Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property Tax Exemption for Wind and Geothermal Energy Producers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Property Tax Exemption for Wind and Geothermal Energy Producers Property Tax Exemption for Wind and Geothermal Energy Producers...

2

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Water Use Geothermal/Water Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

3

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Use Water Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Water Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

4

Wind and Geothermal Incentives Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Wind and Geothermal Incentives Program Wind and Geothermal Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Manufacturer loans: 35,000 per job created within 3 years Manufacturer grants: 5,000 per job created within 3 years Loans for geothermal systems: 3 per square foot of space served up to 5 million; also limited to 50% of eligible costs for residential systems. Loans for wind energy production projects: 5 million Grants for wind energy production projects: 1 million Grants for feasibility studies: 50% of cost up to 175,000 Loan guarantee grants: Up to 75% of deficient funds up to 5 million Program Info Funding Source

5

Wind/Water Nexus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

7

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration...

8

Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

Rigdon, L.

1980-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wind energy/geothermic/solar heating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

I've observed three distinct ''camps'' of renewable energy resources; WIND, Geothermic, and Solar. None of the three are completely adequate for the NE by themselves. I observe little effort to combine them to date. My objective has been to demonstrate that the three can be combined in a practical system. To mitagate the high cost and poor payback for individual residences, I believe neighborhoods of 4 to 5 homes, apartment complexes or condominiums could form an Energy Association alloting a piece of ground (could be a greenbelt) which would contain the well or wells, solar boosted underground water storage and the Solar banks. These are the high cost items which could be prorated and ammortized by the Association. Easements would permit each residence underground insulated water lines for individual heat pump conversions to existing forced air furnaces. Where regulations permit, an individual home could erect his own windmill to belt drive his freon compressor. With or without the optional windmill the water to freon heat pump with its solar boosts on the well water, will enjoy COP's (coefficient of Performances or times better than electric resistance heat) beyond anything on the market today. In a neighborhood energy association, all trenching could be done together all plumbing could be one contract and they could qualify for quantity discounts on heat pump units, chillers and components and installation.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geothermal water may be used for heavy crude recovery  

SciTech Connect

A brief article reports a statement from the USSR on the use of 158 -212/sup 0/F geothermal water in order to increase the yield of high paraffin or waxy oil. The article suggests the conclusion that wherever geothermal resources are close to heavy crude fields, geothermal steam might be used for heavy crude production. It notes that geothermal hot water pipelines in Iceland, transport hot water for municipal heating over a distance of 24 miles.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wind and Geothermal Incentives Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings Category Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Manufacturer loans: 35,000 per job created within 3 years Manufacturer grants: 5,000 per job created within 3 years Loans for geothermal systems: 3 per square foot of space served up to 5 million Loans for wind energy production projects: 5 million Grants for wind energy production projects: 1 million Grants for feasibility studies: 50% of cost up to 175,000 Loan guarantee grants: Up to 75% of deficient funds up to 5 million Program Info Funding Source Alternative Energy Investment Fund (state issued bonds) Start Date January 2009 State Pennsylvania Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount Varies by project, but program generally requires matching funds at least equivalent to DCED funding

12

Wind and Geothermal Incentives Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schools Schools Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Manufacturer loans: 35,000 per job created within 3 years Manufacturer grants: 5,000 per job created within 3 years Loans for geothermal systems: 3 per square foot of space served up to 5 million Loans for wind energy production projects: 5 million Grants for wind energy production projects: 1 million Grants for feasibility studies: 50% of cost up to 175,000 Loan guarantee grants: Up to 75% of deficient funds up to 5 million Program Info Funding Source Alternative Energy Investment Fund (state-issued bonds) Start Date January 2009 State Pennsylvania Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies by project, but program generally requires matching funds at least equivalent to DCED funding

13

DOE provides detailed offshore wind resource maps - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Wind energy potential is broken down by wind speed, water depth, and distance from shore.

14

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Desert Queen geothermal system, which is in close proximity to two locations where geothermal energy is currently being harnessed, may host an additional reservoir. A _18O vs _D plot indicates that Desert Queen waters likely originate from the Humboldt River, and reflects Humboldt River water that is clearly evaporated. Temperatures of the reservoir at depth are estimated to be between 92-141°C and were calculated using the _18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer. It is unclear whether these temperatures

15

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

16

A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description Butte, Montana, like many other mining towns that developed because of either hard-rock minerals or coal, is underlain by now-inactive water-filled mines. In Butte's case, over 10,000 miles of underground workings have been documented, but as in many other mining communities these waters are regarded as more of a liability than asset. Mine waters offer several advantages:

17

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Wellhead and downhole water samples were collected and analyzed from a 114.3-m well at Coso Hot Springs (Coso No. 1) and a 1477-m well (CGEH No. 1) 3.2 km to the west. The same chloride concentration is present in hot waters entering both wells (about 2350 mg/kg), indicating that a hot-water-dominated geothermal system is present. The maximum measured temperatures are 142 degrees C in the Coso No. 1 well and 195 degrees C in the CGEH No. 1 well. Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate

18

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

19

Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

SciTech Connect

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geothermal resources of the Texas Gulf Coast: environmental concerns arising from the production and disposal of geothermal waters. Geological circular 76-7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Disposal and temporary surface storage of spent geothermal fluids and surface subsidence and faulting are the major environmental problems that could arise from geopressured geothermal water production. Geopressured geothermal fluids are moderately to highly saline and may contain significant amounts of boron. Disposal of hot saline geothermal water in subsurface saline aquifers will present the least hazard to the environment. It is not known, however, whether the disposal of as much as 54,000 m/sup 3/ of spent fluids per day into saline aquifers at the production site is technically or economically feasible. If saline aquifers adequate for fluid disposal cannot be found, geothermal fluids may have to be disposed of by open watercourses, canals, and pipelines to coastal bays on the Gulf of Mexico. Overland flow or temporary storage of geothermal fluids may cause negative environmental impacts. As the result of production of large volumes of geothermal fluid, reservoir pressure declines may cause compaction of sediments within and adjacent to the reservoir. The amount of compaction depends on pressure decline, reservoir thickness, and reservoir compressibility. The magnitude of environmental impact of subsidence and fault activation varies with current land use. Geothermal resource production facilities on the Gulf Coast of Texas could be subject to a series of natural hazards: (1) hurricane- or storm-induced flooding, (2) winds from tropical storms, (3) coastal erosion, or (4) expansive soils. None of these hazards is generated by geothermal resource production, but each has potential for damaging geothermal production and disposal facilities that could, in turn, result in leakage of hot saline geothermal fluids.

Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal hot water pump. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, testing and performance capabilities of a Geothermal Hot Water Pumping System being developed are described. The pumping system is intended to operate submerged in geothermal brine wells for extended periods of time. Such a system confines the hot brine in a closed-loop under pressure to prevent the liquid from flashing into steam, in addition to providing a means for reinjecting cooled water and the contaminants into a return well. The system consists of a single-stage centrifugal pump driven by an oil-cooled, high-speed electric motor with integral heat exchanger. For testing purposes a diesel engine driven 400 Hz generator is used for supplying power to the motor. In some areas where commercial power may not be available, the diesel-generator unit or either a rotating or solid state frequency converter may be used to produce the high frequency power required by the motor. Fabrication of a prototype system and testing of the electric motor at frequencies up to 250 Hz was completed. While testing at 275 Hz it was necessary to terminate the testing when the motor stator was damaged as a result of a mechanical failure involving the motor-dynamometer drive adaptor. Test results, although limited, confirm the design and indicate that the performance is as good, or better than predicted. These results also indicate that the motor is capable of achieving rated performance.

Not Available

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geothermal hot water pump. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The design, testing and performance capabilities of a Geothermal Hot Water Pumping System are described. The pumping system is intended to operate submerged in geothermal brine wells for extended periods of time. Such a system confines the hot brine in a closed-loop under pressure to prevent the liquid from flashing into steam, in addition to providing a means for reinjecting cooled water and the contaminates into a return well. The system consists of a single-stage centrifugal pump driven by an oil-cooled, high-speed electric motor with integral heat exchanger. For testing purposes a diesel engine driven 400 Hz generator is used for supplying power to the motor. In some areas where commercial power may not be available, the diesel-generator unit or either a rotating or solid state frequency converter may be used to produce the high frequency power required by the motor. Fabrication of a prototype system and testing of the electric motor at frequencies up to 250 Hz was completed. While testing at 275 Hz it was necessary to terminate the testing when the motor stator was damaged as a result of a mechanical failure involving the motor-dynamometer drive adaptor.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Land Use for Wind, Solar, and Geothermal Electricity Generation Facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale wind, photovoltaic (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal projects. The analysts evaluated 458 existing or proposed projects, representing (as of 2012 third quarter) 51% of installed wind capacity, 80% of PV and CSP capacity, and all known geothermal power plants in the United States. The report identifies two major land use classes: 1) direct area (land permanently or temporarily disturbed due to ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Water Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity...

25

Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warm Springs Water District Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

26

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

27

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Wind  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

traditional sources of energy. Photo of a line of offshore wind turbines in the ocean. Solar Geothermal Wind Water Photo of a wind turbine The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

28

Modeling Studies of Geothermal Systems with a Free Water Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulators developed for geothermal reservoir engineering applications generally only consider systems which are saturated with liquid water and/or steam. However, most geothermal fields are in hydraulic communicatino with shallow ground water aquifers having free surface (water level), so that production or injection operations will cause movement of the surface, and of the air in the pore spaces above the water level. In some geothermal fields the water level is located hundreds of meters below the surface (e.g. Olkaria, Kenya; Bjornsson, 1978), so that an extensive so that an extensive unsaturated zone is present. In other the caprock may be very leaky or nonexistent [e.g., Klamath Falls, oregon (Sammel, 1976)]; Cerro Prieto, Mexico; (Grant et al., 1984) in which case ther eis good hydraulic communication between the geothermal reservoir and the shallow unconfined aquifers. Thus, there is a need to explore the effect of shallow free-surface aquifers on reservoir behavior during production or injection operations. In a free-surface aquifer the water table moves depending upon the rate of recharge or discharge. This results in a high overall storativity; typically two orders of magnitude higher than that of compressed liquid systems, but one or two orders of magnitude lower than that for liquid-steam reservoirs. As a consequence, various data analysis methods developed for compressed liquid aquifers (such as conventional well test analysis methods) are not applicable to aquifer with a free surface.

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Pruess, K.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Water News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water News Water News Bioenergy Buildings Geothermal Government Energy Management Homes Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Advanced Manufacturing Solar Vehicles Water Wind Blog Archive Recent...

30

Wind and Water Nexus: Impacts of Wind Development on Water Use...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind and Water Nexus: Impacts of Wind Development on Water Use in the Energy Sector March 20, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all...

31

Geological and Geothermal Investigation of the Lower Wind River Valley, Southwestern Washington Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind River Valley, on the west slope of the Cascade Range, is a northwest-trending drainage that joins the Columbia River near Carson, Washington. The region has been heavily dissected by fluvial and glacial erosion. Ridges have sharp crests and deep subsidiary valleys typical of a mature topography, with a total relief of as much as 900 m. The region is vegetated by fir and hemlock, as well as dense, brushy ground-cover and undergrowth. The lower 8 km of the valley is privately owned and moderately populated. The upper reaches lies within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and include several campgrounds and day parks, the Carson National Fish Hatchery, and the Wind River Ranger Station and Wind River Nursery of the US Forest Service. Logging activity is light due to the rugged terrain, and consequently, most valley slopes are not accessible by vehicle. The realization that a potential for significant geothermal resources exists in the Wind River area was brought about by earlier exploration activities. Geologic mapping and interpretation was needed to facilitate further exploration of the resource by providing a knowledge of possible geologic controls on the geothermal system. This report presents the detailed geology of the lower Wind River valley with emphasis on those factors that bear significantly on development of a geothermal resource.

Berri, Dulcy A.; Korosec, Michael A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Geothermal-heating facilities for Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School are located in Carson, Washington, adjacent to the Wind River. Both schools are operated by the Stevenson-Carson School District. Carson Elementary, comprised of 49,000 square feet, was constructed in several phases beginning in 1951. The construction is variable, but is characterized by large expanses of single glass and uninsulated masonry areas. An oil fired steam boiler supplies a variety of terminal equipment. Wind River Middle School was built in 1972 and, as a result, exhibits much greater insulation levels. The 38,000 square foot structure is heated entirely by an electric resistance terminal reheat system. Carson Hot Springs Resort, located approximately one half mile from the schools, exhibits temperatures of 124/sup 0/F. In addition, geological work is in progress to better define the local geothermal resource. The feasibility of geothermal use at the school for space heating purposes is examined.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geological and geothermal investigation of the lower Wind River valley, southwestern Washington Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detailed geology of the lower Wind River valley is presented with emphasis on those factors that bear significantly on development of a geothermal resource. The lower Wind River drainage consists primarily of the Ohanapecosh Formation, an Oligocene unit that is recognized across the entire southern Washington Cascade Range. The formation is at least 300 m thick in the Wind River valley area. It consists largely of volcaniclastic sediments, with minor massive pyroclastic flows, volcanic breccias and lava flows. Low grade zeolite facies metamorphism during the Miocene led to formation of hydrothermal minerals in Ohanapecosh strata. Metamorphism probably occurred at less than 180{sup 0}C.

Berri, D.A.; Korosec, M.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Direct uses of hot water (geothermal) in dairying  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Digital computer simulation was used to investigate the peak, steady energy utilization of a geothermal energy-supported dairy. A digital computer program was also written to assess the lifetime economics of the dairy operation. A dynamic simulation program was written to design water storage tanks under diurnal transient loading. The geothermal site specified is the artesian spring named Hobo Wells near Susanville, California. The dairy configuration studies are unique, but consist of conventional processing equipment. In the dairy, cattle waste would be used to generate methane and carbon dioxide by anaerobic digestion. Some carbon dioxide would be removed from the gas stream with a pressurized water scrubber to raise the heating value. The product gas would be combusted in a spark ignition engine connected to an electric generator. The electrical power produced would be used for operation of fans, pumps, lights and other equipment in the dairy. An absorption chiller using a geothermal water driven generator would provide milk chilling. Space heating would be done with forced air hot water unit heaters.

Barmettler, E.R.; Rose, W.R. Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Water-Gas Samples At International Geothermal Area, Mexico (Norman...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

36

Flat Water Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flat Water Wind Farm Flat Water Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flat Water Wind Farm Facility Flat Water Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gestamp Wind North America Developer Flat Water Wind Farm Energy Purchaser Omaha Public Power District Location Richardson County NE Coordinates 40.001077°, -95.955119° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.001077,"lon":-95.955119,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

World Wind and Water Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Wind and Water Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name World Wind and Water Energy LLC Place Delaware Sector Wind energy Product Delaware-based company focused on...

39

Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sodium-Lithium Ratio In Water Applied To Geothermometry Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation,...

40

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of water reinjection at the Niland Geothermal Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems associated with reinjecting spent geothermal brines are currently under investigation. This effort has included field tests of injection water to evaluate treating equipment effectiveness at the Niland Geothermal Test Loop. Membrane filter tests were conducted on fluids from the settling tanks, from the test loop, from the clarifier and at the injection well head (Magmamax No. 3). From this and other information concerning the injection interval, pressure, temperature and well history, an attempt to predict a well half life was made. The results of these calculations were not in agreement with observed well performance. An attempt with some apparent success has been made to understand the possible source of these discrepancies. The cyclic nature of the injection history dictated by need for descaling the test loop, followed by apparent partial recovery of injection acceptance, has led to a theory that is under investigation concerning effect of reheating the injection fluid containing amorphous particulate silica by the reservoir rock and fluid during well shut-in. Preliminary tests indicate some of this finely divided silica may be redisolving with consequent reduction in reservoir damage, and that two widely spaced injection wells in an alternating mode may provide low-cost, long-life injection capacity at Niland and similar geothermal projects.

Jorda, R.M.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

GROUND WATER PROTECTION ISSUES WITH GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Closed loop vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps are grouted to facilitate heat transfer and prevent ground water contamination. The grout must exhibit suitable thermal conductivity as well as adequate hydraulic sealing characteristics. Permeability and infiltration tests were performed to assess the ability of cementitious grout to control vertical seepage in boreholes. It was determined that a superplasticized cement-sand grout is a more effective borehole sealant than neat cement over a range of likely operational temperatures. The feasibility of using non-destructive methods to verify bonding in heat exchangers is reviewed.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 1977 - 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogeologic investigation of Coso hot springs was conducted by field examination of geologic rock units and springs and other features of hydrologic significance and sampling of waters for chemical analysis; determination of the local Coso Hot Springs and regional groundwater hydrology, including consideration of recharge, discharge, movement, and water quality; determination of the possible impact of large-scale

44

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

45

Modeling studies of geothermal systems with a free water surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical simulator was developed for the modeling of air-steam-water systems. The simulator was applied to various problems involving injection into or production from a geothermal reservoir in hydraulic communication with a shallow free-surface aquifer. First, a one-dimensional column problem is considered and the water level movement during exploitation is studied using different capillary pressure functions. Second, a two-dimensional radial model is used to study and compare reservoir depletion for cases with and without a free-surface aquifer. Finally, the contamination of a shallow free-surface aquifer due to cold water injection is investigated. The primary aim of these studies is to obtain an understanding of the response of a reservoir in hydraulic communication with a unconfined aquifer during exploitation or injection and to determine under which circumstances conventional modeling techniques (fully saturated systems) can be applied to such systems.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRZVIOUS PIETHODS OF CALCLXATING STEAM/TtJATER RELATIVE PERPlEX3ILITIES IN GEOTHE?XAL XZSERVOIFG

Stanford University

47

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

49

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

50

Issue Paper Potential Water Availability Problems Associated with Geothermal Energy Operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is the first to study and discuss the effect of water supply problems of geothermal development. Geothermal energy resources have the potential of making a significant contribution to the U.S. energy supply situation, especially at the regional and local levels where the resources are located. A significant issue of concern is the availability and cost of water for use in a geothermal power operation primarily because geothermal power plants require large quantities of water for cooling, sludge handling and the operation of environmental control systems. On a per unit basis, geothermal power plants, because of their inherent high heat rejection rates, have cooling requirements several times greater than the conventional fossil fuel plants and therefore the supply of water is a critical factor in the planning, designing, and siting of geothermal power plants. However, no studies have been specifically performed to identify the water requirements of geothermal power plants, the underlying causes of water availability problems, and available techniques to alleviate some of these problems. There is no cost data included in the report. The report includes some descriptions of known geothermal areas. [DJE-2005

None

1982-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Field Monitoring of a Geothermal Heat Pump Water Heater: Unicoi County High School, Erwin, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geothermal heat pump water heater (HPWH) system -- installed to preheat water entering a 250-gallon gas-fired water heater (GWH) at a Tennessee high school -- reduced water-heating costs by 34 percent per year, compared to the base case GWH system. This report provides results from field monitoring of the geothermal HPWH system, tested in three distinct operating modes for five months. The program goal was to assess the energy and economic benefits of the GWH system with and without the geothermal HPWH...

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

geothermal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal geothermal Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

53

Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

55

High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250C (and eventually to 300?C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

58

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

59

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

60

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Van Soest, Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that _7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fire Water Lodge Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fire Water Lodge Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fire Water Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047°, -107.2528069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

62

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project - Newsletter #6 - September 2010, (NEWF), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

6 - September 2010 6 - September 2010 WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM PIX 16204 New England and Northeast Look to the Horizon...and Beyond, for Offshore Wind In early December, Boston hosted the American Wind Energy Association's second annual Offshore Wind Project Workshop. U.S. and European offshore wind stakeholders convened to discuss the emerging U.S. offshore wind industry and provided evidence of a significant increase in activity along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to Maine. The wind power industry and policymakers are looking to offshore for long-term growth, driven by aggressive policy goals, economic develop- ment opportunities, a finite set of attractive land-based wind sites, and immense wind energy potential at a modest distance from major population centers.

64

Direct utilization of geothermal energy for space and water heating at Marlin, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal heating project, which is one of nineteen direct-use geothermal projects funded principally by DOE, is documented. The five-year project encompassed a broad range of technical, institutional, and economic activities including: resource and environmental assessments; well drilling and completion; system design, construction, and monitoring; economic analyses; public awareness programs; materials testing; and environmental monitoring. Some of the project conclusions are that: (1) the 155/sup 0/F Central Texas geothermal resource can support additional geothermal development; (2) private-sector economic incentives currently exist, especially for profit-making organizations, to develop and use this geothermal resource; (3) potential uses for this geothermal resource include water and space heating, poultry dressing, natural cheese making, fruit and vegetable dehydrating, soft-drink bottling, synthetic-rubber manufacturing, and furniture manufacturing; (4) high maintenance costs arising from the geofluid's scaling and corrosion tendencies can be avoided through proper analysis and design; (5) a production system which uses a variable-frequency drive system to control production rate is an attractive means of conserving parasitic pumping power, controlling production rate to match heating demand, conserving the geothermal resource, and minimizing environmental impacts.

Conover, M.F.; Green, T.F.; Keeney, R.C.; Ellis, P.F. II; Davis, R.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Blood, F.B.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

Not Available

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Viscous Sublayer Below a Wind-Disturbed Water Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drift currents immediately below the water surface were systematically measured in a circulating wind-wave tank. The results confirmed the existence of a viscous sublayer at the airwater interface, with the current varying linearly with depth ...

Jin Wu

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Mechanism for the Increase of Wind Stress (Drag) Coefficient with Wind Speed over Water Surfaces: A Parametric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanism is proposed for a physical explanation of the increase in wind stress (drag) coefficient with wind speed over water surfaces. The formula explicitly incorporates the contribution of both winds and waves through the parameterizations ...

S. A. Hsu

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance, a...

71

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

72

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

73

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

74

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

76

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

77

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

78

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

79

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

80

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

82

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

83

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

84

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

85

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

86

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

87

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

88

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

89

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

90

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

91

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

92

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

93

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

94

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

95

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

96

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

97

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

98

Icing Wind Tunnel Tests on the CSIRO Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have been Performed on several versions of the CSIRO probe designed for the airborne measurement of liquid water content. Four different controller units and 17 different Probe sensors (including half-size and shielded ...

W. D. King; J. E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; J. W. Strapp; D. Huffman

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Interaction of cold-water aquifers with exploited reservoirs of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoirs tend to exhibit good hydraulic communication with adjacent cool groundwater aquifers. Under natural state conditions the hot fluids mix with the surrounding colder waters along the margins of the geothermal system, or discharge to shallow levels by flowing up fault L. In response to exploitation reservoir pressures decrease, leading to changes in the fluid flow pattern in the system and to groundwater influx. The various Cerro Prieto reservoirs have responded differently to production, showing localized near-well or generalized boiling, depending on their access to cool-water recharge. Significant cooling by dilution with groundwater has only been observed in wells located near the edges of the field. In general, entry of cool water at Cerro Prieto is beneficial because it tends to maintain reservoir pressures, restrict boiling, and lengthen the life and productivity of wells. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

NREL: Learning - Student Resources on Geothermal Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy The following resources can provide you with information on geothermal energy - heat from the earth. Geothermal direct use - Producing heat directly from hot water within the earth. Geothermal electricity production - Generating electricity from the earth's heat. Geothermal heat pumps - Using the shallow ground to heat and cool buildings. Printable Version Learning About Renewable Energy Home Renewable Energy Basics Using Renewable Energy Energy Delivery & Storage Basics Advanced Vehicles & Fuels Basics Student Resources Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Heat Pumps Hydrogen Solar Wind Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback.

103

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13-December 12, 1976  

SciTech Connect

During the first three months of this one-year study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating the town of Mammoth Lakes, California using geothermal energy, the following work was completed. Literature concerning both geothermal and conventional hydronic heating systems was reviewed and put on file. Estimates were prepared for the monthly electrical energy consumption and peak electrical demand for space and water heating in Mammoth Lakes Village in 1980. An analysis of the energy potential of the Casa Diablo geothermal reservoir was completed. Discussions were held with US Forest Service and Mammoth County Water District employees, to obtain their input to the feasibility study.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1976-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Three dimensional interpretations of single-well electromagnetic data for geothermal applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies of theTwenty-Ninth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringELECTROMAGNETIC DATA FOR GEOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS Hung-Wen

Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

107

Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

108

Forrest County Geothermal Energy Project Geothermal Project ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of replacing the existing air cooled chiller with geothermal water to water chillers for energy savings at the Forrest County Multi Purpose Center. The project will also replace...

109

Review of water resource potential for developing geothermal resource sites in the western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water resources at 28 known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in the western United States are reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed upon examination of the waer resources, both surface and ground, that exist in the vicinity of the KGRAs located in the southwestern states of California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. In most of these regions water has been in short supply for many years and consequently a discussion of competing demands is included to provide an appropriate perspective on overall usage. A discussion of the water resources in the vicinity of KGRAs in the States of Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are also included.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation (Text Version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

112

Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geysers-Calistoga KGRA geothermal environmental overview: water quality  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Important water-related issues of concern are identified and the available information regarding potential impacts on the quantity and quality of water in an area is assessed. The results of a study and a two-day workshop that included representatives of developers and of concerned local, state, and federal agencies are presented. An inventory of existing data is included in an appendix. (MHR)

Moore, S.F.; Pimentel, K.D.; Krone, R.B.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

South Dakota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota Dakota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Dakota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Dakota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Dakota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Dakota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Dakota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

117

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

118

Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

119

Tennessee/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Tennessee Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Tennessee No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Tennessee No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Tennessee No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Tennessee Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

120

South Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

122

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

Blackett, R.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

Jager, A.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Water  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

sources of energy. Photo of the McNary Dam hydroelectric power plant. Solar Geothermal Wind Water Photo of a yellow floating waver energy device with a U.S. flag. The U.S....

126

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

SciTech Connect

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Wind Power Answer In Times of Water Scarcity (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Strategic energy planning is paramount during times of dramatic population growth, global warming, increasing energy demands, and concerns over energy security, food security, and economic development. Recent concerns over water scarcity have moved the energy-water issue to the forefront of energy options discussions. This presentation describes the current water challenges in the United States and presents a case for wind energy as one way to mitigate the problem of water scarcity in several U.S. regions while providing a clean and sustainable economic future for America.

Flowers, L.; Reategui, S.

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the Valles Caldera - southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field, chemical, and isotopic data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico are presented. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, near San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal and derivative waters (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. The object of the data is to help interpret geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and to provide background data for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Goff, F.; McCormick, Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Preliminary study of the potential environmental concerns associated with surface waters and geothermal development of the Valles Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary evaluation is presented of possible and probable problems that may be associated with hydrothermal development of the Valles Caldera Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), with specific reference to surface waters. Because of the history of geothermal development and its associated environmental impacts, this preliminary evaluation indicates the Valles Caldera KGRA will be subject to these concerns. Although the exact nature and size of any problem that may occur is not predictable, the baseline data accumulated so far have delineated existing conditions in the streams of the Valles Caldera KGRA. Continued monitoring will be necessary with the development of geothermal resources. Further studies are also needed to establish guidelines for geothermal effluents and emissions.

Langhorst, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the resulting constraints on potentially developable electrical power in each geothermal resource area. Analyses were completed for 11 major geothermal areas in California: four in the Imperial Valley, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers-Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Glass Mountain, Wendel Amedee, and Lassen. One area in Hawaii, the Puna district, was also included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process were estimated based upon a specific existing or proposed type of geothermal power plant. The make-up water requirements for each type of conversion process at each resource location were then estimated as a basis for analyzing any constraints on the megawatts which potentially could be developed.

Sakaguchi, J.L.

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

Study of Water Reinjection on the Kamojang Geothermal Reservoir Performance, Indonesia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reservoir simulation model study was developed to investigate effects of water reinjection into the performance of Kamojang geothermal field. Several cases including the existing injection wells and rates, the effect of injection rates, location and depth of proposed injection wells were run to study the temperature, pressure and fluid distribution in the reservoir and its effect into the reservoir and production performance for 30 years of prediction. The results show that the reservoir pressure and temperature drops are very small (4 bar and 5 C, respectively) at the end of the prediction time; therefore, the production target of 140 MW for 30 years can still be accomplished.

Darwis, R.S.; Tampubolon, T.; Simatupang, R.; Asdassah, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Geothermal Direct Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct Use Direct Use Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF [edit] Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Direct Use Links Related documents and websites EERE's Direct Use Report National Institute of Building Science's Whole Building Design Guide Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Dictionary.png Geothermal Direct Use: Low- to moderate-temperature water from geothermal reservoirs can be used to provide heat directly to buildings, or other applications that require

134

Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid geothermal heat pump systems offer many of the benefits of full geothermal systems but at lower installed costs. A hybrid geothermal system combines elements of a conventional water loop heat pump system in order to reduce the geothermal loop heat exchanger costs, which are probably the largest cost element of a geothermal system. These hybrid systems have been used successfully where sufficient ground space to install large heat exchangers for full geothermal options was unavailable, or where the...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

A guide to geothermal energy and the environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy, defined as heat from the Earth, is a statute-recognized renewable resource. The first U.S. geothermal power plant, opened at The Geysers in California in 1960, continues to operate successfully. The United States, as the world's largest producer of geothermal electricity, generates an average of 15 billion kilowatt hours of power per year, comparable to burning close to 25 million barrels of oil or 6 million short tons of coal per year. Geothermal has a higher capacity factor (a measure of the amount of real time during which a facility is used) than many other power sources. Unlike wind and solar resources, which are more dependent upon weather fluctuations and climate changes, geothermal resources are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. While the carrier medium for geothermal electricity (water) must be properly managed, the source of geothermal energy, the Earth's heat, will be available indefinitely. A geothermal resource assessment shows that nine western states together have the potential to provide over 20 percent of national electricity needs. Although geothermal power plants, concentrated in the West, provide the third largest domestic source of renewable electricity after hydropower and biomass, they currently produce less than one percent of total U.S. electricity.

Kagel, Alyssa; Bates, Diana; Gawell, Karl

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

A guide to geothermal energy and the environment  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy, defined as heat from the Earth, is a statute-recognized renewable resource. The first U.S. geothermal power plant, opened at The Geysers in California in 1960, continues to operate successfully. The United States, as the world's largest producer of geothermal electricity, generates an average of 15 billion kilowatt hours of power per year, comparable to burning close to 25 million barrels of oil or 6 million short tons of coal per year. Geothermal has a higher capacity factor (a measure of the amount of real time during which a facility is used) than many other power sources. Unlike wind and solar resources, which are more dependent upon weather fluctuations and climate changes, geothermal resources are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. While the carrier medium for geothermal electricity (water) must be properly managed, the source of geothermal energy, the Earth's heat, will be available indefinitely. A geothermal resource assessment shows that nine western states together have the potential to provide over 20 percent of national electricity needs. Although geothermal power plants, concentrated in the West, provide the third largest domestic source of renewable electricity after hydropower and biomass, they currently produce less than one percent of total U.S. electricity.

Kagel, Alyssa; Bates, Diana; Gawell, Karl

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Improving Water Loop Heat Pump Performance by Using Low Temperature Geothermal Fluid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water-loop heat pump (WLHP) systems are an important option for space conditioning of commercial buildings. They provide the opportunity of saving energy through heat recovery and thermal balancing when heating and cooling occur simultaneously. WLHP systems typically operate with loop water temperature between 16 C and 32 C. When cooling loads dominate, loop water temperatures are maintained below 32 C by rejecting excess heat with a cooling tower. When heating dominates, loop water temperatures are maintained above 16 C by a heater input. The capacity and efficiency of water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in both operating modes are strong functions of the inlet water temperature. The emphasis of this paper is on the analysis of system performances, energy savings of the mixed cooling and heating mode of the WLHP systems for it is a unique operating mode in the air-conditioning and space heating systems. The energy saving effect by using low temperature geothermal as the heat input for WLHP systems was examined.

Xinguo, Li

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Feasibility Study for Photovoltaics, Wind, solar Hot Water and Hybrid Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) located in Albuquerque New Mexico is a community college that serves American Indians and Alaska Natives. SIPIs student body represents over 100 Native American Tribes. SIPI completed a renewable energy feasibility study program and established renewable energy hardware on the SIPI campus, which supplements and creates an educational resource to teach renewable energy courses. The SIPI campus is located, and has as student origins, areas, in which power is an issue in remote reservations. The following hardware was installed and integrated into the campus facilities: small wind turbine, large photovoltaic array that is grid-connected, two photovoltaic arrays, one thin film type, and one polycrystalline type, one dual-axis active tracker and one passive tracker, a hot air system for heating a small building, a portable hybrid photovoltaic system for remote power, and a hot water system to preheat water used in the SIPI Child Care facility. Educational curriculum has been developed for two renewable energy courses one being the study of energy production and use, and especially the roles renewable energy forms like solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, and biomass plays, and the second course being a more advanced in-depth study of renewable energy system design, maintenance, installation, and applications. Both courses rely heavily on experiential learning techniques so that installed renewable energy hardware is continuously utilized in hand-on laboratory activities and are part of the Electronics program of studies. Renewable energy technologies and science has also been included in other SIPI programs of study such as Environmental Science, Natural Resources, Agriculture, Engineering, Network Management, and Geospatial Technology.

Hooks, Ronald; Montoya, Valerie

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

wind | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wind wind Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Phases of a Geothermal Development...

143

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

North Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina/Geothermal Carolina/Geothermal < North Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF North Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in North Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in North Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in North Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for North Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

146

Iowa/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Geothermal Iowa/Geothermal < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Iowa Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Iowa No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Iowa No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Iowa No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Iowa Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

147

New York/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Geothermal New York/Geothermal < New York Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New York Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New York No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New York No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New York No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New York Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

148

West Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Geothermal West Virginia/Geothermal < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF West Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in West Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in West Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in West Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for West Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

149

New Jersey/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey/Geothermal Jersey/Geothermal < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Jersey Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Jersey No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Jersey No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Jersey No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Jersey Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

150

Blind Geothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blind Geothermal System Blind Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Blind Geothermal System Dictionary.png Blind Geothermal System: An area with a geothermal heat source, but no modern surface manifestations. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Many geothermal areas show no signs of geothermal activity at the surface if the heated water is too far below or no conduits to the surface are available. An area of geothermal activity with no surface features is referred to as a "blind geothermal system." Examples Want to add an example to this list? Select a Geothermal Resource Area to

151

Geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine for the generation of energy from geothermal sources including a reaction water turbine of the radial outflow type and a similar turbine for supersonic expansion of steam or gases. The rotor structure may incorporate an integral separator for removing the liquid and/or solids from the steam and gas before the mixture reaches the turbines.

Sohre, J.S.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design concepts for flash steam systems for use with medium temperature geothermal water  

SciTech Connect

Medium temperature water can be utilized for production of electrical energy when it is available in massive quantities. The design concepts herein are to provide a base for feasibility studies and evaluate processes with consideration of the economics of developing this electrical energy on a commercial scale. Two methods of producing electrical energy with geothermal water are being considered. The methods discussed in this document are by the flashing process of producing steam for driving turbine-generators. Flash steam systems were evaluated for use with 300/sup 0/F water. Single and multiflash systems were evaluated and component size sensitivity to operating pressures were studied. It was determined that a double flash system is the most practical system. Net power production of approximately 2.4 megawatts/million pounds per hour of brine is estimated for the double flash system which operates at an initial flash pressure of 30 psia and a second stage pressure of 13 psia. Flash pressures below atmospheric are not recommended due to oxygen leakage into the system. Sensitivity analysis has indicated that the power output is not highly sensitive to the first stage flash pressure. A significant loss in power output occurs if the second stage pressure is increased significantly.

Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Numerical studies of cold water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent reservoir pressure and steam flow rate declines at The Geysers geothermal field in California have attracted interest in studies of increased cold water injection into this system. In this paper, numerical studies of such injection into a fractured vapor-dominated reservoir are conducted using a two-dimensional radial, double-porosity model. The results obtained indicate that cold water injection into superheated (low-pressure) zones will greatly enhance the productivities of steam wells. Injection into two-phase zones with significant liquid reserves in the matrix blocks does not appear to aid in steam recovery until most of the original liquid reserves are depleted. Sensitivity studies are conducted over the range of fracture and matrix permeabilities applicable to the Geysers. The sensitivity of the grid size is also conducted, and shows very large grid effects. A fine vertical space discretization near the bottom of the reservoir is necessary to accurately predict the boiling of the injected water. 28 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Lai, C.H; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Geothermal data-base study: mine-water temperatures. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation of about 1,600 mines and prospects for perennial discharge resulted in the measurement of temperature, pH, specific conductance, and discharge at 80 sites to provide information for a geothermal data base. Measurements were made in the fall, winter, and late spring or early summer to provide information about seasonal variability. None of the temperatures measured exceeded the mean annual air temperature by 15/sup 0/F, but three areas were noted where discharges were anomalously warm, based upon high temperatures, slight temperature variation, and quantity of discharge. The most promising area, at the Gold Bug mine in the Little Rockies, discharges water averaging 7.3/sup 0/C (12.1/sup 0/F) above the mean annual air temperature. The discharge may represent water heated during circulation within the syenite intrusive body. If the syenite is enriched in uranium and thorium, an abnormal amount of heat would be produced by radioactive decay. Alternatively, the water may move through deep permeable sedimentary strata, such as the Madison Group, and be discharged to the surface through fractures in the pluton.

Lawson, D.C.; Sonderegger, J.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quality control of chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples must meet certain levels of accuracy and reliability to be useful for identifying geochemical processes in hydrothermal systems. Quality control is largely a concern for the analytical laboratory, but the geochemist or reservoir engineer using the chemical data must also be concerned with analytical quality. To test accuracy and reliability of analyses available from laboratories, splits of seven water samples were sent to four stable-isotope laboratories, and splits of five water samples were sent to four chemical laboratories. The analyses of each sample were compared among laboratories, and the differences in analyses were evaluated using criteria developed for this comparison. Isotopic compositions were considered reliable if they deviated from mean values by less than 2{per_thousand}, for hydrogen and by less than 0.15{per_thousand}, for oxygen. Concentrations of each chemical component were considered reliable if they differed from mean values by less than 10%. Chemical analyses were examined for internal consistency by calculating the error in ionic charge balance and the error between ionic charge and electrical conductivity. To be considered internally consistent, chemical analyses must have less than 5% error in charge balance and less than 10% error in conductivity balance. Three isotope laboratories gave consistent compositions of all samples. No chemical laboratory gave consistent analyses of all samples. Recommendations are made that provide the user of isotopic and chemical data with the ability to better evaluate the quality of analyses.

Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Water information bulletin No. 30, part 13: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance of the geothermal occurrences of the Wood River Drainage Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pre-tertiary sediments of the Milligen and Wood River Formations consisting primarily of argillite, quartzite, shale and dolomite are, for the most part, exposed throughout the area and are cut locally by outliers of the Idaho Batholith. At some locations, Tertiary-age Challis Volcanics overlay these formations. Structurally the area is complex with major folding and faulting visible in many exposures. Many of the stream drainages appear to be fault controlled. Hydrologic studies indicate hot spring occurrences are related to major structural trends, as rock permeabilities are generally low. Geochemical studies using stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the thermal water in the Wood River region to be depleted by about 10 0/00 in D and by 1 to 2 0/00 in /sup 18/0 relative to cold water. This suggests the water could be meteoric water that fell during the late Pleistocene. The geological data, as well as the chemical data, indicate the geothermal waters are heated at depth, and subsequently migrate along permeable structural zones. In almost all cases the chemical data suggest slightly different thermal histories and recharge areas for the water issuing from the hot springs. Sustained use of the thermal water at any of the identified springs is probably limited to flow rates approximating the existing spring discharge. 28 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Anderson, J.E.; Bideganeta, K.; Mitchell, J.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mono County geothermal activity  

SciTech Connect

Three geothermal projects have been proposed or are underway in Mono County, California. The Mammoth/Chance geothermal development project plans to construct a 10-MW geothermal binary power plant which will include 8 production and 3 injection wells. Pacific Lighting Energy Systems is also planning a 10-MW binary power plant consisting of 5 geothermal wells and up to 4 injection wells. A geothermal research project near Mammoth Lakes has spudded a well to provide a way to periodically measure temperature gradient, pressure, and chemistry of the thermal waters and to investigate the space-heating potential of the area in the vicinity of Mammoth Lakes. All three projects are briefly described.

Lyster, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Geothermal Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies (Redirected from Geothermal Conversion Technologies) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermal Technologies Geothermal energy can be utilized for electricity or heating in more than one way. Regardless of the energy conversion, geothermal energy requires heat(in the form of rock), water, and flow; and every resources will have different values for each. Some resources have very high temperature rock with high porosity (allowing for flow) but little to know water (see Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Some resources have plenty of water, great flow, but the temperatures are not very high which are commonly used for direct use. Any combination of those 3 things can be found in nature, and for that reason there are different classifications of geothermal

159

A Plan for a Sustainable Future Using Wind, Water, and Sun  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Plan for a Sustainable Future Using Wind, Water, and Sun Electrical Energy Storage for Renewable Integration and Grid Applications: Status, Challenges...

160

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Wind Energy Applications for Municipal Water Services: Opportunities, Situation Analyses, and Case Studies; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As communities grow, greater demands are placed on water supplies, wastewater services, and the electricity needed to power the growing water services infrastructure. Water is also a critical resource for thermoelectric power plants. Future population growth in the United States is therefore expected to heighten competition for water resources. Many parts of the United States with increasing water stresses also have significant wind energy resources. Wind power is the fastest-growing electric generation source in the United States and is decreasing in cost to be competitive with thermoelectric generation. Wind energy can offer communities in water-stressed areas the option of economically meeting increasing energy needs without increasing demands on valuable water resources. Wind energy can also provide targeted energy production to serve critical local water-system needs. The research presented in this report describes a systematic assessment of the potential for wind power to support water utility operation, with the objective to identify promising technical applications and water utility case study opportunities. The first section describes the current situation that municipal providers face with respect to energy and water. The second section describes the progress that wind technologies have made in recent years to become a cost-effective electricity source. The third section describes the analysis employed to assess potential for wind power in support of water service providers, as well as two case studies. The report concludes with results and recommendations.

Flowers, L.; Miner-Nordstrom, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Challenging Water Dominated Geothermal System: the CerroSixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Simulation, Uenotai Geothermal Field, Akita Prefecture,

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution of Geothermal Fluids, Long Valley, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Sciences and Office of Geothermal Technologies underconcentrations in Long Valley geothermal waters discriminateand wells from the geothermal field and a nearby exploratory

Brown, Shaun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

167

South Dakota geothermal resources  

SciTech Connect

South Dakota is normally not thought of as a geothermal state. However, geothermal direct use is probably one of the best kept secrets outside the state. At present there are two geothermal district heating systems in place and operating successfully, a resort community using the water in a large swimming pool, a hospital being supplied with part of its heat, numerous geothermal heat pumps, and many individual uses by ranchers, especially in the winter months for heating residences, barns and other outbuildings, and for stock watering.

Lund, J.W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Maps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

169

An accurate formulation of the solubility of Co{sub 2} in water, for geothermal applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility correlations for the H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} system applied so far for numerical simulation of geothermal reservoir and well flows are crude. This is due, at least partly, to the significant disagreement existing between the solubility models and results published in the specialized literature. In this work we analyze the reasons underlying this disagreement. On this basis, we propose a thermodynamically correct, and numerically accurate model for the solubility of carbon dioxide in water. Its range of validity is up to 350 C and 500 bar. Our main contributions are: (a) the adoption of an equation of state for the gas phase that realistically accounts for the non-ideal behavior of both components and that of the mixture, within the P-T range considered; and (b) to accurately include the effects of temperature and pressure on the solubility of carbon dioxide in the liquid phase. The proposed model fits the available phase equilibrium data for the H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} system nicely. In particular, it does not present the severe conflict between the linearity of the model and the lack of linearity of the data, evident in earlier models. The tight fit obtained with our model indicates that the complexities of H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} phase equilibrium are well represented by it.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 WIND & WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES WIND POWER PROGRAM FY14 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Wind and Water Power Technologies accelerates U.S. deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic wind power through research, development and demonstration. These advanced technology investments directly contribute to the President's goals for the United States to double renewable electricity generation again by 2020 and to achieve 80 percent of its electricity from clean, carbon-free energy sources by 2035 through reducing costs and increasing performance of wind energy systems. Wind power currently provides 3.5 percent of the nation's electricity, and more wind-powered electricity generation capacity was installed in the United States in 2012 than

171

Multielement geochemistry of solid materials in geothermal systems and its applications. Part 1. Hot-water system at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemical studies of the geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, have led to development of chemical criteria for recognition of major features of the system and to a three-dimensional model for chemical zoning in the system. Based on this improved level of understanding several new or modified geochemical exploration and assessment techniques have been defined and are probably broadly applicable to evaluation of hot-water geothermal systems. The main purpose of this work was the development or adaptation of solids geochemical exploration techniques for use in the geothermal environment. (MHR)

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

8/10/2010 1 DOE Offshore Wind RFI Response: DEOA-EE0000385, DOE Offshore Wind Program, Input Requested for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

onshore wind and other renewable energy sources including solar, geothermal, biomass, and small hydro-Losique, Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Dear Mr. Beaudry-Losique, Staff of the California Energy Commission provide

Islam, M. Saif

173

Feasibility of geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, September 1976--September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study to determine the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are reported. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and will use existing technology in its design and operation. District heating can provide space and water heating energy for typical customers at lower cost than alternative sources of energy. If the district heating system is investor owned, lower costs are realized after five to six years of operation, and if owned by a nonprofit organization, after zero to three years. District heating offers lower costs than alternatives much sooner in time if co-generation and/or DOE participation in system construction are included in the analysis. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

WIND DATA REPORT Scituate Waste Water Treatment Plant, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributions Figure 3 ­ Wind Speed Distribution, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Figure 5 ­ Diurnal Wind Speeds, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Research ­ Turbulence Intensity vs. Wind Speed, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

175

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Introduction Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding educa- tion to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institu- tions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more gradu- ate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initia-

178

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal(Redirected from Leasing) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties,

179

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties, Nevada (May 2008)

180

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Geothermal Resources Council's 36  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Resources Council's 36 Geothermal Resources Council's 36 th Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada, USA September 30 - October 3, 2012 Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications Xuele Qi, Norman Turnquist, Farshad Ghasripoor GE Global Research, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY, 12309 Tel: 518-387-4748, Email: qixuele@ge.com Abstract Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) present higher efficiency, larger production rate, and can be operated in deeper wells than the other geothermal artificial lifting systems. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300°C geothermal water at 80kg/s flow rate in a maximum 10-5/8" diameter wellbore to improve the cost-effectiveness. In this paper, an advanced ESP design tool comprising a 1D theoretical model and a 3D CFD analysis

182

Geothermal Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:24am Addthis Photo of steam rising high in the air from a geyser. Geothermal energy leverages heated air and water from beneath the earth's surface. This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector. Overview Geothermal energy is produced from heat and hot water found within the earth. Federal agencies can harness geothermal energy for heating and cooling air and water, as well as for electricity production. Geothermal resources can be drawn through several resources. The resource can be at or near the surface or miles deep. Geothermal systems move heat

183

Mulitdimensional reactive transport modeling of CO2 minreal sequestration in basalts at the Helllisheidi geothermal field, Iceland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. , 2004. ICEBOX. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering SoftwareUnited Nations Uni- versity Geothermal Training Programme,H. , 1982. The chemistry of geothermal waters in Iceland. I.

Aradottir, E.S.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Assessment of subsurface salt water disposal experience on the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast for applications to disposal of salt water from geopressured geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

A representative cross section of the literature on the disposal of geothermal brine was perused and some of the general information and concepts is summarized. The following sections are included: disposal statistics--Texas Railroad Commission; disposal statistics--Louisiana Office of Conservation; policies for administering salt water disposal operations; salt water disposal experience of Gulf Coast operators; and Federal Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program's brine disposal operations. The literature cited is listed in the appended list of references. Additional literature is listed in the bibliography. (MHR)

Knutson, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Assessment of subsurface salt water disposal experience on the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast for applications to disposal of salt water from geopressured geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A representative cross section of the literature on the disposal of geothermal brine was perused and some of the general information and concepts is summarized. The following sections are included: disposal statistics--Texas Railroad Commission; disposal statistics--Louisiana Office of Conservation; policies for administering salt water disposal operations; salt water disposal experience of Gulf Coast operators; and Federal Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program's brine disposal operations. The literature cited is listed in the appended list of references. Additional literature is listed in the bibliography. (MHR)

Knutson, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Wind and Temperature Structure over a Land-Water-Land Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind and temperature data obtained on 5 June 1984 during the resund experiment are analyzed. The day was characterized by moderately strong winds blowing from a heated land area over a colder water surface and then over a second heated land ...

J. C. Doran; Sven-Erik Gryning

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Wind-Produced Water Exchange between the Deep Basins of the Baltic Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewal of oxygen-rich water in the deep basins of the Baltic Sea depends mainly on the proper wind conditions. Strong westerly winds over the western Baltic yield an inclination in sea level from the Skagerrak to the Baltic Proper and strong ...

W. Krauss; B. Brgge

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Geothermal space/water heating for City of Mammoth Lakes, California. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are presented. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and uses existing technology in its design and operation. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This interim report presents the results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. Recommendations

190

Wind Energy Ordinances (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

With increasing energy demands in the With increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experi- ence with wind energy are now becom- ing involved. Communities with good wind resources are increasingly likely to be approached by entities with plans to develop wind projects. These opportunities can create new revenue in the form of construction jobs and land lease payments. They also create a new responsibility on the part of local governments to regulate wind turbine installations through ordinances. Ordinances, often found within munici- pal codes, provide various degrees of control to local governments. These laws cover issues such as zoning, traffic, con- sumer protection, and building codes.

191

Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description In this proposal West Virginia University (WVU) outline a project which will perform an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. Full realization of the potential of what might be considered "low-grade" geothermal resources will require the examination many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source the project will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects.

192

Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Geothermal Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies Solar Wind

193

Geothermal: About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - About Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

194

Geothermal: Publications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Publications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

195

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

196

geothermal2.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N N M T R A P E D O F E N E R G Y E T A T S D E T I N U S O F A M E R I CA E GEOTHERMAL TESTING S ince 2006, several geothermal power production companies and the Department of Energy have expressed interest in demonstrating low- temperature geothermal power projects at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). Located at Teapot Dome Oilfield in Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), RMOTC recently expanded its testing and demonstration of power production from low- temperature, co- produced oilfield geothermal waste water. With over 1,000 existing well- bores and its 10,000-acre oil field, RMOTC offers partners the unique opportunity to test their geot- hermal tech- nologies while using existing oilfield infra- structure. RMOTC's current low-temperature geothermal project uses 198°F water separated from Tensleep

197

Geothermal Heat Pumps Deliver Big Savings for Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and the authoring national laboratory. Geothermal heat pump surface water loops. Geothermal Heat Pumps Deliver Big Savings for Federal...

198

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in...

199

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal power) Geothermal power) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

200

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Geothermal Power) (Redirected from Geothermal Power) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermal Energy RSF GeothermalPowerStation.jpg Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth [Geo (Earth) + thermal (heat)].The temperature of the Earth varies widely, and a wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from several sources, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and steam located both near the Earth's surface as well as several miles deep into the Earth, even reaching the Earth's magma.[2][3] Geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal) Geothermal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

202

A Modified Tracer Selection and Tracking Procedure to Derive Winds Using Water Vapor Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remotely sensed upper-tropospheric water vapor wind information has been of increasing interest for operational meteorology. A new tracer selection based on a local image anomaly and tracking procedure, itself based on NashSutcliffe model ...

S. K. Deb; C. M. Kishtawal; P. K. Pal; P. C. Joshi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Stochastic Parametric Mechanism for Growth of Wind-Driven Surface Water Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical understanding of the growth of wind-driven surface water waves has been based on two distinct mechanisms: growth due to random atmospheric pressure fluctuations unrelated to wave amplitude and growth due to wave coherent atmospheric ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Impact of Kalpana-1-Derived Water Vapor Winds on Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclone Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor winds from the operational geostationary Indian National Satellite (INSAT) Kalpana-1 have recently become operational at the Space Applications Centre (SAC). A series of experimental forecasts are attempted here to evaluate the ...

S. K. Deb; C. M. Kishtawal; P. K. Pal

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Basics: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

206

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysersanalysis of the geothermal steam production and cold waterAs a result of high rate of steam withdrawal, the reservoir

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Environment Geothermal/Environment < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

208

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be close to the produced reservoir water without surfaceinjection. Mixing the produced geothermal water with large

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Engineering and economic evaluation of direct hot-water geothermal energy applications on the University of New Mexico campus. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential engineering and economic feasibility of low-temperature geothermal energy applications on the campus of the University of New Mexico is studied in detail. This report includes three phases of work: data acquisition and evaluation, system synthesis, and system refinement and implementation. Detailed process designs are presented for a system using 190/sup 0/F geothermal water to substitute for the use of 135 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/y (141 TJ/y) of fossil fuels to provide space and domestic hot water heating for approximately 23% of the campus. Specific areas covered in the report include economic evaluation, environmental impact and program implementation plans.

Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Co-Produced Geothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Produced Geothermal Systems Produced Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Co-Produced Geothermal System: Co-Produced water is the water that is produced as a by-product during oil and gas production. If there is enough water produced at a high enough temperature co-produced water can be utilized for electricity production. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle General Air Cooled Co-Produced geothermal system demonstration at RMOTC oil site.

211

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

Wright, T.C.

1977-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Geothermal Electricity Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Heat from the earthgeothermal energyheats water that has seeped into underground reservoirs. These reservoirs can be tapped for a variety of uses, depending on the temperature of the water. The energy from high-temperature reservoirs (225-600F) can be used to produce electricity. In the United States, geothermal energy has been used to generate electricity on a large scale since 1960. Through research and development, geothermal power is becoming more cost-effective and competitive with fossil fuels.

215

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Direct Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Use Direct Use Photo of alligators on a farm. Geothermally heated waters allow alligators to thrive on a farm in Colorado, where temperatures can drop below freezing. Geothermal reservoirs of hot water, which are found a few miles or more beneath the Earth's surface, can be used to provide heat directly. This is called the direct use of geothermal energy. Geothermal direct use has a long history, going back to when people began using hot springs for bathing, cooking food, and loosening feathers and skin from game. Today, hot springs are still used as spas. But there are now more sophisticated ways of using this geothermal resource. In modern direct-use systems, a well is drilled into a geothermal reservoir to provide a steady stream of hot water. The water is brought up through

217

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

218

The Wind-Driven Shelf and Slope Water Flow in Terms of a Local and a Remote Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clarke and Van Gorder suggest that many coastally trapped wave modes are needed to describe the wind-driven shelf and slope water alongshore velocity field. Calculations with an harmonic wind forcing confirm this and show that, for example, the ...

Manuel Lopez; Allan J. Clarke

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Geothermal Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:24am Addthis Photo of steam rising high in the air from a geyser. Geothermal energy leverages heated air and water from beneath the earth's surface. This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector. Overview Geothermal energy is produced from heat and hot water found within the earth. Federal agencies can harness geothermal energy for heating and cooling air and water, as well as for electricity production. Geothermal resources can be drawn through several resources. The resource can be at or near the surface or miles deep. Geothermal systems move heat

220

Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems ...  

Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels; Wind ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relict Geothermal Features Relict Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Relict Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Relict Geothermal Features: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Relict geothermal surface feature, include the mineral formations left behind by hot springs, fumaroles, and geysers as well as the alteration of minerals by geothermal waters (e.g. opalization of sediments). Such alteration and deposits are indicators of past hydrothermal activity. Though surface activity has ceased in many areas, relict geothermal features may indicate the presence of a still active geothermal system below the surface. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Relict_Geothermal_Features&oldid=600720"

224

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part II. Water temperature and chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal reconnaissance techniques have identified five areas in Utah County warranting further investigation for low-temperature geothermal resources. One area in northern Utah Valley is along Utah Lake fault zone and includes Saratoga Hot Springs. Water temperatures within this area range from 21 to 43/sup 0/C. Common ion analyses as well as B and Li concentrations indicate waters sampled in this area are anomalous when compared to other samples from the same aquifer. Two other areas in southern Utah Valley also coincide with the Utah Lake fault zone. Common ion analyses, trace element concentrations, and C1/HCO/sub 3/ ratios distinguish these areas from all other waters in this valley. Temperatures within these southern areas range from 21 to 32/sup 0/C. All three thermal areas are possibly the result of deep circulation of meteoric water being warmed and subsequently migrating upward within the Utah Lake fault zone. The Castilla Hot Springs area has been expanded by this study to include a spring located 3 mi further up Spanish Fork Canyon near the Thistle earthflow. A temperature of 50/sup 0/C was recorded for this spring and chemistry is similar to Castilla. In Goshen Valley, the fifth geothermal area identified, measured temperatures range from 20 to 27/sup 0/C for some wells and springs. Chemical analyses, however, do not discern the location of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Klauk, R.H.; Davis, D.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at the Aidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling of mineral-water-gas Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakthrough observed in geothermal systems (e.g. , Shook,recharge project, Geysers geothermal field, California, USA,media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Impact of the Sierra Nevada on Low-Level Winds and Water Vapor Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the influence of the Sierra Nevada on the water cycle in California the authors have analyzed low-level winds and water vapor fluxes upstream of the mountain range in regional climate model simulations. In a low Froude number (Fr) ...

Jinwon Kim; Hyun-Suk Kang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Isotopic Geochemistry and Hydrology of Geothermal Waters in the Ethiopian Rift Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evidence subsurface water-rock source for a reaction in thissuch source water undergoes isotopic exchange with rocks totype source waters are modified by interaction with rocks to

Isotope Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Definition: Geothermal Direct Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Direct Use Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geothermal Direct Use Low- to moderate-temperature water from geothermal reservoirs can be used to provide heat directly to buildings, or other applications that require heat. Generally, the water in the geothermal reservoirs withdrawn for direct use is between 68° F to 302° F. In addition to residential, commercial and industrial buildings, homes, pools and spas, greenhouses, fish farms, and even mining operations utilize direct use of geothermal resources for heat[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal heating is the direct use of geothermal energy for heating applications. Humans have taken advantage of geothermal heat this way since the Paleolithic era. Approximately seventy countries made direct

229

An area-dependent wind function for estimating open water evaporation using land-based meteorological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generally applicable formula for estimating evaporation rate from open water bodies which utilizes readily available land-based meteorological data. We follow the well-known aerodynamic approach in which evaporation rate is modelled as the ... Keywords: Evaporation, Lake, Open water, Pond, Uncertainty, Water body, Wind function, Wind speed

D. L. McJannet; I. T. Webster; F. J. Cook

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal- bearing aquifers. Geothermal Aquifer Resources Montana's many geothermal features attest to the volcanic activity that shaped much of the landscape. Geothermal springs form when ground water is heated range from 50 to 190 degrees F. Oil well drillers have encoun- tered geothermal water edging up to 240

Smerdon, Jason E.

231

Permeability enhancement due to cold water injection: A Case Study at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure transient buildup and falloff data from 3 wells at the Los Azufres geothermal field have been evaluated to determine the extent to which cold water infection increases the permeability of the near-bore reservoir formation. Simultaneous analysis of the buildup and falloff data provides estimates of the permeability-thickness of the reservoir, the skin factor of the well, and the degree of permeability enhancement in the region behind the thermal front. Estimates of permeability enhancement range from a factor of 4 to 9, for a temperature change of about 150{degree}C. The permeability enhancement is attributed to thermally induced contraction and stress-cracking of the formation. 9 refs., 18 figs.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.; Ortiz, J.; Iglesias, E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a heat mining operation rather than tapping an instantly renewable energy source, such as, solar, wind production rate of the water (Sanyal and Butler, 2009). A type of geothermal energy resource of very energy is considered a renewable resource. Therefore, we examine next this apparent contradiction. Figure

Stanford University

233

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geothermal Energy Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earths crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

J. L. Renner

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

236

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a design proposal for a wind energy electrolytic hydrogenfor the best use of wind energy in an unconstrained grid.case of geothermal and biomass. Wind energy however does not

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE provides detailed onshore wind resource map - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands do not have 80-meter wind maps available but have 50-meter ...

239

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

geothermal | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal geothermal Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The guidebook contains an overview, a description of the geothermal resource, statutes and regulations, and legislative policy concerns. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Geothermal development plan: Yuma county  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

White, D.E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparison of Geophysical Model Functions for SAR Wind Speed Retrieval in Japanese Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This work discusses the accuracies of geophysical model functions (GMFs) for retrieval of sea surface wind speed from satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in Japanese coastal waters characterized by short fetches and variable atmospheric stability conditions. In situ observations from two validation sites, Hiratsuka and Shirahama, are used for comparison of the retrieved sea surface wind speeds using CMOD (C-band model)4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5.N. Of all the geophysical model functions (GMFs), the latest C-band GMF, CMOD5.N, has the smallest bias and root mean square error at both sites. All of the GMFs exhibit a negative bias in the retrieved wind speed. In order to understand the reason for this bias, all SAR-retrieved wind speeds are separated into two categories: onshore wind (blowing from sea to land) and offshore wind (blowing from land to sea). Only offshore winds were found to exhibit the large negative bias, and short fetches from the coastline may be a possible reason for this. Moreover, it is clarified that in both the unstable and stable conditions, CMOD5.N has atmospheric stability effectiveness, and can keep the same accuracy with CMOD5 in the neutral condition. In short, at the moment, CMOD5.N is thought to be the most promising GMF

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Katsutoshi Kozai; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Merete Badger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Preliminary performance estimates and value analyses for binary geothermal power plants using ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids in binary geothermal power generation systems is investigated. The available thermodynamic data is discussed and the methods of extrapolating this data to give the quantities needed to perform analyses of the system is given. Results indicated that for a system without a recuperator and with a working fluid which is 50 percent by mass of each constituent, the geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) is 84 percent of that for the 50MW Heber Plant. The cost of generating electric power for this system was estimated to be 9 percent greater than for the Heber Plant. However, if a recuperator is incorporated in the system (using the turbine exhaust to preheat and partially boil the working fluid) the geofluid effectiveness becomes 102 percent of that for the Heber Plant, and the cost of electricity is 5-1/4 percent lower (relative to the Heber Plant) because of less expensive equipment resulting from lower pressure, better heat transfer, and less working fluid to handle for the ammonia-water plant. These results do not necessarily represent the optimum system. Because of uncertainty in thermodynamic properties, it was felt that detailed optimization was not practical at this point. It was concluded that use of nonazeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons as working fluids should be studied before expending further effort in the investigation of the ammonia-water mixtures.

Bliem, C.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

248

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

249

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels Geothermal Technologies...

250

Geothermal Energy Program overview  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

RMOTC - Testing - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Testing Geothermal Testing Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. With the existing geologic structure at RMOTC, promising potential exists for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) testing. The field also has two reliable water resources for supporting low-temperature geothermal testing.

252

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

253

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

254

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Environment < Geothermal(Redirected from Environment) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

255

Geothermal Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Print PDF Print PDF Geothermal Technologies Geothermal energy can be utilized for electricity or heating in more than one way. Regardless of the energy conversion, geothermal energy requires heat(in the form of rock), water, and flow; and every resources will have different values for each. Some resources have very high temperature rock with high porosity (allowing for flow) but little to know water (see Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Some resources have plenty of water, great flow, but the temperatures are not very high which are commonly used for direct use. Any combination of those 3 things can be found in nature, and for that reason there are different classifications of geothermal energy. It is possible for a resource to be technically capable of both electricity production and heating purposes, but the basic classifications

256

A Note on Water-Vapor Wind Tracking Using VAS Data on McIDAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eleven data sets where water-vapor winds were obtained from the GOES-5 6.7-micrometer measurement over the United States are compared with rawinsondes. Over 2OOO point comparisons are made for: a) an arbitrary height assignment of 400 mb; and b) ...

Tod R. Stewart; William L. Smith; Christopher M. Hayden

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and steam located several miles deep into the Earth.[2][3]

258

The geopressured geothermal resources of Texas: regulatory controls over water pollution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are presented: an overview of the control framework, Federal pollution control of surface waters, state water pollution control in Texas, new Federal standards for underground injection control, and a summary assessment. (MHR)

Rogers, K.E.; Oberbeck, A.W.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geothermal turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal turbine intallation in which high-pressure steam is separated from geothermal steam, which is a mixture of steam and water, with the high pressure steam connected to a high pressure turbine. Low pressure steam produced by flashing the hot water component of the geothermal steam is introduced to a low pressure turbine which is constructed and operates independently of the high pressure turbine. The discharge steam from the high pressure turbine is introduced to a steam condenser operating at a low vacuum while discharge steam from the low pressure turbine is introduced into a steam condenser operating at a high vacuum. The cooling water system of the high and low pressure condensers are connected in series with one another. A maximum power increase is obtained if the flow rates of the high and low pressure steams at the extraction ports of the high and low pressure turbines are made substantially equal to one another.

Nishioka, R.

1983-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

Estimation of Offshore Wind Resources in Coastal Waters off Shirahama Using ENVISAT ASAR Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Offshore wind resource maps for the coastal waters off Shirahama, Japan were made based on 104 images of the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the ENVISAT satellite. Wind speed fields were derived from the SAR images with the geophysical model function CMOD5.N. Mean wind speed and energy density were estimated using the Weibull distribution function. These accuracies were examined in comparison with in situ measurements from the Shirahama offshore platform and the Southwest Wakayama buoy (SW-buoy). Firstly, it was found that the SAR-derived 10 m-height wind speed had a bias of 0.52 m/s and a RMSE of 2.33 m/s at Shirahama. Secondly, it was found that the mean wind speeds estimated from SAR images and the Weibull distribution function were overestimated at both sites. The ratio between SAR-derived and in situ measured mean wind speeds at Shirahama is 1.07, and this value was used for a long-termRemote Sens. 2013, 5 2884

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Tomohiro Yamashita; Katsutoshi Kozai; Yasunori Muto; Yasuyuki Baba; Koji Kawaguchi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, 13 December 1976-12 March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the second three months of this feasibility study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating Mammoth Lakes Village, California using geothermal energy, the following work was accomplished. A saturation survey of the number and types of space and water heaters currently in use in the Village was completed. Electric energy and ambient temperature metering equipment was installed. Peak heating demand for Mammoth Lakes was estimated for the years 1985, 1990 and 2000. Buildings were selected which are considered typical of Mammoth Lakes in terms of their heating systems to be used in estimating the cost of installing hydronic heating systems in Mammoth. Block diagrams and an order of magnitude cost comparison were prepared for high-temperature and low-temperature geothermal district heating systems. Models depicting a geothermal district heating system and a geothermal-electric power plant were designed, built and delivered to ERDA in Washington. Local input to the feasibility study was obtained from representatives of the State of California Departments of Transportation and Fish and Game, US Forest Service, and Mono County Planning Department.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

263

Direct use of low temperature geothermal water by Aquafarms International, Inc. for freshwater aquaculture (prawns and associated species). An operations and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In connection with an ongoing commercial aquaculture project in the Coachella Valley, California; a twelve month prawn growout demonstration project was conducted. This project began in August, 1979 and involved the use of low temperature (85/sup 0/F) geothermal waters to raise freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (deMan), in earthen ponds. The following publication is an operations and maintenance guide which may by useful for those interested in conducting similar enterprises.

Broughton, R.; Price, M.; Price, V.; Grajcer, D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Correlation of the Na/K ratio in geothermal well waters with the thermodynamic properties of low albite and potash feldspar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Na/K ratio in geothermal well waters provides a better estimate of the relative stability of low albite and potash feldspar than do predictions from calorimetry and high temperature phase equilibria. The calculated saturation indices from field data for low albite, potash feldspar suggest that [Delta]G[sub f,298][sup o] for the latter should be revised to [minus]3748.6[plus minus]3.7 kJ.mol[sup [minus]1].

Apps, J.A.; Chang, G.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

266

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

267

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

268

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

269

Kamchatka geothermal resources development: Problems and perspectives  

SciTech Connect

There are four long-term exploited geothermal fields in Kamchatka: one steam-water field Pauzhetka (south of Kamchatka peninsula) and three hot water fields: Paratunka (near by town of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) and Esso and Anavgay (center of peninsula). Pauzhetka and Paratunka fields are exploited during almost 28 years. Esso and Anavgay fields are exploited during 25 years. In Pauzhetka 11 MWe geothermal power plant work and on the other fields thermal energy of hot water is directly used. Kamchatka region satisfies energetic demands mainly by organic imported fuels. At the same time electricity produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 2 per cent of total region electricity production, and thermal energy produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 3 per cent of total region thermal energy production. The main reasons of small geothermal portion in the energy production balance of Kamchatka are briefly discussed. The geothermal development reserves and perspectives of geothermal energy use increase in Kamchatka are outlined.

Pashkevich, Roman I.

1966-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Climatology of air quality of Long Valley Geothermal Resource Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Long Valley Known Geothermal Resource Area is one of the more promising regions for development of a large-scale geothermal energy center. This report discusses the climatology and air quality of the area. Details are given on the temperatures, temperature inversions, and winds. Estimates are presented for the present air quality and future air quality during and following development of the resource area. Also discussed are project impact from added pollutants, noise, and precipitation augmentation. The major deleterious effects from development of the Long Valley Geothermal Resource Area appear to be due to increased dust loading during and following construction, and noise from production testing and potential well blowouts. Increased pollution from release of hydrogen sulfide and other pollutants associated with hot water geothermal wells seems to present no problems with regard to surrounding vegetation, potential contamination of Lake Crowley, and odor problems in nearby communities. Precipitation augmentation will probably increase the water level of Lake Crowley, at the expense of possible additional fogging and icing of nearby highways.

Peterson, K.R.; Palmer, T.Y.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

White, D.E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geothermal Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward http://energy.gov/eere/articles/geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward" class="title-link"> Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward

273

Geothermal News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System http://energy.gov/articles/nevada-deploys-first-us-commercial-grid-connected-enhanced-geothermal-system geothermal-system" class="title-link">Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System

274

Geothermal Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to assist the physicist, chemist, engineer, and geologist engaged in discovering and developing geothermal energy resources. This first section contains a glossary of the approximately 500 most frequently occurring geological, physical, and engineering terms, chosen from the geothermal literature. Sections 2 through 8 are fact sheets that discuss such subjects as geothermal gradients, rock classification, and geological time scales. Section 9 contains conversion tables for the physical quantities of interest for energy research in general and for geothermal research in particular.

Leffel, C.S., Jr.; Eisenberg, R.A.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Property:Geothermal/Awardees | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Awardees Awardees Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Awardees Property Type String Description Awardees (Company / Institution) Pages using the property "Geothermal/Awardees" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + Magma Energy + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Montana Tech of The University of Montana + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology +

276

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross activity and the concentration of radium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60/sup 0/C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background radioactivity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from fractured siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters, and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

Leonard, R.B.; Janzer, W.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Health impacts of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus is on electric power production using geothermal resources greater than 150/sup 0/C because this form of geothermal energy utilization has the most serious health-related consequences. Based on measurements and experience at existing geothermal power plants, atmospheric emissions of noncondensing gases such as hydrogen sulfide and benzene pose the greatest hazards to public health. Surface and ground waters contaminated by discharges of spent geothermal fluids constitute another health hazard. It is shown that hydrogen sulfide emissions from most geothermal power plants are apt to cause odor annoyances among members of the exposed public - some of whom can detect this gas at concentrations as low as 0.002 parts per million by volume. A risk assessment model is used to estimate the lifetime risk of incurring leukemia from atmospheric benzene caused by 2000 MW(e) of geothermal development in California's Imperial Valley. The risk of skin cancer due to the ingestion of river water in New Zealand that is contaminated by waste geothermal fluids containing arsenic is also assessed. Finally, data on the occurrence of occupational disease in the geothermal industry are summarized briefly.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geothermal development plan: Pinal County  

SciTech Connect

The Pinal County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified three suspected geothermal resource areas with potential 70/sup 0/C (158/sup 0/F) temperatures. In addition, one geothermal test well near Coolidge encountered bottom hole temperatures of 120/sup 0/C (248/sup 0/F) at a depth of 2440 m (8005 ft) and produced 18.3 l/sec (290 gpm). Geothermal resources are found to occur near population centers where average growth rates of 1.5% to 2% per year are expected over the next 40 years. Mining, agriculture and manufacturing are all important sectors of the regional economy and provide opportunities for direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis includes energy use projections and regional energy price information. Agriculture accounts for 95% of the annual water consumption and predicted decreases in water availability will result in less future agricultural activity. The analysis contains a detailed section matching geothermal resources to potential industrial users. Fourteen firms in 10 industrial classes were identified as having some potential for geothermal energy use. In addition, 25 agricultural firms were identified as having some potential for geothermal use, including the prepared feeds industry.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas Valley and Pyramid Mountains, Hidalgo County, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This circular covers the geology of the Pyramid Peak, Swallow Fork Peak, Table Top Mountain, and South Pyramid Peak 7-1/2-min quadrangles, which include the Lightning Dock KGRA. Hot wells (70 to 115.5/sup 0/C) seem to be structurally controlled by intersections of the ring-fracture zone of an Oligocene ash-flow tuff cauldron (Muir cauldron), a Miocene-to-Holocene north-trending basin-and-range fault (Animas Valley fault), and a northeast-trending lineament that appears to control anomalously heated underground waters and Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt cones in the San Bernardino, San Simon, and Animas Valleys. The Muir cauldron, approximately 20 km in diameter, collapsed in two stages, each associated with the eruption of a rhyolite ash-flow-tuff sheet and of ring-fracture domes. Most of the hydrothermal alteration of the Lightning Dock KGRA is related to the first stage of eruption and collapse, not to the modern geothermal system. Contrary to previous reports, no silicic volcanic rocks younger than basin-and-range faulting are known; unconformities beneath rhyolite ring-fracture domes are caused by Oligocene caldera collapse, not by basin-and-range faulting. The Animas Valley is the site of widespread post-20 My travertine deposits and near-surface veins of calcite, fluorite, and/or psilomelane, controlled by north- or northwest-trending basin-and-range faults. The fluoride-bearing waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA may be a late stage of this hydrothermal activity. Distribution of Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt suggests that deep-seated basalt near the solids may be the ultimate heat source.

Elston, W.E.; Deal, E.G.; Logsdon, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs. #12;15 Pre-feasibility investigation of water and energy options utilising geothermal energy program to investigate and encourage the use of geothermal and waste heat resources for heat-driven pre with an economic, technical and market analysis of various scales of technology application where geothermal energy

Scheel, David

282

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 3. An evaluation of thermal water in the Weiser area, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Weiser area encompasses about 200 square miles in southwest Idaho and contains two thermal water areas: (1) the Crane Creek subarea, which is 12 miles east of Weiser, Idaho, and (2) the Weiser Hot Springs subarea, which is 5 miles northwest of Weiser. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Miocene to Pleistocene age have been faulted and folded to form the northwest-trending anticlines present in much of the area. Basalt of the Columbia River Group or underlying rocks are believed to constitute the reservoir for the hot water. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are present in both subareas. A preliminary audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a shallow conductive zone is associated with each thermal site. Above-normal ground temperatures measured at a depth of 1 metre below the land surface in the Weiser Hot Springs subarea correlate with relatively high concentrations of boron in underlying ground waters, which, in turn, are usually associated with thermal waters in the study area. Sampled thermal waters are of a sodium chloride sulfate or sodium sulfate type, having dissolved-solids concentrations that range from 225 to 1,140 milligrams per litre. Temperatures of sampled waters ranged from 13/sup 0/ to 92.0/sup 0/C. Minimum aquifer temperatures calculated from chemical analysis of water, using geochemical thermometers, were 170/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C in the Crane Creek and Weiser Hot Springs subareas, respectively. Estimated maximum temperatures ranged from 212/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/ to 242/sup 0/C, respectively, in these subareas. The probable heat sources for both subareas are (1) young magmatic intrusive rocks underlying the basalt or (2) above-normal temperatures resulting from thinning of the earth's crust. Maps are included.

Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Basic research needed for the development of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic research needed to facilitate development of geothermal energy is identified. An attempt has been made to make the report representative of the ideas of productive workers in the field. The present state of knowledge of geothermal energy is presented and then specific recommendations for further research, with status and priorities, are listed. Discussion is limited to a small number of applicable concepts, namely: origin of geothermal flux; transport of geothermal energy; geothermal reservoirs; rock-water interactions, and geophysical and geochemical exploration.

Aamodt, R.L.; Riecker, R.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Geothermal: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links News DOE Geothermal Technologies Program News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection September 30, 2008 Update: "Hot Docs" added to the Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection. A recent enhancement to the geothermal legacy site is the addition of "Hot Docs". These are documents that have been repeatedly searched for and downloaded more than any other documents in the database during the previous month and each preceding month. "Hot Docs" are highlighted for researchers and stakeholders who may find it valuable to learn what others in their field are most interested in. This enhancement could serve, for

287

Geothermal pipeline: Progress and development update from the geothermal progress monitor  

SciTech Connect

This article is a progress and development update of new prospects for the utilization of geothermal energy. The city of San Bernadino, California uses high-quality geothermal fluids for laundry processes without the need for water softening or heating. Four geothermal prospects in Oregon including exploration work by Amadarko, CE Exploration Company, Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, and Vulcan Power Company are also reviewed.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds have been designed under this contract that can be used to trace water that has been injected into vapor-dominated and two-phase geothermal fields. Increased knowledge of the injection flow is provided by the tracers, and this augments the power that can be produced. Details on the stability and use of these tracers are included in this report.

Michael C. Adams Greg Nash

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ratio of produced gas to produced water from DOE's EDNA Delcambre No. 1 geopressured-geothermal aquifer gas well test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A paper presented by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) at the Third Geopressured-Geothermal Energy Conference hypothesized that the high ratio of produced gas to produced water from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well was due to free gas trapped in pores by imbibition over geological time. This hypothesis was examined in relation to preliminary test data which reported only average gas to water ratios over the roughly 2-day steps in flow rate. Subsequent public release of detailed test data revealed substantial departures from the previously reported computer simulation results. Also, data now in the public domain reveal the existence of a gas cap on the aquifier tested. This paper describes IGT's efforts to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two models for the occurrence and production of gas in excess of that dissolved in the brine have been used. One model considers the gas to be dispersed in pores by imbibition, and the other model considers the gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifier. The studies revealed that the dispersed gas model characteristically gave the wrong shape to plots of gas production on the gas/water ratio plots such that no reasonable match to the flow data could be achieved. The free gas cap model gave a characteristically better shape to the production plots and could provide an approximate fit to the data of the edge of the free gas cap is only about 400 feet from the well.Because the geological structure maps indicate the free gas cap to be several thousand feet away and the computer simulation results match the distance to the nearby Delcambre Nos. 4 and 4A wells, it appears that the source of the excess free gas in the test of the No. 1 sand may be from these nearby wells. The gas source is probably a separate gas zone and is brought into contact with the No. 1 sand via a conduit around the No. 4 well.

Rogers, L.A.; Randolph, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The design of a water jet drill for development of geothermal resources. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water jet drilling of rock is shown to be a feasible method for potential improvement in gaining access to the earth's resources. Drilling rates of up to 280 in./min in sandstone and 40 in./min in granite have been achieved. While the addition of polymers to the jet stream is found advantageous the low (15%) level of improvement and the difficulty in maintaining concentrate negated further development. The application of confining pressure was found to reduce jet performance, but this was found to be a function more of the rock response than of the jet parameters. Field tests of water jets underground indicated the jet system could be modified to cope with this change. Water jets were found to be more effective, for drilling larger holes, where a combined water jet:roller bit system was developed and laboratory and field trials of this are described. As well as determining the controlling parameters affecting jet drilling performance, and proving that rock compressive strength is not one of them, the research examined other methods of improving jet cutting performance. At jet pressures below 10,000 psi abrasive laden jets were found most advantageous while, for drilling granite, a cavitating flow proved more effective at pressures above 10,000 psi. A reason for this is postulated. Experiments to develop a standardized cavitation resistance test for rock specimens have also been undertaken.

Summers, David A.; Lehnhoff, Terry F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid flow and heat transfer processes during productionis a slow process, so that rates of heat transfer to theprocesses induced by water injection into depleted or depleting vapor zones are characterized by a complex interplay between fluid flow and heat transfer,

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geothermal Progress Monitor: Report No. 14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 14th since its inception in 1980, highlights the anticipated rapid growth in the use of geothermal heat pumps and documents the continued growth in the use of geothermal energy for power generation, both in this country and abroad. In countries with a relatively large demand for new generation capacity, geothermal, if available, is being called on as a preferable alternative to the use of domestic or imported oil. On the other hand, in this country where current demand for new capacity is less, geothermal energy is commonly being put to use in small power generation units operating on the hot water resource.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Federal Energy Management Program: Geothermal Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies Photo of steam rising high in the air from a geyser. Geothermal energy leverages heated air and water from beneath the earth's surface. This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector. Overview Geothermal energy is produced from heat and hot water found within the earth. Federal agencies can harness geothermal energy for heating and cooling air and water, as well as for electricity production. Geothermal resources can be drawn through several resources. The resource can be at or near the surface or miles deep. Geothermal systems move heat from these locations where it can be used more efficiently for thermal or electrical energy applications. The three typical applications include:

294

Hurricane DebbyAn Illustration of the Complementary Nature of VAS Soundings and Cloud and Water Vapor Motion Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility of VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) temperature and moisture soundings and cloud and water vapor motion winds in defining a storm and its surroundings at subsynoptic scales has been examined using a numerical analysis and prognosis ...

John F. Le Marshall; William L. Smith; Geary M. Callan

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Multiple Equilibria, Periodic, and Aperiodic Solutions in a Wind-Driven, Double-Gyre, Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reduced-gravity shallow-water (SW) model is used to study the nonlinear behavior of western boundary currents (WBCs), with particular emphasis on multiple equilibria and low-frequency variations. When the meridionally symmetric wind stress is ...

Shi Jiang; Fei-fei Jin; Michael Ghil

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Influence of Bottom Friction on Sea Surface Roughness and Its Impact on Shallow Water Wind Wave Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a selected subset of the measured data obtained in shallow waters near Vindeby, Denmark, during RASEX (Ris AirSea Experiment), the role of bottom friction dissipation in predicting wind waves (not swell) is assessed with a third-...

Hakeem K. Johnson; Henrik Kofoed-Hansen

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Monitoring Precipitable Water and Surface Wind over the Gulf of Mexico from Microwave and VAS Satellite Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal changes of atmospheric water vapor and surface wind speeds are investigated for a period following an intrusion of cold continental air over the Gulf of Mexico, during the Gulf of Mexico Experiment (GUFMEX) in March 1988. ...

Robert M. Rabin; Lynn A. McMurdie; Christopher M. Hayden; Gary S. Wade

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Geothermal resource data base: Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in Arizona up to 1993. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction. In recent years, the primary growth in geothermal use in Arizona has occurred in aquaculture. Other uses include minor space heating and supply of warm mineral waters for health spas.

Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Strategic plan for the geothermal energy program  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy (natural heat in the Earth`s crust) represents a truly enormous amount of energy. The heat content of domestic geothermal resources is estimated to be 70,000,000 quads, equivalent to a 750,000-year supply of energy for the entire Nation at current rates of consumption. World geothermal resources (exclusive of resources under the oceans) may be as much as 20 times larger than those of the US. While industry has focused on hydrothermal resources (those containing hot water and/or steam), the long-term future of geothermal energy lies in developing technology to enable use of the full range of geothermal resources. In the foreseeable future, heat may be extracted directly from very hot rocks or from molten rocks, if suitable technology can be developed. The US Department of Energy`s Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) endorses a vision of the future in which geothermal energy will be the preferred alternative to polluting energy sources. The mission of the Program is to work in partnership with US industry to establish geothermal energy as a sustainable, environmentally sound, economically competitive contributor to the US and world energy supply. In executing its mission and achieving its long-term vision for geothermal energy, the Program has identified five strategic goals: electric power generation; direct use applications and geothermal heat pumps; international geothermal development; science and technology; and future geothermal resources. This report discusses the objectives of these five goals.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Mountain home known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home KGRA encompasses an area of 3853 hectares (ha) at the foot of the Mount Bennett Hills in Elmore County, Idaho. The site is associated with an arid climate and high winds that generate an acute dust problem. The KGRA lies adjacent to the northwest-southeast trending fault zone that reflects the northern boundary of the western Snake River Plain graben. Data indicate that a careful analysis of the subsidence potential is needed prior to extensive geothermal development. Surface water resources are confined to several small creeks. Lands are utilized for irrigated farmlands and rangeland for livestock. There are no apparent soil limitations to geothermal development. Sage grouse and mule deer are the major species of concern. The potential of locating significant heritage resources other than the Oregon Trail or the bathhouse debris appears to be relatively slight.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Observed and Modeled Wind and Water-Level Response from Tropical Storm Marco (1990)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hurricane Research Division (HRD) analyzes surface wind fields in tropical storms and hurricanes using surface wind observations and aircraft flight-level wind measurements in the vicinity of the storms. The analyzed surface wind fields for ...

Sam H. Houston; Mark D. Powell

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a greater number were thought to be related to faulting. Measured water temperatures at the 124 wells and springs inventoried ranged from 12/sup 0/ to 93/sup 0/C (degrees Celsius) and averaged 50/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, calculated using the silica and the sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, range from 5/sup 0/ to 370/sup 0/C and averaged 110/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures in excess of 140/sup 0/C were found at 42 sites. No areal patterns to the distribution of temperatures either at the surface or subsurface were found. Generally, the quality of the waters sampled was good. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 14 to 13,700 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and averaged 812 mg/l, with higher values occurring in the southeastern part of the State. Twenty-five areas were selected for future study. Of these areas, 23 were selected on the basis of estimated aquifer temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher and two on the basis of geologic considerations.

Young, H.W.; Mitchell, J.C.

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heattransmission fluids  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes our research to date into operatingEGS with CO2. Our modeling studies indicate that CO2 would achieve morefavorable heat extraction than aqueous fluids. The peculiarthermophysicalproperties of CO2 give rise to unusual features in the dependence ofenergy recovery on thermodynamic conditions and time. Preliminarygeochemical studies suggest that CO2 may avoid unfavorable rock-fluidinteractions that have been encountered in water-basedsystems. To morefully evaluate the potential of EGS with CO2 will require an integratedresearch programme of model development, and laboratory and fieldstudies.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Property:Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt Property Type String Description Funding Opportunity Announcement Pages using the property "Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000109 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000116 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000109 +

305

Modeling studies of cold water injection into fluid-depleted, vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical processes involved in cold water injection into a ''superheated'' fractured reservoir are not yet fully understood, and this insufficient knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms limits the possibility of forecasting future resevoir behavior and optimizing the heat extraction process. Numerical simulation can be a very effective tool in the study of the complex phenomena involved, allowing a rapid examination of different situations and conditions, a systematic investigation of the effects of various parameters on reservoir performance, and some insight into long term behavior. We have performed simulation experiments on simple one-dimensional, porous and fractured reservoir models in order to study the migration of injected water, thermodynamic conditions in the boiling zone, heat extraction, and vapor generation. A two-dimensional radial porous medium model, with some characteristics typical of the high productivity zones of Larderello, has also been applied for studying the evolution of the shape and the thermodynamic conditions of the injection plume in the presence of gravity, reservoir heterogeneities and anisotropy.

Calore, C.; Pruess, K.; Celati, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to foster the development, production, and utilization of geothermal resources, prevent waste of geothermal resources, protect correlative rights to the resource, protect existing high quality state waters and safeguard potable waters from pollution, safeguard the natural environment, and promote geothermal and

308

Stanford Geothermal Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

R. Horn

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

310

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

311

Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

312

Geothermal development and the Salton Sea  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The relationship of the Salton Sea, a key element of the Imperial Valley water system, to potential geothermal development in that region is studied. The effects of direct discharge of brines into the Sea are discussed along with the use of Salton Sea water for cooling the geothermal power plants. Methods for controlling the salinity of the Salton Sea are described. (MOW)

Goldsmith, M.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Direct-Use of Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Direct-Use of Geothermal Technologies Direct-Use of Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:46pm Addthis Hot water near the surface of the Earth can be used for heat for a...

314

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

315

Geothermal Project Data and Personnel Resumes  

SciTech Connect

Rogers Engineering Co., Inc. is one of the original engineering companies in the US to become involved in geothermal well testing and design of geothermal power plants. Rogers geothermal energy development activities began almost twenty years ago with flow testing of the O'Neill well in Imperial Valley, California and well tests at Tiwi in the Philippines; a geothermal project for the Commission on Volcanology, Republic of the Philippines, and preparation of a feasibility study on the use of geothermal hot water for electric power generation at Casa Diablo, a geothermal area near Mammouth. This report has brief write-ups of recent geothermal resources development and power plant consulting engineering projects undertaken by Rogers in the US and abroad.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Geothermal Project Data and Personnel Resumes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rogers Engineering Co., Inc. is one of the original engineering companies in the US to become involved in geothermal well testing and design of geothermal power plants. Rogers geothermal energy development activities began almost twenty years ago with flow testing of the O'Neill well in Imperial Valley, California and well tests at Tiwi in the Philippines; a geothermal project for the Commission on Volcanology, Republic of the Philippines, and preparation of a feasibility study on the use of geothermal hot water for electric power generation at Casa Diablo, a geothermal area near Mammouth. This report has brief write-ups of recent geothermal resources development and power plant consulting engineering projects undertaken by Rogers in the US and abroad.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

318

Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

Creed, Robert John; Laney, Patrick Thomas

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

Creed, R.J.; Laney, P.T.

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind, biomass, geothermal, hydropower, and solar energy. Though historically supported through direct public policy

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fairbanks Geothermal Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

323

Decision Analysis for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description The result of the proposed...

324

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Alaska geothermal bibliography  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alaska geothermal bibliography Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

325

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fourteenth workshop geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

326

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

327

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Engineered Geothermal Systems...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

328

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean,...

329

Colorado State Capitol Building Geothermal Program Geothermal Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Capitol Building Geothermal Program Geothermal Project State Capitol Building Geothermal Program Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Colorado State Capitol Building Geothermal Program Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This building is approximately 100 years old, and much of the building is heated with expensive district steam and lacks sufficient central cooling. The requested funding pertains to Topic Area 1 Technology Demonstration Projects. Funding would be used for Phase I - Feasibility Study and Engineering Design, Phase II - Installation and Commissioning of Equipment, and Phase III - Operation, Data Collection, and Marketing. Geothermal energy provided by an open-loop ground source heat pump system and upgrades to the building HVAC systems will reduce consumption of electricity and utility steam created with natural gas. Additionally, comfort, operations and maintenance, and air quality will be improved as a result. It is anticipated that the open loop GHP system will require a 500-650 gpm water flow rate.

330

Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps June 24, 2012 - 5:08pm Addthis Watch how geothermal heat pumps heat and cool buildings by concentrating the naturally existing heat contained within the earth -- a clean, reliable, and renewable source of energy. How does it work? A geothermal heat pump uses the constant below ground temperature of soil or water to heat and cool your home. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes referred to as GeoExchange, earth-coupled, ground-source, or water-source heat pumps, have been in use since the late 1940s. They use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead of the outside air temperature. This allows the system to reach fairly high efficiencies (300% to 600%) on the coldest winter nights, compared to 175% to 250% for air-source heat pumps on cool

331

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Production Basics Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep within the Earth and produces minimal emissions. Photo credit: Pacific Gas & Electric Heat from the earth-geothermal energy-heats water that has seeped into underground reservoirs. These reservoirs can be tapped for a variety of uses, depending on the temperature of the water. The energy from high-temperature reservoirs (225°-600°F) can be used to produce electricity. In the United States, geothermal energy has been used to generate electricity on a large scale since 1960. Through research and development, geothermal power is becoming more cost-effective and competitive with

332

Geothermal/Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transmission Transmission < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Transmission General Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (5) The Geysers power plant showing condensers being retrofitted with direct contact condensers (DCCs). The DCCs were designed by NREL researchers working with Calpine Corporation for improved efficiency. With a 750-megawatt output from 14 units, the Geysers is the largest producer of geothermal power in the world. Geothermal power plants are located very close to the geothermal resource because the hot water/steam would cool down before reaching the power plant, unlike a natural gas plant which pipe gas hundreds or even thousands

333

An Integrated System for the Study of Wind-Wave Source Terms in Finite-Depth Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment to study the spectral balance of the source terms for wind-generated waves in finite water depth was carried out in Lake George, Australia. The measurements were made from a shore-connected platform at varying water depths from ...

Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner; Mark A. Donelan; Cyril McCormick; Alexander V. Babanin; W. Kendall Melville; Fabrice Veron

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Optimization of a Savonius rotor vertical-axis wind turbine for use in water pumping systems in rural Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The D-lab Honduras team designed and constructed a wind-powered water pump in rural Honduras during IAP 2007. Currently, the system does not work under its own power and water must be pumped by hand. This thesis seeks to ...

Zingman, Aron (Aron Olesen)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the EPA regulatory approach toward geothermal energy development. The state of knowledge is described with respect to the constituents of geothermal effluents and emissions, including water, air, solid wastes, and noise. Pollutant effects are discussed. Pollution control technologies that may be applicable are described along with preliminary cost estimates for their application. Finally discharge and emission limitations are suggested that may serve as interim guidance for pollution control during early geothermal development.

Hartley, Robert P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermal initiatives in Central America  

SciTech Connect

The US Agency for International Development is supporting a new project in energy and resources exploitation for Central America. One of the largest components of the project involves exploration and reservoir development investigations directed at enhancing the production of electricity from the region's geothermal resources. An assessment of the geothermal resources of Honduras is in progress, and interesting geothermal regions in the Guanacaste Province of Costa Rica are being explored. Well-logging activities are in progress in the production wells at the Miravalles geothermal field in Costa Rica, and preparations are being made for logging critical wells at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. A self-contained logging truck, complete with high-temperature logging cable and logging tools designed for geothermal service, is being fabricated and will be made available for dedicated use throughout Central America. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of water samples collected in Panama are being evaluated to select a high-priority geothermal site in that country. Application of low- and medium-enthalpy geothermal fluids for industrial and agricultural processes is being investigated in Guatemala.

Hanold, R.J.; Loose, V.W.; Laughlin, A.W.; Wade, P.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Geothermal development plan: Pima County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pima County Area Development evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F), and in addition, one area is identified as having a temperature of 147{sup 0}F (297{sup 0}F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in Tucson where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing sector and the existence of major copper mines provide opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. However, available water supplies are identified as a major constraint to projected growth. The study also includes a regional energy analysis, future predictions for energy consumption and energy prices. A major section of the report is aimed at identifying potential geothermal users in Pima County and providing projections of maximum economic geothermal utilization. The study identifies 115 firms in 32 industrial classes that have some potential for geothermal use. In addition, 26 agribusiness firms were found in the county.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Geothermal development plan: Yuma County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yuma County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F), and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate (90/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C, 194/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F) temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated, although one resource area is located near Yuma, Arizona. One resource site is inferred to contain a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2 percent per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without advese affect on agriculture. Six firms were found in Yuma County which may be able to utilize geothermal energy for process heat needs. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Strengthening Americas Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

crane mounted on a barge designed for offshore crane mounted on a barge designed for offshore wind turbine installation lifts a rotor into place. Photo courtesy of © DOTI 2009-alpha ventus Offshore wind energy is a clean, domestic, renewable resource that can help the United States meet its critical energy, environmental, and economic challenges. By generating electricity from offshore wind turbines, the nation can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and help revitalize key sectors of its economy, including manufacturing. However, realizing these benefits will require overcoming key barriers to the development and deployment of offshore wind technology, including its relatively high cost of energy, technical challenges surrounding installation and

340

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

342

Property:Geothermal/Partner1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partner1 Partner1 Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Partner1 Property Type String Description Partner 1 Pages using the property "Geothermal/Partner1" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + University of Nevada + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + TBA + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + Los Alamos National Laboratory + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + Lawrence Berkeley National Lab +

343

Property:Geothermal/AwardeeCostShare | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Geothermal/AwardeeCostShare Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/AwardeeCostShare Property Type Number Description Awardee Cost Share Pages using the property "Geothermal/AwardeeCostShare" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 9,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 1,082,753 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 4,135,391 +

344

OIT geothermal system improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three geothermal wells drilled during the original campus construction vary from 396 m (1,300 ft) to 550 m (1,800 ft). These wells supply all of the heating and part of the cooling needs of the 11-building, 62,200 m{sup 2} (670,000 ft{sup 2}) campus. The combined capacity of the well pumps is 62 L/s(980 gpm) of 89{degrees}C (192{degrees}F) geothermal fluids. Swimming pool and domestic hot water heating impose a small but nearly constant year-round flow requirement. In addition to heating, a portion of the campus is also cooled using the geothermal resource. This is accomplished through the use of an absorption chiller. The chiller, which operates on the same principle as a gas refrigerator, requires a flow of 38 L/s (600 gpm) of geothermal fluid and produces 541 kW (154 tons) of cooling capacity (Rafferty, 1989). The annual operating costs for the system is about $35,000 including maintenance salary, equipment replacement and cost of pumping. This amounts to about $0.05 per square foot per year.

Lienau, P.J. [Geo-Heat Center, Klamath Falls, OR (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Electricity Production Photo of a geothermal power plant. This geothermal power plant generates electricity for the Imperial Valley in California. Geothermal power plants use steam produced from reservoirs of hot water found a few miles or more below the Earth's surface to produce electricity. The steam rotates a turbine that activates a generator, which produces electricity. There are three types of geothermal power plants: dry steam, flash steam, and binary cycle. Dry Steam Dry steam power plants draw from underground resources of steam. The steam is piped directly from underground wells to the power plant where it is directed into a turbine/generator unit. There are only two known underground resources of steam in the United States: The Geysers in northern California and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, where there's

348

Geothermal development plan: Maricopa County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maricopa County Geothermal Development Plan evaluated the market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified six potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F) and in addition, four suspected intermediate temperature areas (90{sup 0} to 150{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0} to 300{sup 0}F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in and near the Phoenix metropolitan area where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing, trade and service sectors of the regional economy provides opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis is included containing energy use and price projections. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support this growth, though agricultural water use is expected to diminish. The study also contains a detailed section matching geothermal resources to potential users. Two comparative analyses providing economic details for space heating projects are incorporated.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

350

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

351

Cooperative geochemical investigation of geothermal resources in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary studies indicate that the Imperial Valley has a large geothermal potential. In order to delineate additional geothermal systems a chemical and isotopic investigation of samples from water wells, springs, and geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas was conducted. Na, K, and Ca concentrations of nearly 200 well water, spring water, hot spring, and geothermal fluid samples from the Imperial Valley area were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Fournier and Truesdell's function was determined for each water sample. Suspected geothermal areas are identified. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope abundances were determined in order to determine and to identify the source of the water in the Mesa geothermal system. (JGB)

Coplen, T.B.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 runoff - co;il pile Geothermal wells Waste Disposal: WaterLiquid-Dominated Fields Geothermal Nuclear Water EmissionsOil 1. 2. 3. L 3 Gas Geothermal Nuclear Section 1.3 Noise

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A critical question for the future energy policy of the United States is the extent to which geothermal resources can contribute to an ever-increasing demand for electricity. Electric power production from geothermal sources exceeds that from wind and solar combined, yet the installed capacity falls far short of the geothermal resource base characterized in past assessments, even though the estimated size of the resource in six assessments completed in the past 35 years varies by thousands of Megawatts-electrical (MWe). The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS)

354

Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOE Geothermal Program US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Public Service of Colorado Ponnequin Wind Farm Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County Robert C. Beiswanger, Jr. Daemen College May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov DAEMEN COLLEGE Open Loop, Geo-exchange System Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review May 20, 2010 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov DAEMEN COLLEGE Open Loop, Geo-exchange System Principal Investigators Robert C. Beiswanger Jr. Vice President for Business Affairs and Treasurer Dr. Edwin G. Clausen Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College

355

Water: May be the Best Near-Term Benefit and Driver of a Robust Wind Energy Future (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water may be the most critical natural resource variable that affects the selection of generation options in the next decade. Extended drought in the western United States and more recently in the Southeast has moved water management and policy to the forefront of the energy options discussions. Recent climate change studies indicate that rising ambient temperatures could increase evapotranspiration by more than 25% to 30% in large regions of the country. Increasing demand for electricity, and especially from homegrown sources, inevitably will increase our thermal fleet, which consumes 400 to 700 gal/MWh for cooling. Recovering the vast oil shale resources in the West (one of the energy options discussed) is water intensive and threatens scarce water supplies. Irrigation for the growing corn ethanol industry requires 1,000 to 2,000 gallons of water for 1 gallon of production. Municipalities continue to grow and drive water demands and emerging constrained market prices upward. As illustrated by the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, wind offers an important mitigation opportunity: a 4-trillion-gallon water savings. This poster highlights the emerging constrained water situation in the United States and presents the case for wind energy as one of the very few means to ameliorate the emerging water wars in various U.S. regions.

Flowers, L.; Reategui, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

CREST Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CREST Geothermal CREST Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CREST Geothermal Agency/Company /Organization: Sustainable Energy Advantage Partner: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Geothermal Topics: Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: financere.nrel.gov/finance/webfm_send/41/NREL_CREST_Geothermal_version Country: United States RelatedTo: CREST Solar, CREST Wind Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

Wind Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating electricity, charging batteries, pumping water, and grinding grain.

360

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Geothermal  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Geothermal Test Facility, California Geothermal Test Facility, California This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Fact Sheet Other Documents Fact Sheet Geothermal Test Facility, California, Site Fact Sheet December 12, 2011 Other Documents Geothermal Test Facility (GTF) Closure and Records Transfer (DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration memorandum) April 23, 2004 Closure Report East Mesa Geothermal Test Facility July 31, 1998 Recission of Waste Discharge Requirements for U.S. Department of Energy, Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa - El Centro, Imperial County (California Regional Water Quality Control Board letter) January 4, 1997

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Geothermal Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Basics Resource Basics Geothermal Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are located in the west, where the geothermal resource base is concentrated. Current drilling technology limits the development of geothermal resources to relatively shallow water- or steam-filled reservoirs, most of which are found in the western part of the United States. But researchers are developing new technologies for capturing the heat in deeper, "dry" rocks, which would support drilling almost anywhere. Geothermal Resources Map This map shows the distribution of geothermal resources across the United States. If you have trouble accessing this information because of a

362

Property:Geothermal/Impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Impacts Property Type Text Description Impacts Pages using the property "Geothermal/Impacts" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + If successful, this would mark a major advance in our ability to image potentially productive fluid pathways in fracture-dominated systems. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Successful application of techniques could allow replication to buildings across campus and in City of Butte, including county court house, the Federal court building, World Museum of Mining, and numerous privately owned historic buildings.

363

Property:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalRegion" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + Adak Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Aidlin Geothermal Facility + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Geothermal Project + Alaska Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Area + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Project + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region +

364

Environmental overview of geothermal development: northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional environmental problems and issues associated with geothermal development in northern Nevada are studied to facilitate environmental assessment of potential geothermal resources. The various issues discussed are: environmental geology, seismicity of northern Nevada, hydrology and water quality, air quality, Nevada ecosystems, noise effects, socio-economic impacts, and cultural resources and archeological values. (MHR)

Slemmons, D.B.; Stroh, J.M.; Whitney, R.A. (eds.) [eds.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Philip, South Dakota geothermal district heating systems  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal heating project in Philip, South Dakota which uses the waste water from the Haakon School has now been in operation for 15 years. This project was one of the 23 cost shared by the U.S. DOE starting in 1978, of which 15 became operational. This article describes the geothermal heating system for eight buildings in downtown Philip.

Lund, J.W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

ASES Wind Division Webinar: Texas Renewable Energy Industries...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

boards and state committees promoting the development of solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, hydro resources and is also a founding member and former executive director of the...

367

Electricity systems adjust operations to growing wind power output ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

368

Property:Geothermal/Objectives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Objectives Objectives Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Objectives Property Type Text Description Objectives Pages using the property "Geothermal/Objectives" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + Apply three-dimensional/three-component (3D-3C) reflection seismic technology to define transmissive geothermal structures at the Soda Lake Geothermal area, Churchill County, NV. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Install a heat-pump system in Montana Tech's new Natural Resources Building that will (a) provide efficient, geothermally based, climate control for the building, and (b) demonstrate the efficacy of using mine waters for heat pump systems. At a minimum, the system capacity will be in the 50- to 100-ton range, but could be larger if economics warrant.

369

Summary of geothermal studies in Montana, 1980 through 1983. DOE final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geology, hydrology, and surface manifestations of geothermal systems in Montana are described by area. Water-quality information, tables of inventory and water analysis data for springs and wells, and a geothermal resource map are included. (MHR)

Sonderegger, J.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine fluid origin in two exploratory wells Notes Collected water from original coso hot springs well (1967) and CGEH No. 1. and completed chemical analysis to determine fluid origin. The surface expression of fumarole and acid sulfate pools and shallow steam wells gives a false indication of an extensive vapor dominated system because upward convecting, boiling alkaline-chloride waters do not reach the surface.

371

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 5. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the northern Cache Valley area, Franklin County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the north-south trending graben structure known as northern Cache Valley in southeastern Idaho were sampled during the summer and fall of 1973. Geologic and gravity data for the area indicate fault control for nearly all thermal water occurrences. Thermal-water discharges are generally restricted to the course of the Bear River with few known in areas away from the river. Spring deposits in the form of travertine may not be indications of low temperature thermal waters because abundant limestone and dolomite make up the geologic framework. Much gas, believed to consist mostly of carbon dioxide, is being evolved from many of the springs. The hottest water is found near Battle Creek and Squaw hot springs approximately 4 kilometers northwest of the town of Preston. Metoric waters descend along fault planes, fractures, and fissures to depths at which they are heated by increasing rock temperatures (geothermal gradient of 5/sup 0/C per 100 meters). Due to decreased density, the heated waters rise along the same or adjacent fault planes to the surface. The quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer applied to the thermal water discharges indicates temperatures approaching 150/sup 0/C may be encountered by deep drilling. Mixing models, based on quartz solubility, indicate higher aquifer temperatures than the quartz equilibrium thermometer, but chloride concentration vs. temperature plots are not linear. The sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometer indicates higher temperatures than quartz equilibrium and mixing models. The thermal waters are higher in total dissolved solids (12,000 to 13,000 milligrams per liter) than are known elsewhere in Idaho and represent potential pollution hazards should large scale withdrawal be attempted.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

Not Available

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour-by-Hour Cost Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Genevieve Saur (PI), Chris Ainscough (Presenter), Kevin Harrison, Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory January 17 th , 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Acknowledgements * This work was made possible by support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). http://www.eere.energy.gov/topics/hydrogen_fuel_cells.html * NREL would like to thank our DOE Technology Development Managers for this project, Sara Dillich, Eric Miller, Erika Sutherland, and David Peterson. * NREL would also like to acknowledge the indirect

376

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Irrigation pumping using geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of using geothermal energy in an isobutane binary system to drive directly a cluster of irrigation pumps was evaluated. This three well geothermal system, based at 150{sup 0}C (302{sup 0}F) resource at 2000 m (6560 ft), would cost an estimated $7,800,000 in capital investment to provide 6000 gpm of irrigation water from 12 water wells. It would serve approximately 4.5 square miles of irrigated agricultural land, with the delivered water costing $106.76 per acre-foot. This compares with an estimated cost of $60.78 per acre-foot for a conventional irrigation system driven by natural gas at the current price (1980 dollars) of $2.72/mm Btu. It is obvious that if natural gas prices continue to rise, or if geothermal resources can be found at depths less than 2000 meters, then the geothermal irrigation pumping system would be attractive economically. The importance of water to the economy and growth of Arizona was summarized. Total water consumption in Arizona is about 7,600,000 acre-feet annually of which about 87% is used for agriculture. Total supply from the Colorado River and water runoff is only 2,600,000 acre-feet per year, resulting in a net potable groundwater depletion of about 4,000,000 acre-feet per year assuming a recharge rate of about 1,000,000 acre-feet per year.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Geologic setting and geochemistry of thermal water and geothermal assessment, Trans-Pecos Texas. Final report, June 1, 1976-May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot springs and wells in West Texas and adjacent Mexico are manifestations of active convective geothermal systems, concentrated in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Maximum temperatures are 47/sup 0/ and 72/sup 0/C for hot springs and wells in Texas and 90/sup 0/C for hot springs in Mexico within 5 km of the border. Existing information is summarized and the results of a 1-year intensive study of the area are presented. The study includes several overlapping phases: (1) compilation of existing geologic information, both regional studies of geology, structure and geophysics, and more detailed local studies of individual hot spring areas; (2) detailed geologic mapping of hot spring areas to understand the origin and geologic controls of hot springs; (3) field measurement and sampling of hot spring or well waters for geochemical analysis; and (4) synthesis and interpretation of the data.

Henry, C.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development plans. (5) Formulation and implementation of various statewide incentives; emphasis will be given to the recommendations of the Oregon Alternate Energy Development Commission and its Geothermal Task Force.

None

1980-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal resources of Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology has updated its inventory of low and moderate temperature resources for the state and has assisted the Oregon Institute of Technology - GeoHeat Center and the University of Utah Research Institute in prioritizing and collocating important geothermal resource areas. The database compiled for this assessment contains information on location, flow, water chemistry, and estimated reservoir temperatures for 267 geothermal well and springs in Montana. For this assessment, the minimum temperature for low-temperature resource is defined as 10{degree} C above the mean annual air temperature at the surface. The maximum temperature for a moderate-temperature resource is defined as greater than 50{degree} C. Approximately 12% of the wells and springs in the database have temperatures above 50{degree} C, 17% are between 30{degree} and 50{degree} C, 29% are between 20{degree} and 30{degree}C, and 42% are between 10{degree} and 20{degree} C. Low and moderate temperature wells and springs can be found in nearly all areas of Montana, but most are in the western third of the state. Information sources for the current database include the MBMG Ground Water Information Center, the USGS statewide database, the USGS GEOTHERM database, and new information collected as part of this program. Five areas of Montana were identified for consideration in future investigations of geothermal development. The areas identified are those near Bozeman, Ennis, Butte, Boulder, and Camas Prairie. These areas were chosen based on the potential of the resource and its proximity to population centers.

Metesh, J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL's geothermal team develops publications, including technical reports and conference papers, about geothermal resource assessments, market and policy analysis, and geothermal research and development (R&D) activities. In addition to the selected documents available below, you can find resources on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program Web site or search the NREL Publications Database. For additional geothermal documents, including those published since 1970, please visit the Office of Science and Technology Information Geothermal Legacy Collection. Policymakers' Guidebooks Five steps to effective policy. Geothermal Applications Market and Policy Analysis Program Activities R&D Activities Geothermal Applications

383

Geothermal: Promotional Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Promotional Video Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

384

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

385

Geothermal: Bibliographic Citation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Bibliographic Citation Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

386

Geothermal: Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Related Links Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

387

Geothermal: Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Home Page Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

388

Geothermal: Contact Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Contact Us Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

389

Geothermal: Hot Documents Search  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Hot Documents Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

390

Geothermal: Basic Search  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Basic Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

391

Geothermal: Educational Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Educational Zone Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

392

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Resources Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are...

393

Geothermal Resources Council's ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Resources Council's 36 th Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada, USA September 30 - October 3, 2012 Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications...

394

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal News...

395

Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Geothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps June 24, 2012 - 5:08pm Addthis Watch how geothermal heat pumps heat and cool buildings by concentrating the naturally existing heat contained within the earth -- a clean, reliable, and renewable source of energy. How does it work? A geothermal heat pump uses the constant below ground temperature of soil or water to heat and cool your home. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes referred to as GeoExchange, earth-coupled, ground-source, or water-source heat pumps, have been in use since the late 1940s. They use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead of the outside air temperature. This allows the system to reach fairly high efficiencies (300% to 600%) on the coldest

396

Wind Tunnel Measurements of the Response of Hot-Wire Liquid Water Content Instruments to Large Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests were performed on more than 23 cloud liquid water content (LWC) probes and drop spectrometers at the NASA Icing Research Tunnel, with a main objective to characterize their response to large-droplet conditions. As a part of ...

J. W. Strapp; J. Oldenburg; R. Ide; L. Lilie; S. Bacic; Z. Vukovic; M. Oleskiw; D. Miller; E. Emery; G. Leone

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

398

Use of geothermal energy for desalination in New Mexico: a feasibility study. Final report, January 1, 1977-May 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water requirements and availability for New Mexico are described. The possibility of using geothermal resources for desalination of the state's saline water sources is discussed. The following aspects of the problem are covered: resource evaluation, geothermal desalination technology, potential geothermal desalination sites, saline and geothermal aquifer well fields design, geothermal desalination plant waste brine disposal, process water pumping and brine disposal unit costs, environmental considerations, and legal and institutional considerations. (MHR)

Chaturvedi, L.; Keyes, C.G. Jr.; Swanberg, C.A.; Gupta, Y.F.; Davis, R.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Dry hot rock in the Earth's crust represents the largest and most broadly distributed reservoir of usable energy accessible to man. The engineering equipment and methods required to extract and use this energy appear to exist and are now being investigated actively at LASL. At least for deep systems in relatively impermeable rock, not close to active faults, the extraction of energy frtom dry geothermal resertvoirs should involve no significant environmental hazards. The principal environmental effects of such energy systems will be those associated with the surface facilities that use the geothermal heat; these will be visual, in land use, and in the thermal-pollution potential of low-temperature power plants. The energy extraction system itself should be clean; safe, unobtrusive, and economical. (auth)

Smith, M.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Development of Offshore Wind Recommended Practice for U.S. Waters: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses how the American Petroleum Institute oil and gas standards were interfaced with International Electrotechnical Commission and other wind turbine and offshore industry standards to provide guidance for reliable engineering design practices for offshore wind energy systems.

Musial, W. D.; Sheppard, R. E.; Dolan, D.; Naughton, B.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Property:Geothermal/DOEFundingLevel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOEFundingLevel DOEFundingLevel Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/DOEFundingLevel Property Type Number Description DOE Funding Level (total award amount) Pages using the property "Geothermal/DOEFundingLevel" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 5,000,000 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 1,072,744 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 1,999,990 +

402

List of Geothermal ARRA Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ARRA Projects ARRA Projects Jump to: navigation, search List of Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects CSV State Project Type Topic 2 Awardees Funding Location of Project A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project Nevada Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Magma Energy 5,000,000 Soda Lake, Nevada A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project Montana Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Montana Tech of The University of Montana 1,072,744 Butte, Montana A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project New Mexico Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 1,999,990 Socorro, New Mexico

403

Property:Geothermal/AwardeeWebsite | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AwardeeWebsite AwardeeWebsite Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/AwardeeWebsite Property Type URL Description Awardee Website Pages using the property "Geothermal/AwardeeWebsite" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + http://www.magmaenergycorp.com/s/Home.asp + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + http://www.mtech.edu/ + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + http://www.nmt.edu/ +

404

Property:Geothermal/FundingSource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FundingSource FundingSource Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/FundingSource Property Type String Description Funding Source Pages using the property "Geothermal/FundingSource" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 +

405

Property:Geothermal/LocationOfProject | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LocationOfProject LocationOfProject Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/LocationOfProject Property Type Page Description Location of Project Pages using the property "Geothermal/LocationOfProject" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + Soda Lake, Nevada + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Butte, Montana + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + Socorro, New Mexico +

406

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hydrogeochemical data for thermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogeochemical data for thermal and nonthermal waters and gases of the Valles Caldera- southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help...

407

Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

low-enthalpy geothermal water will be designed and examined for their ability to offset fossil fuels and decrease CO2 emissions. - Perform process optimizations and economic...

408

Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands  

SciTech Connect

This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Water | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

410

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

411

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and chemical and isotopic analyses can be undertaken. Integrated analysis of all measurements will d

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Geothermal Today: 2005 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This DOE/EERE Geothermal Technologies Program publication highlights accomplishments and activities of the program during the last two years.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-water pressures , subsidence. DISCLAIMER NeiIher ( h ehere," do not MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUIDSecond Syhposium on Land Subsidence 1976 a t Anaheim, I n t

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal Energy Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the objectives and the status of a long-range program to develop techniques for assessing the resource potential of liquid-dominated geothermal systems. Field studies underway in northern Nevada comprise a systematic integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical measurements, necessary to specify a drilling program encompassing heat flow holes, deep calibration holes, and ultimately, deep test wells. The status of Nevada field activities is described. The areas under study are in a region characterized by high heat flow where temperatures at depth in some geothermal systems exceed 180 C. Areas presently being examined include Beowawe Hot Springs in Whirlwind Valley. Buffalo Valley Hot Springs, Leach Hot Springs in Grass Valley, and Kyle Hot Springs in Buena Vista Valley. Geologic studies encompass detailed examinations of structure and lithology to establish the geologic framework of the areas. The geothermal occurrences are characterized by zones of intense fault intersection, which furnish permeable channelways for the introduction of meteoric water into regions of high temperature at depth.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Asaro, F.; Bowman, H.; McEvilly, T.; Morrison, F.; Witherspoon, P.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Iceland Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_Iceland_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510812

416

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

417

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Two-phase flow in geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Two-phase flow in geothermal energy sources. Annual report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1976 Geothermal Technologies...

418

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

419

Conceptual design study of geothermal district heating of a thirty-house subdivision in Elko, Nevada, using existing water-distribution systems, Phase III. Final technical report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study for district heating of a 30-home subdivision located near the southeast extremity of the city of Elko, Nevada is presented. While a specific residential community was used in the study, the overall approach and methodologies are believed to be generally applicable for a large number of communities where low temperature geothermal fluid is available. The proposed district heating system utilizes moderate temperature, clean domestic water and existing community culinary water supply lines. The culinary water supply is heated by a moderate temperature geothermal source using a single heat exchanger at entry to the subdivision. The heated culinary water is then pumped to the houses in the community where energy is extracted by means of a water supplied heat pump. The use of heat pumps at the individual houses allows economic heating to result from supply of relatively cool water to the community, and this precludes the necessity of supplying objectionably hot water for normal household consumption use. Each heat pump unit is isolated from the consumptive water flow such that contamination of the water supply is avoided. The community water delivery system is modified to allow recirculation within the community, and very little rework of existing water lines is required. The entire system coefficient of performance (COP) for a typical year of heating is 3.36, exclusive of well pumping energy.

Pitts, D.R.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arizona (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arizona. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arizona to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 818 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nevada (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nevada. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nevada to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 944 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Indiana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Indiana to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,684 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Utah (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Utah. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Utah to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 828 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Idaho (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Idaho. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Idaho to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 906 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Abstract We present integrated geophysical data to characterize a geothermal system at Neal Hot Springs in eastern Oregon. This system is currently being developed for geothermal energy production. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the Western Snake River Plain. The intersection of these two fault systems, coupled with high geothermal gradients from thin continental crust produces pathways for surface water and deep geothermal water interactions at Neal Hot Springs.

427

Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Chemical Logging Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To use new methods to assist geothermal well drilling. Notes Chemical logging resulted in the development of a technique to assist in geothermal well drilling and resource development. Calcium-alkalinity ratios plotted versus drill depth assisted in defining warm and hot water aquifers. Correlations between the calcium-alkalinity log and lithologic logs were used to determine aquifer types and detection of hot water zones

428

Geothermal heat pumps in Pierre  

SciTech Connect

There are two municipal connected heat pumps in Pierre, South Dakota: the South Dakota Discovery Center and Pierre City Hall.Both systems now utilize plate heat exchanger between the city water loop and the building loop. This article describes the geothermal system used in Pierre for both space heating and cooling of municipal buildings.

Wegman, S. [South Dakota Public Utilities Commission, Pierre, SD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geothermal Tomorrow 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brochure describing the recent activities and future research direction of the DOE Geothermal Program.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Alaska geothermal bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.) [comps.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine recharge for the system Notes Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta18O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is

432

Isotopic Analysis Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1997 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify the source of chlorine Notes The 36Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples have been measured. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic

433

Completion techniques for geothermal-geopressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are covered: oil well completions, water well completions, sand control techniques, geopressured oil and gas wells, and geopressured water well completion. The conclusions for a geothermal-geopressured water well completion and needed research are included. (MHR)

Boyd, W.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Implementation Plan for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE Review Draft:)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that identifies and evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP), as defined by the State of Hawaii in its 1990 proposal to Congress (DBED 1990). The location of the proposed project is shown in Figure 1.1. The EIS is being prepared pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021), effective May 26, 1992. The State's proposal for the four-phase HGP consists of (1) exploration and testing of the geothermal resource beneath the slopes of the active Kilauea volcano on the Island of Hawaii (Big Island), (2) demonstration of deep-water power cable technology in the Alenuihaha Channel between the Big Island and Mau, (3) verification and characterization of the geothermal resource on the Big Island, and (4) construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Big Island, with overland and submarine transmission of electricity from the Big Island to Oahu and possibly other islands. DOE prepared appropriate NEPA documentation for separate federal actions related to Phase 1 and 2 research projects, which have been completed. This EIS will consider Phases 3 and 4, as well as reasonable alternatives to the HGP. Such alternatives include biomass coal, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, and construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Island of Hawaii (for exclusive use on the Big Island). In addition, the EIs will consider the reasonable alternatives among submarine cable technologies, geothermal extraction, production, and power generating technologies; pollution control technologies; overland and submarine power transmission routes; sites reasonably suited to support project facilities in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner; and non-power generating alternatives, such as conservation and demand-side management.

None

1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

436

Newberry Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search Davenport Newberry Holdings (previously named Northwest Geothermal Company) started to develop a 120MW geothermal project on its...

437

Geothermal Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resources Geothermal Resources August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production...

438

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from...

439

GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Subsiding Areas and Geothermal Subsidence Potential25 Project 2-Geothermal Subsidence Potential Maps . . . . .Subsidence Caused by a Geothermal Project and Subsidence Due

Lippmann, Marcello J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal wind water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Geothermal Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating geothermal development. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Geothermal energy is heat derived below the earth's surface which can be harnessed to generate clean, renewable energy. This vital, clean energy resource supplies renewable power around the clock and emits little or no greenhouse gases -- all while requiring a small environmental footprint to develop. The Energy Department is committed to responsibly developing, demonstrating, and deploying innovative technologies to support the continued expansion of the geothermal industry across the United States. Featured Pinpointing America's Geothermal Resources with Open Source Data

442

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the

444

Geothermal energy in Montana: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. More specific information is included under the planning regions and site specific data summaries. A brief discussion of the geothermal characteristics and a listing of a majority of the known hot springs is included. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented, including: economics, financing, state leasing, federal leasing, direct-use technology, water quality laws, water rights, and the Major Facility Siting Act. (MHR)

Brown, K.E.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

446

Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.741169444444°, -115.51666666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.741169444444,"lon":-115.51666666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

State policies for geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most prominent geothermal resources in the USA occur in fifteen Gulf and Western states including Alaska and Hawaii. In each state, authority and guidelines have been established for administration of geothermal leasing and for regulation of development. Important matters addressed by these policies include resource definition, leasing provisions, development regulations, water appropriation, and environmental standards. Some other policies that need attention include taxation, securities regulations, and utility regulations. It is concluded that conditions needed for the geothermal industry to pursue large-scale development are consumer (utility) confidence in the resource; equitable tax treatment; prompt exploration of extensive land areas; long and secure tenure for productive properties; prompt facility siting and development; and competitive access to various consumers. With these conditions, the industry should be competitive with other energy sectors and win its share of investment capital. This publication reviews for the states various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development. The report summarizes research results from numerous specialists and outlines present state and Federal policies. The report concludes generally that if public policies are made favorable to their development, geothermal resources offer an important energy resource that could supply all new electric capacity for the fifteen states for the next two decades. This energy--100,000 MW--could be generated at prices competitive with electricity from fossil and nuclear power plants. An extensive bibliography is included. (MCW)

Sacarto, D.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

449

Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Therefore, knowledge of the conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fractures are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result, it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have developed advanced poro-thermo-chemo-mechanical fracture models for rock fracture research in support of EGS design. The fracture propagation models are based on a regular displacement discontinuity formulation. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two-dimensional solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate the impact of pro-thermo-chemical processes on fracture permeability and reservoir pressure. Fracture permeability variation is studied using a coupled thermo-chemical model with quartz reaction kinetics. The model is applied to study quartz precipitation/dissolution, as well as the variation in fracture aperture and pressure. Also, a three-dimensional model of injection/extraction has been developed to consider the impact poro- and thermoelastic stresses on fracture slip and injection pressure. These investigations shed light on the processes involved in the observed phenomenon of injection pressure variation (e.g., in Coso), and allow the assessment of the potential of thermal and chemical stimulation strategies.

Ahmad Ghassemi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement.

451

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemistry Of The Lake City Geothermal System, California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Lake City hot springs and geothermal wells chemically fall into a narrow compositional group. This indicates that, with the exception of a few hot springs, mixing with shallow cold ground waters does not have a significant influence on the chemistry of the hot springs. Narrow ranges in plots of F, B and Li versus Cl, and _D to _18O values indicate minimal mixing. Because of this, the compositions of the natural hot spring waters are fairly representative of the parent geothermal water. The average

452

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

453

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Rose Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

454

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r