-M Probe Survey A Acoustic Logs Active Seismic Methods Aeromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Conceptual Model Core Analysis Core Holes Cuttings Analysis D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Drilling Methods E Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion F FLIR Formation Testing Techniques Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey G Gamma Log Gas Flux Sampling Gas Geothermometry Geochemical Data Analysis G cont. Geochemical Techniques Geodetic Survey Geophysical Methods Geothermal Literature Review

74

Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Sodium Natrolite Thursday, October 31, 2013 Structural changes leading to disordering of the cation-water arrangement within the pores of zeolite natrolite while exchanging sodium (Na+) with potassium (K+) have been investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). cation in zeolite sodium natrolite fig1 Figure 1) Artistic representation of the natrolite channel, which opens progressively as a function of the exchanging cation's size. The small golf ball represents ordered sodium cations in a closed elliptical channel, whereas the large baseball represents a disordered cesium cation in an open circular channel. The most fundamental chemical property of zeolites is ion exchange. A

76

Specific complexation of metal oxo cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to novel chelating agents for high molecular weight polyvalent metal oxo cations. Specifically, an improved chelating agent and an improved process of chelation is described to recognize specifically metal oxo cations using organic chelating agents that have a functional group to supply donor groups for metal coordination while simultaneously providing a different group to intramolecularly interact with the oxygen of the oxo group. More precisely, the invention relates to tripodal amine carboxylates useful to sequester uranyl and related metal oxo cations in aqueous solution, and is especially suitable for recovering such oxo cations from dilute aqueous solutions, e.g. seawater, mine runoff, processing waste streams, etc.

Raymond, K.N.; Franczyk, T.S.

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

Wasserman, Stephen R. (Darien, IL); Anderson, Kenneth B. (Lisle, IL); Song, Kang (Woodridge, IL); Yuchs, Steven E. (Naperville, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Cation Adsorption on Manganese Dioxide Impregnated Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed-bed ion-exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. This report documents an alternative ion adsorption process for the purification of liquid wastes, specifically, the use of manganese dioxide (MnO2) impregnated fibers to remove selected cations from PWR liquid waste streams.

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Speci cation and Veri cation of a Steam-Boiler with Signal-Coq Micka l Kerb uf1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speci cation and Veri cation of a Steam-Boiler with Signal-Coq Micka l Kerb uf1 , David Nowak2 assistant, Coq, for the speci cation and the veri cation of co-inductive properties of the well-known steam-boiler cation tools. Keywords: synchronous programming, theorem proving, the steam- boiler problem. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

80

Increased Radical Cation Yields: Arenes in DCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increased Yields of Radical Cations by Arene Addition to Irradiated Increased Yields of Radical Cations by Arene Addition to Irradiated 1,2-Dichloroethane Alison M. Funston and John R. Miller Radiat. Phys. Chem., 72, 601-611 (2005). [Find paper at Elsevier Science Direct] Abstract: Pulse radiolysis in chlorinated hydrocarbon liquids such as 1,2-dichloroethane is a versatile and effective method for the generation of solute radical cations. The addition of a large concentration of toluene or benzene to solutions of 1,2-dichloroethane is found to increase the yield of solute radical cations (G = 0.68 molecules/100 eV in 1,2-dichloroethane (Wang et al., 1979) by a factor of 2.5. The increased yield is found for solutes which have a potential of ~ 1.1 V (vs SCE) or below for the S+·/S couple and is due to reaction of the chlorine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermometry (Fouillac & Michard, 1981) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for geochemical surveys. An interesting point is the remarkable constancy of the NaLi ratio from aquifer to surface manifestations. References C. Fouillac, G. Michard (1981)...

82

ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

Crivello, J.V.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY Dances with hydrogen cations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life depends on the flow of hydrogen cations in water, yet their dynamic behaviour when complexed with water molecules is unknown. The latest computer simulations cast light on the jiggling of hydrated hydrogen ions. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

Microsoft Word - cation-in-zeolite-natrolite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Sodium Natrolite Structural changes leading to disordering of the cationwater arrangement within the pores of zeolite natrolite while exchanging sodium (Na + ) with potassium (K + ) have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The most fundamental chemical property of zeolites is ion exchange. A detailed understanding of why and how ion exchange occurs is of tremendous importance for many industrial processes ranging from well-known water softening to environmental cleanup such as radionuclide storage. In the case of sodium natrolite, rubidium- or cesium- containing natrolites can only be made if Na + is first

87

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Complexation of DNA with Cationic Surfactant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transfection of an anionic polynucleotide through a negatively charged membrane is an important problem in genetic engineering. The direct association of cationic surfactant to DNA decreases the effective negative charge of the nucleic acid, allowing the DNA-surfactant complex to approach a negatively charged membrane. The paper develops a theory for solutions composed of polyelectrolyte, salt, and ionic surfactant. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental measurements. PACS.05.70.Ce- Thermodynamic functions and equations of state PACS.61.20.Qg- Structure of associated liquids: electrolytes, molten salts, etc. PACS.61.25.Hq- Macromolecular and polymer solutions; polymer melts; swelling Corresponding author;

Paulo S. Kuhn; Marcia C. Barbosa; Yan Levin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

O' Neill, Malcolm A. (Winterville, GA); Pellerin, Patrice J. M. (Montpellier, FR); Warrenfeltz, Dennis (Athens, GA); Vidal, Stephane (Combaillaux, FR); Darvill, Alan G. (Athens, GA); Albersheim, Peter (Athens, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Available Technologies: Cation-Exchanged Variants of Zeolite LTA ...  

Berkeley Lab scientists Tae-Hyun Bae and Jeffrey Long have found that cation-exchanged zeolites are outstanding materials for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 ...

92

An Observable Silene/Silylene Rearrangement in a Cationic Iridium ...  

An Observable Silene/Silylene Rearrangement in a Cationic Iridium Complex Steven R. Klei, T. Don Tilley,* and Robert G. Bergman* Department of Chemistry and Center ...

93

CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations  

SciTech Connect

A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cationic Ruthenium Catalysts for Olefin Hydrovinylation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stereoselective carbon?carbon bond formation is one of the most important types of bond construction in organic chemistry. A mild and acid free catalyst system for the hydrovinylation reaction utilizing a cationic, ruthenium center is described. A catalytic amount of RuHCl(CO)(PCy3)2 (2) activated with AgOTF or AgSbF6 at room temperature was found to be an effective catalyst system for the hydrovinylation of vinylarenes and the intramolecular hydrovinylation (IHV) of 1,6-dienes. Vinylarenes with both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents reacted with ethylene at room temperature to provide the desired 3-arylbutenes in moderate to excellent yield (60-99%) under mild reaction conditions, while the IHV reaction of 1, 6 dienes provided greater than 90% of product conversion. We also developed the first hydrovinylation catalyst containing a chelating, bidentate phosphine ligand that provides the desired product. Our ruthenium-based catalytic system has also proven to give an appealing reactivity profile in favor of the desired arylbutenes without promoting undesirable oligomerization and isomerization.

Sanchez, Richard P., Jr

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Is Iodate a Strongly Hydrated Cation?  

SciTech Connect

We show, through a combination of density function theory based molecular dynamics simulations (DFTMD) and experimental x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) studies, that the iodate ion (IO3-) is a zwitterion in solution. The local region adjoining the I atom is sufficiently electropositive that three hydrating waters are oriented with their Os atoms directly interacting with the iodine atom at an I-OH2O distance of 2.95 . This is the orientation of water hydrating a cation. Further, approximately 2-3 water molecules hydrate each O of IO3 - through a single H atom in an orientation of the water that is expected for an anion at an IOH2O distance of 3.85 . We predict that this structure persists, although to a much lesser degree, for BrO3 -, and ClO3 -. This type of local microstructure profoundly affects the behavior of the "anion" at interfaces and how it interacts with other ionic species in solution.

Baer, Marcel D.; Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mundy, Christopher J.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Radiation Stability of Cations in Ionic Liquids. 2. Charge Delocalization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stability of Cations in Ionic Liquids. 2. Improved Radiation Stability of Cations in Ionic Liquids. 2. Improved Radiation Resistance Through Charge Delocalization in 1-Benzylpyridinium Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Jasmine L. Hatcher, Andrew R. Cook, Tomasz Szreder and James F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 117, Just Accepted (2013). [Find paper at ACS Publications]. Abstract: Hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) hold promise as replacements for molecular diluents for processing of used nuclear fuel as well as for the development of alternative separations processes, provided that the solvent can be made resistant to ionizing radiation. We demonstrate that 1-benzylpyridinium cations are uniquely suited as radiation resistant cations due to the occurrence of charge delocalization both in their reduced and oxidized form in the ILs. It is suggested that

98

Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extraction chromatographic material for extracting metal cations from a iquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Renato (Elmhurst, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Poly(3-decylthiophene) Radical Anions and Cations in Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly(3-decylthiophene) Radical Anions and Cations in Solution: Single and Poly(3-decylthiophene) Radical Anions and Cations in Solution: Single and Multiple Polarons and Their Delocalization Lengths in Conjugated Polymers N. Takeda and J. R. Miller J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 14715-14723 (2012). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Optical absorption spectra of anions and cations of poly(3-decylthiophene) (P3DT) in solution were identified as single polarons. Pulse radiolysis of P3DT in THF determined the spatial extent of one negative polaron to be similar to 11.5 thiophene units by observing transient absorption of P3DT(-dot) radical ions, which are prinicpally free ions, at 850 nm with epsilon = (7.25 ± 0.47) x 104 M-1 cm-1 and bleaching of the neutral absorption band at 450 nm. P3DT(-dot) was formed in a combination of diffusive reactions and fast "step" processes. Similarly, a positive

100

Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources. Annual performance report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year`s research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

Crivello, J.V.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Bistability of Cation Interstitials in II-VI Semiconductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stability of cation interstitials in II-VI semiconductors is studied using ab initio methods. We find that interstitials in the neutral charge state are more stable in the tetrahedral interstitial site near the cation, whereas in the (2+) charge state, they are more stable near the anion. The diffusion energy barrier changes when the defect charge state changes. Therefore, if electrons/holes are taken from the defect level by light, changing its charge state, the interstitial atom will be able to diffuse almost spontaneously due to a reduced diffusion barrier.

Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

Cengarle, María Victoria

103

EFFECT OF CATIONS ON ALUMINUM SPECIATION UNDER ALKALINE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments were performed to examine the effect of metal cations common to high level waste on the phase of aluminum formed. Experiments were performed at temperature of 150 C, 75 C, and room temperature, either without additional metal cation, or with 0.01-0.2 molar equivalents of either Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, or Cr{sup 3+}. Results showed that temperature has the greatest effect on the phase obtained. At 150 C, boehmite is the only phase obtained, independent of the presence of other metal cations, with only one exception where a small amount of gibbsite was also detected in the product when 0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} was present. At 75 C, a mixture of phases is obtained, most commonly including bayerite and gibbsite; however, boehmite is also formed under some conditions, including in the absence of additional metal ion. At room temperature, in the absence of additional metal ion, a mixture of bayerite and gibbsite is obtained. The addition of another metal cation suppresses the formation of gibbsite, with a couple of exceptions (0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} or 0.01 equivalents of Cr{sup 3+}) where both phases are still obtained.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geothermometry At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the water produced by this aquifer indicates that the chloridemagnesium ion ratio has been significantly altered by thermal processes. References Donald M. Thomas (1...

106

An Algebraic Speci cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Algebraic Speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System Michel Bidoit 1 , Claude Chevenier describe how to derive an algebraic speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System starting from to specify the detection of the steam-boiler fail- ures. Finally we discuss validation and veri#12;cation

Bidoit, Michel

107

The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition of Formal Program Speci cation and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition of Formal Program Speci#12;cation and Development Methods the design of a steam boiler control, which realizes the informal speci#12;cation handed out. The steam boiler-control speci#12;cation problem was sent out to the partici- pants nine months before

Börger, Egon

108

Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Selective Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print Wednesday, 24 September 2008 00:00 During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions has been known since the early 20th century, when Franz Hofmeister observed that some salts (ionic compounds) aided the solution of proteins in egg, some caused proteins to destabilize and precipitate, and others ranged in activity between the two extremes. Hofmeister then ranked "salt-out" (destabilizing) ions versus "salt-in" (stabilizing) ions according to the magnitude of their effects (the "Hofmeister effects"). However, despite enormous effort, why certain interactions are preferred over others is not completely understood. Recently, a team of researchers from UC Berkeley used the model systems of acetate and formate (two simple carboxylic acids) with a series of cations to test predictions made in the literature for preferential interactions. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used as this technique is highly sensitive to the chemical environments around a molecule. Experiments at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 confirmed strengthening of the interaction between the cations and the carboxylate group in the following order: potassium, sodium, and lithium.

109

Geothermal Literature Review At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In conjunction with field checking of the borate crusts, existing databases were consulted and a cold spring was found in the literature at Teels Marsh that had a geochemical analysis. Geothermometry from this analysis predicted anomalous subsurface temperatures of 192degrees C (Mg-corrected Na-K-Ca geothermometer) and 118degrees C (quartz geothermometer). References Lisa Shevenell, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Chris

110

Weakly Charged Cationic Nanoparticles Induce DNA Bending and Strand Separation  

SciTech Connect

The understanding of interactions between double stranded (ds) DNA and charged nanoparticles will have a broad bearing on many important applications from drug delivery [ 1 4 ] to DNAtemplated metallization. [ 5 , 6 ] Cationic nanoparticles (NPs) can bind to DNA, a negatively charged molecule, through a combination of electrostatic attraction, groove binding, and intercalation. Such binding events induce changes in the conformation of a DNA strand. In nature, DNA wraps around a cylindrical protein assembly (diameter and height of 6 nm) [ 7 ] with an 220 positive charge, [ 8 ] creating the complex known as chromatin. Wrapping and bending of DNA has also been achieved in the laboratory through the binding of highly charged species such as molecular assemblies, [ 9 , 10 ] cationic dendrimers, [ 11 , 12 ] and nanoparticles. [ 13 15 ] The charge of a nanoparticle plays a crucial role in its ability to induce DNA structural changes. If a nanoparticle has a highly positive surface charge density, the DNA is likely to wrap and bend upon binding to the nanoparticle [ 13 ] (as in the case of chromatin). On the other hand, if a nanoparticle is weakly charged it will not induce dsDNA compaction. [ 9 , 10 , 15 ] Consequently, there is a transition zone from extended to compact DNA conformations which depends on the chemical nature of the nanoparticle and occurs for polycations with charges between 5 and 10. [ 9 ] While the interactions between highly charged NPs and DNA have been extensively studied, the processes that occur within the transition zone are less explored.

Railsback, Justin [North Carolina State University; Singh, Abhishek [North Carolina State University; Pearce, Ryan [North Carolina State University; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Collazo, Ramon [North Carolina State University; Sitar, Zlatko [ORNL; Yingling, Yaroslava [North Carolina State University; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ENERGY COMMISSION APPL.lCATION FOR SOURCE MATERIAL LICENSE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COMMISSION COMMISSION APPL.lCATION FOR SOURCE MATERIAL LICENSE Pursuant to the rcgu!ations in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 40, application is hereby made for a license to receive, possess, use, transfer, deliver or import into the United Stat-, source material for the activity or activities described. 1. (check ooa) 2. NAME OF APPLICANT W. R. GRACE 6 Co. 0 (a) New Iicense 0 (b) Amendment to License No.- Davison Chemical Division STA-422 3. Q (c) Renewal of Licensr No. 0 (d) Previous License No. Pompton Plains, N. J. 4. ST,.TE THE AOORESS(ES) AT WHICH SOURCE MATERIAL WILL BE POSSESSED OR USED 868 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, fi. J. a*ocY s up/'l File IF 5. BUSINESS OR OCCUPATION I 6. (a) IF APPLICANT IS AN INDIVIDUAL. STATE CITIZENSHIP

112

Method of separating and recovering uranium and related cations from spent Purex-type systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating uranium and related cations from a spent Purex-type solvent extraction system which contains degradation complexes of tributylphosphate wherein the system is subjected to an ion-exchange process prior to a sodium carbonate scrubbing step. A further embodiment comprises recovery of the separated uranium and related cations. 5 figs.

Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci, in June 1995, to control the Karlsruhe steam boiler simulator satisfactorily. The abstract machines

Börger, Egon

114

Guided conversion to enhance cation detection in water using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach, named guided conversion enhancement, has been established to improve the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensitivity of cation detection in water. Two processes were involved in this approach: the main part was replacement reaction that converted the cations in water to solid granules on the surface of an immersed metallic sheet; the other was electric assistance that increased local cation concentration and strengthened the reaction. With the aid of replacement reaction and an electric field, a detection limit of 16 ppb was achieved for copper cation (Cu{sup 2+}) detection in a water solution of CuSO4. The obtained results suggest that this approach has significant potential to be developed as an effective method for underwater cation detection.

Lu Yuan; Li Ying; Wu Jianglai; Zhong Shilei; Zheng Ronger

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cationic Main Group Compounds as Water Compatible Small Anion Receptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluoride anion plays an important role in dental health and as a result is added to drinking water at low concentrations. If the concentration of fluoride is too high however, skeletal fluorosis can occur. Because of this, there has been significant interest in the development of water compatible anion sensors that can sense fluoride at the ppm level. This is made difficult by the high hydration enthalpy of fluoride (?H0 = -504 KJ/mol) which significantly lowers the reactivity of this anion in water. For this reason it has become the goal of the Gabba group, as well as other research groups to develop fluoride sensing small molecules. Such molecules should possess sufficient Lewis acidity to overcome the hydration enthalpy of the fluoride anion. A significant amount of research has been conducted on triarylboranes containing cationic moieties such as ammonium, phosphonium, and sulfonium groups. This thesis will describe additional examples of such species, including a series of ammonium boranes of the general formula [p-(Mes2B)C6H4(NMe2R)]+. As indicated by anion complexation studies, the R group present in these molecules has a notable effect on the anion affinity of the somewhat distant boron center. Another component of this thesis deals with the chemistry of newly synthesized stiboranes that are also decorated by peripheral ammonium groups. As observed for the ammonium boranes mentioned above, the ammonium groups present in these stiboranes drives anion capture, leading to zwitterionic ammonium antimonite formation.

Leamer, Lauren Anne

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cationic Liposome-Microtuble Complexes: Lipid-Protein Bio-Nanotubles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 is the mixing isoelectric point. A set of TEM images covering the structures in the phase diagram of MT-membrane complexes are shown in Figure 1. For cationic lipid mole...

117

Enabling multi-cation electrolyte usage in LMBs for lower cost and operating temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alloy anodes form a promising path to the use of multi-cation electrolytes by increasing chemical stability. In this study, a lithium-magnesium alloy anode was developed such that lower cost and lower melting temperature ...

Blanchard, Allan (Allan B.)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Determining the Mechanisms of Cationic Contamination Affecting PEMFCs Using a Strip Cell Configuration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cationic contamination of polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been shown to cause serious performance degradation but the exact mechanisms of this degradation are not fully understood. A strip cell configuration was devised to study the mechanisms of performance degradation due to cationic contamination by changing the time and length scales of traditional fuel cells while providing a suitable reference electrode. This 'strip cell' configuration utilizes traditional Nafion{reg_sign} membranes in an in-plane configuration with electrodes painted on each end. Using this cell it was determined that cationic contaminants collect near the cathode of the fuel cell under load and that this profile leads to increased losses primarily in the cathode region. These results can be directly related to performance losses in a typical PEMFC contaminated by foreign cations.

Kienitz, B. L.; Zawodzinski, T. A.; Pivovar, B. S.; Garzon, F. H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The effect of trivalent cations on the major lower mantle silicates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I have investigated the effect of composition, especially ferric iron and aluminum, on the equations of state and phase stability of perovskite and post-perovskite. The presence of trivalent cations decreases the bulk ...

Catalli, Krystle Carina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Kinetic Analysis of Cation Exchange in Birnessite using Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we applied time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) to develop kinetic models that test a proposed two-stage reaction pathway for cation exchange in birnessite. These represent the first rate equations calculated for cation exchange in layered manganates. Our previous work has shown that the substitution of K, Cs, and Ba for interlayer Na in synthetic triclinic birnessite induces measurable changes in unit-cell parameters. New kinetic modeling of this crystallographic data supports our previously postulated two-stage reaction pathway for cation exchange, and we can correlate the kinetic steps with changes in crystal structure. In addition, the initial rates of cation exchange, R ({angstrom}{sup 3} min{sup -1}), were determined from changes in unit-cell volume to follow these rate laws: R = 1.75[K{sup +}{sub (aq)}]{sup 0.56}, R = 41.1[Cs{sup +}{sub (aq)}]{sup 1.10}, R = 1.15[Ba{sup 2+}{sub (aq)}]{sup 0.50}. Thus, the exchange rates for Na in triclinic birnessite decreased in the order: Cs >> K > Ba. These results are likely a function of hydration energy differences of the cations and the preference of the solution phase for the more readily hydrated cation.

C Lopano; P Heaney; J Bandstra; J Post; S Brantley

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

James E. Saiers

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Surface Precipitation Model for the Sorption of Cations on Metal Oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be describedby the formation of a solid solution whose composition varies continuously between sorbents of cations in natural waters (1, 2) and in water treatment processes (3). For this reason, much of a continuum between monolayer gas adsorption and ultimate condensation of the gas. In this paper, a new

Morel, François M. M.

123

Spectroscopic signatures of proton transfer dynamics in the water dimer cation  

SciTech Connect

Using full dimensional EOM-IP-CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ potential energy surfaces, the photoelectron spectrum, vibrational structure, and ionization dynamics of the water dimer radical cation, (H2O)+2, were computed. We also report an experimental photoelectron spectrum which is derived from photoionization efficiency measurements and compares favorably with the theoretical spectrum. The vibrational structure is also compared with the recent experimental work of Gardenier et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 4772 (2009)] and the recent theoretical calculations by Cheng et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113 13779 (2009)]. A reduced dimensionality nuclear Hamiltonian was used to compute the ionization dynamics for both the ground state and first excited state of the cation. The dynamics show markedly different behavior and spectroscopic signatures depending on which state of the cation is accessed by the ionization. Ionization to the ground-state cation surface induces a hydrogen transfer which is complete within 50 femtoseconds, whereas ionization to the first excited state results in a much slower process.

Kamarchik, Eugene; Kostko, Oleg; Bowman, Joel M.; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides  

SciTech Connect

A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

Dimitrov, Vesselin, E-mail: vesselin@uctm.edu [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria)] [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Synthesis and Reversible Reductive Coupling of Cationic, Dinitrogen-Derived Diazoalkane Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of cationic diazoalkane complexes [4-RC6H4C(H)NNMo(N[t-Bu]Ar)3][AlCl4] 4-RC subscript 6 H subscript 4 C(H)NNMo(N[t-Bu]Ar) subscript 3] [AlCl subscript 4

Curley, John J.

126

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemistry of the hot springs strongly suggests the existence of a neutral chloride reservoir with economically developable temperature. The fluid geothermometry tells a consistent story, with cation geothermometry detecting a >210degrees C reservoir temperature, probably near the fumarole, and silica geothermometry and presence of sinter suggesting that 160 to 180degrees C exists close to hot spring B.

128

Synthesis, characterization and application of water-soluble and easily removable cationic pressure-sensitive adhesives. Quarterly technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute studied the adsorption of cationic pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) on wood fiber, and the buildup of PSA in a closed water system during paper recycling; the results are presented. Georgia Tech worked to develop an environmentally friendly polymerization process to synthesize a novel re-dispersible PSA by co-polymerizing an oil-soluble monomer (butyl acrylate) and a cationic monomer MAEPTAC; results are presented. At the University of Georgia at Athens the project focused on the synthesis of water-soluble and easily removable cationic polymer PSAs.

NONE

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Adsorption of anionic and cationic surface-active agents by natural coals  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption isotherms were measured in terms of isopropyl-, butyl- and pentyl-amine and isopropyl alcohol for gas coals and anthracite. It was shown that the amount of adsorption depends on the type of coal and the structure of the adsorbate molecules. Cationic surfactants tend to be adsorbed better than anionic. The paper calculates the standard reduction in free energy during adsorption of amines by coal. It was found that the amine adsorption process leads to an increase in pH.

Butuzova, L.F.; Isaeva, L.N.; Saranchuk, V.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cloning and first functional characterization of a plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (cng) non-selective cation channels have been cloned from a number of animal systems. These channels are characterized by direct gating upon cAMO or cGMO binding to the intracellular portion of the channel protein, which leads to an increase in channel conductance. Animal cng channels are involved in signal transduction systems; they translate stimulus-induced changes in cytosolic cyclic nucleotide into altered cell membrane potential and/or cation flux as part of a signal cascade pathway. Putative plant homologs of animal cng channels have been identified. However, functional characterization (i.e., demonstration of cyclic-nucleotide-dependent ion currents) of a plant cng channel has not yet been accomplished. The authors report the cloning and first functional characterization of a plant member of this family of ion channels. The Arabidopsis cDNA AtCNGC2 encodes a polypeptide with deduced homology to the {alpha}-subunit of animal channels, and facilitates cyclic nucleotide-dependent cation currents upon expression in a number of heterologous systems. AtCNGC2 expression in a yeast mutant lacking a low-affinity K{sup +} uptake system complements growth inhibition only when lipophilic nucleotides are present in the culture medium. Voltage clamp analysis indicates that Xenopus lawvis oocytes injected with AtCNGC2 cRNA demonstrate cyclic-nucleotide-dependent, inward-rectifying K{sup +} currents. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) transfected with AtCNGC2 cDNA demonstrate increased permeability to Ca{sup 2+} only in the presence of lipophilic cyclic nucleotides. The evidence presented here supports the functional classification of AtCNGC2 as a cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channel, and presents the first direct evidence identifying a plant member of this ion channel family.

Leng, Q.; Mercier, R.W.; Yao, W.; Berkowitz, G.A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Juneau, AK (United States)); Nye, C.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States) Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Synthesis, Characterization and Anion Complexation of Cationic Main Group Lewis Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to favorable Coulombic effects, cationic main group Lewis acids should be more Lewis acidic than their neutral counterparts. To investigate this idea, this dissertation has been dedicated to the synthesis, characterization and anion binding properties of new cationic Lewis acids for selective anion complexation. The cationic borane [p-(Mes2B)C6H4(PPh3)] displays an enhanced anion affinity towards fluoride due to a combination of Coulombic and hydrophobic effects, and can be used to detect fluoride at levels below 4 ppm in water. A related phosphonium borane featuring a chromophoric dansyl amide moiety has been synthesized and used for the fluorescence turn on sensing of CN?. This borane is very sensitive and can be used to measure cyanide concentration in the 20-30 ppb range in water. The bidentate borane [o-(Mes2B)C6H4(PPh2Me)] is selective for N3 ? over F? in water/chloroform biphasic mixtures because of the lipophilic character of the azide anion, as well as its ability to interact with both the boron and phosphorus Lewis acidic sites of the receptor via chelation (lp(N)s*(P-C)). Sulfonium borane [o(Mes2B)C6H4(SMe2)] can detect up to 50 ppb of cyanide in water at pH 7 due to favorable Coulombic effects. The sulfonium moiety interacts with the cyanide anion through both bonding and back-bonding interactions, thus enhancing the unusual affinity of [o-(Mes2B)C6H4(SMe2)] towards cyanide. This approach can be extended to Lewis acids containing fluorosilanes such as [1-Ant2FSi-2-Me2S-(C6H4)] whose fluoride affinity exceeds that of neutral fluorosilanes by several orders of magnitude.

Kim, Youngmin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d sup 0 metal alkyl complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long term goals of this project are to design and synthesize highly unsaturated, electrophilic metal complexes and to explore their use as catalysts, reagents, and/or model systems for olefin polymerization and C-H activation chemistry. During the 1990 budget year we have focused our attention on (i) the ligand C-H activation chemistry of Cp{sub 2}Zr(CH{sub 3})(THF){sup +} and related cationic, d{sup o} Zr alkyl complexes, and (ii) the synthesis of new classes of group 4 metal alkyl complexes with non-Cp{sub 2}M ligand environments.

Jordan, R.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Problems of trace-element ratios and geothermometry in a gravel geothermal-aquifer system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system studied is a Tertiary-age, block-faulted basin in which a Pleistocene gravel bed acts as a confined aquifer and permits the lateral dispersion of the geothermal fluids. Vertical movement of the hot water is currently believed to be controlled by faults on the east side of the valley. An aerial magnetic anomaly and a Bouguer gravity anomaly appear to correspond with thoese eastern faults. Basic data on the geology and trace element halos has been presented previously. Evaluation of the mixing phenomena in this system was attempted using a dissolved silica-enthalpy graph. A chalcedony curve is also plotted. An enthalpy versus chloride plot, suggests that either conductive cooling occurs before mixing or that higher chloride content background waters are available for mixing. (MHR)

Sonderegger, J.L.; Donovan, J.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Kinetics of tunneling electron transfer between antimorphous defects in optical crystals with mobile cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental data on the transient optical absorption of wide-band-gap optical crystals of lithium borates Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5}, and Li{sub 6}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and potassium (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP)) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (ADP)) dihydrogen phosphates in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions are analyzed using the theory of diffusion-controlled tunneling recombination. A nanosecond pulsed radiation action on these crystals is shown to form defect pairs, such as polaron-type hole centers and electron centers based on interstitial cations. The relaxation kinetics of these centers over a wide time range of 10{sup -8}-10 s is described by a proposed model of tunneling electron transfer between antimorphous defects in the cation sublattice under the thermally stimulated mobility of recombination partners. The numerical values of the kinetic parameters are determined and the time dependences of the reaction rate constants are calculated for all crystals under study. As a result, the dynamics of change in the optical properties of these crystals under a pulsed radiation action can be simulated.

Ogorodnikov, I. N., E-mail: igor.ogorodnikov@bk.ru; Kiseleva, M. S. [Ural Federal University (Russian Federation)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna  

SciTech Connect

Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Factors Affecting the Fragmentation of Peptide Ions: Metal Cationization and Fragmentation Timescale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The factors affecting peptide fragmentation have been extensively studied in the literature in order to better predict the fragment ion spectra of peptides and proteins. While there are countless influences to consider, metal cation binding in the gas-phase is particularly interesting. Herein, a comparison of fragmentation patterns of a model peptide series with various charge carriers (H+, Li+, Na+, K+, and Cu+) will assist in determining the location of the preferred binding site of the metal cation and in assessing differences in the fragmentation pattern as a result of this binding site. An interesting observation from these studies reveals abundant x-type fragment ions occurring from the fragmentation of alkali-metal cationized peptides. As these fragment ions have been observed in previous studies by others but not addressed, the factors affecting the formation of these x-type fragment ions are explored. Additionally, a home-built 193-nm photodissociation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer is utilized to study how peptide fragmentation kinetics affect the fragmentation pattern observed. Initially, the fragmentation timescales of various peptides are investigated. Results indicate that longer fragmentation timescales (~10 microseconds) result in an increased number of identified peaks with internal and ammonia loss fragment ions being the most common in comparison to 'prompt' fragmentation timescales (~1 microsecond). Furthermore, b-type fragment ion formation is also favored at longer timescales for the arginine containing peptides investigated. The fragmentation pattern of several proline containing peptides is examined by collision-induced dissociation and 193-nm photodissociation. Unique fragment ions are observed with each occurring at a proline residue. Few differences are detected between CID and 193-nm photodissociation spectra, indicating that the proline residues direct fragmentation rather than the dissociation method. In an effort to improve the performance of the photodissociation tandem TOF instrument, the addition of a second source and a dual-stage reflectron are incorporated. The modifications result in improved mass range, signal-to-noise, and increased fragment ion collection efficiencies. High quality mass spectra are acquired across a range of mass-to-charge ratios from ~600 to 1900. Furthermore, the modifications continue to allow investigation of various fragmentation timescales with the addition of an additional timeframe of ~3 microseconds.

Kmiec, Kevin

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission-track annealing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The duration of heating in the Cerro Prieto reservoir was estimated by relating the fading of spontaneous fission tracks in detrital apatite to observed temperatures. The rate of fading is a function of both time and temperature. The apparent fission track age of the detrital apatites then, is a function of both their source age and their time-temperature history. Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures. The temperature in well T-366, where complete annealing first occurs, was estimated to be between 160 and 180{sup 0}C. Complete annealing at these temperatures requires 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 3} years, respectively. Well M-94 has an apparently complex thermal history. Geothermometers in this well indicate temperatures some 50 to 100{sup 0}C higher than those measured directly in the borehole. Fission tracks are partially preserved in M-94 where paleotemperatures were as high as 200{sup 0}C and are erased where geothermometers indicate temperatures of 250{sup 0}C. This implies a thermal event less than 10{sup 1} years and greater than 10{sup 0} years in duration.

Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GAS-PHASE ELECTRONIC SPECTRA OF POLYACETYLENE CATIONS: RELEVANCE OF HIGHER EXCITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transitions to higher electronic states of polyacetylene cations (HC{sub 2n}H{sup +}, n = 4, 5, 6) have been measured in the gas phase at {approx}20 K. The absorption spectra were obtained using a resonant two-color, two-photon fragmentation technique in an ion trap, allowing a direct comparison between laboratory and astrophysical data. The purpose was to investigate the relevance of such transitions to astronomical observations because the general expectation is that the bands could be too broad due to fast intramolecular processes. It is shown that the origin bands are still narrow enough (1-10 cm{sup -1}) to be considered, especially as the higher-lying transitions often possess large oscillator strengths.

Rice, C. A.; Rudnev, V.; Dietsche, R.; Maier, J. P., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

Ebra, Martha A. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Chemically modified polymeric resins for separation of cations, organic acids, and small polar moleculea by high performance liquid chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis is divided into 4 parts: a review, ion chromatography of metal cations on carboxylic resins, separation of hydrophilic organic acids and small polar compounds on macroporous resin columns, and use of eluent modifiers for liquid chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids using conductivity detection.

Morris, J.B.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Improved silica geothermometer for low temperature geothermal resource assessment. Monthly progress report No. 2, February-March, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: literature search, collection of available lithologic and driller's logs, construction of geologic cross sections, and collection of water samples. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antiseptics in Layer-by-Layer Thin Film Assemblies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly has proven to be a powerful technique for assembling thin films with a variety of properties including electrochromic, molecular sensing, oxygen barrier, and antimicrobial. LbL involves the deposition of alternating cationic and anionic ingredients from solution, utilizing the electrostatic charges to develop multilayer films. The present work incorporates cationic antimicrobial agents into the positively-charged layers of LbL assemblies. When these thin films are exposed to a humid environment, the antimicrobial molecules readily diffuse out and prevent bacterial growth. The influence of exposure time, testing temperature, secondary ingredients and number of bilayers on antimicrobial efficacy is evaluated here. Additionally, film growth and microstructure are analyzed to better understand the behavior of these films. The antimicrobial used here is a positively-charged quaternary ammonium molecule (e.g. cetyltrimethylammonium bromide [CTAB]) that allow assemblies to be made with or without an additional polycation like polydiallyldimethylamine. While films without this additional polymer are effective, they do not have the longevity or uniformity of films prepared with its addition. All of the recipes studied show linear growth as a function of the number of bilayers deposited and this growth is relatively thick (i.e. > 100 nm per bilayer). In general, 10-bilayer films prepared with CTAB and poly(acrylic acid) are able to achieve a 2.3 mm zone of inhibition against S. aureus bacteria and 1.3 mm against E. coli when test are conducted at body temperature (i.e. 37oC). Fewer bilayers reduces efficacy, but lower test temperatures improve zones of inhibition. As long as they are stored in a dry atmosphere, antimicrobial efficacy was found to persist even when films were used four weeks after being prepared. The best films remain effective (i.e. antimicrobially active) for 4-6 days of constant exposure to bacteria-swabbed plates. This technology holds promise for use in transparent wound bandages and temporary surface sterilization.

Dvoracek, Charlene M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tetraalkyl- and dialkyl-substituted BEDT-TTF derivatives and their cation-radical salts : synthesis, structure, and properties.  

SciTech Connect

Tetraalkyl and dialkyl derivatives, where alkyl=ethyl and propyl, of the organic electron donor molecule bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene, BEDT-TTF or ET, have been synthesized via the Diels-Alder approach. Several cation-radical salts of these new donors have been prepared and structurally characterized, and found to contain donor molecules in nominally higher oxidation states (+1, +1.5 and +2) than the typically observed oxidation state of +0.5 in BEDT-TTF salts. The higher solubility of the tetraalkyl and dialkyl derivatives in solvents used for crystal growth is proposed as the principal reason for this finding. Surprisingly, X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that the alkyl groups in the neutral tetraethyl-ET as well as the oxidized tetraethyl-ET and diethyl-ET molecules in their cation-radical salts adopt axial configurations, rather than the expected equatorial configurations. Electrical properties of the cation-radical salts have been found to be either insulating or semiconducting, consistent with the higher oxidation states of the donor molecules in the salts and the crystal structures.

Kini, A. M.; Parakka, J. P.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H.-H.; Rivas, F.; DiNino, E.; Thomas, S.; Dudek, J. D.; Williams, J. M.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Neutral and Cationic Main Group Lewis Acids - Synthesis, Characterization and Anion Complexation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The molecular recognition of fluoride and cyanide anions has become an increasingly pertinent objective in research due to the toxicity associated with these anions, as well as their widespread use. Fluoride is commonly added to drinking water and toothpastes to promote dental health, and often used in the treatment of osteoporosis, however, high doses can lead to skeletal fluorosis, an incurable condition. Cyanide is also an extremely toxic anion, which binds to and deactivates the cytochrome-c oxidase enzyme, often leading to fatality. The molecular recognition of these anions in water has proven to be challenging. For fluoride, the anion is small, and thus, efficiently hydrated (?H?hyd = -504 KJ/mol), making its complexation in aqueous environments particularly difficult. In addition to being small and efficiently hydrated like the fluoride anion, cyanide has a pKa(HCN) of 9.3 making its competing protonation in neutral water a further complication. Recent efforts to complex fluoride and cyanide have utilized triarylboranes, which covalently bind the anion. Monofunctional triarylboranes display a high affinity for fluoride with binding constants in the range of 105-106 M-1 in organic solvents, and chelating triarylboranes exhibit markedly higher anion affinities. These species, however, remain challenged in the presence of water. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and properties of novel Lewis acids designed for the molecular recognition of fluoride or cyanide in aqueous environments. To this end, a group 15 element will be incorporated into a main group Lewis acidcontaining molecule for the purpose of: i) increasing the Lewis acidity of the molecule via incorporation of a cationic group, and ii) increasing the water compatibility of the host. Specifically, a pair of isomeric ammonium boranes has been synthesized. These boranes are selective sensors which selectively bind either fluoride or cyanide anions in water. The study of phosphonium boranes has revealed that the latent Lewis acidity of the phosphonium moiety is capable of aiding triarylboranes in the chelation of small anions. Finally, my research shows that Br?nsted acidic H-bond donors such as amides, when paired with triarylboranes, are capable of forming chelate complexes with fluoride.

Hudnall, Todd W.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Anomalously low thermal conductivity and thermoelectric properties of new cationic clathrates in the Sn-In-As-I system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-crystal samples of cationic clathrates in the Sn-In-As-I system with different indium contents have been synthesized. Their crystal structure has been analyzed and their thermoelectric properties have been measured. These compounds are found to be n-type semiconductors with high absolute values of the Seebeck coefficient (S = 400-600 {mu}V/K) and anomalously low thermal conductivity ({kappa} {materials. The reasons for the anomalously low thermal conductivity of these semiconductors are discussed and ways for optimizing their thermoelectric properties are shown.

Shevelkov, A. V.; Kelm, E. A.; Olenev, A. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kulbachinskii, V. A., E-mail: kulb@mig.phys.msu.ru; Kytin, V. G. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Radiometric Determination of Uranium in Natural Waters after Enrichment and Separation by Cation-Exchange and Liquid-Liquid Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The alpha-radiometric determination of uranium after its pre-concentration from natural water samples using the cation-exchange resin Chelex-100, its selective extraction by tributylphosphate and electrodeposition on stainless steel discs is reported. The validity of the separation procedure and the chemical recoveries were checked by addition of uranium standard solution as well as by tracing with U-232. The average uranium yield was determined to be (97 +- 2) % for the cation-exchange, (95 +- 2) % for the liquid-liquid extraction, and more than 99% for the electrodeposition. Employing high-resolution alpha-spectroscopy, the measured activity of the U-238 and U-234 radioisotopes was found to be of similar magnitude; i.e. ~7 mBq/L and ~35 mBq/L for ground- and seawater samples, respectively. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the alpha-peaks was 22 keV, while the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) was estimated to be 1 mBq/L (at the 95% confidence limit).

I. Pashalidis; H. Tsertos

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

CATIONIC SHELL CROSSLINKED NANOPARTICLES AS INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY VEHICLES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanomedicine is a growing field of medicine that seeks to take advantage of nanoscale materials in order to address current challenges such as the ability to cross the epithelial mucus of the lungs to deliver treatment. This thesis focuses on the development of polymer nanomaterials known as shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles to serve as intracellular carriers of genetic material and specifically target injured cells in the lung for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). SCK nanoparticles are spherical in their morphology and their synthesis allows for them to possess tunable functionalities, size, and physical properties. The research presented in this work includes the synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymers that exhibit cationic character in their hydrophilic segment, in order to facilitate cell transfection in the body. The block copolymer poly(acrylamidoethylamine)130-block-polysterene123 (PAEA-b-PS) underwent subsequent micellization in water and crosslinking across the hydrophilic chains. The resulting SCK nanoparticles were c.a 75 nm in diameter and possessed cationic character. Herein, we report the physical and chemical characteristics of the block copolymers, micelles, and crosslinked nanoparticles. Current efforts for refining the synthetic methods in the production of SCK nanoparticles for the treatment of ALI are described.

Florez, Stephanie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ABL J.-R. Abrial, E. Borger, H. Langmaack: The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition of Formal Program Speci cation and Development Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P Preface ABL J.-R. Abrial, E. Borger, H. Langmaack: The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition synthesis of programs from re#12;ned user requirements (Programming boiler control in NUT). page 13 AL- #12;ning abstract machine speci#12;cations of the steam boiler control to well documented executable

Börger, Egon

154

Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state was found to be Au11L52+ at lower coverage and Au11L5+ at higher coverage, respectively. A coverage-dependent electron tunneling mechanism is proposed to account for the observed reduction of charge of mass-selected multiply charged gold clusters soft landed on SAMs. The results demonstrate that one of the critical parameters that influence the chemical and physical properties of supported metal clusters, ionic charge state, may be controlled by selecting the coverage of charged species soft landed onto surfaces.

Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Three Alkali-Metal-Gold-Gallium Systems. Ternary Tunnel Structures and Some Problems with Poorly Ordered Cations  

SciTech Connect

Six new intermetallic compounds have been characterized in the alkali metal (A = Na, Rb, Cs)goldgallium systems. Three isostructural compounds with the general composition A0.55Au2Ga2, two others of AAu3Ga2 (A = Rb, Cs), and the related Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 were synthesized via typical high-temperature reactions and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis: Na0.56(9)Au2Ga2 (I, I4/mcm, a = 8.718(1) , c = 4.857(1) , Z = 4), Rb0.56(1)Au2Ga2 (II, I4/mcm, a = 8.950(1) , c = 4.829(1) , Z = 4), Cs0.54(2)Au2Ga2 (III, I4/mcm, a = 9.077(1) , c = 4.815(1) , Z = 4), RbAu3Ga2 (IV, Pnma, a = 13.384(3) , b = 5.577(1) , c = 7.017(1) , Z = 4), CsAu3Ga2 (V, Pnma, a = 13.511(3) , b = 5.614(2) , c = 7.146(1) , Z = 4), Na13Au41.2(1)Ga30.3(1) (VI, P6 mmm, a = 19.550(3) , c = 8.990(2) , Z = 2). The first three compounds (IIII) are isostructural with tetragonal K0.55Au2Ga2 and likewise contain planar eight-member Au/Ga rings that stack along c to generate tunnels and that contain varying degrees of disordered NaCs cations. The cation dispositions are much more clearly and reasonably defined by electron density mapping than through least-squares refinements with conventional anisotropic ellipsoids. Orthorhombic AAu3Ga2 (IV, V) are ordered ternary Rb and Cs derivatives of the SrZn5 type structure, demonstrating structural variability within the AAu3Ga2 family. All attempts to prepare an isotypic NaAu3Ga2 were not successful, but yielded only a similar composition Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 (NaAu3.17Ga2.33) (VI) in a very different structure with two types of cation sites. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis obtained from tight-binding electronic structure calculations for idealized IIV via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods emphasized the major contributions of heteroatomic AuGa bonding to the structural stability of these compounds. The relative minima (pseudogaps) in the DOS curves for IV correspond well with the valence electron counts of known representatives of this structure type and, thereby, reveal some magic numbers to guide the search for new isotypic compounds. Theoretical calculation of total energies vs volumes obtained by VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) calculations for KAu3Ga2 and RbAu3Ga2 suggest a possible transformation from SrZn5- to BaZn5-types at high pressure.

Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Location and valence state of strontium cations on the framework of a carbon dioxide selective porous silicoaluminophosphate  

SciTech Connect

A Sr{sup 2+}-SAPO-34 material that displays superior CO2 adsorption selectivity and capacity was characterized via XPS and UV-vis spectroscopy to elucidate the valence state of strontium cations and framework silicon environment. Most importantly, the location of the strontium has been estimated from a Rietveld refinement analysis of synchrotron diffraction data. The XPS analysis indicated that the apparent valence state of the strontium is less than 2, an indication of its interaction with the large anionic framework. Furthermore, UV-vis tests pointed to changes in the silicon environment, plausibly related to this valence state or framework faulting. For the refinement, the analysis found that strontium occupied two unique sites: a site Sr1 slightly displaced from six-membered rings and a site Sr2 positioned at the top or bottom of the eight-membered rings. The latter position favors the interaction of the alkaline earth metal with CO{sub 2}, probably resulting in an enhanced electric field-quadrupole moment interaction.

Zhang, Li; Rivera-Ramos, Milton E.; Hernndez-Maldonado, Arturo J. (Puerto Rico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of nonreducible technetium-99m(III) cations as myocardial perfusion imaging agents: initial experience in humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of 15 nonreducible technetium-99m (III) complexes of formula tr-(/sup 99m/TcL(Y)2)+ has been prepared by a general synthetic route based on reductive addition of Y to the technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc) intermediate (/sup 99m/TcL(O))+. In these complexes, selected for potential use as myocardial imaging agents, L represents one of the two tetradentate Schiff base ligands N,N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetone iminato), (en), or N,N'-propylene-1,2-bis(acetylacetone iminato), (pn), while Y represents a monodentate phosphine, phosphite or isonitrile ligand as exemplified by P(CH3)3, P(OCH3)3 and CN-C(CH3)3. Of these 15 complexes, several with octanol/saline partition coefficients in the range 0.04-20 exhibit significant myocardial uptake in rats and dogs. Of these, none exhibit detectable myocardial washout, providing strong support for the hypothesis that myocardial washout occurs only for those /sup 99m/Tc(III) cations that undergo in vivo reduction to the neutral /sup 99m/Tc(II) form. Evaluation of the prototypical complex tr-(/sup 99m/Tc(en)(P(CH3)3)2)+ in seven normal volunteers and patients establishes that it is only a mediocre myocardial imaging agent in man.

Deutsch, E.; Vanderheyden, J.L.; Gerundini, P.; Libson, K.; Hirth, W.; Colombo, F.; Savi, A.; Fazio, F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Spreadsheets for Geothermal Water and Gas Geochemistry | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and plots four common ternaries, three3 "YT" gas geothermometer grids and two gas ratio geothermometer grids, mainly derived from the work of Werner Giggenbach. Typical...

160

Effects of Li[sup +}, K{sup +} and Ba{sup 2 sup +} cations on the ORR at model and high surface area Pt and Au surfaces in alkaline solutions.  

SciTech Connect

This Letter reveals new findings on the influence of noncovalent interactions on the electrochemical interface. Using surface X-ray scattering, we demonstrate that the barium cations are located at 3.4 {angstrom} away from the surface, suggesting that they are partially hydrated, though not adsorbed at the surface. The effect of the cation on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) ranges from significant (Pt) to little (Au), depending on the nature of the metal and cation. Finally, we show that these results, as obtained on well-defined single-crystal surfaces, correlate well with observations on high surface area nanoparticle catalysts.

Strmcnik, D.; van der Vliet, D. F.; Chang, K-C.; Komanicky, V.; Kodama, K.; You, H.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Safarik Univ.); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cation distribution in a Fe-bearing K-feldspar from Itrongay,Madagascar. A combined neutron- and X-ray single crystal diffractionstudy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We determined the cation distribution and ordering of Si, Al and Fe on the tetrahedral sites of a monoclinic low-sanidine from Itrongay, Madagascar, by combined neutron- and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The cation distribution was determined by means of a simultaneous refinement using neutron- and X-ray data, as well as by combining scattering densities obtained from separate refinements with chemical data from a microprobe experiment. The two methods give the same results and show that Fe is fully ordered on T1, whereas Al shows a high degree of disorder. Based on this and previously published temperature-dependent X-ray data, we conclude that it is preferential ordering of Fe on T1 even at high temperature, rather than a high diffusion kinetics of Fe, which causes this asymmetry in ordering behavior between Al and Fe. The preferential ordering of Fe3+ relative to Al3+ in T1 is consistent with its 25 percent larger ionic radius.

Ackermann, Sonia; Kunz, Martin; Armbruster, Thomas; Schefer,Jurg; Hanni, Henry

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

Property:ThermalInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:ThermalInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ThermalInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 93 subproperties: A Acoustic Logs Active Seismic Methods Active Sensors Aeromagnetic Survey Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Cuttings Analysis D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Density Log Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Drilling Methods E Earth Tidal Analysis Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion

163

Propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase: Reactivity of surface cations in hydrogen abstraction steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density functional theory calculations (GGA-PBE) have been performed to investigate the adsorption of C3 (propane, isopropyl, propene, and allyl) and H species on the proposed active center present in the surface ab planes of the bulk Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase in order to better understand the roles of the different surface cations in propane ammoxidation. Modified cluster models were employed to isolate the closely spaced V=O and Te=O from each other and to vary the oxidation state of the V cation. While propane and propene adsorb with nearly zero adsorption energy, the isopropyl and allyl radicals bind strongly to V=O and Te=O with adsorption energies, {Delta}E, being {le} -1.75 eV, but appreciably more weakly on other sites, such as Mo=O, bridging oxygen (Mo-O-V and Mo-O-Mo), and empty metal apical sites ({Delta}E > -1 eV). Atomic H binds more strongly to Te = O ({Delta}E {le} -3 eV) than to all the other sites, including V = O ({Delta}E = -2.59 eV). The reduction of surface oxo groups by dissociated H and their removal as water are thermodynamically favorable except when both H atoms are bonded to the same Te=O. Consistent with the strong binding of H, Te=O is markedly more active at abstracting the methylene H from propane (E{sub a} {le} 1.01 eV) than V = O (E{sub a} = 1.70 eV on V{sup 5+} = O and 2.13 eV on V{sup 4+} = O). The higher-than-observed activity and the loose binding of Te = O moieties to the mixed metal oxide lattice of M1 raise the question of whether active Te = O groups are in fact present in the surface ab planes of the M1 phase under propane ammoxidation conditions.

Muthukumar, Kaliappan [University of Cincinnati; Yu, Junjun [University of Cincinnati; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effects of metal cations present naturally in coal on the fate of coal-bound nitrogen in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with different ranks: correlation between inherent Fe cations and N{sub 2} formation from low-rank coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fate of coal-N in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with 62-81 wt % (daf) C has been studied with a quartz reactor at 1000 C under ambient pressure to examine the effects of metal cations present naturally in these coals on the partitioning of coal-N into N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, tar-N, and char-N. Nitrogen mass balances for all runs fall within the reasonable range of 100 {+-} 5%, and N{sub 2} is the predominant product for all of the coals. As the N{sub 2} yield increases, the sum of NH{sub 3}, HCN, and tar-N is unchanged significantly, whereas the char-N yield decreases almost linearly, showing that most of N{sub 2} originates from char-N. When eight kinds of inherent metals, such as Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe, and Ti, are determined by the conventional method and related with the N{sub 2} yield, there exists a strong, direct correlation between the Fe content and N{sub 2} formation for low-rank coals with less than 75 wt % (daf) C. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays (TEM-EDAX) measurements after pyrolysis at 1000{sup o}C of a German brown coal, which provides the highest N{sub 2} yield of about 60%, reveal the existence of lamella structures because of graphitized carbon as well as nanoscale Fe particles with different sizes and shapes. The mechanism for conversion reactions of char-N to N{sub 2} is discussed in terms of the catalysis by nanoparticles of metallic Fe formed from inherent Fe cations. 34 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Yasuo Ohtsuka; Zhiheng Wu [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Research Center of Sustainable Materials Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Tetrabutylammonium cation in a homoleptic environment of borohydride ligands: [(n-Bu){sub 4}N][BH{sub 4}] and [(n-Bu){sub 4}N][Y(BH{sub 4}){sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent-free dual-cation organic-inorganic derivative, tetrabutylammonium yttrium borohydride (TBAYB), has been prepared for the first time and structurally characterized together with its organic precursor, tetrabutylammonium borohydride (TBAB). Both compounds crystallize in monoclinic unit cells (TBAYB: P2{sub 1}/c, TBAB: P2/c) and they contain [(n-Bu){sub 4}N]{sup +} in a homoleptic environment consisting of BH{sub 4}{sup -} ligands. Presence of large and lightweight Bu{sub 4}N{sup +} cations results in loose packing and low densities of both solids close to 1 g cm{sup -3}. TBAB melts at ca. 130 Degree-Sign C and it decomposes thermally above 160 Degree-Sign C while TBAYB melts at temperature as low as 78 Degree-Sign C, and the melt is stable over an appreciable temperature range of ca. 150 Degree-Sign C. The low melting point of TBAYB is the second lowest among derivatives of yttrium rendering this compound a new ionic liquid above 78 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: A novel organic-inorganic hybrid material for hydrogen storage, where (n-Bu){sub 4}N{sup +} cation is found in homoleptic environment of BH{sub 4}{sup -} ligands, was synthesised. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel organic-inorganic hybrid material for hydrogen storage was synthesised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (n-Bu){sub 4}N{sup +} cation is found in a homoleptic environment of BH{sub 4}{sup -} ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TBAYB derivative is a novel ionic liquid with melting point of 78 Degree-Sign C..

Jaron, T., E-mail: tjaron@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Wegner, W.; Cyranski, M.K.; Dobrzycki, L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Grochala, W., E-mail: wg22@cornell.edu [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); CENT, University of Warsaw, Zwirki i Wigury 93, 02089 Warsaw (Poland)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

The impacts of cation stoichiometry and substrate surface quality on nucleation, structure, defect formation, and intermixing in complex oxide heteroepitaxy LaCrO3 on SrTiO3(001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our ability to design and fabricate electronic devices with reproducible properties using complex oxides is critically dependent on our ability to controllably synthesize these materials in thin-film form. Structure-property relationships are intimately tied to film and interface composition Here we report on the effect of cation stoichiometry on structural quality and defect formation in LaCrO3 heteroepitaxial films prepared using molecular beam epitaxy. We calculate from first principles the regions of stability of various candidate defects as a function of Cr and O chemical potential, along with the predicted effects of these defects on structural parameters. We show that epitaxial LaCrO3 films readily nucleate and remain coherently strained on SrTiO3(001) over a wide range of La-to-Cr atom ratios, but that La-rich films are of considerably lower structural quality than stoichiometric and Cr-rich films. Cation imbalances are accompanied by anti-site defect formation, as deduced by comparing experimental trends in the c lattice parameter with those from first-principles calculations. Cation mixing occurs at the interface for all La-to-Cr ratios investigated, and is not quenched by deposition on SrTiO3(001) at ambient temperature. Indiffused La atoms occupy Sr sites, most likely facilitated by Sr vacancy formation in STO resulting from high-temperature oxygen annealing required to prepare the substrate. Intermixing is effectively quenched by using molecular beam epitaxy to deposit LaCrO3 at ambient temperature on defect free Si(001). However, analogous pulsed laser deposition on Si is accompanied by cation mixing.

Qiao, Liang [ORNL; Zhang, K. H. L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Bowden, Mark E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Varga, Tamas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Colby, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Du, Yingge [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kabius, Bernd [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Sushko, Peter V [University College, London; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Chambers, S. A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acid base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multicomponent mineral aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488 508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca2+ and Sr2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 110 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Pr edota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Be ne zeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic properties. Langmuir 20, 4954 4969]. Our CD modeling results are consistent with these adsorbed configurations provided adsorbed cation charge is allowed to be distributed between the surface (0-plane) and Stern plane (1-plane). Additionally, a complete description of our titration data required inclusion of outer-sphere binding, principally for Cl which was common to all solutions, but also for Rb+ and K+. These outer-sphere species were treated as point charges positioned at the Stern layer, and hence determined the Stern layer capacitance value. The modeling results demonstrate that a multi-component suite of experimental data can be successfully rationalized within a CD and MUSIC model using a Stern-based description of the EDL. Furthermore, the fitted CD values of the various inner-sphere complexes of the mono- and divalent ions can be linked to the microscopic structure of the surface complexes and other data found by spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics (MD). For the Na+ ion, the fitted CD value points to the presence of bidenate inner-sphere complexation as suggested by a recent MD study. Moreover, its MD dominance quantitatively agrees with the CD model prediction. For Rb+, the presence of a tetradentate complex, as found by spectroscopy, agreed well with the fitted CD and its predicted presence was quantitatively in very good agreement with the amount found by spectroscopy.

Ridley, Mora K. [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Hiemstra, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Van Riemsdijk, Willem H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

High cation transport polymer electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state ion conducting electrolyte and a battery incorporating same. The electrolyte includes a polymer matrix with an alkali metal salt dissolved therein, the salt having an anion with a long or branched chain having not less than 5 carbon or silicon atoms therein. The polymer is preferably a polyether and the salt anion is preferably an alkyl or silyl moiety of from 5 to about 150 carbon/silicon atoms.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

169

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

170

Property:ExplorationCostPerMetric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationCostPerMetric ExplorationCostPerMetric Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationCostPerMetric Property Type String Description the unit ratio denominator for exploration cost Allows Values 100 feet cut;30 foot core;compound;day;element;foot;hour;mile;point;process;sample;sq. mile;station;Subject;well Subproperties This property has the following 107 subproperties: A Active Seismic Methods Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Analytical Modeling B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Cation Geothermometers Chemical Logging Conceptual Model Core Holes Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array)

171

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Wellhead and downhole water samples were collected and analyzed from a 114.3-m well at Coso Hot Springs (Coso No. 1) and a 1477-m well (CGEH No. 1) 3.2 km to the west. The same chloride concentration is present in hot waters entering both wells (about 2350 mg/kg), indicating that a hot-water-dominated geothermal system is present. The maximum measured temperatures are 142 degrees C in the Coso No. 1 well and 195 degrees C in the CGEH No. 1 well. Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate

172

Property:ExplorationTimePerMetric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationTimePerMetric ExplorationTimePerMetric Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationTimePerMetric Property Type String Description the unit ratio denominator for exploration time Allows Values job;10 mile;10 stn;100 mile;sq. mile;foot Subproperties This property has the following 121 subproperties: A Active Seismic Methods Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Analytical Modeling B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Cation Geothermometers Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Conceptual Model Core Holes Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques

173

Property:LithologyInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LithologyInfo LithologyInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name LithologyInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 93 subproperties: 2 2-M Probe Survey A Active Seismic Methods Active Sensors Aerial Photography Aeromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Drilling Methods E Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion F FLIR Fault Mapping Field Techniques Flow Test Fluid Inclusion Analysis Fluid Lab Analysis Formation Testing Techniques

174

Microsoft Word - Cooper Stanford_Modeling_Paper__final__1_.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equilibrium Models for Testing Geothermometry Approaches 38 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering D. Craig Cooper Carl D. Palmer Robert W. Smith Travis L....

175

Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Available: Details of CdSe/CdS rod synthesis with differentrod consisting of a spherical CdSe nanocrystal embedded in atechnology. 22 A 40-nm long CdSe/CdS seeded nanorod

Jain, Prashant K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Microsoft Word - cation-in-zeolite-natrolite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

importance for many industrial processes ranging from well-known water softening to environmental cleanup such as radionuclide storage. In the case of sodium natrolite,...

177

Radiation Induced Redox Reactions 2. Imidazolium Cations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we analyzed stable radiolytic products using 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal...

178

Photodissociation of metallo-carbohedrene (met-cars) cluster cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Castleman and co-workers have recently reported the formation of especially stable metal-carbon clusters designated [open quotes]metallo-carbohedrenes[close quotes], or [open quotes]met-cars[close quotes]. In their work, metal-carbon mixed clusters having the formula M[sub 8]C[sub 12] form preferentially from plasmas containing a carbon precursor and transition metals (e.g., Ti[sub 8]C[sub 12]). We report here the first mass-selected photo-dissociation experiments on met-cars clusters. These experiments reveal the decomposition mechanism of these species and provide new insight into their bonding and stabilities. These photodissociation experiments indicate that there are at least two general mechanisms important in met-cars cluster decomposition, metal atom elimination and M-C[sub 2] elimination. Chromium and iron met-cars clusters are suggested to be less stable overall than titanium and vanadium systems, while the M-C[sub 2] interactions are suggested to be especially strong for zirconium met-cars cluster. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Pilgrim, J.S.; Duncan, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

1993-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

ALCHEMI Studies of Cation Site Occupancies in Doped Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Heat Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steel and Composite Tube ... Corrosion Fatigue Studies of High Nickel Tubular Samples Containing Molten Salt ... Impact of Heat Transfer Media on Materials for Concentrated Solar Power.

180

Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil ...  

Biochar also acts as a carbon sink by sequestering ... Amendment and Global Carbon Sequestration -2055 Contact: Gregory C. Flickinger Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the accommodation of high level actinides, U, Pu, with most work focusing on ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

182

A Tagless Strategy for Identi?cation of Stable Protein ...  

Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, and Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, California 94720

183

G10: Mitigation of Corrosion in Cation Exchanger Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array Structure ... E11: Evolution of the Grain Boundary Character Distribution During Grain ... for High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation .... H2: Triboluminescent Smart Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring.

184

Cationic Ir(III) alkyl and hydride complexes: stoichiometric ...  

80 S.R. Klei et al./Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical 189 (2002) 7994 platinum(II) catalyst capable of converting methane to methyl bisulfate, which could ...

185

Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil ...  

Photosynthesis captures more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than any other process on Earth. However, because biomass is not stable and is always ...

186

Hydrogeochemistry of the Jowshan thermal springs, Kerman, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jowshan geothermal system comprises of 6 thermal springs with outlet temperatures ranging from 39.3 to 46.6 C. The thermal water of these springs is presently used for swimming and as a treatment for rheumatism, sinusitis and skin diseases. The ... Keywords: Iran, geothermometry, hydrogeochemistry, thermal spring

Zargham Mohammadi; Hassan Sahraie Parizi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Geochemical studies at four northern Nevada hot spring areas. [Kyle Hot Springs, Leach Hot Springs, Buffalo Hot Springs, and Beowave Hot Springs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water samples from both hot and cold sources in the hydrologic areas surrounding the hot springs were collected and analyzed. Analyses of major, trace, and radio-element abundances of the water samples and of associated rock samples are presented. From this study it is possible that trace- and major-element abundances and/or ratios may be discerned which are diagnostic as chemical geothermometers, complementing those of silica and alkali elements that are presently used. Brief discussions of mixing calculations, possible new chemical geothermometers, and interelement relationships are also included.

Wollenberg, H.; Bowman, H.; Asaro, F.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Computational studies of cation and anion ordering in cubic yttria stabilized zirconia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The investigation of ordering and phase stability in the ZrO2-Y203 system involves two sets of calculations. The first set of calculations uses the cluster expansion method. A guide to the practical implementation of the ...

Predith, Ashley P. (Ashley Page)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cation dopant distributions in nanostructures of transition-metal doped ZnO:Monte Carlo simulations  

SciTech Connect

The path from trace doping to solid solution formation involves an intermediate regime in which the doping level is a few to several atomic percent. In this regime, dopant-dopant interactions, which are driven by the spatial arrangement of dopants, are critical factors in determining the resulting properties. Conventional wisdom counts on simple probabilistic methods for predicting dopant distributions. Here, we use Monte Carlo simulations to show that widely used, straightforward statistical models, such as that of Behringer1, are accurate only in the limit of infinitesimally small surfaceto-volume ratio. For epitaxial films and nanoparticles, where much of the current interest resides, dopant distributions depend strongly on the surface-to-volume ratio. We present empirical expressions that accurately predict dopant bonding configurations as a function of film or particle size, shape and dopant concentration for doped ZnO, a material of particular interest in semiconductor spintronics.

Droubay, Timothy; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Kaspar, Bryce P.; Chambers, Scott A.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The agroecological matrix as alternative to the land-sparing/agriculture intensi cation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a single person. Clearly, at equilibrium, pa ¼ NLe; or a ¼ NLe=p; [1] which suggests that we can minimize a and the biodiversity crisis. However, there exists a very complicated irony that is rarely addressed. The search

191

A Critical Look at Design, Veri cation, and Validation of Large Scale Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented two papers on the Department of Energy's Accel- erated Scienti c Computing Initiative or ASCI: Jan 28, 2003. This just in. From Makkah, Saudi Arabia. An FA-18 ghter carrying a tac- tical nuclear, the weapon detonated. US experts cannot explain how this explosion could have occurred. The city was lled

Hallstrom, Jason

192

Student Summer Project Speci cation -Session 2002 Case-Based Reasoning for Smart Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Techniques #15; Case-Based Reasoning #15; Machine Learning #15; Weka using Java or Recall shell using TCL/TK

Wiratunga, Nirmalie

193

An Endogenous RNA Transcript Antisense to CNG?1 Cation Channel mRNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CNG channels are cyclic nucleotide-gated Ca 2 ?-permeable channels that are suggested to be involved in the activity-dependent alterations of synaptic strength that are thought to underlie information storage in the CNS. In this study, we isolated an endogenous RNA transcript antisense to CNG?1 mRNA. This transcript was capable of down-regulating the expression of sense CNG?1 intheXenopus oocyte expression system. RT-PCR, Northern blot, and in situ hybridization analyses showed that the transcript was coexpressed with CNG?1 mRNA in many regions of human brain, notably in those regions that were involved in long-term potentiation and long-term depression, such as hippocampal CA1 and CA3, dentate gyrus, and cerebellar Purkinje layer. Comparison of expression patterns between adult and fetal cerebral cortex revealed that there were concurrent developmental changes in the expression levels of anti-CNG1 and CNG?1. Treatment of human glioma cell T98 with thyroid hormone T 3 caused a significant increase in anti-CNG1 expression and a parallel decrease in sense CNG?1 expression. These data suggest that the suppression of CNG?1 expression by anti-CNG1 may play an important role in neuronal functions, especially in synaptic plasticity and cortical development. Endogenous antisense RNAmediated regulation may represent a new mechanism through which the activity of ion channels can be regulated in the human CNS.

Chin-hung Cheng; David Tai-wai Yew; Hiu-yee Kwan; Qing Zhou; Yong Liu; Wing-yee Chan; Xiaoqiang Yao; Keith R. Yamamoto

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bidentate coordination of the catechol amide moieties at theand is located near the catechol rings of the assembly. Atoward the three adjacent catechol rings at the vertex of

Pluth, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quantifying the availability and the stability of trace cationic elements in fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Associated with Coal Mining Interactive Forum: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL in this paper to deter- mine these parameters for model elements Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) in fly ash 50 mM EDTA extraction. ? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coal fly ash has

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

196

Identi cation of Mechanical Inclusions Marc Schoenauer Francois Jouve Leila Kallel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ciently handle inverse problems is a good numerical model of the direct problem, and a representation of both materials from these experimental data. In steel manufacturing plants, for instance, it is of vital importance to check if coal scories are included in steel parts, and if their repartition does

Jouve, François

197

Z .Chemical Geology 158 1999 189202 Bacterial effects on the mobilization of cations from a weathered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commonly can complex aluminum in acid streams (e.g., Nordstrom and May 1996; Lindsay and Walthall 1996L sample was filtered (0.45 m) and acidified with 3 drops of trace metal grade nitric acid (FA flowpaths in fractured rock, pH can drop, and the acid dissolution of kaolinite can release Al to streams

Dorn, Ron

198

Low dimensionality spectral sensing for low cost material discrimination and identi cation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 5.2 Simple LED Current Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 5.py Errata and Future Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 A.3 Visualizing Every LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 5-1 Simple LED current control with variable resistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 5

Bove Jr., V. Michael

199

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATION OF CONTRACT 1 I . CONTR...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By ssparate letter or telegran which Includes a r a f m to the solicitation m d amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO BE...

200

Effect of Biocidal Treatments on Cation Exchange Capacity and Fusarium Blight of Soybean in Delaware Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Delaware Soils H. A. Sandier, R. B. Carroll,* and D. L. Sparks ABSTRACT Fusarium wilt has caused it is caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum. A better understanding of the relationship between soil characteristics and the pathogen and between biocidal treatments and physiochemical properties

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of the field-scale cation exchange capacity of Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richland, WA: CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Lichtner, P.C. &A.R. 2003. Estimation of Hanford SX tank waste compositionsS. 2003. Cesium migration in Hanford sediments: a multisite

Steefel, C.I.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMEMTJMOD1F1CATION NO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and renewable energy services to the DOE and the NNSA. 5413 Architectural, engineering, and related services

203

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATION OF CONTRACT 1 I . CONTR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, &ate, ZIP Code) I ( DE-ACOCOOAL66620 10B. DATED (SEE E M 13) 2. AMENDMENTMODIFICATION NO....

204

Paramagnetic Suseptibilities and Electronic Structure of Aqueous Cations of Elements 92 to 95  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

920 (1948). Calvin, M. , Plutonium Project rleport CK-2411 (and G. Sheline, liThe +5 Oxida- tion State of Plutonium",Plutonium Project Record, Vol. 14B, No. 3.15 (to be

Howland, Jerome J.; Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Isolation of Two Agostic Isomers of an Organometallic Cation: Different Structures and Colors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two isomers of [CpMo(CO)2(PiPr3)]+ were isolated, and both were characterized by x-ray crystallography and spectroscopic data. The two differ in the location of the agostic interaction with the metal, from either the CH (methine) or CH3 (methyl) group of the ligand. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support of this work. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The computational studies were performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL.

van der Eide, Edwin F.; Yang, Ping; Bullock, R. Morris

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Stability Multipliers and Upper Bounds: Connections and Implications for Numerical Veri cation of Frequency Domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is continuous, with F(z) = F(z) o ; 3 #12;and Hfir := ( NX i=0 aizi + biz?i : N 2 N;ai;bi 2 R ) : The next Hfir, i = 1;:::;`, such that (2) holds for all z 2 @D. A similar result can be proved with D replaced possibilities, Hfir can be replaced with Hudr de ned by Hudr := ( NX i=0 ai (1 ?z)i + bi (1 + z)i : N 2 N; ai

Tits, André L.

207

Cation Effects on the Layer Structure of Biogenic Mn-Oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). Wet sample slurries were placed in an aluminum sample cell with Lexan windows-bs (Samuel Webb, SSRL). Two Mn-oxide references, triclinic birnessite (TcBir) and -MnO2 were synthesized and Environmental and Quality (ISEQ) Graduate Fellowship. M.Z. also thanks Dr. Samuel Webb at SSRL for his help

Sparks, Donald L.

208

Experimental Verifi cation of Discretely Variable Compression Braking Control for Heavy Duty Vehicles: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference, 2002. [14] T.R. Fortescue, L.S. Kershenbaum, andscheme is proposed by Fortescue et al. [14] in which a time-

Vahidi, Ardalan; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.; Wang, Xiaoyong; Tsao, Tsu Chin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange Using Microfluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanocrystal with DDA, R CdSe was calculated to be 3.4 nm. Rto measure the kinetics of the CdSe-to-Ag 2 Se nanocrystalthe millisecond mixing of CdSe nanocrystal and Ag + reactant

Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar, Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shape-controlled colloidal CdSe quantum rods. Nano Lettersextinction coefficient of CdTe, CdSe, and CdS nanocrystals.teardrop-, and tetrapod-shaped CdSe nanocrystals. Journal of

Luther, Joseph Matthew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Neutral and Cationic Main Group Lewis Acids - Synthesis, Anion Complexation and Redox Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this research concerns the synthesis and characterization of hybrid main group Lewis acids. Initially, the focus of this work was on the synthesis of derivatives possessing unusual bonding interactions enforced by a rigid 1,8- naphthalenediyl scaffold. After discovering a route to a new dilithio reagent, silicon based derivatives featuring R3Si-F->CR3 + and R3C-H->SiFR3 interactions of 2.703(2) and 2.32(2) Angstrom respectively were successfully synthesized and fully characterized. Another hybrid Lewis acid based on the 1,8-naphthalenediyl scaffold that was studied was a trinuclear B2/Hg Lewis acid. This molecule has been shown to bind two fluoride anions sequentially, and the binding events can be followed by differential pulsed votammetry. The final part of this work concerns the reactivity and redox behavior of main group systems. It has been shown that the p-phenylene linker in 4-dimesitylboryl-1- diarylmethylium benzenes effectively reduces electrochemical communication between the carbocation and borane moieties when compared to systems without the linker. Reduction of these species produces a derivative whose EPR signal is only slightly influenced by the ^11 B center. These findings have been further substantiated by theoretical calculations. Finally, the redox properties of alpha-phosphonio- and alpha- phosphonyl-carbocations have been studied. Chemical reduction of both species leads to a predominately carbon centered radical with coupling to the ^31P center of 18 and 19.7 G respectively. The alpha-phosphonio carbocations, however, also undergo ligand exchange reactions with pyridine derivatives suggesting that these species can also be referred to as ligand stabilized carbodications.

Dorsey, Christopher L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes in pH, temperature, concentration, charge, and shear forces, stickies can deposit [3]. These deposits can lead to decreased runnability, productivity and expensive downtime. If the stickie remains in the stock, then machine breaks can be common. Finally, if the stickie is not removed or deposited, it will either leave in the final product causing converting and printing problems or recirculate within the mill. It has been estimated that stickies cost the paper industry between $600 and $700 million a year due to the cost of control methods and lost production attributed to stickies [3]. Also, of the seven recycling mills opened in the United States between 1994 and 1997, four have closed citing stickies as the main reason responsible for the closure [4]. Adhesives are widely used throughout the paper and paperboard industry and are subsequently found in the recycled pulp furnish. Hodgson stated that even the best stock preparation process can only remove 99% of the contaminants, of which the remaining 1% is usually adhesives of various types which are usually 10-150 microns in effective diameter [5]. The large particles are removed by mechanical means such as cleaners and screens, and the smaller, colloidal particles can be removed with washing. The stickies that pass through the cleaning and screening processes cause 95% of the problems associated with recycling [6]. The cleaners will remove most of the stickies that have a density varying from the pulp slurry ({approx}1.0 g/cm3) and will accept stickies with densities ranging from 0.95-1.05 g/cm3 [2]. The hydrophobicity of the material is also an important characteristic of the stickie [7]. The hydrophobicity causes the stickies to agglomerate with other hydrophobic materials such as other stickies, lignin, and even pitch. The tacky and viscous nature of stickies contributes to many product and process problems, negatively affecting the practicality of recycled fiber use. The source of stickies that evade conventional removal techniques are usually synthetic polymers, including acrylates, styrene butadiene rub

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

Qu, Jun (Knoxville, TN); Truhan, Jr.,; John J. (Cookeville, TN); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN); Blau, Peter J. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mining Features for Sequence Classi cation Neal Lesh 1 , Mohammed J. Zaki 2 , Mitsunori Ogihara 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 lesh@merl.com, zaki@cs.rpi.edu, ogihara@cs.rochester.edu 1 MERL - Mitsubishi Electric Research text, DNA sequences, web usage data, and execution traces. In this paper we combine two powerful mining

Zaki, Mohammed Javeed

215

Probing water properties and cationic exchange in calcium-silicate-hydrate : an atomistic modeling study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two problems related to the assessment of the performance of cementitious materials in the nuclear fuel cycle are investigated by means of atomistic simulations. The first is the structural and dynamic nature of water ...

Youssef, Mostafa Youssef Mahmoud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cation field strength effects on high pressure aluminosilicate glass structure: Multinuclear NMR and La XAFS results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., 1990; Solera et al., 1995a,b). There is also an additional MEE around 5555 eV (4.2 A° ?1 ), previ

Asimow, Paul D.

217

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Meaningful applications of water geothermometry to thermal springs in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) are limited to Growler Hot Spring and Morgan Hot Springs. Most hot springs located within LVNP are low-chloride, acid-sulfate waters associated with nearby steam vents. This type of hot-spring activity is characteristically found above vapor-dominated hydrothermal systems. These acid-sulfate waters are not generally useful for liquid chemical geothermometry, however, because their

218

Oxygen-isotope geochemistry of quaternary rhyolite from the Mineral Mountains, Utah, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen isotope analyses were made of phenocryst and glass separates from four Quaternary rhyolite flows and domes in the Mineral Mountains, southwest Utah. With the exception of biotite in all samples and alkali feldspar in the rhyolite domes, all minerals appear to be in close oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium. The geothermometry equations proposed by Bottinga and Javoy (1973) and Javoy (1977) for quartz, alkali feldspar and magnetite produce the best agreement with temperature results fom two-feldspar and iron-titanium oxide geothermometry for these rhyolites. If the rhyolites were generated by partial melting in the crust, their whole-rock (glass) delta/sup 18/O values (6.3 to 6.9 permil) are consistent with generation from I-type (Chappell and White, 1974, O'Neil and Chappell, 1977; O'Neil et. al., 1977) sources.

Bowman, J.R.; Evans, S.H. Jr.; Nash, W.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission track annealing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures.

Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W..

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Preliminary Evaluation of Geothermal Potential at the Cheyenee River Sioux Reservation, South Dakota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geochemical investigation of well waters from the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota revealed considerable diversity in the chemistry of the fluids and indicated that waters from the Dakota Formation were the best candidates for direct-use geothermal applications. Geothermometry calculations for all wells suggest that formation temperatures are <90 C. Potential scaling problems from utilization of the waters would most likely be restricted to carbonate scale and could be offset by maintaining CO{sub 2} gas in solution.

Bergfeld, D.; Bruton, C.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric tests and other experiments with nuclear materials were conducted on the Frenchman Flat playa at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; residual radionuclides are known to exist in Frenchman Flat playa soils. Although the playa is typically dry, extended periods of winter precipitation or large single-event rainstorms can inundate the playa. When Frenchman Flat playa is inundated, residual radionuclides on the typically dry playa surface may become submerged, allowing water-soil interactions that could provide a mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from known areas of contamination. The potential for radionuclide transport by occasional inundation of the Frenchman Flat playa was examined using geographic information systems and satellite imagery to delineate the timing and areal extent of inundation; collecting water samples during inundation and analyzing them for chemical and isotopic content; characterizing suspended/precipitated materials and archived soil samples; modeling water-soil geochemical reactions; and modeling the mobility of select radionuclides under aqueous conditions. The physical transport of radionuclides by water was not evaluated in this study. Frenchman Flat playa was inundated with precipitation during two consecutive winters in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Inundation allowed for collection of multiple water samples through time as the areal extent of inundation changed and ultimately receded. During these two winters, precipitation records from a weather station in Frenchman Flat (Well 5b) provided information that was used in combination with geographic information systems, Landsat imagery, and image processing techniques to identify and quantify the areal extent of inundation. After inundation, water on the playa disappeared quickly, for example, between January 25, 2011 and February 10, 2011, a period of 16 days, 92 percent of the areal extent of inundation receded (2,062,800 m2). Water sampling provided valuable information about chemical processes occurring during inundation as the water disappeared. Important observations from water-chemistry analyses included: 1) total dissolved solids (TDS) and chloride ion (Cl-) concentrations were very low (TDS: < 200 mg/L and Cl-: < 3.0 mg/L, respectively) for all water samples regardless of time or areal extent; 2) all dissolved constituents were at concentrations well below what might be expected for evaporating shallow surface waters on a playa, even when 98 to 99 percent of the water had disappeared; 3) the amount of evaporation for the last water samples collected at the end of inundation, estimated with the stable isotopic ratios ?2H or ?18O, was approximately 60 percent; and 4) water samples analyzed by gamma spectroscopy did not show any man-made radioactivity; however, the short scanning time (24 hours) and relative chemical diluteness of the water samples (TDS ranged between 39 and 190 mg/L) may have contributed to none being detected. Additionally, any low-energy beta emitting radionuclides would not have been detected by gamma spectroscopy. From these observations, it was apparent that a significant portion of water on the playa did not evaporate, but rather infiltrated into the subsurface (approximately 40 percent). Consistent with this water chemistry-based conclusion is particle-size analysis of two archived Frenchman Flat playa soils samples, which showed low clay content in the near surface soil that also suggested infiltration. Infiltration of water from the playa during inundation into the subsurface does not necessarily imply that groundwater recharge is occurring, but it does provide a mechanism for moving residual radionuclides downward into the subsurface of Frenchman Flat playa. Water-mineral geochemical reactions were modeled so that changes in the water chemistry could be identified and the extent of reactions quantified. Geochemical modeling showed that evaporation; equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide and calcite; dissolution of sodium chloride, gypsum, and composite volcanic g

Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Proton and methanol transport in poly(perfluorosulfonate) membranes containing Cs{sup +} and H{sup +} cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poly(perfluorosulfonate acid) membranes were doped with cesium ions to several degrees. These, along with the H{sup +}-form membrane, were investigated in relation to methanol permeability as well as hydrogen ion conductivity. While retaining considerable conductivity, the cesium-doped membranes are highly impermeable to methanol. The author found that methanol permeability in the membrane reduced by over one order of magnitude, owing to the presence of cesium ions. These findings are discussed on the basis of alterations produced by cesium in the membrane microstructure. Also discussed is the potential implication of these results in the direct methanol fuel cell technology.

Tricoli, V. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Animal calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels are homologous and derived from the ubiquitous Cation Diffusion Facilitators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.J. (1996) A DEAD-box RNA helicase in the Escherichia colito the RhlB predicted ATP-dependent RNA helicase of theDEAD box helicase family (Py et al. , 1996). Cai (2007a) has

Matias, Madeleine Gundayao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Semiconducting Transition-Metal Oxides Based on D5 Cations: Theory for MnO and Fe2O3  

SciTech Connect

Transition-metal oxides with partially filled d shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties due to large effective electron/hole masses or due to carrier self-trapping. Employing band-structure calculations and ab initio small-polaron theory for MnO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, we explore the potential of d{sup 5} oxides for achieving desirable semiconducting properties, e.g., in solar energy applications. The quantification of self-trapping energies and the trends with the coordination symmetry suggest strategies to overcome the main bottlenecks, i.e., the tendency for self-trapping of holes due to Mn(II) and of electrons due to Fe(III).

Peng, H.; Lany, S.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene,respectively). With propane and n-butane, all the Ln 2+ ionsof La 2+ with propane and n-butane, and the absence of their

Gibson, John K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dependence of Electronic Structure of SrRuO3 and the Degree of Correlation on Cation Off-Stoichiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have grown and studied high quality SrRuO{sub 3} films grown by MBE as well as PLD. By changing the oxygen activity during deposition we were able to make SrRuO{sub 3} samples that were stoichiometric (low oxygen activity) or with ruthenium vacancies (high oxygen activity). Samples with strontium vacancies were found impossible to produce since the ruthenium would precipitate out as RuO{sub 2}. The volume of the unit cell of SrRuO{sub 3} becomes larger as more ruthenium vacancies are introduced. The residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and room temperature resistivity were found to systematically depend on the volume of the unit cell and therefore on the amount of ruthenium vacancies. The RRR varied from {approx}30 for stoichiometric samples to less than two for samples that were very ruthenium poor. The room temperature resistivity varied from 190 {micro}{Omega} cm for stoichoimetric samples to over 300 {micro}{Omega} cm for very ruthenium poor samples. UPS spectra show a shift of weight from the coherent peak to the incoherent peak around the Fermi level when samples have more ruthenium vacancies. Core level XPS spectra of the ruthenium 3d lines show a strong screened part in the case of stoichiometric samples. This screened part disappears when ruthenium vacancies are introduced. Both the UPS and the XPS results are consistent with the view that correlation increases as the amount of ruthenium vacancies increase.

Siemons, W.

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Field study of tracer and geochemistry behavior during hydraulic fracturing of a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents tracer and geochemistry data from several hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill, NM, HDR geothermal reservoir. Tracers have been injected at various times during these tests: (1) initially, before any flow communication existed between the wells; (2) shortly after a flow connection was established; and (3) after the outlet flow had increased to its steady state value. An idealized flow model consisting of a combination of main fracture flow paths and fluid leakoff into secondary permeability explains the different tracer response curves for these cases, and allows us to predict the fracture volume of the main paths. The geochemistry during these experiments supports our previously developed models postulating the existence of a high concentration indigenous ''pore fluid.'' Also, the quartz and Na-K-Ca geothermometers have been used successfully to identify the temperatures and depths at which fluid traveled while in the reservoir. The quartz geothermometer is somewhat more reliable because at these high temperatures (about 250/sup 0/C) the injected fluid can come to equilibrium with quartz in the reservoir. The Na-K-Ca geothermometer relies on obtaining a sample of the indigenous pore fluid, and thus is somewhat susceptible to problems of dilution with the injection fluid. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Robinson, B.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Low-temperature geothermal assessment of the Santa Clara and Virgin River Valleys, Washington County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exploration techniques included the following: (1) a temperature survey of springs, (2) chemical analyses and calculated geothermometer temperatures of water samples collected from selected springs and wells, (3) chemical analyses and calculated geothermometer temperatures of spring and well water samples in the literature, (4) thermal gradients measured in accessible wells, and (5) geology. The highest water temperature recorded in the St. George basin is 42/sup 0/C at Pah Tempe Hot Springs. Additional spring temperatures higher than 20/sup 0/C are at Veyo Hot Spring, Washington hot pot, and Green Spring. The warmest well water in the study area is 40/sup 0/C in Middleton Wash. Additional warm well water (higher than 24.5/sup 0/C) is present north of St. George, north of Washington, southeast of St. George, and in Dameron Valley. The majority of the Na-K-Ca calculated reservoir temperatures range between 30/sup 0/ and 50/sup 0/C. Anomalous geothermometer temperatures were calculated for water from Pah Tempe and a number of locations in St. George and vicinity. In addition to the known thermal areas of Pah Tempe and Veyo Hot Spring, an area north of Washington and St. George is delineated in this study to have possible low-temperature geothermal potential.

Budding, K.E.; Sommer, S.N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

230

Hydroprobe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroprobe Hydroprobe Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Hydroprobe Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Collection of ground water samples for geochemistry and geothermometry Thermal: Temperature measurements down to 50 m Dictionary.png Hydroprobe: An exploratory drilling technique focused on collecting geothermal fluid samples from shallow depths at relatively inexpensive costs and low environmental impact. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A hydroprobe is a relitively inexpensive and easily portable truck mounted

231

Application of Brazilian kaolinite clay as adsorbent to removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution: Kinetic and thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions  

SciTech Connect

The compound N{sup 1}-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopic, X-ray diffraction, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The kinetic parameters analyzed by the Lagergren and Elovich models gave a good fit for a pseudo-second order reaction with k{sub 2} values 16.0 and 25.1 mmol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} ranges for natural and modified kaolinite clays, respectively. The energetic effects caused by metal ion adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. - Graphical abstract: This investigation reports the use of original and modified kaolinites as alternative absorbents. The compound N-[3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route.

Guerra, Denis L., E-mail: denis@cpd.ufmt.b [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba 78060 900, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba 78060 900, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Airoldi, Claudio [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Pysico-chemical properties of hydrophobic ionic liquids containing 1-octylpyridinium, 1-octyl-2-methylpyridinium or 1-octyl-4-methylpyridinium cations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organometallic catalysis. Chemical Reviews 2002, 102, 3667-catalysis. J. Mol. Cat. A: Chemical 2004, (12) Dai, S. ; Ju,synthesis and catalysis. Chemical Reviews 1999, 99, 2071-

Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Salminen, Justin; Lee, Jong-Min; Prausnitz, John M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification: Guidelines for Planning, Specifi cation, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation, and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators of nuclear power plants face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms that will be produced at various stages of instrumentation and control modernization. This report provides guidance on planning, specifying, designing, implementing, operating, maintaining, and training for modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces. Much of the guidance also will support new plant control rooms. This report also presents detailed information and guidelines on specific t...

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Neutral and Cationic Vanadium Bisimido Complexes: Their Synthesis, Characterization, and Application in the Binding, Activation, and Catalytic Functionalization of Small Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to non-selective Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. 1-14 Inin the heterogeneous Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. In order

La Pierre, Henry Storms

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

UCOWRJournal of Contemporary Water researCh & eduCation Universities CoUnCil on Water resoUrCes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, products obtained from hydrothermal upgrading, Fisher-Tropsch diesel from bio-based synthesis gas and bio by a Karl Fisher titration. For the Karl Fisher titrations a 787 KF Titrino device from Metrohm was used

Vermont, University of

236

Response of fission yeast to toxic cations involves cooperative action of the stress-activated protein kinase Spc1/Sty1 and the Hal4 protein kinase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993. Experiments with Fission Yeast. A laboratory coursetranscriptional responses of fission yeast to environmentalWhitehall. 2002. Role of fission yeast Tup1-like repressors

Wang, L Y; Shimada, K; Morishita, M; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Think positively : the structural basis of cation-binding and coupling of the multidrug and toxic-compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B APS 23I D-B APS 23I D-B SSRL 11-1 8: ?M164C a a 10: ?V216CB b ?A296C (13) c SSRL11-1 SSRL 11-1 d (crystal2) APS 23I D-e ?D371N (21) APS 23I D-D SSRL 11-1 SSRL 11-1 SSRL 11-1 APS

He, Xiao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Pysico-chemical properties of hydrophobic ionic liquids containing 1-octylpyridinium, 1-octyl-2-methylpyridinium or 1-octyl-4-methylpyridinium cations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. A. Z. Ionic liquid (molten salt) phase organometallicambient-temperature molten salts. Inorg. Chem. 1996, 35,are room-temperature molten salts with melting points near

Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Salminen, Justin; Lee, Jong-Min; Prausnitz, John M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Alaska Open-file Report 144 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites Aleutian Arc, Atka Island to Becherof Lake -- Preliminary Results and Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty of more than 30 thermal spring areas reported to exist in the Aleutian arc extending from Atka Island to Becherof Lake were investigated during July and August, 1980. Thermal activity of three of these sites had diminished substantially or no longer existed. At least seven more sites where thermal-spring activity is probable or certain were not visited because of their remoteness or because of time constraints. The existence of several other reported thermal spring sites could not be verified; these sites are considered questionable. On the basis of geothermometry, subsurface reservoir temperatures in excess of 150 C are estimated for 10 of the thermal spring sites investigated. These sites all occur in or near regions of Recent volcanism. Five of the sites are characterized by fumaroles and steaming ground, indicating the presence of at least a shallow vapor-dominated zone. Two, the Makushin Valley and Glacier Valley thermal areas, occur on the flanks of active Mukushin Volcano located on Unalaska Island, and may be connected to a common source of heat. Gas geothermometry suggests that the reservoir feeding the Kliuchef thermal field, located on the flanks of Kliuchef volcano of northeast Atka Island, may be as high as 239 C.

Motyka, R.J.; Moorman, M.A.; Liss, S.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geothermal potential of West-Central New Mexico from geochemical and thermal gradient data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To study the low temperature and Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of west-central New Mexico, 46 water samples were collected and geothermal gradient measurements were made in 29 wells. Water chemistry data indicate that all the samples collected are meteoric waters. High temperatures of samples taken from wells between Gallup and Tohatchi indicate these wells may derive water from a warm aquifer below the depth of the wells. The chemistries of the samples farther south on the Zuni Indian reservation suggest these waters are not circulating below 600 m of the surface. Geothermometry calculations support the conclusion that the waters sampled are meteoric. The geothermometry also indicates that the deep reservoir between Gallup and Tohatchi may be greater than 60/sup 0/C. Thermal gradient data indicate an area of high gradient on the Zuni Indian Reservation with a measured maximum of 67/sup 0/C/km between 181 m and 284 m. This high probably is not hydrologically controlled. The maximum gradients in the study area are 76/sup 0/C/km and 138/sup 0/C/km, measured just east of Springerville, Arizona. These gradients are undoubtedly controlled by circulating water, possibly heated by a magmatic source at depth and circulating back to the surface.

Levitte, D.; Gambill, D.T.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Exploratory energy research program of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported from the University of Hawaii on: UHM rooftop solar energy laboratory; solar pond cleansing techniques; combustion properties of biomass pyrolysis products; high-temperature solar concentrator absorber; biological abatement of hydrogen sulfide during geothermal energy production; geothermal systems on submarine rift zones of the Hawaiian chain; nitrogenous products of OTEC chlorination; interaction of hydrogen and deuterium with transition metals and their alloys at high pressures; shallow magma chambers and geothermal potential of Haleakala, Maui; effects of OTEC waste water on phytoplankton; sodium-lithium geothermometer; breaking wave forces on OTEC pipes; seismic and thermal properties on basalts. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Gas chemistry and thermometry of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

Gas compositions of Cerro Prieto wells in 1977 reflected strong boiling in the reservoir around wells M-20 and M-25. This boiling zone appeared to be collapsing in 1982 when a number of wells in this area of the field were shut-in. In 1977 and 1982, gas compositions also showed boiling zones corresponding to faults H and L postulated by Halfman et al. (1982). Four gas geothermometers were applied, based on reservoir equilibria and calculated fugacities. The Fisher - Tropsch reaction predicted high temperatures and appeared to re-equilibrate slowly, whereas the H/sub 2/S reaction predicted low temperatures and appeared to re-equilibrate rapidly. Hydrogen and NH/sub 3/ reactions were intermediate. Like gas compositions, the geothermometers reflected reservoir processes, such as boiling. Surface gas compositions are related to well compositions, but contain large concentrations of N/sub 2/ originating from air dissolved in groundwater. The groundwater appears to originate in the east and flow over the production field before mixing with reservoir gases near the surface.

Nehring, N.L.; D'Amore, F.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

245

Deep Blue No 2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain 2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Deep Blue No 2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper provides a summary of the drilling operations, flow and injection testing and downhole measurements obtained during the drilling and testing of Deep Blue No.2. This well was sited as a step out to Deep Blue No.1 which measured 145°C at a depth of 645 meters. The maximum temperature recorded in Deep Blue No.2 while drilling was 167.5°C at a depth of 585 meters. Preliminary geothermometry from the short rigon flow test conducted last April 2004 indicated a parent reservoir temperature of 240°C. The results from the November 2004 flow and

246

Deep Blue No. 2-A Resource in the Making at Blue Mountain | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep Blue No. 2-A Resource in the Making at Blue Mountain Deep Blue No. 2-A Resource in the Making at Blue Mountain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Deep Blue No. 2-A Resource in the Making at Blue Mountain Abstract This paper provides a summary of the drilling operations, flow and injection testing and downhole measurements obtained during the drilling and testing of Deep Blue No.2. This well was sited as a step out to Deep Blue No.1 which measured 145°C at a depth of 645 meters. The maximum temperature recorded in Deep Blue No.2 while drilling was 167.5°C at a depth of 585 meters. Preliminary geothermometry from the short rigon flow test conducted last April 2004 indicated a parent reservoir temperature of 240°C. The results from the November 2004 flow and injection testing

247

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Figure 1) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web site (www.nbmg.unr.edu/geothermal/gtmap.pdf), and from a PowerPoint presentation titled 'Geothermal Exploration Short Stories' posted on the Geothermal Resources Council web site

248

Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Spencer Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Spencer Hot Springs?) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web

249

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley

250

A New Geothermal Resource Map Of Nicaragua | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map Of Nicaragua Map Of Nicaragua Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: A New Geothermal Resource Map Of Nicaragua Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A recently completed Geothermal Master Plan Study of Nicaragua assesses the geothermal resource potential of the identified fields and prospects in the country. During the course of the 18-month study, existing data were compiled and evaluated and new exploration work was conducted to determine, for each of ten geothermal resource areas studied: 1) the current level of knowledge about the resource; 2) its exploration or development status; 3) a conceptual model of the geothermal system or systems (incorporating geology, volcanology, geophysics, hydrology, fluid chemistry and geothermometry); 4) estimated recoverable energy reserves; 5)

251

Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Computing Campaign Nonproliferation and Veri?cationResearch and Development Nonproliferation and InternationalCAPITAL EQUIPMENT: NN20 Nonproliferation and Veri?cation

Fernandez, Jeffrey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Genomewide Motif Identification Using a Dictionary Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Siggia, Building a dictionary for genomes: identi?cationIdenti?cation Using a Dictionary Model Chiara Sabatti andsurveys and develops a dictionary model for recognizing

Sabatti, Chiara; Lange, Kenneth

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geochemistry and hydrothermal alteration at selected Utah hot springs. Final report: Volume 3 (revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of Na-K-Ca geothermometry to warm springs in Utah indicates several areas with sufficiently high apparent temperatures to be of interest as geothermal exploration targets. A zone of warm springs in the Bonneville Basin show Na-K-Ca temperatures from 150/sup 0/C to 233/sup 0/C. Examination of Great Salt Lake, Bonneville sediment pore water, and Jordan Valley well-water chemistry indicates that mixing a small percent of these fluids with warm spring water can cause substantial errors in Na-K-Ca temperature estimates. Other saline deposits which may influence Na-K-Ca temperature estimates are the Paradox formation in southeastern Utah, the Muddy Creek formation in southwestern Utah, the Arapien shale in central Utah, the Preuss formation in northeastern Utah, and Playa salts in much of western Utah. The Roosevelt KGRA is the most attractive target identified by Na-K-Ca geothermometry. Hydrothermal alteration, heavy metal distribution, and water chemistry provide additional characterization of the Roosevelt system. Chemistry of a cool water seep (25/sup 0/C) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 241/sup 0/C and SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 125/sup 0/C. A Phillips well flowing from below 1500' (457m) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 262/sup 0/C, SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 262/sup 0/C, and K of 1.5 times the surface spring value. The near surface alteration assemblage is best explained in terms of a decrease in pH of near surface fluids as sulfide oxidizes. Increasing potassium and pH with depth indicates that a K-feldspar stable zone may be intersected with deeper drilling. Geology and alteration were mapped in the Monroe KGRA. (JGB)

Parry, W.T.; Benson, N.L.; Miller, C.D.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Structure-property relationships in radical-cation (electron-donor molecule) and anion-based (including fullerides) organic superconductors and their use in the design of new materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presently known structure-property relations that have been developed for organic superconductors based on the ET molecule (b- phases and k-phases), and the C{sub 60}-anion-based fullerides, and their use in the structural design of new superconducting materials are discussed. 12 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs.

Williams, J.M.; Carlson, K.D.; Kini, A.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Measurements of the sum of HO2NO2 and CH3O2NO2 in the remote troposphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of Stratospheric Chlorine and Reactive NitrogenHydrogen, Nitrogen, and Chlorine Radicals Impli- cations

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and plasma research from spacecraft propulsion to biomedical appli- cations, they are developing solutions

257

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

258

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

259

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

260

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California Abstract The fluid chemistry of the geothermal system that feed Amedee and Wendel Hot Springs in eastern California is complex. Two thermal fluids have been identified based on the concentrations of the conservative elements C1 and B, fluid enthalpies, and the application of chemical geothermometers. One is characterized by temperatures above 120°C and a TDS content of 1300 ppm, and will be used by GeoProducts Corporation to produce electricity. The second did lower in temperature, 75°C, and has a TDS content of 650 ppm. This fluid may be used fore direct heat application at the Susanville

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 162°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=387552"

262

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium

263

Calculation of geothermal reservoir temperatures and steam fractions from gas compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper deals with the chemical equilibria and physical characteristics of the fluid in the reservoir (temperature, steam fraction with respect to total water, gas/steam ratio, redox conditions), which seem to be responsible for the observed concentrations of some reactive species found in the geothermal fluids (CO2, H2, H2S and CH4). Gas geochemistry is of particular interest in vapor-dominated fields where the fluid discharged consists of almost pure steam containing a limited number of volatile chemical species. Considering several geothermal systems, a good correlation has been obtained among the temperatures calculated from the gas geothermometers and the temperatures measured in the reservoir of evaluated by other physical or chemical methods. 24 refs., 5 figs.

D'Amore, F.; Truesdell, A.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro Volcano area of Guatemala  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiometric ages indicate that the Tecuamburro Volcano and three adjacent lava domes grew during the last 38,300 years, and that a 360-m-wide phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, was formed near the base of these domes about 2900 years ago. Laguna Ixpaco is located within the Chupadero crater, from which pyroxene pumice deposits were erupted 38,300 years ago. Thus, the likelihood is great for a partly molten or solid-but-still-hot near-surface intrusion beneath the area. Fumaroles and hot springs issue locally from the Tecuamburro volcanic complex and near Laguna Ixpaco. Analyses of gas and fluid samples from these and other nearby thermal manifestations yield chemical-geothermometer temperatures of about 150{degree} to 300{degree}C, with the highest temperatures at Ixpaco. The existence of a commercial-grade geothermal reservoir beneath the Ixpaco area seems likely. 84 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs.

Heiken, G.; Duffield, W. (eds.)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

266

Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

267

Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

268

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1992) Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on the above discussion, we favor a model in which thermal water rises somewhere between Howard and Seigler Springs. At Howard Springs we see evidence for the most representative deep thermal water because the C1 is elevated (highest measured C1 concentrations occur at Howard Springs). Moreover, the Na-Li, Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers suggest temperatures greater than 240 degrees C. References J. M. Thompson, R. H. Mariner, L. D. White, T. S. Presser, W. C.

269

CX-007389: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Categorical Exclusion Determination 89: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007389: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advances in Hydrogeochemical Indicators for the Discovery of New Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/21/2011 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) would utilize DOE and cost share funds to develop and calibrate new hydrogeochemical indicators and geothermometers for cost effective discovery and management of geothermal resources specific to the Great Basin. Laboratory work would occur at the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering at CSM in Golden, CO. CX-007389.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007391: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

270

Isotopic Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Buffalo Valley Hot Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

271

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

272

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

273

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

274

Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

275

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some

276

Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of

277

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Desert Queen geothermal system, which is in close proximity to two locations where geothermal energy is currently being harnessed, may host an additional reservoir. A _18O vs _D plot indicates that Desert Queen waters likely originate from the Humboldt River, and reflects Humboldt River water that is clearly evaporated. Temperatures of the reservoir at depth are estimated to be between 92-141°C and were calculated using the _18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer. It is unclear whether these temperatures

278

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

279

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

280

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

282

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

283

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nw Basin & Range Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

284

Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Re-Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Re-Evaluation Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Konocti Bay fault zone (KBFZ), initially regarded by some as a promising target for liquid-dominated geothermal systems, has been a disappointment. At least five exploratory wells were drilled in the vicinity of the KBFZ, but none were successful. Although the Na-K-Ca and Na-Li geothermometers indicate that the thermal waters discharging in the vicinity of Howard and Seigler Springs may have equilibrated at temperatures greater than 200°C, the spring temperatures and fluid

285

Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

286

Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

287

Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 192°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=388168

288

Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

Pearl, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Who Gets Public Goods? Using Satellite Imagery to Measure the Distribution of Rural Electrification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Health Services in Rural Rajasthan. American EconomicPan, Jiahua et al. 2006. Rural electri?cation in ChinaSmall hydro power-based rural electri?cation in China. SHP

Min, Brian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The role of biomass in California's hydrogen economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies, gasi?cation and biogas reforming. Gasi?cation55% conversion ef?ciency. Biogas, a methane-rich gas, can beanaerobic digestion. Biogas, land?ll gas, and wastewater

Parker, Nathan C; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cutting tools and wear resistant articles and material for same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic having a relatively high proportion of an alpha prime SiAlON phase and exhibiting high hardness and toughness. In a particularly preferred embodiment, a cation of Gd is used as a modifying cation.

Tien, Tseng-Ying (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Zhen-Kun (Ann Arbor, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reconstructing Ancestral Haplotypes with a Dictionary Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identi?cation using a dictionary model. IEEE Proceedings 90,E. D. 2000. Building a dictionary for genomes: identi?cationHaplotypes with a Dictionary Model KRISTIN L. AYERS 1 ,

Kristin L. Ayers; Chiara Sabatti; Kenneth Lange

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Reconstructing Ancestral Haplotypes with a Dictionary Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identi?cation using a dictionary model. IEEE Proceedings 90,E. D. 2000. Building a dictionary for genomes: identi?cationHaplotypes with a Dictionary Model KRISTIN L. AYERS 1 ,

Ayers, Kristen L; Sabatti, Chiara; Lange, Kenneth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distribution pathways. Speci?cally, we will examine centralized biomass gasi?cation and large-scale steam

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Eur. Phys. J. D (2010) DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2010-10118-y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the appli- cations in geocosmical alkali plasma research [10]. Near the critical point and at higher

Ebeling, Werner

298

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cations. In the Permian Basin, for example, produced waterscould sequester ~57% of Permian Basins CO 2 production from

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A New Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and pharmaceutical appli- cations. The oldest use of methanol is in the conversion of biomass. This process is gaining ...

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

22 Loeschl.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water splitting. Energy services are extensive, ranging from transportation to lighting, heating, communications, agricultural production, water purifi cation and distribution,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Crystal oriented (Bi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remnant polarization and piezoelectric constant of crystal oriented BNBT ... Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in...

302

Recent Advances in Temperature Dependent Ionic Radii Using the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in Pyrochlores ... Lead-free Piezoelectric Films for Transducer Applications.

303

Electronics and Magnetic Materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in Pyrochlores ... Lead-free Piezoelectric Films for Transducer Applications.

304

Dynamic Measurements and Numerical Analysis of Piezoelectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electromechanical coupling coefficients and the piezoelectric charge ... Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in...

305

Novel Method of Researching and Developing Piezoelectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Material research on piezoelectric ceramics was proposed from ... Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in...

306

SRNL at the The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has ...  

viding hydrogen, nitrogen, helium, ... hydrogen isotopes, puri?cation of hydrogen, ... ES focuses on development of advanced hydrogen storage materials,

307

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California  

SciTech Connect

Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation  

SciTech Connect

Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of the second hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoir: results of Phase I, Run Segment 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a long-term (286 day) flow test of the second hot dry rock reservoir at the Fenton Hill field site are presented. This second reservoir was created by fracturing an interval of granitic rock located at a depth of 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the same wellbore pair used in the creation of the first, smaller reservoir. The new fracture system has a vertical extent of at least 320 m (1050 ft), suggesting that the combined heat-transfer area of the old and new fracture systems is much greater than that of the old system. The virgin rock temperature at the bottom of the deeper interval was 197/sup 0/C (386/sup 0/F). Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet, as well as temperatures inferred from geothermometry, showed that the thermal drawdown of the reservoir was about 8/sup 0/C, and preliminary estimates indicate that the minimum effective heat-transfer area of the new reservoir is 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), which is six times larger than the first reservoir.

Zyvoloski, G.A.; Aamodt, R.L.; Aguilar, R.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Preliminary definition of the geothermal resources potential of West Virginia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most of West Virginia is underlain by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. Crystalline rocks are limited to two areas: a small area in the Harpers Ferry region and some basic intrusives and extrusives in Pendleton County. In the Valley and Ridge province the rocks are folded and faulted. The deformation appears to be confined to the sediments overlying the crystalline basement. The Appalachian Basin is characterized by moderately dipping sediments which may reach ticknesses of 7600 meters (25,000 feet) in eastern West Virginia. The 38th parallel fracture zone may extend through West Virginia and serve to localize geothermal resources. Heat flow in West Virginia appears to be rather uniform and in the range of 1.12 to 1.26 heat flow units. Bottomhole temperatures from oil and gas tests show no abnormally hot spots. Warm springs are limited to the eastern portion of West Virginia in the folded Appalachians and appear to be located on the flanks of anticlines at topographic lows. Geothermometry suggests subsurface temperatures in the 45 to 65{sup 0}C (113 to 149{sup 0}F) range. The Appalachian Basin provides a thick sequence of rocks with normal geothermal gradient (18.2{sup 0}C/kilometer, 1{sup 0}F/100 feet). High temperatures are expected at great depths, but production rates are likely to be low. Several oil and gas tests in West Virginia have encountered pressures about twice the normal pressure expected at the depth. However, the overpressured zones appear to be of small extent.

Renner, J.L.; Vaught, T.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Geological and Geophysical Study of the Geothermal Energy Potential of Pilgrim Springs, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located about 75 km north of Nome, was the subject of an intensive, reconnaissance-level geophysical and geological study during a 90-day period in the summer of 1979. The thermal springs are located in a northeast-oriented, oval area of thawed ground approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} in size, bordered on the north by the Pilgrim River. A second, much smaller, thermal anomaly was discovered about 3 km northeast of the main thawed area. Continuous permafrost in the surrounding region is on the order of 100 m thick. Present surface thermal spring discharge is {approx} 4.2 x 10{sup -3} m{sup 3} s{sup -1} (67 gallons/minute) of alkali-chloride-type water at a temperature of 81 C. The reason for its high salinity is not yet understood because of conflicting evidence for seawater vs. other possible water sources. Preliminary Na-K-Ca geothermometry suggests deep reservoir temperatures approaching 150 C, but interpretation of these results is difficult because of their dependence on an unknown water mixing history. Based on these estimates, and present surface and drill hole water temperatures, Pilgrim Springs would be classified as an intermediate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system.

Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, Robert B. [eds.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Chemical and isotopic data for water from thermal springs and wells of Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged NaCl-NaHCO/sub 3/ waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Oregon and near the contact of the Western Cascades with the High Cascades. Thermal springs in the central and northern parts of the Cascades generally issue moderately saline NaCl waters. Farther south in the Cascades, the thermal waters are high in CO/sub 2/ as well as chloride. Most thermal springs in northeastern Oregon issue dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters of high pH (>8.5). These waters are similar to the thermal waters which issue from the Idaho batholith, farther east. Most of the remaining thermal waters are Na mixed-anion waters. Based on the chemical geothermometers, Mickey Srpings, Hot Borax Lake, Alvord Hot Springs, Neal Hot Springs, Vale Hot Springs, Crump Well, Hunters (Lakeview) Hot Springs, and perhaps some of the springs in the Cascades are associated with the highest temperature systems (>150/sup 0/C).

Mariner, R.H.; Swanson, J.R.; Orris, G.J.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in north-central Box Elder County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low-temperature geothermal resources of north-central Box Elder County, Utah were assessed. Exploration techniques used included chemical analyses of water from wells and springs, temperature surveys, and temperature-depth measurements in unused wells within the study area. The highest water temperatures (31/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, and 29/sup 0/C) recorded in this research were located in three separate geographic regions, suggesting that no single warm water occurrence dominates the study area. Total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations ranged from 294 to 11,590 mg/l. Areas of warm water occurrences generally had TDS values of greater than 1100 mg/l. Reservoir temperatures were estimated using chemical geothermometers. Calculated temperatures ranged between 50/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C. Temperature-depth measurements were logged in 16 unused wells. Thermal gradients calculated from the profiles ranged from isothermal to 267/sup 0/C/km. The background gradient for the study area appears to be slightly above the average Basin and Range gradient of 35/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradients were calculated for the area approximately eight kilometers west of Snowville, Utah, which is also an area of warm water. 61 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

Davis, M.C.; Kolesar, P.T.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal hydrology of Warner Valley, Oregon: a reconnaissance study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Warner Valley and its southern extension, Coleman Valley, are two of several high-desert valleys in the Basin and Range province of south-central Oregon that contain thermal waters. At least 20 thermal springs, defined as having temperatures of 20/sup 0/C or more, issue from Tertiary basaltic flows and tuffs in and near the valleys. Many shallow wells also produce thermal waters. The highest measured temperature is 127/sup 0/C, reported from a well known as Crump geyser, at a depth of 200 meters. The hottest spring, located near Crump geyser, has a surface temperature of 78/sup 0/C. The occurrence of these thermal waters is closely related to faults and fault intersections in the graben and horst structure of the valleys. Chemical analyses show that the thermal waters are of two types: sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate waters. Chemical indicators show that the geothermal system is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Conductive heat flow in areas of the valley unaffected by hydrothermal convection is probably about 75 milliwatts per square meter. The normal thermal gradient in valley-fill dpeosits in these areas may be about 40/sup 0/C per kilometer. Geothermometers and mixing models indicate that temperatures of equilibration are at least 170/sup 0/C for the thermal components of the hotter waters. The size and location of geothermal reservoirs are unknown.

Sammel, E.A.; Craig, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Apacheta, a new geothermal prospect in Northern Chile  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discovery of two high-temperature fumaroles, with gas geochemistry compatible with an economic geothermal system, established Apacheta as one of the most attractive geothermal exploration prospects in northern Chile. These remote fumaroles at 5,150 m elevation were first sampled in 1999 by ENAP and its partners, following up on the reports of a CODELCO water exploration well that flowed small amounts of dry steam at 4,540 m elevation in the valley 4.5 km east of the fumaroles. The prospect is associated with a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic complex located within a NW-trending graben along the axis of the high Andes. The regional water table is 4,200 masl. There are no hot springs, just the 88 degrees C steam well and the 109 degrees and 118 degrees C fumaroles with gas compositions that indicate reservoir temperatures of greater than or equal to 250 degrees C, using a variety of gas geothermometers. An MT-TDEM survey was completed in 2001-2002 by Geotermica del Norte (SDN), an ENAP-C ODELCO partnership, to explore the Apacheta geothermal concession. The survey results indicated that base of the low resistivity clay cap has a structural apex just west of the fumaroles, a pattern typically associated with shallow permeability within a high temperature geothermal resource. SGN plans to drill at least one exploration well in 2002-03 to characterize a possible economic resource at Apacheta.

Urzua, Luis; Powell, Tom; Cumming, William B.; Dobson, Patrick

2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (-128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO{sub 3}/{sup -} and SiO{sub 2} relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145{sup 0} and 196{sup 0}C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500{degree}C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Thermal springs in the Salmon River basin, central Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salmon River basin within the study area occupies an area of approximately 13,000 square miles in central Idaho. Geologic units in the basin are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; however, granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith are predominant. Water from thermal springs ranges in temperature from 20.5/sup 0/ to 94.0/sup 0/ Celsius. The waters are slightly alkaline and are generally a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations are variable and range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined from the silicic acid-corrected silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water isotope geothermometers range from 30/sup 0/ to 184/sup 0/ Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal waters are near zero and indicate the waters are at least 100 years old. Stable-isotope data indicate it is unlikely that a single hot-water reservoir supplies hot springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 15,800 acre-feet of water in 1980. Associated convective heat flux is 2.7 x 10/sup 7/ calories per second.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada Thermal Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and SiO/sub 2/ relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145/sup 0/ and 196/sup 0/C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Regional geothermal exploration in north central New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad-based geothermal resource reconnaissance study covering Bernalillo, Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Taos, Torrance, and Valencia counties in north central New Mexico was conducted from June 15, 1981, through September 30, 1983. Specific activities included the compilation of actual temperature, bottom-hole temperature gradient, and geotemperature data; tabulation of water chemistry data; field collection of temperature-depth data from existing wells; and drilling of temperature gradient holes in the Ojo Caliente, San Ysidro, Rio Puerco, and Polvadera areas. The data collected were used to perform: (1) a regional analysis of the geothermal energy potential of north central New Mexico; (2) two site-specific studies of the potential relationship between groundwater constrictions and geothermal resources; (3) an evaluation of the geothermal energy potential at Santa Ana Pueblo; (4) a general analysis of the geothermal energy resources of the Rio Grande Rift, including specific data on the Valles Caldera; and (5) an evaluation of the use of geothermometers on New Mexico groundwaters. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual chapters.

Icerman, L. (ed.) [ed.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reservoir simulation and geochemical study of Cerro Prieto I wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined reservoir simulation and geochemical data analysis are used to investigate the effects of recharge and other reservoir processes occurring in the western part of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field (i.e., Cerro Prieto I area). Enthalpy-based temperatures and bottomhole temperatures are calculated based on simplified models of the system, considering different reservoir boundary conditions and zones of contrasting initial temperatures and reservoir properties. By matching the computed trends with geothermometer-based temperature and enthalpy histories of producing wells, the main processes active in the western area of Cerro Prieto are identified. This part of the geothermal system is strongly influenced by nearby groundwater aquifers; cooler waters readily recharge the reservoirs. In response to exploitation, the natural influx of cold water into the shallower alpha reservoir is mainly from the west and down Fault L, while the recharge to the deeper beta reservoir in this part of the field, seems to be only lateral, from the west and possibly south. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Spectroscopic Investigations of the Fouling Process on Nafion Membranes in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nafion-117 membrane used in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) is analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The XPS study reveals the chemical identity and environment of vanadium cations accumulated at the surface due to their low diffusivity. On the other hand, the 17O NMR spectrum explores the diffused vanadium cation from the bulk part of Nafion and shows the chemical bonding of cation and the host membrane. The 19F NMR shows the basic Nafion structure is not altered due to the presence of diffused vanadium cation. Based on these spectroscopic studies, the chemical environment of diffused vanadium cation in the Nafion membrane is discussed. This study also shed light into the possible cause for the high diffusivity of certain vanadium cations inside the Nafion membranes.

Vijayakumar, M.; Sivakumar, Bhuvaneswari M.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Hu, Jian Z.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U.sup.+4 cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd.sup.+2 cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Wolson, Raymond D. (Lockport, IL); Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

Bartlett, Neil (Orinda, CA); Whalen, J. Marc (Corning, NY); Chacon, Lisa (Corning, NY)

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

New silicotitanate molecular sieve and condensed phases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application relates to an invention for a new silicotitanate molecular sieve ion exchange material for the capture and immobilization of divalent cations from aqueous and/or hydrocarbon solutions, including elements such as radioactive strontium or industrial RCRA metal cations. The invention also relates to the ability to either recycle the captured metal for future use or to encapsulate the cation through thermal treatment of the molecular sieve to a condensed phase.

Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Endogeneity of the Exchange Rate as a Determinant of FDI: A Model of Money, Entry, and Multinational Firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of FDI: A Model of Money, Entry, and Multinational Firmsinvestment behavior with money. JEL Classi?cations: F1, F2,equilibrium framework with money, endogenous exchange rates,

Russ, Katheryn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Characterization and Chemical Bonding Structure of Fluorocarbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in ... Low Temperature Co-fired Ca-Cu Titanate Multilayers for Integration into LTCC...

333

Ultrafast Dynamics of Pyrrolidinium Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Dynamics of Pyrrolidinium Cation Ionic Liquids Hideaki Shirota, Alison M. Funston, James F. Wishart, Edward W. Castner, Jr. J. Chem. Phys. 122, 184512 (2005). Find paper...

334

Molecular Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Newly developed conversion materials such as iron fluorides enable access to the multiple valence states of the cathode cation in high capacity...

335

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

detected cations) during nanoparticle growth events, grouped according the land type. Error bars indicate standard deviation of the mean. Many of the atmosphere's tiniest...

336

Electrostatics for Exploring the Nature of Water Adsorption on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Introduction ... and become dispersed as colloidal platelets, and the sodium cations ... to include polymer adsorption on hydrated clay surfaces, which is ...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

Engineering secondary cell wall deposition in plants  

loop, biofuels, cell wall, lignin, sacchari?cation, synthetic biology. Summary ... target speci?c cell types such as ?bre and pith cells. It is well

338

International Symposium on Defects, Transport and Related ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Temperature Steam Permeation via Ambipolar Diffusion in Perovskite Proton ... Local Structure and Cation Distribution in Mullite-Type Bi2(FexAl1-x)4O

339

Transport in Co-Based Materials for Fuel Cells and Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Temperature Steam Permeation via Ambipolar Diffusion in Perovskite Proton ... Local Structure and Cation Distribution in Mullite-Type Bi2(FexAl1-x)4O

340

Microsoft Word - S09545_EC012913  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General observations from Figure 5 included the following: Upgradient locations (green) have no dominant cation type and are distributed between bicarbonate and sulfate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Global Soil Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clay, rock), bulk density, cation exchange capacity, aluminum content, thermal and hydraulic conductivity, C, N (NH4, NO3 )content, N mineralization, N fixation,...

342

STRIPPING OF PROCESS CONDENSATES FROM SOLID FUEL CONVERSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cation t Steam Methanotion Condensate Process condensatefoul process condensate which is formed by condensing steaml. The condensates Water vapor off-gas Cool in coal Steam or

Hill, Joel David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Available Technologies: Single-step Superlatticed Nanorod ...  

... spectacular results that ... R.D., et al., Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods Through Partial Cation Exchange. Science 317, 355 (2007 ...

344

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Normal Faults In Utah edit Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal springs associated with normal faults in Utah have been analyzed for major cations...

345

COLOR cctoday_fall_2006 for Web.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OXYGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANE PROTOTYPE Gasifi cation systems offer coal-fi red power plant operators a way to utilize coal - the nation's most affordable and abundant energy resource...

346

Capturing Carbon from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scrubbing technology (7, 8). The modifi cations are focused primarily on extensive thermal integration of the CO 2 -capture system with the power plant and develop- ment of...

347

Precision cutting of nanotubes with a low-energy electron beam  

lective damage has been induced in transmission electron ... During cutting, the SEM was operated in line scan mode at maximum magni?cation s1063d, ...

348

Controlled release of gentamicin from polyelectrolyte multilayers to treat implant-related infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polyelectrolyte multilayered (PEM) coatings were fabricated to incorporate and release the small, hydrophilic antibiotic gentamicin from implant surfaces for infection control. The use of a cationic hydrolytically cleavable ...

Moskowitz, Joshua Seth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The development of a prescreening model to identify failed and gross polluting vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quali?cations or test facility type, the percentage ofsystem (EIS) type Test facility type: test-only, test-and-

Choo, Sangho; Shafizadeh, Kevan; Niemeier, Deb

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Healthcare & Biology Licenses Available | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

While Clearing Biowaste from Water 200802055 Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil Amendment and Global Carbon Sequestration 200802057 Treatment of Fuel...

351

Distribution, ecology and reproductive biology of wild tomatoes and related nightshades from the Atacama Desert region of northern Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the manuscript, Lynn Kimsey (UC-Davis) for identi?cationLynn Kimsey at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC-Davis.

Chetelat, Roger T.; Pertuz, Ricardo A.; Fandez, Luis; Graham, Elaine B.; Jones, Carl M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Formation, Stability, and Electrical Studies of Polycrystalline A x Ga ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the other, a portion of the sodium is replaced with another monovalent cation prior to solid state .... 095- Research on Air-Conditioning-Type Building Materials.

353

Inhibitor Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Cationic molecular structures in commercial oil field inhibitors...acids derived from such oils as soya,

354

Fe Spin Reorientation across the Metamagnetic Transition in ...  

3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, ... results in a modi?cation of the electronic structure, which

355

Superconducting materials and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new chemical method and apparatus for preparing precursor powders for metal oxide superconductor ceramics are described. Superconductors, free of contaminating cations, are thus obtained. 10 figs.

Bunker, B.C.; Lamppa, D.L.; Voigt, J.A.

1988-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

View / Download  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 11, 2012 ... in the transmission electron microscope to perform quantitative studies of dislo- cation defects in metals and intermetal- lic alloys, said Dennis...

357

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) or solid oxidewind, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), natural gascoal integrated gasi?cation combined cycle (IGCC), and coal

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents natural gas combined cycle, PC Sub and PC Superintegrated gasi?cation combined cycle (IGCC) plants withand natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) with amine capture (

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Adaptive online brain-computer interface for interpretation and visualization of desired reach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high- performance brain-computer interface, Nature, vol.classi?cation for brain- computer interfaces, IEEE Trans.the 3rd International Brain- Computer Interface Workshop and

Hammon, Paul S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Numerical estimation of the relative entropy of entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[16] H. Wolkowicz, R. Saigal, L. Vandenberghe, Handbook of semidefinite programming: theory, algorithms, and appli- cations, Kluwer, 2000. [17] R.A. Horn and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table of Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

P. Yang, C. Zhang, J. Zhan, Y. Fan, and J. Wu. Formation of Zn-Ca-Ni Tri Cation's Phosphate Coating on Steel and Study that Properties..................................615.

362

Glass Formation of LaTiZrO System by Containerless Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at the interface between liquid and crucible during solidi?cation and it enables ... Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales.

363

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Biochemical Investigations of Environmental Changes on Structure and Function of Subtilisins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transesteri?cations for biofuel production, which has beendown costs and make biofuel production more economicallytemperatures for biofuel production. For example, three

Liszka, Michael Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Scope De?nition and Inventory Analysis; Internationalin life- cycle inventories using hybrid approaches. Environ.Reichl, H. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis and Identi?cation

Krishnan, Nikhil; Boyd, Sarah; Somani, Ajay; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Gastric H,K-ATPase as a drug target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cations. J Biol Chem Fukushima Y, Nakao M: Changes inChem 1980;255(16):7813-9. Fukushima Y, Post RL: Binding of

Shin, Jai M; Sachs, G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Primer on Gasoline Prices Figure 1. What Do We Pay for in a Why ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

cation and the marketing strategy of the owner. 1U. S. Department of Transportation, ... refinery maintenance, can prompt bidding for available sup-plies.

367

Synthesis of Mesocellular Silica Foams with Tunable Window and Cell Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polystyrene microspheres coated with cationic surfactants are easily prepared by micro- emulsion templates. These silica foams resemble dense aerogels. Introduction Because of their greatly enhanced pore

Yang, Peidong

368

Rare Earth and Plutonium Doping of Apatite - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Rare Earth and Plutonium Doping of Apatite ... Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State of Ce ...

369

Glass, Glass-Ceramic and Ceramic Waste Forms for Current and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

370

Ground Water Inhibitors of Localized Corrosion in Passivating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

371

Evaluation of Mixing Occurring in the SRS Saltstone Transfer Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

372

Immobilisation of Pyroprocessing Waste Salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

373

Perovskite Structured Oxides for Simultaneous Incorporation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility limits, local crystal structures, and cation ordering configurations of the ... Hot Isostatic Pressing of Chlorine-Containing Plutonium Residues and...

374

Novel Porous Materials for the Separation and Sequestration of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

375

Co.ra  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of these specimens is to be identical to the fabri- cation of similar pieces made for Argonne National laboratory. The gadolinium seaquioxide should be introduced with the uranium...

376

Microstructural Design of Piezoelectric ZnO Thin Films as High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, For most piezoelectric (PE) applications, ZnO films having ... Energy Landscape in Frustrated Systems: Cation Hopping and Relaxation in...

377

Revisions to Monthly Natural Gas Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gasification obtained from the Great Plains coal gasifi-cation plant. When annual data become final, the monthly supplemental gaseous fuels data are adjusted

378

Advanced Characterization Techniques of Glasses - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Many researchers rely on NMR of glass-forming cations to understand network structure, often in combination with other experimental and...

379

KHALIL AMINE, PH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois. Career Activities & Highlights Inorganic Analysis: ICP, ICP-MS, Hg, TCLP, LECO Carbon & Sulfur o Support to PNNL TTQP for ICP: cation impurities and high...

380

In situ heat transfer in man-made geothermal energy reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock on the west flank of the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex, in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat was extracted in a closed-loop mode of operation, injecting water into one well and extracting the heated water from a separate production well. The first reservoir was produced by fracturing the injection well at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous rock temperature was 185/sup 0/C. The relatively rapid thermal drawdown of the water produced from the first reservoir, 100/sup 0/C in 74 days, indicated that its effective fracture radius was about 60 m (200 ft). Average thermal power extracted was 4 MW. A second, larger reservoir was created by refracturing the injection well 180 m (600 ft) deeper. Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet as well as temperatures inferred from chemical geothermometry showed that the thermal drawdown of this reservoir was negligible; the effective heat transfer area of the new reservoir must be at least 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), nearly six times larger than the first reservoir. In addition reservoir residence time studies employing visible dye tracers indicated that the mean volume of the second reservoir is nine times larger. Other measurements showed that flow impedances were low, downhole water losses from these reservoirs should be manageable, that the geochemistry of the produced water was essentially benign, with no scaling problems apparent, and that the level of induced seismic activity was insignificantly small.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California  

SciTech Connect

The California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) selected the San Bernardino area for detailed geothermal resource investigation because the area was known to contain promising geothermal resource sites, the area contained a large population center, and the City of San Bernardino had expressed serious interest in developing the area's geothermal resource. Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs, South San Bernardino, and Harlem Hot Springs--in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the South San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142 C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the South San Bernardino geothermal area was 56 C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal areas was 49.5 C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well.

Youngs, Leslie G.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hydrothermal factors in porosity evolution and caprock formation at the Geysers steam field, California--insight from the Geysers Coring Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)/geothermal industry-sponsored Geysers Coring Project (GCP) has yielded 236.8 m of continuous core apparently spanning the transition between the uppermost Geysers steam reservoir and its caprock. Both zones in the corehole are developed in superficially similar, fractured, complexly veined and locally sericitized, Franciscan (late Mesozoic) graywacke-argillite sequences. However, whereas the reservoir rocks host two major fluid conduits (potential steam entries), the caprock is only sparingly permeable. This discrepancy appears to reflect principally vein texture and mineralogy. Two types of veins are common in the core--randomly-oriented, Franciscan metamorphic quartz-calcite veins; and high-angle, late Cenozoic veins deposited by The Geysers hydrothermal system. The older veins locally contain hydrothermal carbonate-dissolution vugs, which, although concentrated at the larger fluid conduit, are scattered throughout the core. The younger veins, commonly with intercrystalline vugs, consist dominantly of euhedral quartz, calcite, K-feldspar, wairakite, and pyrite--those in the reservoir rock also contain minor epidote and illite. The corresponding caprock veins are devoid of epidote but contain abundant, late-stage, mixed-layer illite/smecite (5-18% smectite interlayers) with minor chlorite/smectite (40-45% smectite interlayers). We suggest that clots of these two expandable clays in the caprock clog otherwise permeable veins and carbonate-dissolution networks at strategic sites to produce or enhance the seal on the underlying steam reservoir. Illite/smectite geothermometry indicates that the SB-15-D caprock clays were precipitated in the approximate temperature range 180-218 C, and those in the reservoir at about 218-238 C. These temperatures, along with occurrence of the clays on commonly etched calcite, K-feldspar, or wairakite, suggest that the clays were precipitated from mildly acidic steam condensate under conditions similar to those now prevailing.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part I. Geothermal exploration in Trans-Pecos, Texas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All of the new drilling for geothermal gradient and heat flow studies have been concentrated in an area near Hueco Tanks State Park. Interest in the area was raised by the silica geothermometry map of Hoffer (1979) and its proximity to El Paso, which is less than 25 miles away and expanding rapidly toward the area of geothermal interest. Several industries in El Paso appear to be potential users of non-electrical grade hot waters. A total of 14 holes have been drilled for geothermal gradient and heat-flow measurements. Of these, 12 were 50 meters deep and all but two had gradients in excess of 100/sup 0/C/km, one having a gradient as high as 306/sup 0/C/km. Of the remaining two, one penetrated bedrock at about 50 meters and was drilled to a total depth of 125 meters. The gradient in the limestone bedrock is 170/sup 0/C/km and the heat flow is about 11 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. This is the highest heat flow thus far reported for a locality in the Rio Grande Rift. The last hole is 300 meters deep and has a gradient of 142/sup 0/C/km and a heat flow of 9 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. The Hueco Tanks site is very promising for at least space heating applications of hot water. Based on the 300 meter hole the potential for electricity grade temperatures still exist, but the tight limestone bedrock may require hot dry rock extraction technology.

Roy, R.F.; Taylor, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

1984-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

pDCS: Security and Privacy Support for Data-Centric Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involves six basic steps in handling sensed data: determine the storage cell, encrypt, forward, store and military appli- cations [1], such as remote surveillance, habitat monitor- ing, and collaborative target and cell keys also need to be updated upon a node revo- cation. Second, in pDCS, the key encryption keys

Zhu, Sencun

387

889.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2004 ... In this paper we consider a mathematical program with equilibrium ... y Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, ... quali cations such as Mangasarian-Fromovitz constriant quali cation (MFCQ) does ..... Although in some special cases an MPEC may become a convex ..... York, 1983.

388

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Session 10: The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico: The Experiences Gained from Its Exploration and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto case study demonstrated the value of a multidisciplinary effort for exploring and developing a geothermal field. There was no problem in recognizing the geothermal potential of the Cerro Prieto area because of the many obvious surface manifestations. However, the delineation of the geothermal reservoir at depth was not so straightforward. Wells drilled near the abundant surface manifestations only produced fluids of relatively low enthalpy. Later it was determined that these zones of high heat loss corresponded to discharge areas where faults and fractures allowed thermal fluids to leak to the surface, and not to the main geothermal reservoir. The early gravity and seismic refraction surveys provided important information on the general structure of the area. Unaware of the existence of a higher density zone of hydrothermally altered sediments capping the geothermal reservoir, CFE interpreted a basement horst in the western part of the field and hypothesized that the bounding faults were controlling the upward flow of thermal fluids. Attempting to penetrate the sedimentary column to reach the ''basement horst'', CFE discovered the {alpha} geothermal reservoir (in well M-5). The continuation of the geothermal aquifer (actually the {beta} reservoir) east of the original well field was later confirmed by a deep exploration well (M-53). The experience of Cerro Prieto showed the importance of chemical ratios, and geothermometers in general, in establishing the subsurface temperatures and fluid flow patterns. Fluid chemical and isotopic compositions have also been helpful to determine the origin of the fluids, fluid-production mechanisms and production induced effects on the reservoir.

Lippman, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Geology, characteristics, and resource potential of the low-temperature geothermal system near Midway, Wasatch County, Utah. Report of Investigation No. 142  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To evaluate the geothermal energy potential of the hot springs system near Midway, Wasatch Co., Utah, consideration was given to heat flow, water chemistry, and structural controls. Abnormal heat flow was indicated qualitatively by snow-melt patterns and quantitatively by heat-flow measurements that were obtained from two of four temperature-gradient wells drilled in the area. These measurements indicated that the area north of the town of Midway is characterized by heat flow equal to 321.75 MW/m/sup 2/, which is over four times the value generally considered as normal heat flow. Chemical analyses of water from six selected thermal springs and wells were used in conjunction with the silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers to estimate the reservoir temperature of the thermal system. Because the calculated temperature was more than 25/sup 0/C above the maximum observed temperature, a mixing model calculation was used to project an upper limit for the reservoir temperature. Based on these calculations, the system has a reservoir temperature ranging from 46 to 125/sup 0/C. Structural information obtained from published geologic maps of the area and from an unpublished gravity survey, enabled two models to be developed for the system. The first model, based on geologic relationships in the mountains to the north and west of Midway, assumes that the heat for the thermal system comes from a relatively young intrusive or related hydrothermal convection system in the vicinity of the Mayflower mine. Meteoric waters would be heated as they approach the heat source and then move laterally to the south through faults and fractures in the rocks. These thermal waters then rise to the surface through fractures in the crest of an anticline underneath the Midway area. The second model, based on the gravity survey, assumes an igneous intrusion directly beneath Midway as the heat source.

Kohler, J.F.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geothermal pilot study final report: creating an international geothermal energy community  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Pilot Study under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) was established in 1973 to apply an action-oriented approach to international geothermal research and development, taking advantage of the established channels of governmental communication provided by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Pilot Study was composed of five substudies. They included: computer-based information systems; direct application of geothermal energy; reservoir assessment; small geothermal power plants; and hot dry rock concepts. The most significant overall result of the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study, which is now complete, is the establishment of an identifiable community of geothermal experts in a dozen or more countries active in development programs. Specific accomplishments include the creation of an international computer file of technical information on geothermal wells and fields, the development of studies and reports on direct applications, geothermal fluid injection and small power plants, and the operation of the visiting scientist program. In the United States, the computer file has aready proven useful in the development of reservoir models and of chemical geothermometers. The state-of-the-art report on direct uses of geothermal energy is proving to be a valuable resource document for laypersons and experts in an area of increasing interest to many countries. Geothermal fluid injection studies in El Salvador, New Zealand, and the United States have been assisted by the Reservoir Assessment Substudy and have led to long-range reservoir engineering studies in Mexico. At least seven small geothermal power plants are in use or have been planned for construction around the world since the Small Power Plant Substudy was instituted--at least partial credit for this increased application can be assigned to the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study. (JGB)

Bresee, J.C.; Yen, W.W.S.; Metzler, J.E. (eds.)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Self-regenerating column chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternation ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multifunction column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multifunction ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins. Applications are to separation of nitrogen and sulfur isotopes.

Park, Woo K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Structural conditionality of the piezoelectric properties of langasite family crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atomic displacements upon isomorphic substitutions in crystals of the langasite family have been analyzed. The thermal parameters are determined and the probability density function of atoms is analyzed. Local potential energy minima are found which can be occupied by atoms under external effects. The contributions of cations in all four independent crystallographic positions and anions in all three such positions to the piezoelectric properties are established. One specific structural feature is the constant (at isomorphic substitutions) or possible (under external effects) but always opposite displacements of two cations along symmetry axis 2. Large cations in eight-vertex polyhedra make the main contribution to the piezoelectric properties. The cations in the tetrahedra on symmetry axis 2 weaken these properties. The cations in the octahedra in the origin of coordinates and in the tetrahedra on symmetry axes 3 only slightly affect the piezoelectricity.

Dudka, A. P., E-mail: dudka@ns.crys.ras.ru; Simonov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U{sup +4} cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd{sup +2} cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode. 5 figs.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Wolson, R.D.; Gay, E.C.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Anion exchange membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Alaska Open-File Report 127 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites in Southern Southeastern Alaska - Preliminary Results and Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information has been gathered on 13 reported thermal-spring sites, 12 in southern Southeastern Alaska and one in western British Columbia. Five of the reported sites could not be substantiated by DGGS. The eight known thermal spring sites are associated with grainitic terrain and, except for Baker Island Hot Springs, occur within or near intensively fractured Cretaceous-age pluons of the Coast Range Batholith. Thermal-spring surface temperatures range from 21 C (Twin Lakes) to 91.5 C (Bailey Bay). The greatest discharge occurs at Chief Shakes hot springs (450 1pm). Bell Island Hot Springs, which has about a 100-1 pm discharge and a 70 C temperature, has had the most development. Two previously unreported thermal-spring sites, Barnes Lake warm springs and Bradfield hot springs, have a low rate of discharge and respective surface temperatures of about 25 and 54 C. The known thermal springs probably originate from circulation of meteoric waters through deep-seated fracture and fault systems. The chemical constituents of the alkali-sulfate to alkali-chloride thermal waters are probably derived from interaction of the deeply circulating meteoric waters with the granitic wall rocks. Chemical geothermometry suggests subsurface temperatures of 55 to 151 C. If waters are being heated solely by conduction from wall rocks, circulation depths must be about 1.5 to 5 km, assuming geothermal gradients of 30 to 50 C/km. Variations in temperature, discharge, and chemistry were noted at several thermal springs for which previous records are available. A major decrease in silica and potassium concentrations at Chief Shakes hot springs is suggested by comparing recent analyses of water chemistry to Waring's (1917) original analysis. The rate of discharge at Bell Island Hot Springs may have increased by a factor of two since Waring's visit to the springs. Subsurface reservoirs associated with thermal springs in southern Southeastern Alaska are of low temperature and are probably limited in extent, compared to geothermal fields now being used elsewhere in the world. Only the Bell Island and Bailey Bay sites now offer any potential for generation of electricity; these sites could also be used for a variety of direct uses such as space heating, wood or lumber processing, and perhaps aquaculture. The other sites have less potential but could be used locally for space heating or agriculture enhancement.

Motyka, Roman J.; Moorman, Mary A.; Reeder, John W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Investigation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in the Sonoma Valley Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sonoma Valley area contains low-temperature geothermal resources (20 C {le} T {le} 90 C) having the potential for useful development. Sonoma Valley residents, local governments and institutions, private developers, and manufacturers may be able to utilize the geothermal resources as an alternate energy source. Historically, there have been at least six geothermal spring areas developed in the Sonoma Valley. Four of these (Boyes Hot Springs, Fetter's Hot Springs, Agua Caliente Springs, and the Sonoma State Hospital warm spring) lie on a linear trend extending northwestward from the City of Sonoma. Detailed geophysical surveys delineated a major fault trace along the east side of the Sonoma Valley in association with the historic geothermal areas. Other fault traces were also delineated revealing a general northwest-trending structural faulting fabric underlying the valley. Water wells located near the ''east side'' fault have relatively high boron concentrations. Geochemical evidence may suggest the ''east side'' fault presents a barrier to lateral fluid migration but is a conduit for ascending fluids. Fifteen of the twenty-nine geothermal wells or springs located from literature research or field surveys are located along or east of this major fault in a 10 km (6.2 miles) long, narrow zone. The highest recorded water temperature in the valley appears to be 62.7 C (145 F) at 137.2 meters (450 feet) in a well at Boyes Hot Springs. This is consistent with the geothermal reservoir temperature range of 52-77 C (126-171 F) indicated by geothermometry calculations performed on data from wells in the area. Interpretation of data indicates a low-temperature geothermal fluid upwelling or ''plume'', along the ''east side'' fault with subsequent migration into permeable aquifers predominantly within volcanic strata. It is quite likely other geothermal fluid ''plumes'' in association with faulting are present within the Sonoma Valley area. A 5.8 km{sup 2} geothermal zone, that parallels the fault trace, is delineated and is perhaps the most favorable area for further investigation and possible geothermal production.

Youngs, Leslie G.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Bezore, Stephen P.; Majmundar, Hasu H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Stability Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakout Session Breakout Session I Chemical Stability * What are the Reactions? i. Products must be identified (loss of IEC is not enough) ii. Establish reaction mechanism(s) iii. Measure the kinetics II Reaction of membrane with OH - /HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- at various hydration levels - nucleophilicity and basicity of anion species i. Cations a) Small molecule analogues b) Effects of hydration state and temperature c) Cation design R 4 N + ???? Families of cations * Ammoniums * Guanadiniums * Sulfoniums * Phosphoniums [problematic] * Phosphazeniums II Reaction with OH - /HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- and Hydration levels (cont'd) ii. Tethers - Link to cation - Link to backbone - Spacers (in between) iii. Backbone a) Hydrocarbon - Structure - Functional makeup b) Fluoropolymer III Reactive O 2 Species HOO - /H

399

The Pennsylvania State University The Graduate School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................148 Figure 4.3: Chemical data (symbols) and PHAST predictions (lines) of the first reactive tracer inherent in the PHAST model....................................................146 Table 4-4 Cation Exchange Reactions Included in PHAST Models

Singha, Kamini

400

Four LBA-ECO Data Sets Released from the Nutrient Dynamics Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LBA). LBA-ECO ND-02 Cation Leaching from Forest and Pasture Soils, Para, Brazil. Data set prepared by D. Markewitz, E.A. Davidson, R.D.O. Figueiredo, P.R. Moutinho and D.C....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of the Trade-Off between Power Consumption and Performance in Bluetooth Based Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To further increase the applicability of Bluetooth in real appli- cations, reducing the energy consumption and hardware cost are important research topics. In this paper we examine the trade-off between power consumption and performance for our experimen- ...

Juan-Carlos Cano; Jose-Manuel Cano; Carlos Calafate; Eva Gonzalez; Pietro Manzoni

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Inconel Inert Anode Current Collector for Solid Oxide Membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, An innovative inert anode current collector is successfully developed and ... During electrolysis at 1423 K, magnesium cations in the flux are reduced at a ... Inclusions from Molten Steel Using a High Frequency Magnetic Field.

403

Electrochemical Windows of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids from Molecular Dynamics and Density Functional Theory Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated the cathodic and anodic limits of six room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) formed from a combination of two common cations, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) and N,N-propylmethylpyrrolidinium (P13), and ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

404

Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids Consisting of the Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids Consisting of the 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Cation with Various Anions and the Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide Anion with Various Cations Hui Jin, Bernie O'Hare, Jing Dong, Sergei Arzhantsev, Gary A. Baker, James F. Wishart, Alan J. Benesi, and Mark Maroncelli J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 81-92 (2008). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Physical properties of 4 room-temperature ionic liquids consisting of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation with various perfluorinated anions and the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N-) anion with 12 pyrrolidinium-, ammonium-, and hydroxyl-containing cations are reported. Electronic structure methods are used to calculate properties related to the size, shape, and dipole moment of individual ions. Experimental measurements of

405

Uncoupling heart cell specification and migration in the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ectopic beating heart tissue suggests that Mesp acts as aorigins of the vertebrate heart: Speci?cation of the cardiacMesp gene speci?es heart precursor cells. Development 131,

Davidson, Brad; Shi, Weiyang; Levine, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Trialkylammonio-Dodecaborates: Anions for Ionic Liquids with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trialkylammonio-Dodecaborates: Anions for Ionic Liquids with Potassium, Lithium and Proton as Cations E. Justus, K. Rischka, J. F. Wishart, K. Werner and D. Gabel Chem. Eur. J. 14,...

407

School-Based Screening: A Population-Based Approach to Inform and Monitor Childrens Mental Health Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a response to intervention (RTI) model on identi?cation ofresponse to intervention (RtI) movement of identifying andwithin a school as a part of a RtI program to determine risk

Dowdy, Erin; Ritchey, Kristin; Kamphaus, R. W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cations-report-april-17-2009 Article DOE to Issue Second Solicitation for Purchase of Crude Oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Solicitation Issued for Up to Four Million...

409

The Structural Disorder and Lattice Stability of (Ba,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 Complex Perovskites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural disorder and lattice stability of complex perovskite (Ba,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3, a promising cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells and oxygen permeation membranes, is explored by means of first principles DFT calculations. It is predicted that Ba and Sr ions easily exchange their lattice positions (A-cation disorder) similarly to Co and Fe ions (B-cation disorder). The cation antisite defects (exchange of A- and B-type cations) have a relatively high formation energy. The BSCF is predicted to exist in an equilibrium mixture of several phases and can decompose exothermically into the Ba- and Co-rich hexagonal (Ba,Sr)CoO3 and Sr- and Fe-rich cubic (Ba,Sr)FeO3 perovskites.

S.N.Rashkeev

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nanoelectromechanical Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Electromechanics of Carbon Nanotube Resonators 2.1 Basic3.4.2 Capacitance of a Carbon Nanotube Field-Emission Tunnel5 Parametric Ampli?cation in Carbon Nanotube Resonators 5.1

Aleman, Benjamin Jose

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method for inhibiting silica precipitation and scaling in geothermal flow systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for inhibiting silica scaling and precipitation in geothermal flow systems by on-line injection of low concentrations of cationic nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly polymeric imines, polymeric amines, and quaternary ammonium compounds.

Harrar, Jackson E. (Castro Valley, CA); Lorensen, Lyman E. (Orinda, CA); Locke, Frank E. (Lafayette, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Method for inhibiting silica precipitation and scaling in geothermal flow systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for inhibiting silica scaling and precipitation in geothermal flow systems by on-line injection of low concentrations of cationic nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly polymeric imines, polymeric amines, and quaternary ammonium compounds is described.

Harrar, J.E.; Lorensen, L.E.; Locke, F.E.

1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

Comments on Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EG. Global warming and U.S. crime rates: An appli- cation of6. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime reported by DallasPolice Dept, Texas: Crime rate per 100,000 population,

Williams, Matt N.; Hill, Stephen R.; Spicer, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gamble and Hess Reply to Williams et al regarding Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EG. Global warming and U.S. crime rates: An appli- cation of6. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime reported by DallasPolice Dept, Texas: Crime rate per 100,000 population,

Gamble, Janet L; Hess, Jeremy J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

High Temperature Steam Permeation via Ambipolar Diffusion in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Selective steam transport in dense proton-conducting perovskite ... Local Structure and Cation Distribution in Mullite-Type Bi2(FexAl1-x)4O9.

416

Molecular Mechanisms of a Retinal Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate the transduction of light signals to electrical signals in vertebrate photoreceptors. These channels are non-selective for cations and open upon (more)

Martinez-Francois, Juan R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR CONSEQUENCES OF DISEASE ASSOCIATED PROCESSING DEFECTS IN CONE PHOTORECEPTOR CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE-GATED CHANNELS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are heterotetrameric (2A3:2B3) cation channels critical to the molecular cascade that couples light stimulus to membrane potential changes in photoreceptor cells. (more)

Duricka, Deborah Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Vehicle Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit BusesModeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses.Modeling and Veri?cation of CNG-Powered Transit Buses J.K.

Hedrick, J. K.; Ni, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 174 (2000) 403410  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Peking Uni6ersity, Beijing 100871, PR China Received 3 January 2000; accepted 15 May 2000 Keywords in both theoretics and appli- cations. It is well known that many drugs are insoluble in water but soluble

Huang, Jianbin

420

Roderick MacKinnon - Patents  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Patents - Roderick MacKinnon (2003-2011) MacKinnon Page Resources with Additional Information US 6,641,997 ASSAYS FOR SCREENING COMPOUNDS WHICH INTERACT WITH CATION CHANNEL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Milestone Demonstrates Impact of Scientific Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be needed for hydrogen-based cars. The figure shows the organic isophthalate anions with green, blue and red spheres and their Cu cations linkers as cyan tetrahedra. The large...

422

Process for loading weak-acid ion exchange resin with uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for loading ion exchange resins is described. The process comprises contacting a weak acid cation exchange resin in the ammonium form with a uranyl fluoride salt solution.

Notz, Karl J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

RussiaSNL2-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

be friendly to low-cost, high-performance computers, such as clusters. Modifi ed for the Web Environ- ment Com- muni- cation Note A 1 A A S A T ...

424

Isotopic generator for bismuth-212 and lead-212 from radium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing radionuclides of bismuth-212 and lead-212. Thorium-228 and carrier solution starting material is input to a radiologically contained portion of an isotopic generator system, and radium-224 is separated from thorium-228 which is retained by a strongly basic anion exchange column. The separated radium-224 is transferred to an accessible, strongly acidic cationic exchange column. The cationic column retains the radium-224, and natural radioactive decay generates bismuth-212 and lead-212. The cationic exchange column can also be separated from the contained portion of the system and utilized without the extraordinary safety measures necessary in the contained portion. Furthermore, the cationic exchange column provides over a relatively long time period the short lived lead-212 and bismuth-212 radionuclides which are useful for a variety of medical therapies.

Atcher, Robert W. (Kensington, MD); Friedman, Arnold M. (Park Forest, IL); Hines, John (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networks: Ag 2 Se Gels and Aerogels by Cation ExchangeArea Vanadium Oxide Aerogels. Electrochem. Solid State Lett.of a 3D Graphene/Nanoparticle Aerogel. Adv. Mater. 2011, 23,

Rauda, Iris Ester

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Computational methods for analyzing and detecting genomic structural variation : applications to cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating CGH and ESP data into a ?ow problem. . . . .integrating arrayCGH and ESP. Personal Communi- cation. [End-Sequence Pro?ling (ESP) and Paired-end Mapping (PEM)

Bashir, Ali

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Very Bright Gamma- Ray Burst in a Galactic Halo 3.1Galaxies of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Constraints1.3 Gamma-Ray Burst Classi?cation . . . . . . 1.4 Gamma-Ray

Perley, Daniel Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combinatorial synthesis of chemically diverse core-shell nanoparticles for intracellular delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analogous to an assembly line, we employed a modular design for the high-throughput study of 1,536 structurally distinct nanoparticles with cationic cores and variable shells. This enabled elucidation of complexation, ...

Siegwart, Daniel

429

A TABULATION AND EVALUATION OF ION EXCAHNGE DATA ON SMECTITIES, CERTAIN ZEOLITIES AND BASALT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with alkali metal cations. Hanford Lab. Publ. HW-SA-3031, 35Mineral reaction work at Hanford. p. 115-150 in "The use ofFiscal Year 1980 for Rockwell Hanford Operations of Rockwell

Benson, L.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

cctoday_spring_2006_FINAL.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

top- ics as risk assessment; monitoring, mitigation, and verifi cation (MM&V); NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOEFE-0498 * ISSUE NO. 66, SPRING...

431

World Sheet Commuting beta-gamma CFT and Non-Relativistic String Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmolog- ical uni?cation of string theories, arXiv:hep-landscape of supercritical string theory, arXiv:0705.0980 [invariance, supersymmetry and string theory, Nucl. Phys.

Kim, Bom Soo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Vision-based head pose estimation and interactivity analysis : algorithms, systems and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cation, a programmable shader cannot read data from thewhich can be sampled in a shader. Multiple textures can beLanguage (GLSL) vertex shader [73]. A vertex shader is a

Murphy-Chutorian, Erik Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

View / Download  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

thetic Coal-Petcoke Slags (Al2O3-CaO-. FeO-SiO2-V2O3) under Simulated Gasifi - cation Conditions, published in Energy and Fuels. 2012 Class of Fellows.

434

Impact of phosphate factory on the biological characteristics of North Lebanon surface sediments ( Levantine Basin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Phosphogypsum can improve soil properties such as pH, soil electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange soil infertility by phosphogypsum. Plant and Soil 128, 2, 127-129. Barbosa Filho, M.P., Zimmermann F

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Automation of radiochemical analysis by applying flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., 2001). Phosphogypsum improved soil properties such as pH, soil electrical conductivity (EC), cation by phosphogypsum. Plant and Soil 128, 2 :127-129 Amin F (1993) Etude de la fixation du phosphore sur des matériaux

Sánchez, David

436

High Performance Computing Meets Experimental Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing Meets Experimental Mathematics David H. Bailey Lawrence Berkeley large, high-performance computer systems. What's more, in these new appli- cations the computer computation, implemented on high performance computer (HPC) systems. We present these results, in part

Bailey, David H.

437

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the GP50 gradient pump, LC25 chromatography oven, and CD25 conductivity detector [2]. Cation of a number of industrial sponsors. However, any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed

438

Radiation and photochemistry section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highlights of this past year in the Radiation and Photochemistry Section at Argonne include: (1) picosecond optical studies of radical cations and excited states produced in hydrocarbon radiolysis provided the first kinetic measurements of ion transformation and production of triplet and singlet excited states by ion recombination. (2) studies of radical cations of alkyl-substituted amines and sulfides provided insights into ion-molecule reactions of radical cations in the condensed phase. (3) studies of the behavior of strained alkane radical cations, such as cubane {sup +}{center dot}, revealed new rearrangements and remarkable, medium-dependent differences in their structures. (4) H{center dot}atom reactions yielding e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} provided the first reliable measurements of hydrated-electron enthalpy and entropy and forced the revision of some previous thinking about the driving force in {sub aq}{sup {minus}} reactions.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economics of the combined cycle gas turbinean experiencePC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with post-integrated gasi?cation combined cycle (IGCC) plants with

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Instrument Schedule for dcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thu Apr 3 2003, 5, 3576, Dynamics of structure-directing template cations in molten and glassy CZX-1, Martin Iton Trouw, NCSU ANL LANL, 30-600K ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The future of electric two-wheelers and electric vehicles in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cation, including battery cost, charging infrastructure, andEVs is small due to high battery cost, though the market iscation is impeded by high battery cost, lack of recharging

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

RTZen: Highly Predictable, Real-time Java Middleware for Distributed and Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-Time Speci?cation for Java. Addison-Wesley (2000) 8.Vitek, J. : Real-time java scoped memory: Design patternsof the jRate Real-Time Java Implementation. In Meersman,

Raman, Krishna; Zhang, Yue; Panahi, Mark; Colmenares, Juan A; Klefstad, Raymond; Harmon, Trevor

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Research of Heat Storage Tank Operation Modes in Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation investigates typical operation modes of the heat storage tank in the small-scale cogeneration (CHP) plant, analyses formation of thermal stratifi-cation in such storage (more)

Streckien?, Giedr?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electron-cloud updated simulation results for the PSR, and recent results for the SNS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cation in the case of the SNS, we have used a low number ofSpallation Neutron Source (SNS) under con- struction at theparameters for the PSR and SNS. Parameter proton beam energy

Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Science/Engineering Foundation Fellowships Grant Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/professional school appli- cation process, and planning for pro- ductive careers. Above all else, it is a generative and engineering frameworks to generate products that enhance human endeavor. Culture of chemical engineering

446

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Sanyo Electric Co. Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: NA Nominal Pack Voltage: 330.0 VDC Nominal Cell...

447

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Sanyo Electric Co. Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 330.0 VDC...

448

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Sanyo Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 6.0 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 144.0 VDC Nominal Cell...

449

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

450

Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

451

Investigation of the Effect of Functional Group Substitutions on the Gas-Phase Electron Affinities and Ionization Energies of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids Ions using Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cathodic and anodic stabilities of room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are important factors in their applications in electrochemical devices. In this work, we investigated the electron affinities of cations and ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

452

A Flexible Nonparametric Test for Conditional Independence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Specication Tests,Journal of Econometrics, [4]A Consistent Conditional Moment Test of Functional Form,the 5% standardized GCR test, SW2007 test, and SW2008 test

Huang, Meng; Sun, Yixiao; White, Hal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Sample-Specific Cancer Pathway Analysis Using PARADIGM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cation of response to QNZ (an NF-KB inhibitor) in the breastfor the combination of QNZ (an NF-KB inhibitor) and E2F3.studies have shown that NF-KB may activate E2F family

Benz, Stephen Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

July 2006 BWXTymes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ciency. Four Black Belt candidates-Tim Tal- ley, Kathy Gerth, Paul Sooter and Chris Mur- phy-have completed all the requirements and received their certifi cation as Six Sigma...

455

A database for the study of marine mammal behavior: Gap analysis, data standardization, and future directions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power to develop robust behavioral or ecological models that could help de?ne critical habitats of marinepower of modeling for a variety of appli- cations. In this case, behavioral data of marine

Shaffer, S A; Costa, Daniel P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Microsoft Word - PoreFormerTypeandDensity.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

method. 10 Solutions of lead acetate and Zr, Ti, and Nb alkoxides in glacial acetic acid were mixed to form a clear cation solution. This solution was added to an...

457

MAC/PHY Cross-Layer Design and Analysis for Multiple Packet Detector MIMO Sanaz Barghi Hamid Jafarkhani Homayoun Yousefi'zadeh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orthogonal resources to different terminals. In heavy load conditions, slotted access methods use resources- This work was partially sponsored by a grant from the Boeing Company. cations. Generally speaking, layered

Yousefi'zadeh, Homayoun

458

Quantification of enterococci and human adenoviruses in environmental samples by real-time PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uorogenic probe tech- nique (TaqMan PCR) to the detection of2003. Multiplexed, real-time PCR for quantitative detectionS. Sayler. 2003. Real-time PCR quanti?- cation of nitrifying

He, J W; Jiang, Sunny C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Generalizations of M?ntz's theorem via a Remez-type ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cation" have the same power that the "extra division" has in the Bak-Newman-. Somorjai ...... 1 inally, the last line follows by observing that i? e A ? (') and ?. ?.

460

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infiltration rates, or passive solar houses with rock-bedpassive solar developments, but none have yet made a commitment to change loan qualifi- cation criteria to include the house's

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

U.S. Soil and Mineralogy Data and Weathering Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds as rain, snow, and fog, as well as dry deposition in gas and particulate forms, can lead to the formation of sulfuric and nitric acids in soils and surface waters, resulting in decreased pH and alkalinity, higher aluminum concentrations, and increased leaching of base cations. This report evaluates methods to estimate base cation weathering rates for use in watershed simulations and in critical load calculations developed to protect surface waters and ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

462

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

Green, Mark A. (West Lafayette, IN); Tsang, Brenda W. (Lafayette, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Extraction of cesium and strontium from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cesium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4[prime](5) [1-hydroxy-2-ethylhexyl]benzo 18-crown-6 compound and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. Strontium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4[prime](5[prime]) [1-hydroxyheptyl]cyclohexo 18-crown-6 compound, and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. 3 figs.

Davis, M.W. Jr.; Bowers, C.B. Jr.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

465

Biochar production method and composition therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to a method for producing an oxygenated biochar material possessing a cation-exchanging property, wherein a biochar source is reacted with one or more oxygenating compounds in such a manner that the biochar source homogeneously acquires oxygen-containing cation-exchanging groups in an incomplete combustion process. The invention is also directed to oxygenated biochar compositions and soil formulations containing the oxygenated biochar material.

Lee, James W.; Buchanan, III, Archibald C.; Evans, Barbara R.; Kidder, Michelle K.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

1983-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

467

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stohl, Frances V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Evaluation of the Potential Uses of Unmodified and Surfactant-Modified Zeolite for Fly Ash Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal ash leachate can contain a wide range of inorganic constituents, including cationic trace metals and oxyanions. In the event of a release of leachate to ground water, removal of these constituents can be challenging due to their varying properties, especially for in situ treatments such as permeable reactive barriers. Synthetic and natural zeolites have been successfully used to remove cations in a variety of industrial and commercial applications, and more recently, surfactant-modified zeolites hav...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

469

Extraction of cesium and strontium from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cesium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4'(5) [1-hydroxy-2-ethylhexyl]benzo 18-crown-6 compound and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. Strontium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4'(5') [1-hydroxyheptyl]cyclohexo 18-crown-6 compound, and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution.

Davis, Jr., Milton W. (Lexington, SC); Bowers, Jr., Charles B. (Columbia, SC)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

DNA Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Activity DNA Activity Name: Sara Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is DNA an anion or a cation? I thought since it was negatively charged it was an anion but mt teacher in class today said it was a cation because negatively charged molecules logically migrate to the positively charged plate of the cathode, ie molecules that migrate towards a cathode are cations. Where is the error in my logic or there error in my logic? Replies: DNA is negatively charged due to the phosphate ions present in the ribose-phosphate backbone. It moves towards the positive pole during electrophoresis. The definition kation/anion is confusing because: 1. a cation moves to the cathode 2. the cathode is negative, thus 3. a cation is positive DNA is an anion. The confusion is that a cathode is negative, but a cation is positively charged. For that reason these terms are not generally used in this context.

471

Structure and magnetic properties of the Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} family of oxides: A combined experimental and theoretical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic properties of the Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} family of oxides crystallizing in a non-centrosymmetric space group have been investigated in detail along with structural aspects by employing X-ray and neutron diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy and other techniques. The study has revealed the occurrence of several interesting features related to unit cell parameters, site disorder and ionic size. Using first-principles density functional theory based calculations, we have attempted to understand how magnetic ordering and related properties in these oxides depend sensitively on disorder at the cation site. The origin and tendency of cations to disorder and the associated properties are traced to the local structure and ionic sizes. -- Graphical abstract: We have studied both experimentally and theoretically the important role of disorder at the cation site on magnetic and related properties of the Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} family of oxides crystallizing in a non-centrosymmetric space group. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Interesting observations on cation site disorder, cell parameters and ionic size. {yields} Cation site disorder explains magnetic ordering. {yields} Demonstrates the importance of the A-site cations.

Saha, Rana; Shireen, Ajmala [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, New Chemistry Unit, Theoretical Science Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Bera, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Sundarayya, Y.; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, New Chemistry Unit, Theoretical Science Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Yusuf, S.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Waghmare, Umesh V. [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, New Chemistry Unit, Theoretical Science Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Sundaresan, A., E-mail: sundaresan@jncasr.ac.i [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, New Chemistry Unit, Theoretical Science Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Rao, C.N.R, E-mail: cnrrao@jncasr.ac.i [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, New Chemistry Unit, Theoretical Science Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560 064 (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

Tompkins, E.R.

1959-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

473

Recovery process for electroless plating baths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

Anderson, Roger W. (Farragut, TN); Neff, Wayne A. (Knoxville, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recovery process for electroless plating baths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

COLOR cctoday_fall_2006 for Web.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OXYGEN SEPARATION OXYGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANE PROTOTYPE Gasifi cation systems offer coal-fi red power plant operators a way to utilize coal - the nation's most affordable and abundant energy resource - more effi ciently and cost-effectively, and in a more environmentally responsible manner. Yet many improvements still are needed to overcome remaining barriers to industry acceptance of full gasifi cation systems, such as gas separation processes, components, and systems. A key requirement for tomorrow's energy technologies is a continuous supply of nearly pure oxygen in industrial quantities. There are several major process advantages to using oxygen-blown gasifi ers, and many existing and future gasifi cation projects are or will be oxygen-blown, including the planned

476

Microsoft Word - LPN.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cationic Liposome-Microtubule Complexes: Lipid-Protein Bio-Nanotubes with Open or Closed Ends Uri Raviv *,† , Daniel J. Needleman *,† , Youli Li *,† , Herbert P. Miller † , Leslie Wilson † , and Cyrus R. Safinya *,† * Materials Department, Physics Department † Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Department, Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 In this work we explored the structured that form when cationic liposomes are mixed with microtubules (MTs). Using synchrotron small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we find two novel structures(1). For soft and intermediate rigid membranes we find that the cationic liposomes spread and coat the MTs

477

Synthetic laser medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

Stokowski, S.E.

1987-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

Patents -- John B. Goodenough  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patents - John B. Goodenough Patents - John B. Goodenough Goodenough Page · Resources with Additional Information US 4,049,891 COMPOSITIONS FOR FAST ALKALI-METAL-ION TRANSPORT - Goodenough, John B.; Hong, Henry Y-P; September 20, 1977 Fast alkali-metal-ion transporters are provided having low resistivities and low-activation-energy mobilities at temperatures at which alkali metals are molten. The novel compounds promote alkali-metal-ion transport in three dimensions within their crystalline structure and have the general formula: or wherein A is potassium, sodium or lithium, Z' is a tetrahedrally coordinated cation or mixtures thereof, X is an octahedrally coordinated cation or mixtures thereof, n is a number greater than 1 and less than 4, m is a number from 1 up to 2 and Z' is a mixture of at least two Z' cations.

479

Interactions and Dynamics of Silyl- and Siloxy-Substituted RTILs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions and Dynamics of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Interactions and Dynamics of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids that have Silyl- and Siloxy-Substituted Imidazolium Cations H. Shirota, J. F. Wishart, and E. W. Castner, Jr. J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 4819-4829 (2007). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: The intermolecular interactions and dynamics of novel ionic liquids with alkylsilyl and alkylsiloxy substitutions on the cations are studied by measuring the intermolecular vibrational spectra and reorientational dynamics using femtosecond Kerr effect methods. The new ionic liquids include 1-dimethylphenylsilylmethyl-3-methylimidazolium (PhSi-mim+), and 1-methyl-3-pentamethyldisiloxymethylimidazolium (SiOSi-mim+) cations paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2-) anion. Measured ionic

480

New Physics in a Copper-Iridium Compound | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Key Target for Diabetes Drugs A Key Target for Diabetes Drugs Molten Metal Solidifies into a New Kind of Glass Organic Polymers Show Sunny Potential A New Family of Quasicrystals Cool Muscles: Storing Elastic Energy for Flight Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Physics in a Copper-Iridium Compound August 6, 2013 Bookmark and Share (a) Cu-Ir chain of Sr3CuIrO6. Oxygen atoms surround both copper (Cu2+) and iridium (Ir4+) cations (ions positively charged due to the loss of electrons to the oxygen atoms, which become negatively-charged anions). The copper cation forms a planar arrangement with the surrounding oxygen anions, while the iridium cation resides at the center of an octahedral

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermometry cation geothermometers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

482

Modified clay sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

Fogler, H. Scott (Ann Arbor, MI); Srinivasan, Keeran R. (Livonia, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Concentration and purification of plutonium or thorium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In this invention a first solution obtained from such as a plutonium/thorium purification process or the like, containing plutonium (Pu) and/or thorium (Th) in such as a low nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) concentration may have the Pu and/or Th separated and concentrated by passing an electrical current from a first solution having disposed therein an anode to a second solution having disposed therein a cathode and separated from the first solution by a cation permeable membrane, the Pu or Th cation permeating the cation membrane and forming an anionic complex within the second solution, and electrical current passage affecting the complex formed to permeate an anion membrane separating the second solution from an adjoining third solution containing disposed therein an anode, thereby effecting separation and concentration of the Pu and/or Th in the third solution.

Hayden, John A. (Arvada, CO); Plock, Carl E. (Golden, CO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

Thornton, M.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

Assessment report on the kinetics of radionuclide adsorption on Yucca Mountain tuff  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of sorption was measured by observing the uptake of radionuclides by tuff wafers and crushed tuff as a function of time. In addition, the broadening of breakthrough curves for cations eluted through crushed-tuff columns was interpreted in terms of adsorption kinetics. The results of these measurements are consistent with a diffusion-limited adsorption mechanism for simple cations, such as strontium, cesium, and barium. The adsorption kinetics for these simple cations is sufficiently fast so that equilibrium can be assumed for the retardation of these chemical species in the groundwater velocities that would be reasonable for most release scenarios. The actinides, in particular plutonium, exhibited a slow time dependence for adsorption. 23 refs., 61 figs., 12 tabs.

Rundberg, R.S.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Novel hydrophobic ionic liquids electrolyte based on cyclic sulfonium used in dye-sensitized solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel series of hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids based on six cyclic sulfonium cations were first time synthesized and applied in dye-sensitized solar cells as pure solvents for electrolyte system. The chronoamperograms result showed that the length of substituent on sulfonium cations could inhibit the I{sub 3}{sup -} diffusion and the five-ring structure of sulfonium was benefit for fast triiodide ion diffusion. The electrochemical impendence spectra measurement of dye-sensitized solar cells with these ionic liquid electrolytes was carried out and the result indicated that the cations' structure had indeed influence on the cells' performance especially for the fill factor, which was further proved by the measurement result of I-V curves of these dye-sensitized solar cells. The conclusion was obtained that the electron exchange reaction on Pt counter electrode/electrolyte interface dominated the cells' performance for these ionic liquid electrolyte-based DSCs. (author)

Guo, Lei; Pan, Xu; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Changneng; Fang, Xiaqin; Chen, Shuanghong; Dai, Songyuan [Key Lab of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Trapping and diffusion of fission products in ThO2 and CeO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trapping and diffusion of Br, Rb, Cs and Xe in ThO2 and CeO{sub 2} have been studied using an Ab Initio total energy method in the local-density approximation of density functional theory. Fission products incorporated in cation mono-vacancy, cation-anion di-vacancy and Schottky defect sites are found to be stable, with the cation mono-vacancy being the preferred site in most cases. In both oxides, Rb and Cs are the most likely to be trapped, and Xe is more difficult to incorporate than other fission products. The energy barriers for migration of each species in ThO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2} are also calculated. Alkali metals are relatively more mobile than other fission products, and bromine is the least mobile.

Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Weber, William J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Global Impact of the Systemic Economies and MENA Business Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the MENA Region We extend the country coverage of the GVAR dataset used in Dees et al. (2007) by adding 14 countries located in the Middle East and North Africa region as well as three other Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) members... model and provide justi?cation for our modelling speci?cation. For various data sources used to build the quarterly GVAR dataset, covering 1979Q2 to 2011Q2, see the Data Appendix. 3.1.1 Domestic Variables Real GDP, yit, the rate of in?ation, #25;it...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or Ag2S lattices were used to calculate interface formation energies. The formation energies indicate the favorability for interface nucleation at different facets of the nanorod and the stability of the interfaces during growth of the secondary material (Cu2S or Ag2S) within the CdS nanocrystal. The physical properties of the CdS-Ag2S and CdS-Cu2S binary nanorods are discussed in terms of the electronic structure of their components and the heterostructure morphology.

Sadtler, Bryce F

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

491

Seafloor Classification using Contour Maps Recovered from Side-Scan Sonar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional seabed texture segmentation algorithms extract features from images using the gray level intensity of the side-scan images. In this paper we present a method for the classi cation of texture seabeds based on height information. First we propose a new method for the reconstruction of the seabeds by combining a backscattering model and exploiting the geometry of the sonar. The recovery performance of the surface is compared with a previously published method. Afterwards a simple classi cation procedure is applied over rocky and ripple seabeds by using contours maps recovered from sidescan sonar images. 80:8% of the reconstructed seabeds were succesfully classi ed.

Esther Dura; Judith Bell; Dave Lane

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

Janke, Christopher J. (Oliver Springs, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Hydrodesulfurization catalysis by Chevrel phase compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M.sub.x Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts. The most active catalysts were the "large" cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the "small" cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

McCarty, Kevin F. (Livermore, CA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA)

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

494

Electrical storage device  

SciTech Connect

A battery is described having a layered transition metal dichalcogenide cathode in which has been incorporated by intercalation a relatively small amount of a dopant material having a relatively large atomic or ionic size so as to spread apart adjacent molecular layers in the cathode material and permit more rapid intercalation of cations during the battery discharge, an anode, and an electrolyte which will permit the migration of cations from the anode to the cathode. The preferred dopants are sodium or potassium and the invention is chiefly applicable to a battery having a molybdenum disulphide cathode.

Haering, R.R.; Stiles, J.A.

1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

495

Can Ionic Liquids Be Used As Templating Agents For Controlled Design of Uranium-Containing Nanomaterials?  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured uranium oxides have been prepared in ionic liquids as templating agents. Using the ionic liquids as reaction media for inorganic nanomaterials takes advantage of the pre-organized structure of the ionic liquids which in turn controls the morphology of the inorganic nanomaterials. Variation of ionic liquid cation structure was investigated to determine the impact on the uranium oxide morphologies. For two ionic liquid cations, increasing the alkyl chain length increases the aspect ratio of the resulting nanostructured oxides. Understanding the resulting metal oxide morphologies could enhance fuel stability and design.

Visser, A.; Bridges, N.; Tosten, M.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

496

Ion exchange behavior among metal trisilicates: probing selectivity, structures, and mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One model system for the investigation of selectivity in inorganic ion exchangers is a group of synthetic analogues of the mineral umbite. Hydrothermally synthesized trisilicates with the general form A2BSi3O9.H2O, where A is a monovalent cation, and B = Ti4+, Zr4+, and Sn4+ have been shown to have ion exchange properties. The extended three dimensional framework structure offers the ability to tune the selectivity based on the size of the cavities and channels. The unit cell volume, and therefore the pore size, can be altered by changing the size of the octahedral metal. The substitution of Ge for Si can also increase the pore size. A variety of cations have been exchanged into the trisilicates including alkali and alkaline earths, lanthanides, and actinides. The reason for the selectivity rests in the pocket of framework oxygens which make up the exchange sites. Close examination of the cation environments shows that the ions with the greatest affinity are those that have the closest contacts to the framework oxygens. For example, among alkali cations, zirconium trisilicate demonstrates the greatest affinity for Rb+ and has the most A-O contact distances approaching the sum of their ionic radii. The origins of selectivity also rely upon the valence of the incoming cation. When cations are of similar ionic radius, a cation of higher charge is always preferred over the lower valence. Ion exchange studies in binary solutions of cations of different valence, but similar size (1.0 ) have proven the selectivity series to be Th4+ > Gd3+ > Ca2+ > Na+. Through structural characterization, kinetic studies, and use of in situ x-ray diffraction techniques the origins of selectivity in these inorganic ion exchangers has been further elucidated. The principles gleaned from these studies can be applied to other inorganic framework materials. The umbite system has the potential to be altered and tailored for specific separation needs. The trisilicate materials presented in this work are representative of the types of advances in inorganic materials research and prove their potential as applicable compounds useful for solving real world problems.

Fewox, Christopher Sean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The impact of impurities on long-term PEMFC performance  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical experimentation and modeling indicates that impurities degrade fuel cell performance by a variety of mechanisms. Electrokinetics may be inhibited by catalytic site poisoning from sulfur compounds and CO and by decreased local proton activity and mobility caused by the presence of foreign salt cations or ammonia. Cation impurity profiles vary with current density, valence and may change local conductivity and water concentrations in the ionomer. Nitrogen oxides and ammonia species may be electrochemically active under fuel cell operating conditions. The primary impurity removal mechanisms are electrooxidation and water fluxes through the fuel cell.

Garzon, Gernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopes, Thiago [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sansinena, Jose - Maria [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kienitz, Brian [LLNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Temporal Logic Model Checking of CSP:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the possibility of doing LTL model checking on CSP speci cations in the context of re nement. We present a technique to perform LTL model checking of CSP processes using re nement checking in general and the FDR tool in particular. We present a tool which automates the translation process from LTL model checking to CSP re nement. Also, if time permits, we will present another tool which uses latest generation Prolog technology to symbolically animate, compile, and model check CSP speci cations.

Tools And Techniques; Michael Leuschel; Ivan Wolton; Thierry Massart; Laksono Adhianto

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Process for preparing active oxide powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

Berard, Michael F. (Ames, IA); Hunter, Jr., Orville (Ames, IA); Shiers, Loren E. (Ames, IA); Dole, Stephen L. (Burnt Hills, NY); Scheidecker, Ralph W. (Ames, IA)

1979-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

500

Implementation of variably saturated flow into PHREEQC for the simulation of biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software tool for the simulation of one-dimensional unsaturated flow and solute transport together with biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone was developed by integrating a numerical solution of Richards' equation into the geochemical modelling ... Keywords: Cation exchange, Geochemical modelling, Hydraulic properties, Reactive transport, Surface complexation, Unsaturated flow

L. Wissmeier; D. A. Barry

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z