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1

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper reviews the use of earthquake studies in the field of geothermal exploration. Local, regional and teleseismic events can all provide useful information about a geothermal area on various scales. It is imperative that data collection is conducted in properly designed, realistic experiments. Ground noise is still of limited usefulness as a prospecting tool. The utility of the method cannot yet be assessed because of its undeveloped methodology and the paucity of case histories.

2

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

3

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with the geology of the area, which is well known. An east-west trending Bouguer gravity profile was constructed through the center of the heat flow anomaly described by Combs (1976). The best fit model for the observed gravity at

4

State of Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment - Summary E.L Majer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the

5

Use of slim holes for geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment: A preliminary report on Japanese experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The publicly available Japanese data on the use of slim holes in geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment are reviewed in this report. Slim holes have been used for (1) obtaining core for geological studies, (2) delineating the stratigraphic structure, (3) characterizing reservoir fluid state (pressure, temperature, etc.), and (4) defining the permeability structure for reservoir assessment. Examples of these uses of slim hole data are presented from the Hohi Geothermal Area and the Sumikawa Geothermal Field. Discharge data from slim holes and production wells from the Oguni Geothermal Field indicate that it may be possible to infer the discharge rate of production wells based on slim hole measurements. The Japanese experience suggests that slim holes can provide useful data for cost-effective geothermal reservoir assessment. Therefore, plans for a full scale evaluation of Japanese slim hole data are outlined.

Garg, S.K. [S-Cubed, La Jolla, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The...

8

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

9

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

10

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with...

11

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than 15 years ago. New understanding of the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation are now being applied to image fractures in gas and oil environments. It now may be appropriate to apply these methods, with modifications, to geothermal applications. It is assumed that to implement the appropriate methods an industry coupled program tightly linked to actual field cases, iterating between development and application will be pursued. The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

Majer, E.L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

13

Geothermal reservoir technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir sĚtudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program (review), including a report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1979 Program, recommended seismic surveys in conjunction with DOE/DGE's industry coupled program in the Northern Basin and Range Province, and the objectives of the Marina del Rey conference are presented. Final reports of six committees which met to define the state-of-the-art in geothermal exploration and to recommend exploration technology development are included. These committees are: structure, stratigraphy, and igneous processes; exploration architecture; electrical methods; seismic methods; thermal methods; water/rock interaction; and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

Nielson, D.L. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bibliography Definition of Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringDevelopment of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. * 1.4 DataF i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

19

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Program Review - Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program; Including a Report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1978, The Division of Geothermal Energy of the Department of Energy established the Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program. The purpose of this program is to ''provide assistance to the Nation's industrial community by helping to remove technical and associated economic barriers which presently inhibit efforts to bring geothermal electric power production and direct heat application on line''. In the near term this involves the adaptation of exploration and assessment techniques from the mineral and petroleum industry to geothermal applications. In the near to far term it involves the development of new technology which will improve the cost effectiveness of geothermal exploration.

Nielson, Dennis L., ed.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

26

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

30

Imaging Tools for Electrical Resistivity in Geothermal Exploration and Reservoir Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because reservoir production is primarily in fractured rock, a great deal of effort has been spent devising means of remotely sensing fractures and fracture zones using geophysics. Since increased fluid content or alteration of fractures can give rise to an electrical conductivity contrast, electromagnetic (EM) means of probing have been investigated extensively over the years. Although direct and indirect fracture responses have been noted in many field situations, a fracture response can be subtle and progress has been sporadic. The purpose of this project was to facilitate inductive fracture detection by providing the interpretation tools and knowledge-theoretic frame work for innovative high resolution fracture detection and delineation.

A.C. Tripp

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

32

Session 4: Geothermal Reservoir Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of geothermal reservoir behavior is presently in a state of change brought about by the discovery that reservoir heterogeneity--fractures in particular--is responsible for large scale effects during production. On the other hand, some parts of a reservoir, or some portions of its behavior. may be unaffected by fractures and behave, instead, as if the reservoir were a homogeneous porous medium. Drilling has for many years been guided by geologists prospecting for fractures (which have been recognized as the source of production), but until recently reservoir engineers have not studied the behavior of fractured systems under production. In the last three years research efforts, funded by the Department of Energy and others, have made significant progress in the study of fractures. The investigations into simulation of fracture flow, tracer analysis of fractured systems, and well test analysis of double porosity reservoirs are all advancing. However, presently we are at something of a conceptual impasse in defining a reservoir as fractured or porous. It seems likely that future directions will not continue to attempt to distinguish two separate reservoir types, but will focus instead on defining behavior types. That is, certain aspects of reservoir behavior may be considered to be generally of the porous medium type (for example, field wide decline), while others may be more frequently fracture type (for example, breakthrough of reinjected water). In short, our overall view of geothermal reservoir definition is becoming a little more complex, thereby better accommodating the complexities of the reservoirs themselves. Recent research results already enable us to understand some previously contradictory results, and recognition of the difficulties is encouraging for future progress in the correct direction.

Horne, Roland N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

34

Methods for geothermal reservoir detection emphasizing submerged environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared for the California State Lands Commission to aid them in evaluating exploration programs for geothermal reservoirs, particularly in submerged land environments. Three charts show: (1) a logical progression of specific geologic, geochemical, and geophysical exploration techniques for detecting geothermal reservoirs in various geologic environments with emphasis on submerged lands, (2) various exploration techniques which can be used to develop specific information in geothermal areas, and (3) if various techniques will apply to geothermal exploration according to a detailed geologic classification. A narrative in semi-outline form supplements these charts, providing for each technique; a brief description, advantages, disadvantages, special geologic considerations, and specific references. The specific geologic situation will control the exploration criterion to be used for reservoir detection. General guidelines are established which may be of use in evaluating such a program, but the optimum approach will vary with each situation.

Case, C.W.; Wilde, P.

1976-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geothermal reservoir technology research at the DOE Idaho Operations Office  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal reservoir technology research projects managed at the Department of Energy Idaho Falls Operations office (DOE-ID) account for a large portion of the Department of Energy funding for reservoir technology research (approximately 7 million dollars in FY-95). DOE-ID managed projects include industry coupled geothermal exploration drilling, cooperative research projects initiated through the Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO), and other geothermal reservoir technology research projects. A solicitation for cost-shared industry coupled drilling has been completed and one zward has been made in FY-95. Another solicitation for industry coupled drilling may be conducted in the spring of 1996. A separate geothermal research technology research, development and demonstration solicitation will result in multiple year awards over the next 2 years. The goals of these solicitations are to ensure competition for federal money and to get the Government and the geothermal industry the most useful information for their research dollars.

Creed, Bob

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

36

UWC geothermal resource exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program was developed to explore the strength of the geothermal and hot dry rock (HDR) resource at the Montezuma Hot Springs at the United World College (UWC). The purpose of the UWC {number_sign}1 well is to obtain hydrologic, geologic, and temperature information for ongoing geothermal evaluation of the Montezuma Hot Springs area. If sufficient fluids are encountered, the hole will be cased with a 4 1/2 inch production casing and re-permitted as a geothermal low-temperature well. If no fluid is encountered, the well will be abandoned per Oil Conservation Division regulation. The objectives of the exploration are to evaluate the resource potential to provide space heating for the entire campus of the United World College, determine the effect of a well on the Hot Springs outflow, accurately measure the UWC heating loads versus time, evaluate the potential to support local thermal industry development, assess the feasibility of HDR development, and create an educational program from the collection of data derived from the research effort.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Influence of Reservoir Heterogeneity on Geothermal Fluid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. THE INFLUENCE OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY ON GEOTHERMAL FLUID AND METHANE RECOVERY FROM A GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Ariel Esposito...

38

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

39

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

40

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of...

42

The LBL geothermal reservoir technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the DOE/GD-funded Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is the development and testing of new and improved methods and tools needed by industry in its effort to delineate, characterize, evaluate, and exploit hydrothermal systems for geothermal energy. This paper summarizes the recent and ongoing field, laboratory, and theoretical research activities being conducted as part of the Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In...

44

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

46

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Second workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 focused national attention on energy problems. A national focus on development of energy sources alternative to consumption of hydrocarbons led to the initiation of research studies of reservoir engineering of geothermal systems, funded by the National Science Foundation. At that time it appeared that only two significant reservoir engineering studies of geothermal reservoirs had been completed. Many meetings concerning development of geothermal resources were held from 1973 through the date of the first Stanford Geothermal Reservoir Engineering workshop December 15-17, 1975. These meetings were similar in that many reports dealt with the objectives of planned research projects rather than with results. The first reservoir engineering workshop held under the Stanford Geothermal Program was singular in that for the first time most participants were reporting on progress inactive research programs rather than on work planned. This was true for both laboratory experimental studies and for field experiments in producing geothermal systems. The Proceedings of the December 1975 workshop (SGP-TR-12) is a remarkable document in that results of both field operations and laboratory studies were freely presented and exchanged by all participants. With this in mind the second reservoir engineering workshop was planned for December 1976. The objectives were again two-fold. First, the workshop was designed as a forum to bring together researchers active in various physical and mathematical branches of the developing field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give participants a current and updated view of progress being made in the field. The second purpose was to prepare this Proceedings of Summaries documenting the state of the art as of December 1976. The proceedings will be distributed to all interested members of the geothermal community involved in the development and utilization of the geothermal resources in the world. Many notable occurrences took place between the first workshop in December 1975 and this present workshop in December 1976. For one thing, the newly formed Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) has assumed the lead role in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The second workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from ERDA. In addition, two significant meetings on geothermal energy were held in Rotarua, New Zealand and Taupo, New Zealand. These meetings concerned geothermal reservoir engineering, and the reinjection of cooled geothermal fluids back into a geothermal system. It was clear to attendees of both the New Zealand and the December workshop meetings that a great deal of new information had been developed between August and December 1976. Another exciting report made at the meeting was a successful completion of a new geothermal well on the big island of Hawaii which produces a geothermal fluid that is mainly steam at a temperature in excess of 600 degrees F. Although the total developed electrical power generating capacity due to all geothermal field developments in 1976 is on the order of 1200 megawatts, it was reported that rapid development in geothermal field expansion is taking place in many parts of the world. Approximately 400 megawatts of geothermal power were being developed in the Philippine Islands, and planning for expansion in production in Cerro Prieto, Mexico was also announced. The Geysers in the United States continued the planned expansion toward the level of more than 1000 megawatts. The Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford December 1976 with 93 attendees from 4 nations, and resulted in the presentation of 44 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. The major areas included in the program consisted of reservoir physics, well testing, field development, well stimulation, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The planning forth is year's workshop and the preparation of the proceedings was carried out mainly by my associate Paul

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr. (eds.)

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

49

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Slimholes for geothermal reservoir evaluation - An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topics covered in this session include: slimhole testing and data acquisition, theoretical and numerical models for slimholes, and an overview of the analysis of slimhole data acquired by the Japanese. The fundamental issues discussed are concerned with assessing the efficacy of slimhole testing for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. the term reservoir evaluation is here taken to mean the assessment of the potential of the geothermal reservoir for the profitable production of electrical power. As an introduction to the subsequent presentations and discussions, a brief summary of the more important aspects of the use of slimholes in reservoir evaluation is given.

Hickox, C.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Details Activities (8) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Most theoretical fundamentals of geothermal geochemistry were established by the mid-1980s, as were numerous practical applications of these fundamentals to geothermal resource evaluation and management. Since that time, these geeochmical tools have been refined to various degrees. Noted developments include: widespread use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); advances in spectral analysis; new and refined

52

Compilation of geothermal information: exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Database for Geothermal Energy Exploration and Evaluation is a printout of selected references to publications covering the development of geothermal resources from the identification of an area to the production of elecric power. This annotated bibliography contains four sections: references, author index, author affiliation index, and descriptor index.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The

54

Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

Not Available

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

56

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The size and low resistivity of the clay cap associated with a geothermal system create a target well suited for electromagnetic (EM) methods and also make electrical detection of the underlying geothermal reservoir a challenge. Using 3-D numerical models, we evaluate four EM techniques for use in geothermal exploration: magnetotellurics (MT), controlled-source audio magnetotellurics (CSAMT), long-offset time-domain EM (LOTEM), and short-offset time-domain EM (TEM). Our results show that all of these techniques can delineate the clay cap, but none can be said to unequivocally detect the reservoir. We do find, however, that the EM

57

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pruess, K. , Analysis of injection testing of geothermalreservoirs: Geothermal Resoures Council, Vol. 4. , (into a fractured geothermal reservoir: Transactions, Vol. 4,

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings:...

59

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation...

60

Third workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 14, 1977, with 104 attendees from six nations. In keeping with the recommendations expressed by the participants at the Second Workshop, the format of the Workshop was retained, with three days of technical sessions devoted to reservoir physics, well and reservoir testing, field development, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The program presented 33 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. Although the format of the Workshop has remained constant, it is clear from a perusal of the Table of Contents that considerable advances have occurred in all phases of geothermal reservoir engineering over the past three years. Greater understanding of reservoir physics and mathematical representations of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated reservoirs are evident; new techniques for their analysis are being developed, and significant field data from a number of newer reservoirs are analyzed. The objectives of these workshops have been to bring together researchers active in the various physical and mathematical disciplines comprising the field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give the participants a forum for review of progress and exchange of new ideas in this rapidly developing field, and to summarize the effective state of the art of geothermal reservoir engineering in a form readily useful to the many government and private agencies involved in the development of geothermal energy. To these objectives, the Third Workshop and these Proceedings have been successfully directed. Several important events in this field have occurred since the Second Workshop in December 1976. The first among these was the incorporation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) into the newly formed Department of Energy (DOE) which continues as the leading Federal agency in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The Third Workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from DOE through a subcontract with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. A second significant event was the first conference under the ERDA (DOE)-ENEL cooperative program where many of the results of well testing in both nations were discussed. The Proceedings of that conference should be an important contribution to the literature. These Proceedings of the Third Workshop should also make an important contribution to the literature on geothermal reservoir engineering. Much of the data presented at the Workshop were given for the first time, and full technical papers on these subjects will appear in the professional journals. The results of these studies will assist markedly in developing the research programs to be supported by the Federal agencies, and in reducing the costs of research for individual developers and utilities. It is expected that future workshops of the Stanford Geothermal Program will be as successful as this third one. Planning and execution of the Workshop... [see file; ljd, 10/3/2005] The Program Committee recommended two novel sessions for the Third Workshop, both of which were included in the program. The first was the three overviews given at the Workshop by George Pinder (Princeton) on the Academic aspect, James Bresee (DOE-DGE) on the Government aspect, and Charles Morris (Phillips Petroleum) on the Industry aspect. These constituted the invited slate of presentations from the several sectors of the geothermal community. The Program Committee acknowledges their contributions with gratitude. Recognition of the importance of reservoir assurance in opting for geothermal resources as an alternate energy source for electric energy generation resulted in a Panel Session on Various Definitions of Geothermal Reservoirs. Special acknowledgments are offered to Jack Howard and Werner Schwarz (LBL) and to Jack Howard as moderator; to the panelists: James Leigh (Lloyd's Bank of California), Stephen Lipman (Union Oil), Mark Mathisen (PG&E), Patrick M

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1977-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

62

Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Careers to someone by E-mail Share Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal Careers on Facebook Tweet about Energy Education and Workforce...

63

West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.19166667,"lon":-120.385,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Geothermal reservoir engineering code: comparison and validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTERCOMP has simulated six geothermal reservoir problems. INTERCOMP's geothermal reservoir model was used for all problems. No modifications were made to this model except to provide tabular output of the simulation results in the units used in RFP No. DE-RP03-80SF-10844. No difficulty was encountered in performing the problems described herein, although setting up the boundary and grid conditions exactly as specified were sometimes awkward, and minor modifications to the grid system were necessitated. The results of each problem are presented in tabular and (for many) graphical form.

Not Available

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Physical processes of subsidence in geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to acquire core and fluid from producing geothermal reservoirs (East Mesa, United States, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico); to test specimens of this core for their short-term and long-term (creep) compaction response; and to develop a compaction constitutive model that would allow future analysis of reservoir compaction and a surface subsidence. A total of approximately two hundred feet of core was obtained from eleven wells in the two geothermal fields. Depths and porosities ranged from 3500 to 11,000 feet and 15 to 40 percent, respectively. Several samples of geothermal fluids were also obtained. After geologically and geochemically describing the materials obtained, selected specimens were tested for their response to the pressures and temperatures of the geothermal environment and to simulated changes in those conditions that would be caused by production. Short-term tests (for example, tests for compressibility extending over a time interval of an hour or less in the laboratory) indicated that these sedimentary materials behaved normally with respect to the expected behavior of reservoir sandstones of these depths and porosities. Compressibilities were of the order 1 x 10/sup 6/ psi. Long-term tests, extending up to several weeks in duration, indicated that pore pressure reduction, simulating reservoir production, tended to cause creep compaction at an initial rate of about 1 x 10/sup -7/ percent porosity reduction per second.

Schatz, J.F.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermodynamic behaviour of simplified geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Starting from the basic laws of conservation of mass and energy, the differential equations that represent the thermodynamic behavior of a simplified geothermal reservoir are derived. Its application is limited to a reservoir of high permeability as it usually occurs in the central zone of a geothermal field. A very practical method to solve numerically the equations is presented, based on the direct use of the steam tables. The method, based in one general equation, is extended and illustrated with a numerical example to the case of segregated mass extraction, variable influx and heat exchange between rock and fluid. As it is explained, the method can be easily coupled to several influx models already developed somewhere else. The proposed model can become an important tool to solve practical problems, where like in Los Azufres Mexico, the geothermal field can be divided in an inner part where flashing occurs and an exterior field where storage of water plays the main role.

Hiriart, G.; Sanchez, E.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

Howard, J.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas analysis is applied to exploration at the Lightn~gD ock geothe~aflie ld, which has no surface manifestations, to exploration by drilling, and to monitoring Cerro Prieto - a producing field. It is assumed that reservoir fluids have a different gas chemistry than local groundwater, and that gas chemistry can be interpreted as a three source system, magmatic, crustal, and meteoric, modified by processes of boiling, mixing, and condensation. We show that gas analyses can delineate the location of major structures that serve as fluid conduits, map fluid flow

76

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330┬░C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

77

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interviews were conducted with exploration experts with both geothermal and oil-and-gas industry experience to identify the exploration challenges and best practices for the...

78

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysersanalysis of the geothermal steam production and cold waterAs a result of high rate of steam withdrawal, the reservoir

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail: sass@geo.tu-darmstadt.de ABSTRACT The investigation and exploration of potential deep geothermal important in the exploration of potentially engineered geothermal systems and of mid to low enthalpy

Stanford University

80

DESCRIPTION OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL TWO-PHASE SIMULATOR SHAFT78 FOR USE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, I' Report No. 76-G. : Three- . Dimensional Geothermal Reservoir Simulation,f1161. Coats, K. H. : "Geothermal Reservoir Modeling," paper

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulation methods are used to study how the exploitation of different horizons affects the behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir. The reservoir model is a schematic representation of the Olkaria field in Kenya. The model consists of a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlying the main liquid dominated reservoir. Four different cases were studied, with fluid produced from: 1) the vapor zone only, 2) the liquid zone only, 3) both zones and 4) both zones, but assuming lower values for vertical permeability and porosity. The results indicate that production from the shallow two-phase zone, although resulting in higher enthalpy fluids, may not be advantageous in the long run. Shallow production gives rise to a rather localized depletion of the reservoir, whereas production from deeper horizons may yield a more uniform depletion proces, if vertical permeability is sufficiently large.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.; Bjoernsson, S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal System, Nevada, Status Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal System, Nevada, Status Update Authors Joe Iovenitti, Jon Sainsbury, Ileana Tibuleac, Robert Karlin, Philip Wannamaker, Virginia Maris, David Blackwell, Mahesh Thakur, Fletcher H. Ibser, Jennifer Lewicki, B. Mack. Kennedy and Michael Swyer Conference Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University; Stanford, California; 2013 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the

83

Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and

84

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Injection into a fractured geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study is made on the movement of the thermal fronts in the fracture and in the porous medium when 100{sup 0}C water is injected into a 300{sup 0}C geothermal reservoir with equally spaced horizontal fractures. Numerical modeling calculations were made for a number of thermal conductivity values, as well as different values of the ratio of fracture and rock medium permeabilities. One important result is an indication that although initially, the thermal front in the fracture moves very fast relative to the front in the porous medium as commonly expected, its speed rapidly decreases. At some distance from the injection well the thermal fronts in the fracture and the porous medium coincide, and from that point they advance together. The implication of this result on the effects of fractures on reinjection into geothermal reservoirs is discussed.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal system has been widely studied and reported by scientists through the past several years, but there is still a considerable divergence of opinion regarding the structural setting, origin, and internal structure of this energy resource. Because of accelerating exploration and development drilling that is taking place, there is a need for a reservoir model that is consistent with the limited geologic facts available regarding the area. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F.

88

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

89

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range...

90

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

92

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Gas Analysis of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions: A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in reservoir fluids can be applied to fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the initial phase and lower drill hole completion costs. Commercial costs for fluid inclusion analysis done on at 20 feet intervals on chip samples for 10,000 ft oil wells is about $6,000, and the turn around time is a few weeks.

David I. Norman; Joseph Moore

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through...

95

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through...

96

Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that can help the geothermal industry in exploration, tracer analysis, infrastructure management, and the general distribution and use of data. GIS systems are highly...

97

Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalExplorationAtAkutan,Alaska-FavorableIndicationsForAHigh-EnthalpyHydrothermalResourceNearARemoteMarket&oldid38813...

98

Geothermal reservoir categorization and stimulation study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyses of the fraction of geothermal wells that are dry (dry-hole fraction) indicate that geothermal reservoirs can be fitted into four basic categories: (i) Quaternary to late Tertiary sediments (almost no dry holes); (ii) Quaternary to late Tertiary extrusives (approximately 20 percent dry holes); (iii) Mesozoic or older metamorphic rocks (approximately 25-30 percent dry holes); and (iv) Precambrian or younger rocks (data limited to Roosevelt Springs where 33 percent of the wells were dry). Failure of geothermal wells to flow economically is due mainly to low-permeability formations in unfractured regions. Generally the permeability correlates inversely with the temperature-age product and directly with the original rock porosity and pore size. However, this correlation fails whenever high-stress fields provide vertical fracturing or faulting, and it is the high-stress/low-permeability category that is most amenable to artificial stimulation by hydraulic fracturing, propellant fracturing, or chemical explosive fracturing. Category (i) geothermal fields (e.g., Cerro Prieto, Mexico; Niland, CA; East Mesa, CA) are not recommended for artificial stimulation because these younger sediments almost always produce warm or hot water. Most geothermal fields fit into category (ii) (e.g., Wairakei, New Zealand; Matsukawa, Japan; Ahuachapan, El Salvador) and in the case of Mt. Home, ID, and Chandler, AZ, possess some potential for stimulation. The Geysers is a category (iii) field, and its highly stressed brittle rocks should make this site amenable to stimulation by explosive fracturing techniques. Roosevelt Springs, UT, well 9-1 is in category (iv) and is a flow failure. It represents a prime candidate for stimulation by hydraulic fracturing because it has a measured temperature of 227/sup 0/C, is cased and available for experimentation, and is within 900 m of an excellent geothermal producing well.

Overton, H.L.; Hanold, R.J.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

100

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-THERMAL INFRARED BAND AND MAGNETOTELLURIC METHOD TO SIMULATE A GEOTHERMAL SITTING AT MT. CIREMAI, WEST JAVA at surface is crucial for geothermal exploration. Since field observations to map surface manifestation

Stanford University

102

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University FOR GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION AT JEMEZ PUEBLO IN NEW MEXICO Lianjie Huang1 and Michael Albrecht2 1 Los Alamos Geothermal Technology Center 4200 West Jemez Road, Suite 301-13 Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA e-mail: michael

Stanford University

103

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

104

Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

Kutasov, I.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Challenging Water Dominated Geothermal System: the CerroSixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Simulation, Uenotai Geothermal Field, Akita Prefecture,

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in jointed and layered rocks in geothermal fields.of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 116, 257- 278.fracturing in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: Results

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Application of stress corrosion to geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are several alternative equations which describe slow crack growth by stress corrosion. Presently available data suggest that an alternative form may be preferable to the form which is most often used, but the issue cannot be clearly decided. Presently available stress corrosion data on glasses and ceramics suggest that rocks in a proposed geothermal reservoir will crack readily over long time periods, thus seriously limiting the operation of this type of power source. However, in situ hydrofracturing measurements together with a theoretical treatment suggest that such a reservoir will contain a relatively high pressure over a long period of time without further cracking. Further experimentation is desirable to measure directly the critical stresses for crack growth rates on the order of 10/sup -7/ m/sec.

Demarest, H.H. Jr.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

112

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

113

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

114

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This collaborative project will perform the following tasks to fully define the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoir underlying the Jemez Reservation: - Conduct 1-6,000-scale geologic mapping of 6 mi2 surrounding the Indian Springs area. - Using the detailed geologic map, locate one N-S and two E-W seismic lines and run a seismic survey of 4 mi2; reduce and analyze seismic data using innovative high-resolution seismic migration imaging techniques developed by LANL, and integrate with 3-D audio-frequency MT/MT data acquired at the same area for fault and subsurface structure imaging and resource assessment.

116

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration,...

118

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon...

119

History match simulation of Serrazzano geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The simulator SHAFT79 of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been applied to field-wide distributed parameter simulation of the vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at Serrazzano, Italy. Using a three-dimensional geologically accurate mesh and detailed flow rate data from 19 producing wells, a period of 15.5 years (from 1959 to 1975) has been simulated. The reservoir model used is based on field measurements of temperatures and pressures, laboratory data for core samples, and available geological and hydrological information. The main parameters determined (adjusted) during development of the simulation are permeabilities and much of the initial conditions. Simulated patterns of pressure decline show semi-quantitative agreement with field observations. The simulation suggests that there is cold water recharge and/or incomplete heat transfer from he rock due to fractures in the margins of the reservoir, and some steam flowing to the main well field originates from deep fractures rather than from boiling in the two-phase zones modeled. Simulation methodology and ambiguity of parameter determination is discussed.

Pruess, K.; Weres, O.; Schroeder, R.; Marconcini, R.; Neri, G.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Abstract The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource's connectivity, therefore making fracture characterization highly important. This study aims to develop methodologies to use resistivity measurements to infer fracture properties in geothermal fields. The resistivity distribution in the field can be estimated by measuring potential differences between various points and the data can then be used to infer fracture properties due to the contrast in resistivity between water and rock.

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121

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

122

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

123

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be close to the produced reservoir water without surfaceinjection. Mixing the produced geothermal water with large

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Radon as an In Situ Tracer in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By measuring trace amounts of radon in geothermal steam, utilities can estimate changes in the properties of the fluid produced from a reservoir. These measurements provide a method to monitor the transition from a liquid-dominated reservoir to a boiling reservoir.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

128

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

129

Geothermal exploration and development in Nevada through 1973  

SciTech Connect

A brief description is given of Nevada's geothermal resources, and exploration activity for geothermal power through 1973. The use, geology, exploration, and regulation of the State's geothermal energy resources are discussed.

Garside, L.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Base Technologies and Tools for Supercritical Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Development of downhole tools capable of reliable operation in supercritical environments is a significant challenge with a number of technical and operational hurdles related to both the hardware and electronics design. Hardware designs require the elimination of all elastomer seals and the use of advanced materials. Electronics must be hardened to the extent practicable since no electronics system can survive supercritical temperatures. To develop systems capable of logging in these environments will require a number of developments. More robust packaging of electronics is needed. Sandia will design and develop innovated, highly integrated, high-temperature (HT) data loggers. These data loggers will be designed and developed using silicon-on-insulator/silicon carbide (SOI/SiC) technologies integrated into a MultiChip Module (MCM); greatly increasing the reliability of the overall system (eliminating hundreds of board-level innerconnects) and decreasing the size of the electronics package. Tools employing these electronics will be capable of operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 ┬░C and by using advanced Dewar flasks, will operate in a supercritical reservoir with temperatures over 450 ┬░C and pressures above 70 MPa. Dewar flasks are needed to protect the electronic components, but those currently available are only reliable in temperature regimes in the range of 350 ┬░C; promising advances in materials will be investigated to improve Dewar technologies. HT wireline currently used for logging operations is compromised at temperatures above 300 ┬░C; along with exploring the development of a HT wireline for logging purposes, alternative approaches that employ HT batteries (e.g., those awarded a recent R&D 100) will also be investigated, and if available will enable deployment using slickline, which is not subject to the same temperature limitations as wireline. To demonstrate the capability provided by these improvements, tools will be developed and fielded. The developed base technologies and working tool designs will be available to industry throughout the project period. The developed techniques and subsystems will help to further the advancement of HT tools needed in the geothermal industry.

131

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The authors have analyzed the splitting of shear waves from microearthquakes recorded by a 16-station three-component seismic network at the Northwest Geysers geothermal field, Geysers, California, to determine the preferred orientation of subsurface fractures and cracks. Average polarization crack directions with standard deviation were computed for each station. Also, graphical fracture characterizations in the form of equal-area projections and rose diagrams were created to depict the

132

True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Parameters governing the resistivity in geothermal areas are analyzed. A method for the calculation of the true temperature of geothermal reservoirs is explained, and the effectiveness of the method is evidenced. Author(s): Jin Doo Jung Published: Geoexploration, 1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/0016-7142(77)90002-3 Source: View Original Journal Article

133

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. Basic assumptions of the method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed.

134

Recent geothermal reservoir engineering activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes the most recent activities in reservoir engineering for the geothermal group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The primary emphasis of the geothermal program of LBL is dedicated to reservoir engineering including theoretical investigations, the development and application of mathematical models, and field studies. The objectives of these activities are to develop and validate methods and instruments which will be utilized in the determination of the parameters of geothermal systems, and the identification and evaluation of the importance of the distinct processes which occur in reservoirs. The ultimate goal of the program is the development of state of the art technologies which characterize geothermal reservoirs and evaluate their productive capacity and longevity.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Benson, S.M.; Pruess, K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer

136

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These are appendices A thru E of the Ahuachapan geothermal field reservoir analysis. The volume contains: mineralogy contours, ionic chlorine and silicon dioxide contours, well summaries, and temperature and pressure effects. (JEF)

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Exploration geothermal gradient drilling, Platanares, Honduras, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a review and summary of the core drilling operations component of the Honduras Geothermal Resource Development Project at the Platanares geothermal prospect in Honduras, Central America. Three intermediate depth (428 to 679 m) coreholes are the first continuously cored geothermal exploration boreholes in Honduras. These coring operations are part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) effort funded by the Agency for International Development (AID) and implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) in cooperation with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (ENEE) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy, thermal gradient, and flow test data of the boreholes. The primary objectives of this coring effort were (1) to obtain quantitative information on the temperature distribution as a function of depth, (2) to recover fluids associated with the geothermal reservoir, (3) to recover 75% or better core from the subsurface rock units, and (4) to drill into the subsurface rock as deeply as possible in order to get information on potential reservoir rocks, fracture density, permeabilities, and alteration histories of the rock units beneath the site. The three exploration coreholes drilled to depths of 650, 428 and 679 m, respectively, encountered several hot water entries. Coring operations and associated testing began in mid-October 1986 and were completed at the end of June 1987.

Goff, S.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Ruefenacht, H.D.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.; Ramos, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

139

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

Olsen, G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geothermal Exploration In Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From Remote Sensing Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Poster: Geothermal Exploration In Pilgrim, Alaska- First...

142

Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project Details Activities (23) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) project is a cooperative DOEhdustry project to find, evaluate, and define additional geothermal resources throughout the western United States. The ultimate goal is to aid in the development of geographically diverse geothermal resources and increase electrical power generation from geothermal resources in the continental United States. The project was initiated in April 2000 with a solicitation for industry participation in the project, and this solicitation resulted in seven successful awards in

143

Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote...

144

Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

145

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For...

146

An Evaluation Of Exploration Methods For Low-Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods For Low-Temperature Geothermal Systems In The Artesian-City Area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An...

147

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada...

148

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents the results of analysis of a state of the art set of wireline petrophysical and wellbore image logs recorded in the Alum 25-29 well, southwestern Nevada. The Alum well penetrated nearly 2000 ft (610 m) of volcano-clastic rocks and more than 1000 ft of basement, separated from the sediments by a shallowly dipping detachment fault. The logs were acquired both to characterize the site and also to select the

149

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

150

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data collected during the tests also indicated that the reservoir pressure varies systematically in response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir in southern Raft River valley is fairly extensive and significantly permeable and merits further exploration.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE...

152

Geothermal exploration technology. Annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following programs: electrical and electromagnetic computer modeling techniques; minicomputer for in-field processing of magnetotelluric data; superconducting thin-film gradiometer and magnetometers for geophysical applications; magnetotellurics with SQUID magnetometers; controlled-source electromagnetic system; geothermal seismic field system development; Klamath Basin geothermal resource and exploration technique evaluation; Mt. Hood geothermal resource evaluation; East Mesa seismic study; seismological studies at Cerro Prieto; self-potential studies at Cerro Prieto; resistivity studies at Cerro Prieto; magnetotelluric survey at Cerro Prieto; and precision gravity studies at Cerro Prieto. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

S-cubed geothermal technology and experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of ten research projects are presented. They include: equations describing various geothermal systems, geohydrological environmental effects of geothermal power production, simulation of linear bench-scale experiments, simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin, geopressured geothermal reservoir simulator, user-oriented geothermal reservoir simulator, geothermal well test analyses, geothermal seismic exploration, high resolution seismic mapping of a geothermal reservoir, experimental evaluation of geothermal well logging cables, and list of publications. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

Aydelotte, S.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN  

SciTech Connect

The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98░c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110░c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 ▒ 10░c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5░c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm▓. Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fractured geothermal reservoir growth induced by heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field testing of a hydraulically-stimulated, hot dry rock geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico has indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for documenting the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations which caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock systems may be possible.

Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Robinson, B.A.; Potter, R.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Abstract Modern portable gravimeters can routinely achieve a5 ugal uncertainty with careful measurementprocedures involving multiple station occupations inthe same day, and stacking of readings over at least15 minutes during each occupation. Although furtherimprovements in gravimeter accuracy are feasible,other practical factors relating to repeat surveys ofgeothermal fields make such improvements oflimited value. The two most important factors arebenchmark elevation variations (3 ugal/cm) andgroundwater level fluctuations (5-10 ugal/m). Dualfrequency GPS receivers can give elevations

160

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose an integrated study method for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. This method combines analyses of geology, seismology, and geochemistry. First, geological analysis is made using data of material sources, structures, sediments, and geothermal regimes to determine the hydrocarbon-formation conditions of gas hydrate in marine areas. Then analyses of seismic attributes,such as BSR, AVO, and BZ as well as forward modeling are conducted to predict the potential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Status of geothermal reservoir engineering research projects supported by USDOE/Division of Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the fall of 1977, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) proposed that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) assume lead responsibility, on DGE's behalf, for geothermal reservoir engineering. This summary discusses briefly the DOE/DGE-sponsored geothermal reservoir engineering research program which includes LBL in-house research and research done by others through LBL. LBL in-house research has emphasized improvement of well test analysis methods and the development of geothermal reservoir performance simulators. Work by others has included 18 separate contracts on a variety of technical and scientific projects. Altogether, 29 distinguishable research topics have been addressed. Fourteen institutions, including eight private companies, have interacted with the program. Table 1, along with figures 2 and 3 summarized the status of the work.

Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

164

Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California.

Pickles, W L; Kasameyer, P W; Martini, B A; Potts, D C; Silver, E A

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; INFRARED SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Watson, K. Published: Geophysics, 4/1/1976

166

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of exploration techniques applied to geothermal resource investigations in northern Nevada were evaluated and rated by seven investigators involved in the work. A quantitative rating scheme was used to obtain estimates of technique effectiveness. From survey cost information we also obtained and compared cost-effectiveness estimates for the various techniques. Effectiveness estimates were used to develop an exploration strategy for the area. However, because no deep confirmatory drilling has been done yet, the technique evaluations and exploration

168

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION STRATEGY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Mines Nevada Geothermal Study: Report No. 4, Feb.J. , 1976, Assessing the geothermal resource base of the1977, Microseisms in geothermal Studies in Grass Valley,

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Tiwi geothermal reservoir: Geology, geochemistry, and response to production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tiwi geothermal field is located on the Bicol Peninsula of Southern Luzon in the Philippines. The field is associated with the extinct Quaternary stratovolcano Mt. Malinao, one of a chain of volcanos formed as a result of crustal subduction along the Philippine Trench to the east. The geothermal reservoir is contained within a sequence of interlayered andesite flows and pyroclastic deposits that unconformably overlie a basement complex of marine sediments, metamorphic, and intrusive rocks. In its initial state, the Tiwi reservoir was an overpressured liquid-filled system containing near-neutral sodium chloride water at temperatures exceeding 260{degree}C. The reservoir is partially sealed at its top and sides by hydrothermal argillic alteration products and calcite deposition. Isolated portions of the reservoir contain a corrosive acid chloride-sulfate water associated with a distinctive advanced argillic mineral assemblage. Withdrawal of fluid for electricity generation has caused widespread boiling in the reservoir and the formation of steam zones. The resultant solids deposition in wellbores and near-wellbore formation has been mitigated by a combination of mechanical and chemical well stimulation. Mass withdrawal from the reservoir has also caused invasion of cold groundwater into the reservoir through former fluid outflow channels. During 1983-1987, several wells were flooded with cold water and ceased flowing. In response, PGI moved development drilling west to largely unaffected areas and undertook recompletion and stimulation programs. These programs effectively halted the decline in generation by 1988.

Hoagland, J.R.; Bodell, J.M. (Unocal Geothermal Div., Santa Rosa, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

AN ASSESSMENT OF PRECISE SURFACE GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS FOR MONITORING THE RESPONSE OF A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR TO EXPLOITATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Response of a Geothermal Reservoir to Exploitation R. B,THE RESPONSE OF A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR T EXPLOITATION O R.D i v i s i o n o f Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies o

Grannell, R.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) Exploration Activity...

176

A Reservoir Assessment of the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Upon moderately dipping, fracture network. Condensed steam at the steep reservoir flank drains back to the hot water table. These flanks are defined roughly by marginally-producing geothermal wells. Field extensions are expected to be on the southeast and northwest. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably represent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resitivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. Monitoring gravity and geodetic changes with time and mapping microearthquake activity are methods that show promise for determining reservoir size, possible recharge, production lifetime, and other characteristics of the known stream field. Seismic reflection data may contribute to the efficient exploitation of the field by identifying fracture zones that serve as conduits for the steam. (DJE-2005)

Thomas, Richard P.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Dykstra, Herman; Stockton, A.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A STUDY ON GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGlNEERING APPROACH COMBINED WITH GEOLOGICAL INFORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the combined approaches of reservoir geology and engineering to a geothermal field where geological characteristics are highly complex and heterogeneous.Especially,the concrete approaches are discussed for the case of geothermal reservoir performance studies with a developed numerical model, by showing example cases accompanied with reinjection of produced disposal hot water into underground in an object geothermal reservoir. This combined approach will be a great help in solving complicated problems encountered during the development of a geothermal field.

Hirakawa, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshinobu, F.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fracture network modeling of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluid flow and tracer transport in a fractured Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir are modeled using fracture network modeling techniques. The steady state pressure and flow fields are solved for a two-dimensional, interconnected network of fractures with no-flow outer boundaries and constant-pressure source and sink points to simulate wellbore-fracture intersections. The tracer response is simulated by particle tracking, which follows the progress of a representative sample of individual tracer molecules traveling through the network. Solute retardation due to matrix diffusion and sorption is handled easily with these particle tracking methods. Matrix diffusion is shown to have an important effect in many fractured geothermal reservoirs, including those in crystalline formations of relatively low matrix porosity. Pressure drop and tracer behavior are matched for a fractured HDR reservoir tested at Fenton Hill, NM.

Robinson, B.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Final report: geothermal exploration in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the performance period of the contract, 15 volumes of topical reports and 21 volumes of final technical reports were issued concerning geothermal exploration. These reports are listed. In this ultimate volume of the final technical report, abstracts of all reports, a summary of the highlights of achievements under these reports, and copies of published papers which acknowledge financial support from the contract are included.

Not Available

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Session 10: The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico: The Experiences Gained from Its Exploration and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto case study demonstrated the value of a multidisciplinary effort for exploring and developing a geothermal field. There was no problem in recognizing the geothermal potential of the Cerro Prieto area because of the many obvious surface manifestations. However, the delineation of the geothermal reservoir at depth was not so straightforward. Wells drilled near the abundant surface manifestations only produced fluids of relatively low enthalpy. Later it was determined that these zones of high heat loss corresponded to discharge areas where faults and fractures allowed thermal fluids to leak to the surface, and not to the main geothermal reservoir. The early gravity and seismic refraction surveys provided important information on the general structure of the area. Unaware of the existence of a higher density zone of hydrothermally altered sediments capping the geothermal reservoir, CFE interpreted a basement horst in the western part of the field and hypothesized that the bounding faults were controlling the upward flow of thermal fluids. Attempting to penetrate the sedimentary column to reach the ''basement horst'', CFE discovered the {alpha} geothermal reservoir (in well M-5). The continuation of the geothermal aquifer (actually the {beta} reservoir) east of the original well field was later confirmed by a deep exploration well (M-53). The experience of Cerro Prieto showed the importance of chemical ratios, and geothermometers in general, in establishing the subsurface temperatures and fluid flow patterns. Fluid chemical and isotopic compositions have also been helpful to determine the origin of the fluids, fluid-production mechanisms and production induced effects on the reservoir.

Lippman, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of two hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of granite at 2.7 to 3.0 km (9000 to 10,000 ft) at the Fenton Hill site, near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Both reservoirs are research reservoirs, in the sense that both are fairly small, generally yielding 5 MWt or less, and are intended to serve as the basic building blocks of commercial-sized reservoirs, consisting of 10 to 15 similar fractures that would yield approximately 35 MWt over a 10 to 20 yr period. Both research reservoirs were created in the same well-pair, with energy extraction well number 1 (EE-1) serving as the injection well, and geothermal test well number 2 (GT-2) serving as the extraction, or production, well. The first reservoir was created in the low permeability host rock by fracturing EE-1 at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous temperature was 185/sup 0/C (364/sup 0/F). A second, larger reservoir was formed by extending a small, existing fracture at 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the injection well about 100 m deeper and 10/sup 0/C hotter than the first reservoir. The resulting large fracture propagated upward to about 2.6 km (8600 ft) and appeared to Rave an inlet-to-outlet spacing of 300m (1000 ft), more then three times that of the first fracture. Comparisons are made with the first reservoir. Evaluation of the new reservoir was accomplished in two steps: (1) with a 23-day heat extraction experiment that began October 23, 1979, and (2) a second, longer-term heat extraction experiment still in progress, which as of November 25, 1980 has been in effect for 260 days. The results of this current experiment are compared with earlier experiments.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Seismic and magneto-telluric imaging for geothermal exploration at Jemez pueblo in New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow geothermal reservoir in the Pueblo of Jemez in New Mexico may indicate a commercial-scale geothermal energy potential in the area. To explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, seismic surveys are conducted along three lines for the purpose of imaging complex subsurface structures near the Indian Springs fault zone. A 3-D magneto-telluric (MT) survey is also carried out in the same area. Seismic and MT imaging can provide complementary information to reveal detailed geologic formation properties around the fault zones. The high-resolution seismic images will be used together with MT images, geologic mapping, and hydrogeochemistry, to explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, and to determine whether a conunercial-scale geothermal resource exists for power generation or direct use applications after drilling and well testing.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albrecht, Michael [LOS ALAMOS GEOTHERMAL

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

PROCEEDINGS TWENTIETH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a global reservoir value of the amount of adsorbed liquid water per kg of rock (called ADS in the present paper). We simulated the natural state with different values of ADS,...

184

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics,...

185

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing: 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. This report traces reservoir growth as demonstrated during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m/sup 3/. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D.; Cremer, G.M. (eds.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t h e v a p r phase. I n a vapor-dominated geothermal r e s e r v o i r , t h e only "non-vapor" f l u when adsorbed water is the only "non-vapor" f l u i d present. There is a f u r t h e r consideration

Stanford University

188

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Projects Definition Projects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) projects are cooperative Department of Energy (DOE)/industry projects to find, evaluate, and define additional geothermal resources throughout the western United States. The ultimate goal is to increase electrical power generation from geothermal resources in the United States and facilitate reductions in the cost of geothermal energy through applications of new technology. DOE initiated GRED in April 2000 with a solicitation for industry participation, and this solicitation resulted in seven successful

191

Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Definition Projects And Definition Projects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Details Activities (40) Areas (10) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) projects are cooperative Department of Energy (DOE)/industry projects to find, evaluate, and define additional geothermal resources throughout the western United States. The ultimate goal is to increase electrical power generation from geothermal resources in the United States and facilitate reductions in the cost of geothermal energy through applications of new technology. DOE initiated GRED in April 2000 with a solicitation for industry participation, and this solicitation resulted in seven successful

192

State-of-the-art review of geothermal reservoir modelling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art in geothermal reservoir modelling is summarized and evaluated. Only those models which have been developed exclusively for geothermal simulation are considered. Attention is focused primarily on the two and three dimensional distributed parameter models. The general porous flow theory is formulated. For each model, the governing equations, method of approximation, treatment of the convection term, treatment of the nonlinear coefficients, solution of the resulting algebraic equations, and representation of the well-bore are presented. Example problems that have been treated are discussed briefly. (MHR)

Pinder, G.F.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Geothermal Exploration Best Practices: A Guide to Resource Data Collection,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Best Practices: A Guide to Resource Data Collection, Exploration Best Practices: A Guide to Resource Data Collection, Analysis and Presentation for Geothermal Projects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Exploration Best Practices: A Guide to Resource Data Collection, Analysis and Presentation for Geothermal Projects Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Exploration best practices for any natural resource commodity should aim to reduce the resource risk prior to significant capital investment, for a fraction of the cost of the planned investment. For geothermal energy, the high risks cost of proving the resource is one of the key barriers facing the industry. This guide lays out best practices for geothermal exploration to assist geothermal developers and their

194

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Geothermal chemistry/exploration investigations at Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dixie Valley geothermal field has continuously produced electric power since 1988. At the request of Oxbow Geothermal Corp. and the US Department of Energy, the authors have organized an inter-agency team of investigators to examine several topics of concern regarding management and behavior of the resource. These topics include scaling of the injection system, recharge of the reservoir, geochemical monitoring of the reservoir, and development of increased fumarolic activity north of the power plant.

Goff, F.; Bergfeld, D.; Counce, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey (United States); Bruton, C.J.; Nimz, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area is located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range to the west and the Colorado Plateau to the east. We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different

197

Three-dimensional seismic imaging of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The source interval was 100 feet while the source line spacing was 400 feet. The sources were comprised of 4 vibrator trucks arranged in a box array. Seismic processing involved, among other steps, the picking of over 700,000 of the possible one million traces to determine first arrival travel times, normal moveout correction, 3-D stack, deconvolution, time migration, and depth conversion. The final data set represents a 3-D cube of the subsurface structure in the reservoir. Additionally, the travel times were used to perform tomographic inversions for velocity estimates to support the findings of the surface seismic imaging. The results suggest the presence of at least one dominant fault responsible for the migration of fluids in the reservoir. Furthermore, it is suggested that this feature might be part of a fault system that includes a graben structure.

Feighner, M.; Gritto, R.; Daley, T.M.; Keers, H.; Majer, E.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

199

Numerical simulation of reservoir compaction in liquid dominated geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical model is introduced which simulates the effects of fluid production as well as reinjection on the vertical deformation of water dominated geothermal reservoirs. This program, based on an Integrated Finite Difference technique and Terzaghi's one-dimensional consolidation model, computes the transport of heat and water through porous media, and resulting pore volume changes. Examples are presented to show the effects of reservoir heterogeneities on the compaction of these hot water systems, as well as the effects of different production-injection schemes. The use of isothermal models to simulate the deformation of non-isothermal systems was also investigated.

Lippmann, M.J.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Reservoir studies of the Seltjarnarnes geothermal field, Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Seltjarnarnes geothermal field in Iceland has been exploited for space heating for the last 16 years. A model of the field has been developed that integrates all available data. The model has been calibrated against the flow rate and pressure decline histories of the wells and the temperature and chemical changes of the produced fluids. This has allowed for the estimation of the permeability and porosity distribution of the system, and the volume of the hot reservoir. Predictions of future reservoir behavior using the model suggest small pressure and temperature changes, but a continuous increase in the salinity of the fluids produced.

Tulinius, H.; Spencer, A.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kristmannsdottir, H.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

Pruess, K.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Simple numerical simulation for liquid dominated geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model for geothermal reservoir has been developed. The model used is based on an idealized, two-dimensional case, where the porous medium is isotropic, nonhomogeneous, filled with saturated liquid. The fluids are assumed to have constant and temperature dependent viscosity. A Boussinesq approximation and Darcyĺs law are used. The model will utilize a simple hypothetical geothermal system, i.e. graben within horsts structure, with three layers of different permeabilities. Vorticity plays an importance roles in the natural convection process, and its generation and development do not depend only on the buoyancy, but also on the magnitude and direction relation between the flow velocity and the local gradient of permeability to viscosity ratio. This model is currently used together with a physical, scaled-down reservoir model to help conceptual modeling.

Wintolo, Djoko; Sutrisno; Sudjatmiko; Sudarman, S.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

Ahmad Ghassemi

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Abstract In order to evaluate the suitability of the soil mercury geochemical survey as a geothermal exploration technique, soil concentrates of mercy are compared to the distribution of measured geothermal gradients at Dixie Valley, Nevada; Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and Nova, Japan. Zones containing high mercury values are found to closely correspond to high geothermal gradient zones in all three areas. Moreover, the highest mercury values within the anomalies are found near the wells with the highest geothermal gradient. Such close correspondence between soil concentrations

206

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Details Activities (20) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: In 2005, Idaho National Laboratory was conducting a study of historical exploration practices and success rates for geothermal resources identification. Geo Hills Associates (GHA) was contracted to review and accumulate copies of published literature, Internet information, and unpublished geothermal exploration data to determine the level of exploration and drilling activities that occurred for all of the currently

207

Application of inverse modeling to geothermal reservoir simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the non-isothermal, multiphase, multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching and parameter estimation based on data obtained during testing and exploitation of geothermal fields.The ITOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding simulation output can be calculated. Furthermore, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. Automatic history matching using ITOUGH2 is robust and efficient so that model parameters affecting geothermal field performance can reliably be estimated based on a variety of field measurements such as pressures, temperatures, flow rates, and enthalpies. The paper describes the methodology of inverse modeling and provides a detailed discussion of sample problems to demonstrate the application of the method to data from geothermal reservoirs.

Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Bullivant, D.P.; O`Sullivan, M.J. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Engineering Science

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Workshop on Electrical Methods in Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the workshop are: (1) to disseminate case histories of the application of electrical methods in the geothermal environment; (2) to disseminate information from theoretical and field studies bearing on the relative merits of the reconnaissance electrical methods such as MT/AMT, Tellurics, Bipole-dipole, and self-potential; (3) to disseminate information from theoretical and field studies bearing on the relative merits of the detailed electrical methods such as downhole-to-surface methods, Schlumberger resistivity, electromagnetics; (4) to make studies of the cost-effectiveness of reconnaissance versus detailed electrical methods; (5) to analyze the preferred location and/or locations of electrical methods in typical exploration architecture; (6) to develop goals for specific theoretical and field comparisons of the cost-effectiveness and resolution of the various electrical methods; (7) to develop goals for advances in (a) equipment, (b) data processing, and (c) data interpretation of electrical methods applied in the geothermal environment; and (8) to discuss the advantages and limitations of electrical methods in the search for geothermal resources.

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Geothermal resources: exploration and exploitation. A bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This comprehensive bibliography contains 5476 citations of foreign and domestic research reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books concerned with the exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources. The coverage dates back as far as useful references could be obtained and extends through June 1976. References are arranged in broad subject categories and are made up of complete bibliographic citations. These are followed by a listing of subject descriptors used to describe the subject content of each reference. Four indexes are included: Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number. Also included is a list of journals from which articles were selected. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of Production Decline in Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and analysis methods were gathered from the petroleum, geothermal, and hydrological literature. The data sets examined include: Wairakei, New Zealand -141 wells; Cerro Prieto, Mexico - 18 wells; The Geysers, USA - 27 wells; Larderello, Italy - 9 wells and groups; Matsukawa and Otake, Japan - 8 wells; and Olkaria, Kenya - 1 well. The analysis methods tested were; Arps's equations, Fetkovich type curves, Slider's method for Arps, Gentry's method for Arps, Gentry's and McCray's method, other type curves, P/z vs. Q method, Coats' influence function method, and Bodvarsson's Linearized Free Surface Green's Function method. The conclusions are: (1) The exponential equation fit is satisfactory for geothermal data. (2) The hyperbolic equation should be used only if the data fit well on a hyperbolic type curve. (3) The type curve methods are useful if the data are not too scattered. They work well for vapor dominated systems and poorly for liquid dominated systems. (4) Coats' influence function method can be used even with very scattered data. (5) Bodvarsson's method is still experimental but it shows much promise as a useful tool.

Byrns, R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal reservoir engineering is an important aspect f the Department of Energyĺs Geothermal Technology Division, geothermal research and development program. Reservoir engineering-related research, a component of all geosciences activities, is of particular importance in the context of Hydrothermal Reservoir Research. Three closely related research activities (Brine Injection, Reservoir Definition, and Caldera Reservoir Investigations) are now combined under the more general heading of Reservoir Technology. Scientific investigations, as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program, also contribute greatly to the understanding of the behavior of high-temperature hydrothermal convection systems. With the creation of the Geothermal Technology Organization, where geothermal research will be cost-shard with industry, it is anticipated that a number of research topics will be brought to the point where the geothermal industry can rapidly put new technology into use. 2 tabs., 2 figs.

Mock, John E.; Blackett, Robert E.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reservoir and injection technology: Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford: Third annual report for the period October 1, 1986 through September 30, 1987: (Final report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of geothermal reservoir engineering. General topics covered are: reinjection technology, reservoir technology, and heat extraction. (LSP)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the most definitive in providing the necessary data for successful citing of geothermal exploration, production, and injection wells, which appears to be electrical geophysical...

215

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Caldwell Ranch Exploration and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic...

216

Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples...

217

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...

218

Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal...

219

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Journal Article: Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) edit Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0)...

220

A History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: A History Of Geothermal Exploration In Washington Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The presence of Mt. St. Helens and other Quaternary andesitic volcanoes and other indicators, e.g., both thermal and both mineral springs, in the Washington Cascades suggests that this area has good potential for geothermal resources. Exploration for geothermal resources has been conducted in the region since the early 1970s, with surge of interest and exploration activity in 1974 when the Federal Government developed a leasing program for its land. This surge was followed by a gradual decline in activity through the early 1980s. During the mid 1980s,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Abstract We present integrated geophysical data to characterize a geothermal system at Neal Hot Springs in eastern Oregon. This system is currently being developed for geothermal energy production. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the Western Snake River Plain. The intersection of these two fault systems, coupled with high geothermal gradients from thin continental crust produces pathways for surface water and deep geothermal water interactions at Neal Hot Springs.

222

United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies performed by personnel from the Geothermal Program Office (GPO) strongly suggested that there is a geothermal resource beneath lands controlled by the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot. The geothermal fluid is thought to be convecting meteoric water that is derived from precipitation within the

223

Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Remote sensing is a useful tool for identifying the surface expression of geothermal systems based on characteristic mineral assemblages that result from hydrothermal alteration (Kratt et al., 2004; Vaughan et al., 2005). Buffalo Valley in Pershing and Lander Counties, Nevada, is an area of high potential for geothermal energy production (Shevenell et al., 2004). Geothermal heat is expressed by several hot springs with surface temperatures of up to 79┬░C (Olmsted et al., 1975). The hot springs and a chain of Quaternary cinder cones appear to be

224

A Review of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Republic Geothermal, Inc., and its subcontractors have planned and executed four experimental fracture stimulation treatments under the Department of Energy-funded Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The 2-year program, begun in February 1979, is Ultimately to include six full-scale field hydraulic and chemical stimulation experiments in geothermal wells. This paper describes the overall program and the four treatments completed to date. The GRWSP is organized into two phases. Phase I consists of literature and theoretical studies, laboratory investigations, and numerical work. The main purpose of this work is to establish the technological bases for geothermal well stimulation design. Phase I1 will include the planning, execution, and evaluation of six well stimulation treatments which utilize the technology developed in Phase I. Two stimulation experiments were performed at the Raft River, Idaho, known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in late 1979. This is a naturally fractured, hard rock reservoir with a relatively low geothermal resource temperature 149 C {+-} (300 F{+-}). A conventional planar hydraulic fracture job was performed in Well RRGP-5 and a ''Kiel'' dendritic, or reverse flow, technique was utilized in Well RRGP-4. In mid-1980, two stimulation experiments were performed at the East Mesa, California, KGRA. The stimulation of Well 58-30 provided the first geothermal well fracturing experience in a moderate temperature, 177 C {+-} (350 F{+-}), reservoir with matrix-type rock properties. The two treatments consisted of a conventional hydraulic fracture of a deep, low-permeability zone and a mini-frac ''Kiel'' treatment of a shallow, high-permeability zone in the same well. The stimulation experiment results to date were evaluated using short-term production tests, conventional pressure transient analysis, interference pressure data, chemical and radioactive tracers, borehole acoustic televiewer surveys and numerical models. This combination of evaluation techniques yielded an interpretation of fracture geometry and productivity enhancement. However, the evaluation of artificially induced fractures in naturally fractured formations was found to lead to possibly non-unique solutions. In all the field experiments, artificial fractures were created and well productivity was increased. A discussion of the prestimulation and poststimulation data and their evaluation are provided for each experiment in this report.

Campbell, D. A.; Hanold, R. J.; Sinclair, A. R.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Coordination with Other Geothermal Programs . . . . . . 6the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei Abstract Though exploring for hydrothermal resources is not new, advances in exploration technologies and the pursuit of less visible resources have created a need to outline exploration best practices. This multi-year study outlines 21 geothermal exploration regions in the Western United States. These regions were developed based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) physiographic regions, then adjusted to fit geothermal parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects

228

Formation evaluation in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies relative to some formation evaluation aspects of geothermal reservoirs are reported. The particular reservoirs considered were the liquid dominated type with a lithology of the sedimentary nature. Specific problems of interest included the resistivity behavior of brines and rocks at elevated temperatures and studies on the feasibility of using the well log resistivity data to obtain estimates of reservoir permeability. Several papers summarizing the results of these studies were presented at various technical meetings for rapid dissemination of the results to potential users. These papers together with a summary of data most recently generated are included. A brief review of the research findings precedes the technical papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for four papers. Five papers were abstracted previously for EDB.

Ershaghi, I.; Dougherty, E.E.; Handy, L.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Alternate operating strategies for Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flow testing and heat extraction experiments in prototype Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs have uncovered several challenges which must be addressed before commercialization of the technology is possible. Foremost among these is the creation of a reservoir which simultaneously possesses high permeability pathways and a large volume of fractured rock. The current concept of heat extraction -- a steady state circulation system with fluid pumping from the injection well to a single, low pressure production well -- may limit our ability to create heat extraction systems which meet these goals. A single injection well feeding two production wells producing fluid at moderate pressures is shown to be a potentially superior way to extract heat. Cyclic production is also demonstrated to have potential as a method for sweeping fluid through a larger volume of rock, thereby inhibiting flow channeling and increasing reservoir lifetime. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Robinson, B.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling of geothermal reservoirs: Fundamental processes, computer simulation, and field applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. Then we examine applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation technology on geothermal energy development are pointed out. We conclude with considerations on possible future developments in the mathematical modeling of geothermal fields. 45 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Pruess, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

233

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Chena Hot Springs geothermal field was intensively explored, tested, and developed without a wireline unit between October 2005 and August 2006. Due to the remote location of the project and its small size of 0.4 MW, it was necessary to perform the work without the geothermal industry infrastructure typically utilized in the 48 contiguous states. This could largely be done because some of the wells were capable of artesian flow at below boiling temperatures. The geology, consisting of

234

Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Geographic information systems (GIS) are an underused resource that can help the geothermal industry in exploration, tracer analysis, infrastructure management, and the general distribution and use of data. GIS systems are highly customizable to specific user needs and can use entire corporate data sets through a visual interface. This paper briefly documents the use of GIS in specific examples of geothermal research at the

235

Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For Geothermal Exploration For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and

236

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic

237

Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA Abstract N/A Authors B. A. Martini, E. A. Silver, W. L. Pickles and P. A. Cocks Conference Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting; Morelia, Mexico; 2004 Published Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting;, 2004 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA

238

Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Review of the geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

SciTech Connect

The overall program and the four experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date are described. The GRWSP is organized into two phases. Phase I consists of studies (literature and theoretical), laboratory investigations, and numerical work. Phase II will include the planning, execution and evaluation of six well stimulation treatments which utilize the technology developed in Phase I. Two stimulation experiments were performed at the Raft River, Idaho, Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) in late-1979. This is a naturally fractured, hard rock reservoir with a relatively low geothermal resource temperature (300/sup 0/F). A conventional planar hydraulic fracture job was performed in Well RRGP-5 and a Kiel dendritic (or reverse flow) technique was utilized in Well RRGP-4. In mid-1980, two stimulation experiments were performed at the East Mesa, California, KGRA. The stimulation of Well 58-30 provided the first geothermal well fracturing experience in a moderate temperature (350/sup 0/F/sup +/) reservoir with matrix type rock properties. The two treatments consisted of a conventional hydraulic fracture of a deep, low permeability zone and a minifrac Kiel treatment of a shallow, high permeability zone in the same well. The stimulation experiment results to date were evaluated using short-term production tests, conventional pressure transient analysis, interference pressure data, chemical and radioactive tracers, borehole acoustic televiewer surveys, and numerical models.

Campbell, D.A.; Hanold, R.J.; Sinclair, A.R.; Vetter, O.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fracturing operations in a dry geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracturing operations at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site initiated unique developments necessary to solve problems caused by an extremely harsh downhole environment. Two deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures are in excess of 600/sup 0/F (315/sup 0/C). The wells were drilled during 1979 to 1981, inclined at 35 degrees, one above the other, and directionally drilled in an azimuthal direction orthogonal to the least principal in-situ crustal stress field. Hydraulic fracturing experiments to connect the two wells have used openhole packers, hydraulic jet notching of the borehole wall, cemented-in insolation liners and casing packers. Problems were encountered with hole drag, high fracture gradients, H/sub 2/S in vent back fluids, stress corrosion cracking of tubulars, and the complex nature of three-dimensional fracture growth that requires very large volumes of injected water. Two fractured zones have been formed by hydraulic fracturing and defined by close-in, borehole deployed, microseismic detectors. Initial operations were focused in the injection wellbore near total depth, where water injection treatments totalling 51,000 bbls (8100 m/sup 3/) were accomplished by pumping through a cemented-in 4-1/2 in. liner/PBR assembly. Retrievable casing packers were used to inject 26,000 bbls (4100 m/sup 3/) in the upper section of the open hole. Surface injection pressures (ISIP) varied from 4000 to 5900 psi (27 to 41 MPa) and the fracture gradient ranged from 0.7 to 0.96 psi/ft.

Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Hendron, R.H.; Sinclair, A.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A two-dimensional numerical model of coupled fluid flow, heat transfer and rock mechanics in naturally fractured rock is developed. The model is applicable to assessments of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir characterisation experiments, and to the study of hydraulic stimulations and the heat extraction potential of HDR reservoirs. Modelling assumptions are based on the characteristics of the experimental HDR reservoir in the Carnmenellis granite in Cornwall, S. W. England. In

242

Integrated exploration for low-temperature geothermal resources in the Honey Lake basin, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated exploration study is presented to locate low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the Honey Lake area of northern California. Regional studies to locate the geothermal resources included gravity, infrared, water-temperature, and water-quality analyses. Five anomalies were mapped from resistivity surveys. Additional study of three anomalies by temperature-gradient and seismic methods was undertaken to define structure and potential of the geothermal resource. The gravity data show a graben structure in the area. Seismic reflection data, indicate faults associated with surface-resistivity and temperature-gradient data. The data support the interpretation that the shallow reservoirs are replenished along the fault zones by deeply circulating heated meteoric waters.

Schimschal, U. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

245

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

246

Economic modeling of electricity production from hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs: methodology and analyses. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical methodology is developed for assessing alternative modes of generating electricity from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy sources. The methodology is used in sensitivity analyses to explore relative system economics. The methodology used a computerized, intertemporal optimization model to determine the profit-maximizing design and management of a unified HDR electric power plant with a given set of geologic, engineering, and financial conditions. By iterating this model on price, a levelized busbar cost of electricity is established. By varying the conditions of development, the sensitivity of both optimal management and busbar cost to these conditions are explored. A plausible set of reference case parameters is established at the outset of the sensitivity analyses. This reference case links a multiple-fracture reservoir system to an organic, binary-fluid conversion cycle. A levelized busbar cost of 43.2 mills/kWh ($1978) was determined for the reference case, which had an assumed geothermal gradient of 40/sup 0/C/km, a design well-flow rate of 75 kg/s, an effective heat transfer area per pair of wells of 1.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 2/, and plant design temperature of 160/sup 0/C. Variations in the presumed geothermal gradient, size of the reservoir, drilling costs, real rates of return, and other system parameters yield minimum busbar costs between -40% and +76% of the reference case busbar cost.

Cummings, R.G.; Morris, G.E.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geothermal probabilistic cost model with an application to a geothermal reservoir at Heber, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A financial accounting model that incorporates physical and institutional uncertainties has been developed for geothermal projects. Among the uncertainties it can handle are well depth, flow rate, fluid temperature, and permit and construction times. The outputs of the model are cumulative probability distributions of financial measures such as capital cost, levelized cost, and profit. These outputs are well suited for use in an investment decision incorporating risk. The model has the powerful feature that conditional probability distribution can be used to account for correlations among any of the input variables. The model has been applied to a geothermal reservoir at Heber, California, for a 45-MW binary electric plant. Under the assumptions made, the reservoir appears to be economically viable.

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microseisms in geothermal exploration: studies in Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Frequency-wavenumber (f-k) spectra of seismic noise in the bands 1 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 10 Hz in frequency and parallel bar k parallel bar less than or equal to 35.7 cycles/km in wavenumber, measured at several places in Grass Valley, Nevada, exhibit numerous features which can be correlated with variations in surface geology and sources associated with hot spring activity. Exploration techniques for geothermal reservoirs, based upon the spatial distribution of the amplitude and frequency characteristics of short-period seismic noise, are applied and evaluated in a field program at a potential geothermal area in Grass Valley, Nevada. A detailed investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the noise field was made to guide subsequent data acquisition and processing. Contour maps of normalized noise-level derived from carefully sampled data are dominated by the hot spring noise source and the generally high noise levels outlining the regions of thick alluvium. Major faults are evident when they produce a shallow lateral contrast in rock properties. Conventional seismic noise mapping techniques cannot differentiate noise anomalies due to buried seismic sources from those due to shallow geological effects. The noise radiating from a deep reservoir ought to be evident as body waves of high phase velocity with time-invariant source azimuth. A small two-dimensional array was placed at 16 locations in the region to map propagation parameters. The f-k spectra reveal local shallow sources, but no evidence for a significant body wave component in the noise field was found. With proper data sampling, array processing provides a powerful method for mapping the horizontal component of the vector phase velocity of the noise field. In Grass Valley, and probably in most areas, the 2 to 10 Hz microseismic field is predominantly fundamental mode Rayleigh waves controlled by the very shallow structure.

Liaw, A.L.C.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ASSESSMENT OF LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL Fujimitsu and Sachio Ehara Geothermic Laboratory, Earth Resources Engineering Department, Kyushu University

Stanford University

251

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

252

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Based on Slim Hole Drilling, Volume 1: Analytical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI tested and documented slim hole drilling as a geothermal resource evaluation method. The results of this work confirm that lower cost reservoir evaluations can be performed using slim hole methods. On the basis of this report's probabilistic reservoir size estimate, the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the island of Hawaii could support 100-300 MWe of geothermal power capacity.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Based on Slim Hole Drilling, Volume 2: Application in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI tested and documented slim hole drilling as a geothermal resource evaluation method. The results of this work confirm that lower cost reservoir evaluations can be performed using slim hole methods. On the basis of this report's probabilistic reservoir size estimate, the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the island of Hawaii could support 100-300 MWe of geothermal power capacity.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRZVIOUS PIETHODS OF CALCLXATING STEAM/TtJATER RELATIVE PERPlEX3ILITIES IN GEOTHE?XAL XZSERVOIFG

Stanford University

255

EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project 921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada SUMMARY The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation. Rockwood has submitted to the BLM, Tonopah Field Office, an Operations Plan for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project within Esmeralda County, Nevada. The purpose of the project is to determine subsurface temperatures, confirm the existence of geothermal resources, and

256

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration 5: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.'s (Ormat's) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on

257

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.'s (Ormat's) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on

258

EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project 921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada SUMMARY The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation. Rockwood has submitted to the BLM, Tonopah Field Office, an Operations Plan for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project within Esmeralda County, Nevada. The purpose of the project is to determine subsurface temperatures, confirm the existence of geothermal resources, and

259

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/S0148-9062(97)87449-9 Source: View Original Journal Article Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Numerical_Evaluation_Of_Electromagnetic_Methods_In_Geothermal_Exploration_-_L_Pellerin,_J_M_Johnston_%26_G_W_Hohmann,_Geophysics,_61(1),_1996,_Pp_121-130&oldid=3883

260

New Heat Flow Models in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study developed new analytical models for predicting the temperature distribution within a geothermal reservoir following reinjection of water having a temperature different from that of the reservoir. The study consisted of two parts: developing new analytical models for the heat conduction rate into multi-dimensional, parallelepiped matrix blocks and developing new analytical models for the advance of the thermal front through the geothermal reservoir. In the first part of the study, a number of semi-empirical models for the multi-dimensional heat conduction were developed to overcome the limitations to the exact solutions. The exact solution based on a similarity solution to the heat diffusion equation is the best model for the early-time period, but fails when thermal conduction fronts from opposing sides of the matrix block merge. The exact solution based on an infinite series solution was found not to be useful because it required tens of thousands of terms to be include d for accuracy. The best overall model for the entire conduction time was a semi-empirical model based on an exponential conduction rate. In the second part of the study, the early-time period exact solution based on similarity methods and the semi-empirical exponential model were used to develop new analytical models for the location of the thermal front within the reservoir during injection. These equations were based on an energy balance on the water in the fractured network. These convective models allowed for both dual and triple porosity reservoirs, i.e., one or two independent matrix domains. A method for incorporating measured fracture spacing distributions into these convective models was developed. It was found that there were only minor differences in the predicted areal extent of the heated zone between the dual and triple porosity models. Because of its simplicity, the dual porosity model is recommended. These new models can be used for preliminary reservoir studies. Although they are not as accurate as numerical simulators, they are simple, easy and inexpensive to use. These new models can be used to get general information about reservoir behavior before committing to the considerable greater expense of numerical simulation.

Reis, John

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration- The Mt-5-Ex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration-...

262

Geothermal exploration techniques: a case study. Final report. [Coso geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to review and perform a critical evaluation of geothermal exploration methods and techniques. The original intent was to publish the work as a handbook; however, the information is not specific enough for that purpose. A broad general survey of geothermal exploration techniques is reported in combination with one specific case study.

Combs, J.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geothermal reservoir engineering, second workshop summaries, December 1-3, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Workshop proceedings included the following: (1) During the Overview Session some papers, among others, discussed 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research' and 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Industry'; (2) Session I, Reservoir Physics, included papers on 'Steam Zone Temperature Gradients at the Geysers' and 'Water Influx in a Steam Producing Well'; (3) Session II, Well Testing, included papers on 'Borehole Geophysics in Geothermal Wells--Problems and Progress' and 'Herber-Pressure Interference Study'; (4) Session III, Field Development, included papers on 'A Reservoir Engineering Study of the East Mesa KGRA' and 'Determining the Optimal Rate of Geothermal Energy Extraction'; (5) Session IV, Well Stimulation, included papers on 'Fluid Flow Through a Large Vertical Crack in the Earth's Crust' and 'Explosive Stimulation of Geothermal Wells'; and (6) Session V, Modeling, included papers on 'Steam Transport in Porous Media' and 'Large-Scale Geothermal Field Parameters and Convection Theory.'

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi Stevinweg 1 Delft, 2628 CN, The Netherlands e-mail: h.salimi@tudelft.nl ABSTRACT The Delft Geothermal

Stanford University

265

Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

Pritchett, J.W.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time dependent temperature response of the wells at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Resource were developed. A horizontal, two-dimensional, finite-difference model for calculating pressure effects was constructed to simulate reservoir performance. Vertical, two-dimensional, finite-difference, axisymmetric models for each of the three existing wells at Raft River were also constructed to describe the

267

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Geothermal System (EGS) were coupled with wellbore flow simulations. The 3D reservoir simulations used at par with H2O based EGS. The total exergy that can be generated in 1 km2 area of a geothermal reservoir

Stanford University

268

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Germany iulia.ghergut@geo.uni-goettingen.de ABSTRACT In fluid-based geothermal reservoirs, thermal between "heat exchange area" and RTD features of a geothermal reservoir feel natural, but act highly

Stanford University

269

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Berkeley, California 94720 e-mail: Kboyle@lbl.gov ABSTRACT The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir experiences, and processing system. INTRODUCTION Geological Setting The Geysers geothermal reservoir is located just south

Stanford University

270

Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana  

SciTech Connect

The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░F exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬? of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the ├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?center├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬Ł of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░F or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Reservoir simulation studies: Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical reservoir simulation techniques were used to perform a history-match of the Wairakei geothermal system in New Zealand. First, a one-dimensional (vertical) model was chosen; realistic stratigraphy was incorporated and the known production history was imposed. The effects of surface and deep recharge were included. Good matches were obtained, both for the reservoir pressure decline history and changes in average discharge enthalpy with time. Next, multidimensional effects were incorporated by treating with a two-dimensional vertical section. Again, good history matches were obtained, although computed late-time discharge enthalpies were slightly high. It is believed that this disparity arises from inherently three-dimensional effects. Predictive calculations using the two-dimensional model suggest that continued future production will cause little additional reservoir pressure drop, but that thermal degradation will occur. Finally, ground subsidence data at Wairakei was examined. It was concluded that traditional elastic pore-collapse models based on classical soil-mechanics concepts are inadequate to explain the observed surface deformation. It is speculated that the measured subsidence may be due to structural effects such as aseismic slippage of a buried reservoir boundary fault.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Measurement requirements and methods for geothermal reservoir system parameters: an appraisal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key needs in the advancement of geothermal energy is the availability of adequate measurements to aid the reservoir and production engineer in the development and operation of geothermal reservoirs, wells and the overall process plant. This report documents the geothermal parameters and their measurement requirements and provides an appraisal of measurement methods and instruments capable of meeting the requirements together with recommendations on identified deficiencies.

Lamers, M.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Radon emanometry as a geothermal exploration technique; theory and an example from Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four radon survey lines were established over the geothermal field of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. The radon flux was determined using the Westinghouse Alpha 2 system which measures the flux at each station over a period of 30 days using an alpha-sensitive dosimeter. The method was very successful in locating mapped fault systems that communicate with the structurally controlled geothermal reservoir. It is concluded that this method, coupled with a structural analysis, can be useful as a site-specific exploration tool, particularly in locating exploration holes in known geothermal areas.

Nielson, D.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Methodology for ranking geothermal reservoirs in non-electric industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of geothermal reservoirs exist and to perform a thorough study of each of these reservoirs to determine those most desirable for demonstration projects can be costly and time consuming. A methodology for assigning rankings to these reservoirs, given a limited amount of data, is presented. The top ranked reservoirs would then be studied more thoroughly. In addition, a methodology for ranking the large number of industries that could possibly utilize geothermal energy in nonelectric applications is given to determine those industries which will have the most impact on national energy demand if converted to geothermal use.

Farah, O.G.; Williams, F.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

276

Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Burlington Northern (BN) conducted TIR surveys using a fixed wing aircraft over 17 different geothermal prospects in Washington, Montana and Wyoming because of this remote sensing tool's ability to detect variations in the heat emitted from the earth's surface. The surveys were flown at an average elevation of 5000 ft. above the ground surface which gave a spatial resolution of approximately 7 feet diameter. BN found thermal activity which had not been recognized previously in some prospects (e.g., Lester,

277

Geothermal resource conceptual models using surface exploration data | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal resource conceptual models using surface exploration data Geothermal resource conceptual models using surface exploration data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal resource conceptual models using surface exploration data Abstract The most important element of an analysis to target a geothermal well or assess resource capacity is a resource conceptual model consistent with the available information. A common alternative approach to both targeting and assessment is to focus on a data anomaly or, in some cases, several stacked anomalies. However, even stacked anomalies are commonly misleading without support from a conceptual model. The most important element of a geothermal conceptual model is a predicted natural state isotherm pattern, especially in section view. Although inferring such an isotherm pattern at an

278

DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal Energy Resources DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal Energy Resources February 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Focusing on reducing the upfront costs of geothermal development as well as improve its effectiveness, the U.S. Department of Energy today announced plans to leverage oil and gas expertise to test the reliability and efficiency of geothermal power generation at oil and gas fields. DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy will combine efforts to have experts test and validate low temperature geothermal power generation technologies at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) near Casper, Wyoming.

279

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to:...

280

Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260{degrees}C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was develope. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220{degrees}C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S. Lippmann, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mainieri, A. [Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad, San Jose (Costa Rica)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). Awardees (Company Institution) AltaRock Energy, Inc. Awardee Website http:www.altarockenergy.com Partner 1 University of Nevada at...

282

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electrical conductivity (FEC), to determine the fracture surface area, heat content and heat transfer, flow rates, and chemistry of the geothermal fluids encountered by the...

283

Advances In Geothermal Resource Exploration Circa 2007 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Circa 2007 Exploration Circa 2007 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Advances In Geothermal Resource Exploration Circa 2007 Details Activities (8) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At the outset of the 21st centry, the geothermal community at-large is essentially attempting to use available exploration tools and techniques to find needles (geothermal occurrences) in very large haystacks (expanses of unexplored territory). Historically teh industry has relied on teh presence of surface manifestations of subsurface heat, such as hot springs, fumaroles, or geyers as a firt-order exploration tool., Regrettably, even when such surface manifestations are investigated more closely, there is no proven technique or techniques that can bve used with

284

Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A High-Enthalpy Hydrothermal Resource Near A Remote Market Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A High-Enthalpy Hydrothermal Resource Near A Remote Market Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In summer 2009, the City of Akutan completed an exploration program to characterize the geothermal resource and assess the feasibility of geothermal development on Akutan Island. Akutan Island, Alaska is home to North America's largest seafood processing plant. The City of Akutan and the fishing industry have a combined peak demand of ~7-8 MWe which is currently supplied by diesel fuel. The exploration program included

285

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

286

Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Injection and energy recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies of the effects of injection on the behavior of production wells completed in fractured two-phase geothermal reservoirs are presented. In these studies the multiple-interacting-continua (MINC) method is employed for the modeling of idealized fractured reservoirs. Simulations are carried out for a five-spot well pattern with various well spacings, fracture spacings, and injection fractions. The production rates from the wells are calculated using a deliverability model. The results of the studies show that injection into two-phase fractured reservoirs increases flow rates and decreases enthalpies of producing wells. These two effects offset each other so that injection tends to have small effects on the usable energy output of production wells in the short term. However, if a sufficiently large fraction of the produced fluids is injected, the fracture system may become liquid-filled and an increased steam rate is obtained. Our studies show that injection greatly increases the long-term energy output from wells, as it helps extract heat from the resrvoir rocks. If a high fraction of the produced fluids is injected, the ultimate energy recovery will increase manyfold.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; O'Sullivan, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Abstract Remote sensing is a cost-effective tool that can be used to cover large areas for the...

290

Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fourth exploration well within Fort Bidwell Indian Community (FBIC) lands has been successfully drilled to a total depth of 4,670 feet. Mud return temperatures and cuttings analysis are consistent with the hydrothermal model on which the well location was based. Wireline surveys have encountered an obstruction just below the casing shoe, and further evaluation of this well and resource awaits clean-out and testing activities. Author(s): Joe LaFleur, Anna Carter, Karen Moore, Ben Barker, Paul

291

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

292

Alum Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Alum Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow (6 ft) temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature and seismic data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations. Four geothermal wells will be drilled and geologically characterized in Phase 2. The project will use a coiled-tube rig to test this drilling technology at a geothermal field for the first time. Two slimwells and two production wells will be drilled with core collected and characterized in the target sections of each well. In Phase 3, extended flow tests will be conducted on the producible wells to confirm the geothermal resource followed by an overall assessment of the productivity of the Alum geothermal area. Finally, Phase 3 will evaluate the relative contribution of each exploration technique in reducing risk during the early stages of the geothermal project.

293

Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Mercury Geochemistry Surface Mercury Geochemistry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow, soil-mercury surveys can be used effectively in exploration for geothermal resources. Soil-mercury data from six areas in Nevada, California and New Mexico are analyzed using contour maps, histogram and probability graphs. Plotting on probability graphs allows background and anomalous populations to be resolved even when considerable overlap between populations is present. As is shown in several examples, separate soil-mercury populations can be plausibly interpreted. Mercury data can significantly enhance the structural understanding of a prospect

294

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity are diffuse and appear unsuitable for defining the areal extent of the reservoir. However, from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these regions a general discriminant was constructed that combines several physical parameters for identifying the presence of a geothermal system.

Hadley, D.M.; Cavit, D.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei geothermal field, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an abbreviated summary of the final project report on an extensive collection of fundamental field information concerning the history of the Wairakei geothermal field in New Zealand. The purpose of the effort was to accumulate any and all pertinent data so that various theoretical reservoir simulation studies may be carried out in the future in a meaningful way. Categories of data considered include electrical resistivity measurements, magnetic force surveys, surface heat flow data and a catalog of surface manifestations of geothermal activity, geological and stratigraphic information, residual gravity anomaly surveys, laboratory measurements of formation properties, seismic velocity data, measurements of fluid chemical composition, monthly well-by-well mass and heat production histories for 1953 through 1976, reservoir pressure and temperature data, and measurements of subsidence and horizontal ground deformation. The information is presented in three forms. A review of all the data is contained in the final project report. The present report summarizes that information. In addition, a magnetic tape suitable for use on a computer has been prepared. The magnetic tape contains a bank of information for each well in the field, on a well-by-well basis. For each well, the tape contains the completion date, the surface altitude, the bottomhole depth, the geographic location, the slotted and perforated interval locations, the bottomhole diameter, locations of known casing breaks, the geologic drilling log, fault intersections, shut-in pressure measurements, and month-by-month production totals of both mass and heat for each month from January 1953 through December 1976.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geothermal Exploration In Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From Remote  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From Remote Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From Remote Sensing Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Poster: Geothermal Exploration In Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From Remote Sensing Studies Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In an effort to develop a sustainable alternate energy resource and decrease the dependency on expensive oil in rural Alaska, the Department of Energy and the Alaska Energy Authority have jointly funded an exploration project to investigate the Pilgrim Hot Springs geothermal system in western Alaska. Phase one of the exploration involves a remote sensing based assessment of the geothermal system. We used all available cloud-free summer-time thermal infrared (TIR) images from the Landsat data archive to detect and map the surface thermal anomalies in the study area

297

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Over 2000 km2 (772 mi2) of 5 m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired over the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation in the Fall of 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in the field. We are in the process of

298

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Evaluation of the mercury soil mapping geothermal exploration techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the suitability of the soil mercury geochemical survey as a geothermal exploration technique, soil concentrations of mercury are compared to the distribution of measured geothermal gradients at Dixie Valley, Nevada; Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and Noya, Japan. Zones containing high-mercury values are found to closely correspond to high geothermal gradient zones in all three areas. Moreover, the highest mercury values within the anomalies are found near the wells with the highest geothermal gradient. Such close correspondence between soil concentrations of mercury and high-measured geothermal gradients strongly suggests that relatively low-cost soil mercury geochemical sampling can be effective in identifying drilling targets within high-temperature areas.

Matlick, J.S.; Shiraki, M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Akutan geothermal system, which is a part of Alaska's Aleutian volcanic arc, has several known thermal springs and a known fumarole field. It is reported to be one of the few high-grade geothermal resources in Alaska with a potential for further development as a geothermal energy resource. However, there is paucity of data and limited understanding and characterization of this system for optimal resource development. We used cloud-free summer-time thermal infrared (TIR) images

305

Geothermal exploration and resource assessment: R and D program benefit/cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Exploration and Resource and Reservoir Assessment (GERRA) Research and Development (R and D) Program of the Department of Energy was analyzed to evaluate its cost effectiveness and relevance to the needs of the geothermal exploration industry. This analysis was conducted in three phases. The first phase involved a review of the state-of-the-art and an identification of major R and D needs, followed by a quantitative assessment of the benefits expected from the achievement of some realistic targets for reducing the proportion of unsuccessful (non-productive) wells drilled in the course of exploration for a reservoir. In the second phase, questionnaires concerning the utility, effectiveness and need for improvement of certain commonly used exploration techniques were mailed to a set of 72 individuals active in geothermal exploration. The third phase consisted of in-person interviews with well recognized experts in geothermal exploration. The results of the quantitative analysis suggest that a benefit/cost ratio exceeding ten can be realized for the R and D expenditure by achieving a relatively modest target of improving the current weighted average exploratory drilling success ratio by 3 percentage points (i.e., from 0.24 to 0.27). The responses to the mailed questionnaires indicated that the emphasis of R and D should be on improving the data interpretation capability rather than the data collection (measurement) capability.Liquid geochemistry, seismic methods and thermal methods were identified as the techniques deserving most attention. The in-person interviews revealed that the industry is more concerned about finding buyers (utilities) for the discovered resources than about finding new resources in the near term.

Dhillon, H.; El-Sawy, A.; Goldstein, S.; Meidav, T.; Pfundstein, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Electromagnetic soundings over a geothermal reservoir in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electromagnetic (EM) sounding survey was performed over a region encompassing the Dixie Valley geothermal field with the purpose of mapping the subsurface resistivity in the geothermal field and its surroundings. The EM survey consisted of 19 frequency-domain depth soundings made with the EM-60 system using three separate horizontal-loop transmitters, and was designed to explore a narrow region adjacent to the Stillwater Range to a depth of 2 to 3 k. Most sounding curves could be fitted to three-layer resistivity models. The surface layer is moderately conductive (10 to 15 ohm-m), has a maximum thickness of 500 m, and consists mainly of alluvial fan and lake sediments. More conductive zones are associated with hydrothermally altered rocks; a resistivity high may be associated with siliceous hot spring deposits. The conductive second layer (2 to 5 ohm-m) varies in thickness from 400 to 800 m and thickens toward the center of the valley. This layer probably consists of lacustrine sediments saturated with saline waters. Local resistivity lows observed in the second layer may be related to elevated subsurface temperatures. This layer may act as a cap rock for the geothermal system. Resistivities of the third layer are high (50 to 100 ohm-m) except in a narrow 5-km band paralleling the range front. This low-resistivity zone, within volcanic rocks, correlates well in depth and location with reported zones of geothermal fluid production. It also seems to correlate with the western margin of a concealed graben structure previously inferred from other geophysical data.

Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy@egi.utah.edu ABSTRACT Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) can be developed in reservoirs otherwise lacking sufficient

Stanford University

308

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University electrical generation capacity of a geothermal system. The methodology consists of combining probability of a geothermal reservoir to obtain the probability distribution function for the stored energy ("heat in place

Stanford University

309

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1@kyudai.jp ABSTRACT The natural state model was developed in the Takigami geothermal field, using TOUGH2 simulator

Stanford University

310

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University ON OPTIMAL LOCATION AND SIZE OF A HEAT SINK IN A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Y. Feng, M. Tyagi and C.D. White Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, 70802, USA E-mail: yfeng1@tigers.lsu.edu ABSTRACT Geothermal

Stanford University

311

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated

Stanford University

312

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

313

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

314

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

315

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description A comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach is proposed using existing geophysical exploration technology coupled with new seismic techniques and subject matter experts to determine the combination of geoscience data that demonstrates the greatest potential for identifying EGS drilling targets using non-invasive techniques. This proposed exploration methodology is expected to increase spatial resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness that is inherent in geological data, thereby reducing the uncertainty in the primary selection criteria for identifying EGS drilling targets. These criteria are, in order of importance: (1) temperatures greater than 200-250┬░C at 1-5 km depth; (2) rock type at the depth of interest, and; (3) stress regime.

316

Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The scope of this three phase project includes tasks to validate a variety of innovative exploration and drilling technologies which aim to accurately characterize the geothermal site and thereby reduce project risk. Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations.

317

Exploration Criteria for Low Permeability Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decision to drill deep holes in a prospective geothermal system implies that geothermal energy resources exist at depth. The drill hole location and budget result from hypothesis regarding the location and depth of the resource within the overall system. Although operational decisions normally dictate the practicality of drilling, the characteristics, we must first understand how unique various surface or shallow subsurface data are in assessing the nature of the resource. The following progress report summarizes the results of numerical simulations of heat and mass transport around igneous plutons and the synthesis of geologic data. To date, the results of the study describe the transient nature of thermal resources and the ambiguities which must be accounted for in using current technology to assess the nation's geothermal resources. [DJE-2005

Norton, D.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Abstract Remote sensing is a cost-effective tool that can be used to cover large areas for the purpose of geothermal exploration. A particular application is the use of satellite thermal infrared (TIR) imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard an orbiting satellite. It can be used to search remotely for elevated surface temperatures, which may be associated with geothermal resources. The study region is in the central part of eastern California, with emphasis on the Coso geothermal field. Nighttime scenes are most

319

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data

320

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major concern in the development of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths such as those caused by thermally-induced stress cracking. Past analyses of HDR and HFR reservoirs have tended to focus primarily on the coupling between hydrology (flow), heat transfer, and rock mechanics. Recent studies suggest that rock-fluid interactions and associated mineral dissolution and precipitation effects could have a major impact on the long-term performance of HFR reservoirs. The present paper uses recent European studies as a starting point to explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in HFR systems. We examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance by maintaining or even enhancing injectivity. Chemical manipulations considered here include pH modification and dilution with fresh water. We performed coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua), using the non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate that modifying the injection water chemistry can enhance mineral dissolution and reduce clay swelling. Chemical interactions between rocks and fluids will change a HFR reservoir over time, with some changes favorable and others not. A detailed, quantitative understanding of processes and mechanisms can suggest chemical methods for reservoir management, which may be employed to improve the performance of the geothermal system.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Abstract From 1955 to 1962, approximately 40 wells were drilled in 15 California thermal areas for the purpose of exploring and developing natural steam to utilize for electric power generation. Twenty-four of the wells were drilled in the three areas which at present seem to have the greatest potential for the production of natural steam: The Geysers, Sonoma County; Casa Diablo, Mono County; and the Salton Sea area, Imperial County.Since June 1960, steam from The Geysers thermal area, produced at a rate of approximately 250,000 Ib/hr, has been utilized to operate a 12,500 kw

322

Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project applies the known relationship between fault permeability and the mechanics of rocks under stress to reduce risks in exploration well targeting. Although the concept has been applied before, the project would innovate by dramatically increasing the detail and types of information on the mechanical state of the target area using a variety of low-cost measurements in advance of deep drilling. In addition to the mechanical data, holes into the shallow warm aquifer related to the thermal anomaly will allow analysis of chemical indicators of upflow as a more direct measure of the location of fault permeability.

323

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1966, Energy and power of geothermal resources: Dept. o fTelluric exploration for geothermal anomalies i n Oregon:Bowen, R.G. , 1972, Geothermal o v k i e w s of t h e '

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sandstone consolidation analysis to delineate areas of high-quality reservoirs suitable for production of geopressured geothermal energy along the Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of reservoir quality of lower Tertiary sandstones along the Texas Gulf Coast delineates areas most favorable for geopressured geothermal exploration. Reservoir quality is determined by whole core, acoustic log, and petrographic analyses. The Wilcox Group has good reservoir potential for geopressured geothermal energy in the Middle Texas Gulf Coast and possibly in adjacent areas, but other Wilcox areas are marginal. The Vicksburg Formation in the Lower Texas Gulf Coast is not prospective. Reservoir quality in the Frio Formation increases from very poor in lowermost Texas, to marginal into the Middle Texas Gulf Coast and to good through the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. The Frio Formation in the Upper Texas Gulf Coast has the best deep-reservoir quality of any unit along the Texas Gulf Coast. (MHR)

Loucks, R.G.; Dodge, M.M.; Galloway, W.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT OF THE RESULTS IN THE DESIGN OF THE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS. G. Partasides1 , A. Lizides1 , S. Kassinis1 , G. Florides

Stanford University

326

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University THE SOLUTION OF GEOTHERMAL HEAT-CARRIER Belova .P. Research Geotechnological Centre, Far Eastern Branch of geothermal power plants operation. Silica extraction from the solution of geothermal plants and its cleaning

Stanford University

327

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail:john.lund@nrel.gov ABSTRACT A geothermal direct-use project utilizes a natural resource, a flow of geothermal fluid, aquaculture ponds, and industrial processes. Geothermal utilization requires matching the varied needs

Stanford University

328

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University BINARY POWER PLANTS IN REMOTE GEOTHERMAL AREAS OF INDONESIA Huenges E., K. Erbas, M. Jaya, and A. Saadat in remote areas. Geothermal is one of these and has huge resources in Indonesia. Today, geothermal provides

Stanford University

329

Geothermal field case studies that document the usefulness of models in predicting reservoir and well behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant art of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Falls in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources. 14 refs., 6 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Geothermal Field Case Studies that Document the Usefulness of Models in Predicting Reservoir and Well Behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant part of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Fall in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge

332

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method of using in situ porosity measurements to place an upper bound on geothermal reservoir compaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Placing an upper bound on reservoir compaction requires placing a lower bound on the reservoir effective compaction modulus. Porosity-depth data can be used to find that lower-bound modulus in a young sedimentary basin. Well-log and sample porosity data from a geothermal field in the Imperial Valley, CA, give a lower-bound modulus of 7.7 x 10{sup 3} psi. This modulus is used with pressure drops calculated for a reservoir to determine an upper bound on reservoir compaction. The effects of partial reinjection and aquifer leakage on upper-bound subsidence estimated from the compaction are illustrated for a hypothetical reservoir and well array.

Schatz, J.F.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Cheney, J.A.

1979-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History Abstract After several years of reconnaissance geology in Nevada, an exploration program to evaluate the geothermal resource potential of Dixie Valley was begun in 1974. Between 1974 and 1978 Sunoco Energy Development Co. conducted two heat-flow drilling programs, a resistivity survey, a seismic emission study, a ground noise survey, two magnetotelluric surveys, a hydrology study, and a surface geology survey. The synthesis of the data resulting from these projects into the regional geologic framework led to the acquisition of geothermal resource leases from fee property owners,

335

Geothermal Resource Conceptual Models Using Surface Exploration Data | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Geothermal Resource Conceptual Models Using Surface Exploration Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Resource Conceptual Models Using Surface Exploration Data Abstract The most important element of an analysis to target a geothermal well or assess resource capacity is a resource conceptual model consistent with the available information. A common alternative approach to both targeting and assessment is to focus on a data anomaly or, in some cases, several stacked anomalies. However, even stacked anomalies are commonly misleading without

336

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

337

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

338

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

339

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

340

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

342

Preliminary studies for geothermal exploration in Hawaii, 1973--1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first volume of the series on geothermal exploration in Hawaii is a compilation of information and data relevant to geothermal resources, which are available prior to the commencement of the exploration program. A narrative account of the exploration program puts into perspective the various stages of the exploration program from 1973 to 1975. The value of this narrative account lies in that it shows how the conclusion was reached to concentrate the exploration program on the east rift of Kilauea volcano as that rift zone showed the most promise of all the volcanic centers and rift zones. The narrative ends at the selection of a drilling site. The geology and hydrology of the east rift was summarized to include data existing before the exploration program and some of the early results of the field surveys. A literature survey of Kilauea volcano attempted to cover the information available on the volcano. A literature survey of the geothermal potential of the volcanoes on the island of Oahu has already been published elsewhere. A short summary and reference is included in the volume.

Furumoto, A.S.; MacDonald, G.A.; Druecker, M.; Fan, P.F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Colorado Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

344

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Study of Water Reinjection on the Kamojang Geothermal Reservoir Performance, Indonesia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reservoir simulation model study was developed to investigate effects of water reinjection into the performance of Kamojang geothermal field. Several cases including the existing injection wells and rates, the effect of injection rates, location and depth of proposed injection wells were run to study the temperature, pressure and fluid distribution in the reservoir and its effect into the reservoir and production performance for 30 years of prediction. The results show that the reservoir pressure and temperature drops are very small (4 bar and 5 C, respectively) at the end of the prediction time; therefore, the production target of 140 MW for 30 years can still be accomplished.

Darwis, R.S.; Tampubolon, T.; Simatupang, R.; Asdassah, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Recommendations of the industry advisory panel on geothermal reservoir definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the August 1984 meeting of the advisory panel are listed. The panel's comments on DOE's Geothermal Program and industry's needs and priorities are presented. (MHR)

Gulati, M.S.; Lippmann, M.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Proceedings of the technical review on advances in geothermal reservoir technology---Research in progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This proceedings contains 20 technical papers and abstracts describing most of the research activities funded by the Department of Energy (DOE's) Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, which is under the management of Marshall Reed. The meeting was organized in response to several requests made by geothermal industry representatives who wanted to learn more about technical details of the projects supported by the DOE program. Also, this gives them an opportunity to personally discuss research topics with colleagues in the national laboratories and universities.

Lippmann, M.J. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL FLUID FLOW MONITORING BY THE REPEAT GRAVITY MEASUREMENT AT THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAPAN -APPLICATION OF HYBRID GRAVITY

Stanford University

350

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Kelly Blake and Nicholas C. Davatzes Temple University 1901 North 13th Street structures in image logs of wells from the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF), CA record variation in the azimuth

Stanford University

351

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Talang geothermal field lies in Solok Regency- West Sumatra Province. Low gravity anomaly (bouguer source of the geothermal system in the area. The gravity anomaly leneament trending NW-SE coincident

Stanford University

352

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY F├╝sun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Ayg├╝n G├╝ney, Aye Alpagut B├╝k├╝lmez In Kizildere Geothermal Field, there were 25 drilled wells until 2009, 9 of which are currently being produced

Stanford University

353

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL FIELD - A RECENTLY DESIGNED DIGITAL BOREHOLE LOG DATA SHEET USING MICROSOFT EXCEL of the borehole log data compiled at the Pailas Geothermal Borehole Field (rate of penetration, weight on bit, mud

Stanford University

354

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University problems associated with geothermal utilization. Hellishei├░i Power Plant annually emits around 13000 tons of 2011. H2S will be separated from other geothermal gases at a pilot gas separation plant, dissolved

Stanford University

355

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University APPRAISAL SYSTEM FOR DEEP GEOTHERMAL ENERGY SYSTEMS IN AQUIFERS W.A. van Leeuwen, C.N.P.J. Maaijwee and N.a.vanleeuwen@geo.uu.nl ABSTRACT Pursuit and use of geothermal energy in the Netherlands is developing steadily. However, in order

Stanford University

356

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT OLKARIA I, KENYA Cornel O. Ofwona Geothermal Development Company Ltd., P. O. Box 100746 - 00101 Nairobi, Kenya e-mail: cofwona@gdc.co.ke ABSTRACT Exploitation of Olkaria geothermal field started in 1981 when

Stanford University

357

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Earl Mattson1 , Mitchell Plummer1 , Carl Palmer1 , Larry Hull1 , Samantha Miller1 and Randy Nye2 1 Idaho National Laboratory PO Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2107 2 US Geothermal Inc 1505

Stanford University

358

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University TEMPERATURE DATA OBTAINED AT AND AROUND THE LAS PAILAS GEOTHERMAL PROJECT AND IN RINC├?N DE LA VIEJA NATIONAL the existence of subsoil thermal anomalies that may be correlated with local faults in the Pailas Geothermal

Stanford University

359

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University out in Salavatli geothermal field, Turkey. Since reinjection returns as relatively colder water seismometers at the Salavatli, K├Âk, Aydin, Turkey geothermal area was deployed in May 2010 in connection

Stanford University

360

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Group Zorlu Plaza, Avcilar stanbul, 34310, TURKEY e-mail: aygun.guney@zorlu.com ABSTRACT Geothermal well that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District of Renewable Energy of PRC" had clearly explained that geothermal energy belongs to renewable energy

Stanford University

362

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 SUSTAINABILITY OF GEOTHERMAL DOUBLETS-in the natural energy flow will slowly replenish the geothermal system and it will again be available

Stanford University

363

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University CASING IN A HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL Gunnar Sk├║lason Kaldal1 *, Magn├║s ├?. J├│nsson1 , Halld├│r@hi.is ABSTRACT The production casing of a high temperature geothermal well is subjected to multiple thermo

Stanford University

364

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL FIELD, SW-ICELAND Samuel W. Scott1 , Ingvi Gunnarsson2 , Andri Stefánsson1 , Stefán Arnórsson1 sampling campaign has recently been carried out at the Hellisheiði geothermal field in southwest Iceland

Stanford University

365

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 CONVERTING GEOTHERMAL PLAYS TO PROJECTS and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia e

Stanford University

366

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SOFTWARE S. Alcaraz1 , R. Lane2 , K. Spragg2 , S. Milicich1,3 , F. Sepulveda4 and G. Bignall1 1 Geothermal is an innovative 3-D modelling visualisation software and resource management tool, developed

Stanford University

367

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS FROM SABALAN GEOTHERMAL FIELD, N-W IRAN Haeri A.,1 Strelbitskaya S., Porkhial S2 ., Ashayeri, A1 . 1

Stanford University

368

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

Stanford University

369

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN KOTAMOBAGU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NORTH SULAWESI, INDONESIA Riogilang, H.1, 3 , Itoi, R.1 , Taguchi, S2 from thermal spring, river, and shallow well in Kotamobagu geothermal field. Temperature of waters

Stanford University

370

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 ┬░C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Stanford University

371

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal...

372

Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those processes in reservoir simulators. Second-priority research topics (4): {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced fracture detection geophysical methods, such as 3-D surface seismics, borehole seismics, and imaging using earthquake data. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced stress measurement techniques, such as borehole breakout analysis, tilt-meters, and earthquake focal mechanism analysis. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test high-temperature down-hole tools for short-term and long-term diagnostics, such as borehole imaging, geophone arrays, packers, and electrical tools.

Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report highlights the work that was done to characterize fractured geothermal reservoirs using production data. That includes methods that were developed to infer characteristic functions from production data and models that were designed to optimize reinjection scheduling into geothermal reservoirs, based on these characteristic functions. The characterization method provides a robust way of interpreting tracer and flow rate data from fractured reservoirs. The flow-rate data are used to infer the interwell connectivity, which describes how injected fluids are divided between producers in the reservoir. The tracer data are used to find the tracer kernel for each injector-producer connection. The tracer kernel describes the volume and dispersive properties of the interwell flow path. A combination of parametric and nonparametric regression methods were developed to estimate the tracer kernels for situations where data is collected at variable flow-rate or variable injected concentration conditions. The characteristic functions can be used to calibrate thermal transport models, which can in turn be used to predict the productivity of geothermal systems. This predictive model can be used to optimize injection scheduling in a geothermal reservoir, as is illustrated in this report.

Roland N. Horne, Kewen Li, Mohammed Alaskar, Morgan Ames, Carla Co, Egill Juliusson, Lilja Magnusdottir

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of US organizations sponsored by the US Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: (1) surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; (2) the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; (3) geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and (4) reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geological control on the reservoir characteristics of Olkaria West Geothermal Field, Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The reservoir of the West Olkaria Geothermal Field is hosted within tuffs and the reservoir fluid is characterized by higher concentrations of reservoir CO{sub 2} (10,000-100,000 mg/kg) but lower chloride concentrations of about 200 mg/kg than the East and North East Fields. The West Field is in the outflow and main recharge area of the Olkaria geothermal system. Permeability is generally low in the West Field and its distribution is strongly controlled by the structures. Fault zones show higher permeability with wells drilled within the structures havin larger total mass outputs. However, N-S and NW-SE faults are mainly channels for cold water downflow into the reservoir. Well feeder zones occur mostly at lava-tuff contacts; within fractured lava flows and at the contacts of intrusives and host rocks.

Omenda, Peter A.

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Interaction of cold-water aquifers with exploited reservoirs of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoirs tend to exhibit good hydraulic communication with adjacent cool groundwater aquifers. Under natural state conditions the hot fluids mix with the surrounding colder waters along the margins of the geothermal system, or discharge to shallow levels by flowing up fault L. In response to exploitation reservoir pressures decrease, leading to changes in the fluid flow pattern in the system and to groundwater influx. The various Cerro Prieto reservoirs have responded differently to production, showing localized near-well or generalized boiling, depending on their access to cool-water recharge. Significant cooling by dilution with groundwater has only been observed in wells located near the edges of the field. In general, entry of cool water at Cerro Prieto is beneficial because it tends to maintain reservoir pressures, restrict boiling, and lengthen the life and productivity of wells. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Application of magnetic method to assess the extent of high temperature geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of thermally altered rocks in high temperature geothermal reservoirs hosted by young volcanic rocks can be assessed from magnetic surveys. Magnetic anomalies associated with many geothermal field in New Zealand and Indonesia can be interpreted in terms of thick (up to 1 km) demagnetized reservoir rocks. Demagnetization of these rocks has been confirmed by core studies and is caused by hydrothermal alteration produced from fluid/rock interactions. Models of the demagnetized Wairakei (NZ) and Kamojang (Indonesia) reservoirs are presented which include the productive areas. Magnetic surveys give fast and economical investigations of high temperature prospects if measurements are made from the air. The magnetic interpretation models can provide important constraints for reservoir models. Magnetic ground surveys can also be used to assess the extent of concealed near surface alteration which can be used in site selection of engineering structures.

Soengkono, S.; Hochstein, M.P.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; ELECTRICAL SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; KGRA; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USA; WELLS Author(s): Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf, R.J. Published: Geophysics, 10/12/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article

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381

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Tongonan Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal power from the northern flank of the eroded Ancestral Mount Bao (AMB) volcano in Leyte Island, Philippines. A structural model guide is presented to delineate exploration targets in other flanks of the 1200 km2 area of the AMB volcano. If applied, the model constrains the coverage of geothermal exploration to

382

Reservoir enhancement on the impermeable margins of productive geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate the performance of Los Alamos technology in selected geothermal fields, to adapt the technology to the existing industry infrastructure where necessary, and to facilitate its application through demonstration and communication. The primary specific objective was to identify, collaborate, and partner with geothermal energy- producing companies in an evaluation of the application of Los Alamos microseismic mapping technology for locating fracture permeability in producing geothermal fields.

Goff, S.; Gardner, J.; Dreesen, D.; Whitney, E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Modeling, design, and life performance prediction for energy production from geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

System modeling supports the design and long-term, commercially successful operation of geothermal reservoirs. Modeling guides in the placement of the injection and production wells, in the stimulation of the reservoir, and in the operational strategies used to ensure continuing production. Without an understanding of the reservoir, it is possible to harm the reservoir by inappropriate operation (especially break-through of cold injection fluid) and the desired profitable lifetimes will not be reached. In this project the authors have continued to develop models for predicting the life of geothermal reservoirs. One of the goals has been to maintain and transfer existing Hot Dry Rock two-dimensional fractured reservoir analysis capability to the geothermal industry and to begin the extension of the analysis concepts to three dimensions. Primary focus has been on interaction with industry, maintenance of Geocrack2D, and development of the Geocrack3D model. It is important to emphasize that the modeling is complementary to current industry modeling, in that they focus on flow in fractured rock and on the coupled effect of thermal cooling. In the following sections the authors document activities as part of this research project: industry interaction; national and international collaboration; and model development.

Swenson, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

McCoy Area, Nevada geothermal reservoir assessment case history - Northern Basin and Range. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The McCoy geothermal prospect is located in north-central Nevada at the junction of the Augusta Mountains, Clan Alpine Mountains and the New Pass Range. Geothermal exploration on the prospect consisted of an integrated program of geologic, geochemical and geophysical studies. The geochemical studies included hydrogeochemistry, soil geochemistry, and drill cuttings geochemistry. Geophysical exploration included heatflow studies, aeromagnetic, self-potential, gravity, passive seismic, dipole-dipole resistivity, electromagnetic and magnetotelluric surveys. Exploration drilling includes fifty-two (52) shallow thermal gradient holes and five (5) intermediate depth temperature gradient wells. Shallow low-temperature geothermal reservoirs were encountered in two areas. In the McCoy Mine area the resource was found in the Permo-Pennsylvanian rocks. In the southern part of the prospect a resource with temperatures of 100/sup 0/C was encountered in the basal conglomeratic sandstone of the Triassic section.

Pilkington, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Prediction of thermal front breakthrough due to fluid reinjection in geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemically reactive tracers can be used to measure reservoir temperature distributions because of their extreme sensitivity to temperature. If a reactive tracer flows through a reservoir from an injection well to a production well, then early in the production history the tracer will contact mostly high temperatures and experience a high percentage of decomposition. As more energy is extracted from the reservoir, subsequent reactive tracer tests will show less decomposition. Tracers must be chosen which have reaction kinetics appropriate to the temperature patterns expected in the reservoir under consideration. If kinetics are too slow, no significant reaction occurs. If kinetics are too fast, essentially all of the tracer will react. In neither case can useful information be obtained. Seventeen chemically reactive tracers have been identified which are appropriate for geothermal reservoirs in the 70 to 275/sup 0/C range. Of the 17 tracer reactions investigated, 5 are hydrolysis of esters, 3 are hydrolysis of amines, and 9 are hydrolysis of aryl halides. A method for choice of the appropriate reactive tracer for a given reservoir is also presented. The method requires measurement of the residence time distribution (from a conservative tracer test), an estimate of reservoir temperature, and some simple geochemistry measurements and calculations. Several examples of choosing reactive tracers for existing geothermal reservoirs are given.

Birdsell, S.A.; Robinson, B.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

APPLICATIONS OF GEOTHERMALLY- PRODUCED COLLOIDAL SILICA IN RESERVOIR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Acknowledgment This work was sponsored by the Geothermal Technologies Office in the Department of Energy. 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Project...

387

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mathematical models of land subsidence in geothermal areas:2nd Int. Symp. Land Subsidence, Anaheim, Ca. , Dec. 13-17,Symposium on Land Subsidence, Anaheim, CA, December 10-17,

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 x 104 kg/day of water were produced and 3.2 x 104 kg/dayand water through a porous geothermal system, including the vertical deformations produced

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lualualei Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

390

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

391

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

1974 geothermal field tests at the Niland Reservoir in the Imperial Valley of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The phases of the 1974 geothermal field tests at the Niland Reservoir in the Imperial Valley of California are documented. The following tests are included: separator, steam scrubber, steam turbine, heat exchanger, packed heat exchanger, corrosion, chemical cleaning, and control and instrumentation. (MHR)

Not Available

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Initial Report on the Development of a Monte Carlo-Markov Chain Joint Inversion Approach for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and subsequent characterization of potential resources typically employ a variety of geophysical, geologic and geochemical techniques. However, since the data collected by each technique provide information directly on only one or a very limited set of the many physical parameters that characterize a geothermal system, no single method can be used to describe the system in its entirety. Presently, the usual approach to analyzing disparate data streams for geothermal applications is to invert (or forward model) each data set separately and then combine or compare the resulting models, for the most part in a more or less ad hoc manner. However, while each inversion may yield a model that fits the individual data set, the models are usually inconsistent with each other to some degree. This reflects uncertainties arising from the inevitable fact that geophysical and other exploration data in general are to some extent noisy, incomplete, and of limited sensitivity and resolution, and so yield non-unique results. The purpose of the project described here is to integrate the different model constraints provided by disparate geophysical, geological and geochemical data in a rigorous and consistent manner by formal joint inversion. The objective is to improve the fidelity of exploration results and reservoir characterization, thus addressing the goal of the DOE Geothermal Program to improve success in exploration for economically viable resources by better defining drilling targets, reducing risk, and improving exploration/drilling success rates.

Foxall, W; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Dyer, K; Sun, Y

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to identify thermal characteristics in deep geothermal reservoirs during the long-term operation of a power at several stages during operation of the power plant to identify changes in the reservoir properties temperature changes in the reservoir during power plant operation. Based on the positive results

Stanford University

395

Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

Morgan Ames

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geometry and reservoir heterogeneity of tertiary sandstones: a guide to reservoir continuity and geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

External and internal continuity of Tertiary sandstones are controlled by various factors including structural trends, sand body geometry, and the distribution of mineral framework, matrix, and intersticies within the sand body. Except for the limits imposed by faults, these factors are largely inherited from the depositional environment and modified during sandstone compaction and cementation. Sandstone continuity affects energy exploration and production strategies. The strategies range in scope from regional to site-specific and closely parallel a sandstone hierarchy. The hierarchy includes subdivisions ranking from genetically related aquifer systems down to individual reservoirs within a fault-bounded sandstone. Volumes of individual reservoirs are 50% less to 200% more than estimated from conventional geologic mapping. In general, mapped volumes under-estimate actual volumes where faults are nonsealing and overestimate actual volumes where laterally continuous shale breaks cause reductions in porosity and permeability. Gross variations in these pore properties can be predicted on the basis of internal stratification and sandstone facies. Preliminary analyses indicate that large aquifers are found where barrier and strandplain sandstones parallel regional faults or where fluvial (meandering) channels trend normal to regional faults. Within these sand bodies, porosity and permeability are highest in large-scale crossbedded intervals and lowest in contorted, bioturbated, and small-scale ripple cross-laminated intervals.

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

US Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation. Final report (Year 3)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several reservoir model improvements incorporated into the UTA model are described. The most significant modification to the model was the inclusion of semiimplicit treatment of transmissibilities so as to better handle two-phase flow problems associated with flow near the wellbore. A description of the reservoir mechanics presumed operative in geopressured-geothermal reservoirs is included. A mathematical model describing two-dimensional flow in compacting porous media is developed from the Lagrangian point of view. A description of the way the differential equations are approximated by finite differences and subsequently solved by means of numerical procedures is presented. Various sensitivity studies made with the reservoir model are described. Particular emphasis was given to the study of potential shale dewatering effects on reservoir depletion and the effects of compaction on fluid recovery. To study shale dewatering, the shale thickness and the shale vertical permeability were treated as variables in several simulation experiments. The effects of compaction were modeled with optimistic and pessimistic values for the uniaxial compaction coefficient in an attempt to define a region of expected reservoir performance. Laboratory analysis of core samples obtained from the geopressured-geothermal test well was completed by the end of year 3. These data indicate that the uniaxial compaction coefficient is of the same order of magnitude as the pessimistic value used on the sensitivity studies. Because of this the expected fluid recovery from geopressured reservoirs has been reduced to a nominal 5% of the in-place volumes rather than the previously reported 10%.

MacDonald, R.C.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Chang, M.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fish Lake Valley, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, sits at the southern end of the Mina Deflection where the very active Death Valley-Furnace Creek-Fish Lake Valley fault system makes a right step to transfer slip northward into the Walker Lane. Northern Fish Lake Valley has been pulling part since ca. 6 Ma, primarily along the Emigrant Peak normal fault zone (Stockli et al., 2003). Elevated tectonic activity in Fish Lake Valley suggests there may be increased fracture permeability to facilitate

400

Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging spectrometers separately. May and June 2008, the Prospectir sensor and SEBASS (Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System) were located on together on a roll compensated mount viewing through the same camera port in a Twin Otter. These two imaging spectrometers have similar Instantaneous Fields of View (IFOV) and together collect over 600 channels of spectral information from the visible to the long wave infrared.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal Field, Monograph on The Geysers GeothermalField, Geothermal Resources Council, Special Report no. 17,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Redirected from Under Steamboat Springs Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

403

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Columbus Salt Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

404

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hualalai Northwest Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

405

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between 850 and 100 m...

406

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

None

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Summary of hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. Reservoir growth is traced. Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266/sup 3/m. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Inverse Modelling of the Kawerau Geothermal Reservoir, NZ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we describe an existing model of the Kawerau geothermal field and attempts to improve this model using inverse modeling techniques. A match of model results to natural state temperatures and pressures at three reference depths are presented. These are used to form and ''objective function'' to be minimized by inverse modeling.

White, S.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hawaii Geothermal Project; HGP-A Reservoir Engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project well HGP-A has undergone a two-year testing program which included cold water pumpdown tests, flashing flows with measurements of temperature and pressure profiles, and noise surveys. These tests and the data obtained are discussed in detail.

Yuen, P.C.; Chen, B.H.; Kihara, D.H.; Seki, A.S.; Takahashi, P.K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The first deep geothermal exploration borehole (995 m) to be drilled in the UK for over 20 years was completed at Eastgate (Weardale, Co. Durham) in December 2004. It penetrated 4 m of sandy till (Quaternary), 267.5 m of Lower Carboniferous strata (including the Whin Sill), and 723.5 m of the Weardale Granite (Devonian), with vein mineralization occurring to 913 m. Unlike previous geothermal investigations of UK radiothermal

411

MICROSEISMS IN GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION: STUDIES IN GRASS VALLEY, NEVADA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period seismic noise (T>30 sec) . . . 2.5 Geothermal ground226. Clacy, G.R.T. ? 1968, Geothermal ground noise amplitudestudies at the Cos0 geothermal area, China Lake, California:

Liaw, A.L.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (6) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Arizona Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

413

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Unit. Final report, September 1977-July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three exploratory geothermal wells were drilled in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource area in southwestern Utah to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the US DOE's geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations which included the drilling of an earlier exploratory well at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area was also provided. Two of the wells were abandoned before reaching target depth because of severe lost circulation and hole sloughing problems. The two completed holes reached depths of 5221 ft. and 7735 ft., respectively, and a maximum reservoir temperature of 353/sup 0/F at 7320 ft. was measured. The deepest well flow was tested at the rate of 47,000 lbs/h with a wellhead temperature of 200/sup 0/F and pressure of 3 psig. Based upon current economics, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource is considered to be sub-commercial for the generation of electrical power. A synopsis is given of the exploratory drilling activities and results containing summary drilling, testing, geologic and geochemical information from four exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Use of slim holes for reservoir evaluation at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect

Three slim holes were drilled at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada about 15 km south of Reno. The slim holes were drilled to investigate the geologic conditions, thermal regime and productive characteristics of the geothermal system. They were completed through a geologic sequence consisting of alluvium cemented by geothermal fluids, volcaniclastic materials, and granodiorite. Numerous fractures, mostly sealed, were encountered throughout the drilled depth; however, several open fractures in the granodiorite, dipping between 65 and 90{degree}, had apertures up to 13 mm in width. The depths of the slim holes vary from 262 to 277 m with open-hole diameters of 76 mm. Pressure and temperature logs gave bottom-hole temperatures ranging from 163 to 166{degree} C. During injection testing, downhole pressures were measured using capillary tubing with a surface quartz transducer while temperatures were measured with a Kuster temperature tool located below the capillary tubing pressure chamber. No pressure increase was measured at reservoir depths in any of the three slim holes while injecting 11 kg/s of 29{degree}C water indicating a very high permeability in the geothermal reservoir. These injection test results suggested that productive geothermal fluids could be found at depths sufficient for well pumping equipment and at temperatures needed for electrical power production using binary-type conversion technology.

Combs, Jim; Goranson, Colin

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long Author(s): B. Martin, E. Silver, W. Pickles, P. Cocks Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection,...

416

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal systems. Using borates as an exploation guide, and with key assistance from remote sensing techniques, three new geothermal targets have been identified in...

417

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And...

419

Application of (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry as a Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application of (U-Th)He Thermochronometry as a Geothermal Exploration Tool in Extensional Tectonic Settings: The Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

420

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reservoir exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crucial step in developing enhanced geothermal system (EGS) for commercial production is "reservoir with a base-case temperature of 80o C, representing steam condensate, was used for injection. Conductive heat

Stanford University

422

Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Need to develop a reservoir model for Coso Notes Analysis of complex geothermal system was done by looking at the available data on the Coso Geothermal Field References Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F. (1 September 1985) Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=510801" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers

424

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A close spatial relationship exists between Quaternary borate deposits and moderate to high temperature (>=150oC) geothermal systems in the western part of the Great Basin. Similarly, a strong correlation exists between high concentrations of boron in groundwater and geothermal activity in the Great Basin. These relationships hae special significance for geothermal exploraion becauase ina number of cases, Quaternary surface borates occur without associated springs, and thus the borates can, and

425

Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer economics. Substantial heat that has accumulated within reservoir rock and its vicinity can be extracted by circulating water relatively colder than reservoir temperature. We use compositional reservoir simulation coupled with a semianalytical equation of the wellbore heat loss approximation to estimate surface heat recovery. Additionally, sensitivity analyses provide understanding of the effect of various parameters on heat recovery in the artificial geothermal resources. Using the current state-of-art technology, the cumulative electrical power generated from heat recovered is about 246 MWhr accounting for 90percent downtime. Characteristics of heat storage within the reservoir rock were identified. The factors with the largest impact on the energy recovery during the water injection phase are the duration of the steamflood (which dictates the amount of heat accumulated in the reservoir) and the original reservoir energy in place. Outlet reservoir-fluid temperatures are used to approximate heat loss along the wellbore and estimate surface fluid temperature using the semianalytical approaches. For the injection well with insulation, results indicate that differences in fluid temperature between surface and bottomhole are negligible. However, for the conventional production well, heat loss is estimated around 13 percent resulting in the average surface temperature of 72 degrees C. Producing heat can be used in two applications: direct uses and electricity generation. For the electricity generation application that is used in the economic consideration, the net electrical power generated by this arrival fluid temperature is approximately 3 kW per one producing pattern using Ener-G-Rotors.

Limpasurat, Akkharachai

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 injection wells, varying locations of injection/production segments of wells, and exploiting years. In absence of production/injection wells and presence of a uniform geothermal gradient of 18 C injection well that sequesters CO2 into the geothermal reservoir. This allows assessment of the effect

Stanford University

427

In situ heat transfer in man-made geothermal energy reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock on the west flank of the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex, in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat was extracted in a closed-loop mode of operation, injecting water into one well and extracting the heated water from a separate production well. The first reservoir was produced by fracturing the injection well at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous rock temperature was 185/sup 0/C. The relatively rapid thermal drawdown of the water produced from the first reservoir, 100/sup 0/C in 74 days, indicated that its effective fracture radius was about 60 m (200 ft). Average thermal power extracted was 4 MW. A second, larger reservoir was created by refracturing the injection well 180 m (600 ft) deeper. Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet as well as temperatures inferred from chemical geothermometry showed that the thermal drawdown of this reservoir was negligible; the effective heat transfer area of the new reservoir must be at least 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), nearly six times larger than the first reservoir. In addition reservoir residence time studies employing visible dye tracers indicated that the mean volume of the second reservoir is nine times larger. Other measurements showed that flow impedances were low, downhole water losses from these reservoirs should be manageable, that the geochemistry of the produced water was essentially benign, with no scaling problems apparent, and that the level of induced seismic activity was insignificantly small.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fourth annual report, January 1, 1988--December 1, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

Greg N. Boitnott

2003-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Calculation of geothermal reservoir temperatures and steam fractions from gas compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper deals with the chemical equilibria and physical characteristics of the fluid in the reservoir (temperature, steam fraction with respect to total water, gas/steam ratio, redox conditions), which seem to be responsible for the observed concentrations of some reactive species found in the geothermal fluids (CO2, H2, H2S and CH4). Gas geochemistry is of particular interest in vapor-dominated fields where the fluid discharged consists of almost pure steam containing a limited number of volatile chemical species. Considering several geothermal systems, a good correlation has been obtained among the temperatures calculated from the gas geothermometers and the temperatures measured in the reservoir of evaluated by other physical or chemical methods. 24 refs., 5 figs.

D'Amore, F.; Truesdell, A.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on small computer systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers, was tested on three PCs (486-33, 486-66, Pentium-90), a MacIntosh Quadra 800, and a workstation IBM RISC 6000. A two-phase, single porosity, 3-D geothermal reservoir model with 1,411 irregular grid blocks, with production from and injection into the reservoir was used as the test model. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in each machine environment are described. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported for each of the machines used. It is concluded that the current PCs provide the best price/performance platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers and high-end workstations.

Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

436

Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

Morin, R.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hickman, S.H. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Shapiro, A.M. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Sass, J.H. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Numerical Analysis Of Three Component Induction Logging In Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is supporting the development of the ''Geo-Bilt'', geothermal electromagnetic-induction logging tool that is being built by ElectroManetic Instruments, Inc. The tool consists of three mutually orthogonal magnetic field antennas, and three-component magnetic field receivers located at different distances from the source. In its current configuration, the source that has a moment aligned along the borehole axis consists of a 1m long solenoid, while the two trans-axial sources consist of 1m by 8cm loops of wire. The receivers are located 2m and 5m away from the center of the sources, and five frequencies from 2 kHz to 40 kHz are being employed. This study is numerically investigating (1) the effect of the borehole on the measurements, and (2) the sensitivity of the tool to fracture zone-geometries that might be encountered in a geothermal field. The benefits of the results are that they will lead to a better understanding of the data that the tool produces during its testing phase and an idea of what the limitations of the tool are.

Dr. David L. Alumbaugh

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

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Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels Geothermal Technologies...

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