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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT OCTOBER 1 ­ DECEMBER 31, 1996 #12;1 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL that in the vertical case. 1.2 INTRODUCTION The process of boiling in porous media is of significance in geothermal

Stanford University

3

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT JANUARY 1 - MARCH 31, 1997 #12;2 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL in geothermal systems as well as in many other applications such as porous heat pipes, drying and nuclear waste

Stanford University

4

Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

Stanford University

5

Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2012 Annual Report |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2012 Annual Report Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2012 Annual Report January 7, 2013 - 3:56pm Addthis The Geothermal Technologies...

6

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Report: Geothermal Dual...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

7

Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of PetroleumStanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

8

2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technology Program's (GTP's) involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

Cross, J.; Freeman, J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program, Status Report: Foreign Research on Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) research outside the United States. The term ''enhanced geothermal systems'' refers to the use of advanced technology to extract heat energy from underground in areas with higher than average heat flow but where the natural permeability or fluid content is limited. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from low permeability hydrothermal to hot dry rock.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Kansas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following regional geological and geophysical studies are reported: establishment of a geothermal gradient data base from approximately 45,000 bottom hole temperatures recorded from well logs and interpretation of this data in terms of regional geology and establishment and interpretation of a second data base of geothermal gradients from thermal logging data from 144 holes of opportunity in the state. (MHR)

Steeples, D.W.; Stavnes, S.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geothermal progress monitor report No. 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 6 presents a state-by-state summary of the status of geothermal leasing, exploration, and development in major physiographic regions where geothermal resource potential has been identified. Recent state-specific activities are reported at the end of each state status report, while recent activities of a more general nature are summarized briefly in Part II of the report. A list of recent publications of potential interest to the geothermal community and a directory of contributors to the geothermal progress monitoring system are also included.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT t o U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LAWRENCE BERKELEY PRESENTATIONS & PUBLICATIONS APPENDIX A: STANDARD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM WEEKLY SEMINAR ii 1 4 23 35 49 58 60 63 65 Geothermal Program has maintained momentum built up under the previous National Science Foundation support

Stanford University

14

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News...

16

Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Progress report on electrical...

17

2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report March 5, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Foro Energy, Inc....

18

Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 8. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Report Number 8 presents information concerning ongoing technology transfer activities and the mechanisms used to support these activities within geothermal R and D programs. A state-by-state review of major geothermal development activities for the reporting period 1 February 1983 through 31 July 1983 is provided. Recent drilling and exploration efforts and the current status of geothermal electric power plant development in the United States are summarized.

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Application of the Australian Geothermal Reporting Code to "Convention...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract The Geothermal Reserves and Resources Reporting Code was developed in Australia with the intention of it being principally applied to Australian geothermal...

20

NREL Releases Report on Policy Options to Advance Geothermal...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Geothermal Exploration Policy Mechanisms, was recently released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory | photo courtesy of Geothermal Resources Council. A new DOE report,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

Joe Beall; Mark Walters

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Internal Technical Report, 1981 Annual Report, An Analysis of the Response of the Raft River Geothermal Site Monitor Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A groundwater monitoring program has been established on the Raft River Geothermal Site since 1978. The objective of this program is to document possible impacts that may be caused by geothermal production and injection on the shallow aquifers used for culinary and irrigation purposes. This annual progress report summarizes data from 12 monitor wells during 1981. These data are compared with long-term trends and are correlated with seasonal patterns, irrigation water use and geothermal production and testing. These results provide a basis for predicting long-term impacts of sustained geothermal production and testing. To date, there has been no effect on the water quality of the shallow aquifers.

Thurow, T.L.; Large, R.M.; Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

NATIONAL GEOTHERMAL INFORMATION RESOURCE ANNUAL REPORT, 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an International Geothermal Energy Comnuni ty", J .C.environmental aspects of geothermal energy which provide theData Compilation Geothermal Energy Aspects o f Hydrogen

Phillips, Sidney L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geothermal Progress Monitor. Report No. 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term challenges of the US geothermal industry and its long-range potential are dominant themes in this issue of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Progress Monitor which summarizes calendar-year 1996 events in geothermal development. Competition is seen as an antidote to current problems and a cornerstone of the future. Thus, industry's cost-cutting strategies needed to increase the competitiveness of geothermal energy in world markets are examined. For example, a major challenge facing the US industry today is that the sales contracts of independent producers have reached, or soon will, the critical stage when the prices utilities must pay them drop precipitously, aptly called the cliff. However, Thomas R. Mason, President and CEO of CalEnergy told the DOE 1996 Geothermal Program Review XIV audience that while some of his company's plants have ''gone over the cliff, the world is not coming to an end.'' With the imposition of severe cost-cutting strategies, he said, ''these plants remain profitable... although they have to be run with fewer people and less availability.'' The Technology Development section of the newsletter discusses enhancements to TOUGH2, the general purpose fluid and heat flow simulator and the analysis of drill cores from The Geysers, but the emphasis is on advanced drilling technologies.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the timely development of geothermal resources in the US. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a development program aimed at reducing well costs through improvements in the technology used to drill and complete geothermal wells. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been selected to manage this program for DOE/DGE. Based on analyses of existing well costs, cost reduction goals have been set for the program. These are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987. To meet these goals, technology development in a wide range of areas is required. The near-term goal will be approached by improvements in conventional, rotary drilling technology. The long-term goal will require the development of an advanced drilling and completion system. Currently, the program is emphasizing activities directed at the near-term cost reduction goal, but increased emphasis on advanced system development is anticipated as time progresses. The program is structured into six sub-elements: Drilling Hardware, Drilling Fluids, Completion Technology, Lost Circulation Control Methods, Advanced Drilling Systems, and Supporting Technology. Technology development in each of these areas is conducted primarily through contracts with private industries and universities. Some projects are conducted internally by Sandia. This report describes the program, status, and results of ongoing R and D within the program for the 1980 fiscal year.

Varnado, S. G.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geothermal Progress Monitor, report No. 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Issue No. 13 documents that most related factors favor the growth and geographic expansion of the US geothermal industry and that the industry is being technologically prepared to meet those challenges into the next century. It is the function of GPM to identify trends in the use of this resource and to provide a historical record of its development pathway. The information assembled for this issue of GPM indicates that trends in the use of geothermal energy in this country and abroad continue to be very positive. Favorable sentiments as well as pertinent actions on the part of both government and industry are documented in almost every section. The FEDERAL BEAT points up that the National Energy Strategy (NES) developed at the highest levels of the US government recognizes the environmental and energy security advantages of renewable energy, including geothermal, and makes a commitment to substantial diversification'' of US sources of energy. With the announcement of the construction of several new plants and plant expansions, the INDUSTRY SCENE illustrates industry's continued expectation tha the use of geothermal energy will prove profitable to investors. In DEVELOPMENT STATUS, spokesmen for both an investor-owned utility and a major geothermal developer express strong support for geothermal power, particularly emphasizing its environmental advantages. DEVELOPMENT STATUS also reports that early successes have been achieved by joint DOE/industry R D at The Geysers which will have important impacts on the future management of this mature field. Also there is increasing interest in hot dry rock. Analyses conducted in support of the NES indicate that if all the postulated technology developments occur in this field, the price of energy derived from hot dry rock in the US could drop.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Progress Report on Electrical Resistivity Studies Coso Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Progress Report on Electrical Resistivity Studies Coso Geothermal Area Inyo County California Abstract The first...

29

Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II: Animas Valley, New...

30

Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Geothermal progress monitor: Report No. 17  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is particularly concerned with reducing the costs of geothermal power generation, especially with the abundant moderate to low-temperature resources in the US. This concern is reflected in DOE`s support of a number of energy conversion projects. Projects which focus on the costs and performance of binary cycle technology include a commercial demonstration of supersaturated turbine expansions, which earlier studies have indicated could increase the power produced per pound of fluid. Other binary cycle projects include evaluations of the performance of various working fluid mixtures and the development and testing of advanced heat rejection systems which are desperately needed in water-short geothermal areas. DOE is also investigating the applicability of flash steam technology to low-temperature resources, as an economic alternative to binary cycle systems. A low-cost, low-pressure steam turbine, selected for a grant, will be constructed to utilize fluid discharged from a flash steam plant in Nevada. Another project addresses the efficiency of high-temperature flash plants with a demonstration of the performance of the Biphase turbine which may increase the power output of such installations with no increase in fluid flow. Perhaps the most noteworthy feature of this issue of the GPM, the 17th since its inception in 1980, is the high degree of industry participation in federally-sponsored geothermal research and development. This report describes geothermal development activities.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Geothermal progress monitor. Report No. 16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue, the 16th since 1980, illustrates the potential of the liquid-dominated geothermal resource. Achievement of this potential by publicly held companies, who are required to publish financial statements, has involved the use of high-quality resources and the best available technologies or, in some instances, their own innovative modifications of existing technologies as well as a high degree of technical and management expertise. This issue also documents some effects of the new climate of utility deregulation and competition among independent power producers on the geothermal industry. The continuing importance attached to geothermal heat pumps as a preferred space conditioning technology by a number of disparate interests is illustrated by a number of articles. Magma Power Co. reported record gains in both 1993 revenues and earnings over 1992; California Energy has acquired Magma, creating the largest geothermal energy producer in the world. Owing to stagnation in USA, it was decided to focus on international markets. After the introduction, the issue has sections on: Federal beat, industry scene, financing, technology development, direct use technology, state and local, international, technology transfer, and directory.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

US geothermal database and Oregon cascade thermal studies: (Final report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two tasks of different nature. The first of these tasks was the preparation of a data base for heat flow and associated ancillary information for the United States. This data base is being used as the basis for preparation of the United States portion of a geothermal map of North America. The ''Geothermal Map of North America'' will be published as part of the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) series of the Geological Society of America. The second of these tasks was to make a geothermal evaluation of holes drilled in the Cascade Range as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)/Industry co-sponsored deep drilling project. This second task involved field work, making temperature logs in the holes, and laboratory work, measuring thermal conductivity measurements on an extensive set of samples from these holes. The culmination of this task was an interpretation of heat flow values in terms of the regional thermal conditions; implications for geothermal systems in the Cascade Range; evaluation of the effect of groundwater flow on the depths that need to be drilled for successful measurements in the Cascade Range; and investigation of the nature of the surface groundwater effects on the temperature-depth curves. 40 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Carter, L.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NATIONAL GEOTHERMAL INFORMATION RESOURCE ANNUAL REPORT, 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schwartz, Oct: 1977. "Geothermal Aspects o f Hydrogen Sul 4.S.R. Schwartz, "Review o f Geothermal Subsidence", LBL-3220,k i l e d to over 200 geothermal specialists i n 1977. Over

Phillips, Sidney L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Imperial County geothermal development. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities of the Geothermal Office during the quarter are discussed, including: important geothermal events, geothermal waste disposal, a grant award by the California Energy Commission, the geothermal development meeting, and the current status of geothermal development in Imperial County. Activities of the Geothermal Planner are addressed, including permits, processing of EIR's, and other planning activities. Progress on the direct heat study is reported.

Not Available

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Beowawe Geothermal Area evaluation program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several exploration programs were conducted at the Beowawe Geothermal Prospect, Lander and Eureka County, Nevada. Part I, consisting of a shallow temperature hole program, a mercury soil sampling survey, and a self-potential survey were conducted in order to select the optimum site for an exploratory well. Part II consisted of drilling a 5927-foot exploratory well, running geophysical logs, conducting a drill stem test (2937-3208 feet), and a short-term (3-day) flow test (1655-2188 feet). All basic data collected is summarized.

Iovenitti, J. L

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms, Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a review of geothermal project financial terms as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The data were collected over seven analysis periods from the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2009 to the second half (2H) of 2011.

Lowder, T.; Hubbell, R.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state-by-state review of major geothermal-development activities during 1982 is presented. It also inlcudes a summary of recent drilling and exploration efforts and the results of the 1982 leasing program. Two complementary sections feature an update of geothermal direct-use applications and a site-by-site summary of US geothermal electric-power development.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 5. Progress report, June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Updated information is presented on activities and progress in the areas of electric power plants, direct heat applications, deep well drilling, leasing of federal lands, legislative and regulatory actions, research and development, and others. Special attention is given in this report to 1980 highlights, particularly in the areas of electric and direct heat uses, drilling, and the Federal lands leasing program. This report also includes a summary of the DOE FY 1982 geothermal budget request to Congress.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geothermal Progress Monitor: Report No. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 14th since its inception in 1980, highlights the anticipated rapid growth in the use of geothermal heat pumps and documents the continued growth in the use of geothermal energy for power generation, both in this country and abroad. In countries with a relatively large demand for new generation capacity, geothermal, if available, is being called on as a preferable alternative to the use of domestic or imported oil. On the other hand, in this country where current demand for new capacity is less, geothermal energy is commonly being put to use in small power generation units operating on the hot water resource.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geothermal Progress Monitor. Report No. 15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two themes dominate this issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 15th since its inception in 1980. The first of these is the significance of the government/industry partnership role in geothermal development. This joint effort is reflected in the continued, measured growth in the use of geothermal energy, for both power generation and direct use applications, in this country and abroad, as well as in the development of new, innovative technologies to ensure a bright future for the resource. The second theme is the growing popularity of geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) among utilities, their customers, and federal agencies, all with disparate interests in the technology.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Abstract With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy...

44

Geothermal energy in Arizona. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current knowledge and basic data on geothermal resources in Arizona are compiled. The following are covered: specific area investigations, thermal aspects of Arizona, and exploration methods. (MHR)

Stone, C.; Witcher, J.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

RRC - Geothermal Production Test Completion or Recompletion Report...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Test Completion or Recompletion Report and Log Form GT-1 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RRC - Geothermal Production Test...

46

Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a preliminary engineering and economic assessment of five direct use projects using low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. Each project site and end-use application was selected because each has a high potential for successful, near-term (2 to 5 years) commercial development. The report also includes an extensive bibliography, and reference and contact lists. The five projects are: Wendel Agricultural Complex, East Mesa Livestock Complex, East Mesa Vegetable Dehydration Facility, Calapatria Heating District and Bridgeport Heating District. The projects involve actual investors, resource owners, and operators with varying financial commitments for project development. For each project, an implementation plan is defined which identifies major barriers to development and methods to overcome them. All projects were determined to be potentially feasible. Three of the projects cascade heat from a small-scale electric generator to direct use applications. Small-scale electric generation technology (especially in the 0.5 to 3 MW range) has recently evolved to such a degree as to warrant serious consideration. These systems provide a year-round heating load and substantially improve the economic feasibility of most direct use energy projects using geothermal resources above 200/sup 0/F.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal progress monitor: Report Number 19  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Short articles are presented related to activities in the federal government and the geothermal industry, international developments, state and local government activities, technology development, and technology transfer. Power plant tables and a directory of organizations involved in geothermal resource development are included.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) is the 11th since the inception of the publication in 1980. It continues to synthesize information on all aspects of geothermal development in this country and abroad to permit identification and quantification of trends in the use of this energy technology. In addition, the GPM is a mechanism for transferring current information on geothermal technology development to the private sector, and, over time, provides a historical record for those interested in the development pathway of the resource. In sum, the Department of Energy makes the GPM available to the many diverse interests that make up the geothermal community for the multiple uses it may serve. This issue of the GPM points up very clearly how closely knit many of those diverse interests have become. It might well be called an international issue'' since many of its pages are devoted to news of geothermal development abroad, to the efforts of the US industry to participate in overseas development, to the support given those efforts by federal and state agencies, and to the formation of the International Geothermal Association (IGA). All of these events indicate that the geothermal community has become truly international in character, an occurrence that can only enhance the future of geothermal energy as a major source of energy supply worldwide. 15 figs.

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

Capuano, Louis, Jr. (Thermasource Inc.); Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert (Thermasource Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Economic assessment of nine geothermal direct use applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an economic analysis of nine federally-supported geothermal direct heat applications which were part of DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program. Three of the projects analyzed were user-owned systems, and six were district heating systems. Five of the nine projects are successful from an economic standpoint and the majority of these projects are in areas where geothermal energy has long been used for heating. The results of this analysis indicate that geothermal energy projects can be economic under certain conditions, but these conditions may not be very widespread.

Gordon, L.C.; Breton, T.R.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

New Mexico statewide geothermal energy program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of geothermal energy resource assessment work conducted by the New Mexico Statewide Geothermal Energy Program during the period September 7, 1984, through February 29, 1988, under the sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy and the State of New Mexico Research and Development Institute. The research program was administered by the New Mexico Research and Development Institute and was conducted by professional staff members at New Mexico State University and Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. The report is divided into four chapters, which correspond to the principal tasks delineated in the above grant. This work extends the knowledge of the geothermal energy resource base in southern New Mexico with the potential for commercial applications.

Icerman, L.; Parker, S.K. (ed.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council fifth annual report. Final draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is the natural heat of the earth, and can be tapped as a clean, safe, economical alternative source of energy. Much of the geothermal energy resource is recoverable with current or near-current technology and could make a significant contribution both to increasing domestic energy supplies and to reducing the US dependence on imported oil. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural process applications. This report describes the progress for fiscal year 1980 (FY80) of the Federal Geothermal Program. It also summarizes the goals, strategy, and plans which form the basis for the FY81 and FY82 program activities and reflects the recent change in national policy affecting Federal research, development and demonstration programs. The Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC) believes that substantial progress can and will be made in the development of geothermal energy. The IGCC goals are: (1) reduce the institutional barriers so that geothermal projects can be on-line in one-half the current time; (2) make moderate temperature resources an economically competitive source of electricity; (3) remove the backlog of noncompetitive lease applications; (4) competitive lease all KGRA lands; and (5) cut the cost of hydrothermal technology by 25%.

Abel, Fred H.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance: Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes geothermal activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the second quarter of FY-95. It describes 92 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources and equipment. Research activities are summarized on geothermal energy cost evaluation, low temperature resource assessment and ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct heat Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential geothermal direct-use energy market and its application to projects in California are assessed. Project identification effort is to be focused on those that have the highest probability for near-term successful commercial operations. Near-term herein means 2 to 5 years for project implementation. Phase I has been focused on defining and assessing: (1) the geothermal direct-use resources that are suitable for near-term utilization; and (2) the generic applications (municipal heating districts, horticultural greenhouse firms, laundries, etc.) that are suitable for near-term projects. Five economic development regions in the state, containing recognized geothermal direct-use resources, have been defined. Thirty-eight direct use resources have been evaluated in these regions. After assessment against pre-selected criteria, twenty-seven have been rated with a priority of I, II or III, thereby qualifying them for further marketing effort. The five areas with a priority of I are summarized. These areas have no perceived impediments to near-term development. Twenty-nine generic categories of applications were assessed against previously selected criteria to determine their near term potential for direct use of geothermal fluids. Some twenty industry, commercial and institutional application categories were rated with a priority of I, II or III and warrant further marketing efforts. The seven categories with a priority of I are listed. These categories were found to have the least impediments to near-term application projects.

Longyear, A.B. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following R&D activities: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Other activities are reported on technical assistance, technology transfer, and the geothermal progress monitor.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research at the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility was successfully concluded in September 1979. In 13,000 hours of operation over a three and one half year period, the nominal 10 megawatt electrical equivalent GLEF provided the opportunity to identify problems in working with highly saline geothermal fluids and to develop solutions that could be applied to a commercial geothermal power plant producing electricity. A seven and one half year period beginning in April 1972, with early well flow testing and ending in September 1979, with the completion of extensive facility and reservoir operations is covered. During this period, the facility was designed, constructed and operated in several configurations. A comprehensive reference document, addressing or referencing documentation of all the key areas investigated is presented.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

INEL Geothermal Environmental Program. Final environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of environmental monitoring programs and research during development of a moderate temperature geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley is presented. One of the major objectives was to develop programs for environmental assessment and protection that could serve as an example for similar types of development. The monitoring studies were designed to establish baseline conditions (predevelopment) of the physical, biological, and human environment. Potential changes were assessed and adverse environmental impacts minimized. No major environmental impacts resulted from development of the Raft River Geothermal Research Facility. The results of the physical, biological, and human environment monitoring programs are summarized.

Thurow, T.L.; Cahn, L.S.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective for the Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project is to provide another source of base-load renewable energy in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB). To accomplish this, Chena Hot Springs Resort (Chena) drilled a re-injection well to 2700 feet and a production well to 2500 feet. The re-injection well allows a greater flow of water to directly replace the water removed from the warmest fractures in the geothermal reservoir. The new production will provide access to warmer temperature water in greater quantities.

Karl, Bernie [CHSR,LLC Owner] [CHSR,LLC Owner

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Geothermal Technologies Office 2012 Peer Review Report  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysis Geothermal Play Fairway GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES FY14

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geothermal Technologies Office Annual Report 2012  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysis Geothermal Play Fairway GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES

62

Annual resources report. [Glossary on technical terms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is separated into the following sections: acknowledgments; a table of contents; a list of tables and figures; a glossary; an introduction; an overview of the role of energy resources in New Mexico; separate sections on oil and gas, coal, electrical generation, uranium, and geothermal energy; a section on the geologic setting of oil and gas, coal, and uranium; an appendix of additional tables pertaining to oil and gas development; and a listing of selected references. The glossary is a brief listing of technical terms used in the report with simplified definitions for the reader's use. The overview contains highlights of data found in the report as well as comparisons of New Mexico's resources with those of other states and the nation. In general, each section covering a resource area describes reserves, production, prices, consumption, transportation, employment, and revenue statistics over the past ten or more years and projections to the year 2000.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NANA Geothermal Assessment Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) assessed geothermal energy potential in the NANA region for both heat and/or electricity production. The Geothermal Assessment Project (GAP) was a systematic process that looked at community resources and the community's capacity and desire to develop these resources. In October 2007, the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17075 to NRC for the GAP studies. Two moderately remote sites in the NANA region were judged to have the most potential for geothermal development: (1) Granite Mountain, about 40 miles south of Buckland, and (2) the Division Hot Springs area in the Purcell Mountains, about 40 miles south of Shungnak and Kobuk. Data were collected on-site at Granite Mountain Hot Springs in September 2009, and at Division Hot Springs in April 2010. Although both target geothermal areas could be further investigated with a variety of exploration techniques such as a remote sensing study, a soil geochemical study, or ground-based geophysical surveys, it was recommended that on-site or direct heat use development options are more attractive at this time, rather than investigations aimed more at electric power generation.

Jay Hermanson

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geothermal progress monitor: Report No. 10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue synthesizes information on all aspects of geothermal development in this country and abroad to permit identification and quantification of trends in the use of this source of energy. The contents include: (1) the Federal Beat; (2) The Industry Scene; (3) Financing; (4) Development Status; (5) Leasing and Drilling; (6) State and Local; (7) International; and (8) Technology Transfer. (ACR)

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-97. It describes 174 contracts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Occidental Geothermal, Inc. , Oxy Geothermal Power Plant No. 1: draft environmental impact report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following aspects of the proposed geothermal power plant are discussed: the project description; the environment in the vicinity of project as it exists before the project begins, from both a local and regional perspective; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the growth inducing impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

South Dakota Geothermal Commercialization Project. Final report, July 1979-October 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the South Dakota Energy Office in providing technical assistance, planning, and commercialization projects for geothermal energy. Projects included geothermal prospect identification, area development plans, and active demonstration/commercialization projects. (ACR)

Wegman, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs" was organized collaboratively by the NSF-funded Tengchong PIRE

Ahmad, Sajjad

69

Geothermal resource assessment, South Dakota: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven geothermal aquifers in South Dakota contain an accessible resource base of about 11,207 x 10/sup 18/ J. The potentially productive geothermal aquifers are: Deadwood Formation (Cambrian), Winnipeg Formation + Red River Formation + Englewood Limestone (Ordovician through Devonian), Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Minnelusa Formation (Mississippian-Permian), Inyan Kara Group (Cretaceous), and Newcastle Sandstone (Cretaceous). The resource estimate was obtained by first using heat flow, thermal conductivity, temperature gradient, and stratigraphic data to estimate aquifer temperatures. The heat content of each aquifer was determined from the product of the volumetric heat capacity, aquifer volume, and temperature difference between the aquifer and the mean annual temperature for a 14 x 14 grid of 240 km/sup 2/ cells. Geothermal fluid temperatures range from about 120/sup 0/C in the Deadwood Formation in the Williston Basin to about 30/sup 0/C for the Newcastle Sandstone in south-central South Dakota. The area containing the resource lies largely west of the Missouri River. About 10,000 km/sup 2/ of the resource area is characterized by anomalously high heat flow values greater than 100 mW m/sup -2/.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Annual Report for Fiscal Year 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. Table 1 lists significant events in the history of use of geothermal energy in the U.S., starting in1884. That is useful for tracking which Federal departments and agencies managed aspects of this work over time. Table 2 gives a complete accounting for all Federal outlays for geothermal energy development for FY 1979 - 1989, including non-DOE outlays. Table 3 shows the status of the U.S. Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program at end of FY 1989: of the $500 million authorized, $285 million was committed to eight projects, and about $40 million had been paid out on project defaults. An additional $101 million had been repaid by the borrowers. (DJE 2005)

None

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical assistance was provided to 60 requests from 19 states. R&D progress is reported on: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Two presentations and one tour were conducted, and three technical papers were prepared. The Geothermal Progress Monitor reported: USGS Forum on Mineral Resources, Renewable Energy Tax Credits Not Working as Congress Intended, Geothermal Industry Tells House Panel, Newberry Pilot Project, and Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Nevada.

Lienau, P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal energy abstract sets. Special report No. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains annotated citations in the following areas: (1) case histories; (2) drilling; (3) reservoir engineering; (4) injection; (5) geothermal well logging; (6) environmental considerations in geothermal development; (7) geothermal well production; (8) geothermal materials; (9) electric power production; (10) direct utilization of geothermal energy; (11) economics of geothermal energy; and (12) legal, regulatory and institutional aspects. (ACR)

Stone, C. (comp.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION. m C.l i c a t i o n s of Geothermal Energy Substudy ParticipantsA N INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY J U N E 1978 I

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .Assessment, (4) Small Geothermal Power Plants and (5) Hoti - b u t i o n of geothermal power (1400 W e ) . (XBL 785-

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION. m C.A N INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY J U N E 1978 Il i c a t i o n s of Geothermal Energy Substudy Participants

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION. m C.d approach to solar and geothermal energy, r e s o u r c e sl f u e l boilers, and geothermal energy. The model was d e

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D, and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center. It describes 95 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with goethermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics, and resources. Research activities are summarized on geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, goethermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Report on the U.S. DOE Geothermal Technologies Program's 2009 Risk Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL conducted an annual program risk analysis on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). NREL implemented a probabilistic risk analysis of GTP-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) work, primarily for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The analysis examined estimates of improvement potential derived from program RD&D work for two types of technology performance metric (TPM): EGS-enabling technologies potential and EGS cost improvement potential. Four risk teams (exploration, wells/pumps/tools, reservoir engineering, and power conversion) comprised of industry experts, DOE laboratory researchers, academic researchers, and laboratory subcontractors estimated the RD&D impacts and TPM-improvement probability distributions. The assessment employed a risk analysis spreadsheet add-in that uses Monte Carlo simulation to drive the Geothermal Electric Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). The GETEM-based risk analysis used baseline data from the experts' discussion of multiple reports and data sources. Risk results are expressed in terms of each metric's units and/or the program's top-level metric: levelized costs of electricity (LCOE). Results--both qualitative comments and quantitative improvement potential--are thorough and cohesive in three of the four expert groups. This conference paper summarizes the industry's current thinking on various metrics and potential for research improvement in geothermal technologies.

Young, K. R.; Augustine, C.; Anderson, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal Materials Development. Annual report FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored ``full cost`` recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R&D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geothermal Materials Development, Annual Report FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored full cost'' recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Geothermal Energy R&D Program: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form.

None

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details activities from July through September 1993, Topics addressed are: Technical Assistance; Research and Development Activities; Technology Transfer; Geothermal Progress Monitor; and Personnel.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geothermal Energy R&D Program: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form.

None

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1989 Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form. (DJE -2005)

None

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Imperial County geothermal development semi-annual report, October 1, 1980-March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current geothermal progress in Imperial County is reported. Three areas are reported: Geothermal Administration, Geothermal Planning, and other Geothermal Activities. Geothermal Administration addresses the status of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) transfer, update of the Geothermal Resource Center, and findings of Geothermal field inspections. In addition, the cooperative efforts between industry and the County; Master EIR for the Salton Sea KGRA and the resurveying of the subsidence detection network are covered. Geothermal Planning addresses a Board of Supervisor action on the Union Oil Geothermal Production Permit for 16 wells in the Salton Sea KGRA and a permit for Southern California Edison 10 megawatts power plant in the Salton Sea KGRA. Planning Commission action covers: Amendment of Magma Power's 49 megawatts Geothermal Production Permit to 28 megawatt power plant and relocation of the plant and wells within the Salton Sea KGRA; Exploration permit to Occidental Geothermal for four exploratory wells in East Brawley; Geothermal Production Permit to Southern California Edison to operate a 10 megawatt power plant in the Salton Sea KGRA; and Geothermal production permit to Union Oil for 16 production-injection wells in the Salton Sea KGRA. Lastly, EIR exemptions to CEQA were granted to Chevron for 70 shallow temperature observation holes and Union for fifteen. Other Geothermal Activity addresses the County Direct Heat Development study; the solicitation for district heating and cooling proposals; the new Geothermal Class II-1 disposal site; the DOE Region IX meeting in Tucson; and USGA designating a new KGRA, the East Brawley KGRA, the Westmorland KGRA, and revising the southern border of the Salton Sea KGRA.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact Models  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Conceptual and Logical Data Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses at Raft River a. Logical Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 b. Fact Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 Derived from Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., August 2002. "Results from the Short-Term Well Testing Program at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., October 2004.

Cuyler, David

90

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f o r m a t i o n on geothermal wells and f i e l d s , t hArea, Chemical Analysis, Geothermal Well/Drillhole. Developwater from t h e geothermal wells a t Wairakei is about 4800

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Review of International Geothermal Activities and Assessment of US Industry Opportunites: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains detailed summaries, with bibliographies, of past, present, and planned geothermal development in 71 selected countries and areas. The report gives a pretty good description of types of work that had been done in each country by the mid 1980s, but does not tell much about which geothermal-provider country did the work. There are maps for most of the countries. There are numbers for market factors, but not for estimated geothermal potential. The information in this document has been superceded by the country summaries in the World Geothermal Congress Transactions of 1995, 2000, and 2005. This report was prepared by Meridian Corporation, Alexandria, VA. (DJE 2005)

None

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part I. Geothermal exploration in Trans-Pecos, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All of the new drilling for geothermal gradient and heat flow studies have been concentrated in an area near Hueco Tanks State Park. Interest in the area was raised by the silica geothermometry map of Hoffer (1979) and its proximity to El Paso, which is less than 25 miles away and expanding rapidly toward the area of geothermal interest. Several industries in El Paso appear to be potential users of non-electrical grade hot waters. A total of 14 holes have been drilled for geothermal gradient and heat-flow measurements. Of these, 12 were 50 meters deep and all but two had gradients in excess of 100/sup 0/C/km, one having a gradient as high as 306/sup 0/C/km. Of the remaining two, one penetrated bedrock at about 50 meters and was drilled to a total depth of 125 meters. The gradient in the limestone bedrock is 170/sup 0/C/km and the heat flow is about 11 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. This is the highest heat flow thus far reported for a locality in the Rio Grande Rift. The last hole is 300 meters deep and has a gradient of 142/sup 0/C/km and a heat flow of 9 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. The Hueco Tanks site is very promising for at least space heating applications of hot water. Based on the 300 meter hole the potential for electricity grade temperatures still exist, but the tight limestone bedrock may require hot dry rock extraction technology.

Roy, R.F.; Taylor, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geothermal development. Semi-annual report, October 1, 1980-March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three areas are reported: geothermal administration, geothermal planning, and other geothermal activities. Administration covers the status of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project transfer, update of the Geothermal Resource Center, and findings of the geothermal field inspections. Planning addresses Board of Supervisor actions, Planning Commission actions, notice of exemptions, and the master Environmental Impact Report for Salton Sea. The other activity includes the County Direct Heat Development study; the solicitation for district heating and cooling proposals; the new Geothermal Class II-1 disposal site; the DOE Region IX meeting in Tucson; and USGA designating a new KGRA, the East Brawley KGRA, the Westmoreland KGRA, and revising the southern border of the Salton Sea KGRA. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July--September 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-97 (July--September 1997). It describes 213 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps, geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, acquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, and industrial applications. Research activities include the completion of a Comprehensive Greenhouse Developer Package. Work accomplished on the revision of the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook are discussed. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 3), dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses, and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, January - March 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the second quarter of FY-97. It describes 176 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on well pumping in commercial groundwater heat pump systems. A memorandum of understanding between the GHC and EIA is described. Work accomplishments on the Guidebook are discussed. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

Lienau, P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Geothermal Data...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Recovery Act: Geothermal Data Aggregation: Submission of Information into the National Geothermal Data System, Final Report DOE Project DE-EE0002852 June 24, 2014 Geothermal...

97

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a third quarter 1994 report of activities of the Geo-Heat Center of Oregon Institute of Technology. It describes contacts with parties during this period related to assistance with geothermal direct heat applications. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, resources, and equipment. Research is also being conducted on failures of vertical lineshaft turbines in geothermal wells.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1996--September 1996. Federal Assistance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-96. It describes 152 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

Lienau, P.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Review of international geothermal activities and assessment of US industry opportunities: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated to review and assess international developments in the geothermal energy field and to define business opportunities for the US geothermal industry. The report establishes data bases on the status of worldwide geothermal development and the competitiveness of US industry. Other factors identified include existing legislation, tax incentives, and government institutions or agencies and private sector organizations that promote geothermal exports. Based on the initial search of 177 countries and geographic entities, 71 countries and areas were selected as the most likely targets for the expansion of the geothermal industry internationally. The study then determined to what extent their geothermal resource had been developed, what countries had aided or participated in this development, and what plans existed for future development. Data on the energy, economic, and financial situations were gathered.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Telephone Flat Geothermal Development...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976 Abstract Progress during April to July...

102

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- State geothermal commercialization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, July-December 1980 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

103

The Thirteenth Annual Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Report for Fiscal Year 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. (DJE 2005)

None

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismicity; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology...

105

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

Hodge, D.S. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-98 (October--December 1997). It describes 216 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications of lineshaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, a comprehensive aquaculture developer package and revisions to the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 4) which was devoted entirely to geothermal activities in South Dakota, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reference book on geothermal direct use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the direct uses of geothermal energy in the United States. Topics discussed include: low-temperature geothermal energy resources; energy reserves; geothermal heat pumps; geothermal energy for residential buildings; and geothermal energy for industrial usage.

Lienau, P.J.; Lund, J.W.; Rafferty, K.; Culver, G.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report explores the effectiveness of the historical and current body of policies in terms of increased geothermal electricity development. Insights are provided into future policies that may drive the market to optimize development of available geothermal electricity resources.

109

Nevada low-temperaure geothermal resource assessment: 1994. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data compilation for the low-temperature program is being done by State Teams in two western states. Final products of the study include: a geothermal database, in hardcopy and as digital data (diskette) listing information on all known low- and moderate- temperature springs and wells in Nevada; a 1:1,000,000-scale map displaying these geothermal localities, and a bibliography of references on Nevada geothermal resources.

Garside, L.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Fluid Injection, Reservoir Engineering D. E.engineering op- erations, management o the chemical f process fluidEngineering are primarily concerned with predicting the effects of in- jecting fluids

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a n d a r d i z e d steam turbine-driven electric generatingLocated Geothermal Steam Turbine Driven Electric Genera- t ia 3-We noncondensing steam turbine at Leyte with assis-

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

1981-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Investigations and activities of Imperial County geothermal staff: 1982-83. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects initiated, in progress, or completed; County/Industry cooperative efforts; and reports related to geothermal development issued by the County between October 1982 and December 1983 are described.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Field, Monograph on The Geysers GeothermalField, Geothermal Resources Council, Special Report no. 17,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Geothermal Technology Development Program. Annual progress report, October 1983-September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Technology Development Program. The work reported is sponsored by the Department of Energy/Geothermal Hydropower Technology Division (DOE/GHTD), with program management provided by Sandia National Laboratories. The program emphasizes research in rock penetration mechanics, fluid technology, borehole mechanics, diagnostics technology, and permeability enhancement. 102 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, April 1 to September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The completion of the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site, modification of the similar, binary cycle Prototype Power Plant, and the water treatment program that studies environmentally safe ways to inhibit corrosion and scaling in geothermal power plants and investigates corrosion resistant materials are summarized. Studies of binary geothermal cycles using mixed hydrocarbon working fluids are described as part of the continuing search for ways to produce low-cost electricity from moderate-temperature geothermal fluids. Progress is reported on studies of direct contact heat exchanger concepts, heat rejection systems, and primary heat exchangers with augmentation. As part of the now-ended series of aquaculture experiments, an unsuccessful attempt to incubate common carp embryos in geothermal waters is reported. An experiment in revegetating disturbed land at Raft River is mentioned and progress on DOE's new User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program is described. An estimate is presented of the amount of hydrothermal energy that could be produced by the year 2000, with and without Federal assistance, for electric generation and direct applications such as industrial process heat. Progress is reported on the Marketing Assistance Program, through which technical information and assistance is provided potential users and developers of geothermal resources. Also reported is progress in DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Program demonstration projects and Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) Program study projects.

Ihrig, R.R. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geothermal policy project. Quarterly report, March 1-May 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts continued to initiate geothermal and groundwater heat pump study activities in newly selected project states and to carry forward policy development in existing project states. Minnesota and South Carolina have agreed to a groundwater heat pump study, and Maryland and Virginia have agreed to a follow-up geothermal study in 1980. Follow-up contacts were made with several other existing project states and state meetings and workshops were held in eleven project states. Two generic documents were prepared, the Geothermal Guidebook and the Guidebook to Groundwater Heat Pumps, in addition to several state-specific documents.

Connor, T.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Summary of geothermal exploration activity in the State of Washington from 1978 to 1983. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project activity is summarized with references to the publications produced. Project findings are reported as they relate to specific geothermal resource target areas. Some major projects of the goethermal exploration program are: thermal and mineral spring chemistry, heat flow drilling, temperature gradient measurements, Cascade Range regional gravity, geohydrology study of the Yakima area, low temperature geothermal resources, geology, geochemistry of Cascade Mountains volcanic rocks, and soil mercury studies. (MHR)

Korosec, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 3, March-April 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reviewed in the following areas: electric uses; direct heat uses; drilling activities; exploration; leases; outreach and technical assistance; feasibility studies and application demonstrations; geothermal loan guarantee program; general activities; R and D activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; environmental activities; and state, local, and private sector activities. Also included are a list of reports and publications and a directory of individuals in the geothermal community. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION STRATEGY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Mines Nevada Geothermal Study: Report No. 4, Feb.J. , 1976, Assessing the geothermal resource base of the1977, Microseisms in geothermal Studies in Grass Valley,

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process applications for geothermal energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal goal of the program was to demonstrate economical and technical suitability of geothermal energy as a source of industrial process heat through a cooperative program with industrial firms. To accomplish that: a critical literature survey in the field was performed; a workshop with the paper and pulp industry representatives was organized; and four parallel methods dealing with technical and economical details of geothermal energy use as a source of industrial process heat were developed.

Mikic, B.B.; Meal, H.C.; Packer, M.B.; Guillamon-Duch, H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geothermal Direct-Heat Utilization Assistance - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geo-Heat Center provided (1) direct-use technical assistance, (2) research, and (3) information dissemination on geothermal energy over an 8 1/2 year period. The center published a quarterly bulletin, developed a web site and maintained a technical library. Staff members made 145 oral presentations, published 170 technical papers, completed 28 applied research projects, and gave 108 tours of local geothermal installations to 500 persons.

J. W. Lund

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

Thomas, D.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Geothermal Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting to Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a baseline description of the transmission issues affecting geothermal technologies. The report begins with a comprehensive overview of the grid, how it is planned, how it is used, and how it is paid for. The report then overlays onto this 'big picture' three types of geothermal technologies: conventional hydrothermal systems; emerging technologies such as enhanced engineered geothermal systems (EGS) and geopressured geothermal; and geothermal co-production with existing oil and gas wells. Each category of geothermal technology has its own set of interconnection issues, and these are examined separately for each. The report draws conclusions about each technology's market affinities as defined by factors related to transmission and distribution infrastructure. It finishes with an assessment of selected markets with known geothermal potential, identifying those that offer the best prospects for near-term commercial development and for demonstration projects.

Hurlbut, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

132

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

134

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of brief summaries of the activities of the Geo-Heat Center during the report period. Technical assistance was given to requests from 20 states in the following applications: space and district heating; geothermal heat pumps; greenhouses; aquaculture; industrial plants; electric power; resource/well; equipment; and resort/spa. Research and development activities progressed on (1) compilation of data on low-temperature resources and (2) evaluation of groundwater vs. ground-coupled heat pumps. Also summarized are technology transfer activities and geothermal progress monitoring activities.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the DOE Geothermal Program activities were split between Core Research and Industrial Development. The technical areas covered are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology (including Hot Dry Rock Research and The Geyser Cooperation), and Conversion Technology (power plants, materials, and direct use/direct heat). Work to design the Lake County effluent pipeline to help recharge The Geysers shows up here for the first time. This Progress Report is another of the documents that are reasonable starting points in understanding many of the details of the DOE Geothermal Program. (DJE 2005)

None

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Silica bronze project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to incorporate waste silica from the HGP-A geothermal well in Pohoiki with other refractory materials for investment casting of bronze sculpture. The best composition for casting is about 50% silica, 25% red cinders, and 25% brick dust; remaining ingredient is a binder, such as plaster and water.

Bianchini, H.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geothermal progress monitor report No. 9, June 1985. A decade of progress, 1974-1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue--No. 9--focuses on 10 years of progress in: geothermal research and development, geothermal leasing, and geothermal resource assessment.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Recovery Act: Geothermal Data Aggregation: Submission of Information into the National Geothermal Data System, Final Report DOE Project DE-EE0002852 June 24, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a Department of Energy funded effort to create a single cataloged source for a variety of geothermal information through a distributed network of databases made available via web services. The NGDS will help identify regions suitable for potential development and further scientific data collection and analysis of geothermal resources as a source for clean, renewable energy. A key NGDS repository or ‘node’ is located at Southern Methodist University developed by a consortium made up of: • SMU Geothermal Laboratory • Siemens Corporate Technology, a division of Siemens Corporation • Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin • Cornell Energy Institute, Cornell University • Geothermal Resources Council • MLKay Technologies • Texas Tech University • University of North Dakota. The focus of resources and research encompass the United States with particular emphasis on the Gulf Coast (on and off shore), the Great Plains, and the Eastern U.S. The data collection includes the thermal, geological and geophysical characteristics of these area resources. Types of data include, but are not limited to, temperature, heat flow, thermal conductivity, radiogenic heat production, porosity, permeability, geological structure, core geophysical logs, well tests, estimated reservoir volume, in situ stress, oil and gas well fluid chemistry, oil and gas well information, and conventional and enhanced geothermal system related resources. Libraries of publications and reports are combined into a unified, accessible, catalog with links for downloading non-copyrighted items. Field notes, individual temperature logs, site maps and related resources are included to increase data collection knowledge. Additional research based on legacy data to improve quality increases our understanding of the local and regional geology and geothermal characteristics. The software to enable the integration, analysis, and dissemination of this team’s NGDS contributions was developed by Siemens Corporate Technology. The SMU Node interactive application is accessible at http://geothermal.smu.edu. Additionally, files may be downloaded from either http://geothermal.smu.edu:9000/geoserver/web/ or through http://geothermal.smu.edu/static/DownloadFilesButtonPage.htm. The Geothermal Resources Council Library is available at https://www.geothermal-library.org/.

Blackwell, David D. [SMU Geothermal Laboratory; Chickering Pace, Cathy [SMU Geothermal Laboratory] (ORCID:0000000228898620); Richards, Maria C. [SMU Geothermal Laboratory

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Executive summaries of reports leading to the construction of the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive summaries have been written for 61 reports and compilations of data which in part, have led to the construction of the Baca 50 MW Geothermal Demonstration Project (GDP). The reports and data include environmental research, reservoir and feasibility studies, the project proposal to DOE and the Final Environmental Impact Statement. These executive summaries are intended to give the reader a general overview of each report prior to requesting the report from the GDP Data Manager.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.; Westermeier, J.F.; Giroux, H.D.; Lowe, G.D.; Nienberg, M.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Executive summaries of reports leading to the construction of the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive summaries have been written for 61 reports and compilations of data which, in part, have led to the construction of the Baca 50 MW Geothermal Demonstration Project (GDP). The reports and data include environmental research, reservoir and feasibility studies, the project proposal to DOE and the Final Environmental Impact Statement. These executive summaries are intended to give the reader a general overview of each report prior to requesting the report from the GDP Data Manager.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.; Westermeier, J.F.; Giroux, H.D.; Lowe, G.D.; Nienberg, M.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation and targeting of geothermal energy resources in the southeastern United States. Final report, May 1, 1976-June 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the geothermal program have been to develop and apply geological and geophysical targeting procedures for the discovery of low-temperature geothermal resources related to heat-producing granite. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers comprising the report. (ACR)

Costain, J.K.; Glover, L. III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

New geothermal site identification and qualification. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies remaining undeveloped geothermal resources in California and western Nevada, and it estimates the development costs of each. It has relied on public-domain information and such additional data as geothermal developers have chosen to make available. Reserve estimation has been performed by volumetric analysis with a probabilistic approach to uncertain input parameters. Incremental geothermal reserves in the California/Nevada study area have a minimum value of 2,800 grosss MW and a most-likely value of 4,300 gross MW. For the state of California alone, these values are 2,000 and 3,000 gross MW, respectively. These estimates may be conservative to the extent that they do not take into account resources about which little or no public-domain information is available. The average capital cost of incremental generation capacity is estimated to average $3,100/kW for the California/Nevada study area, and $2,950/kW for the state of California alone. These cost estimates include exploration, confirmation drilling, development drilling, plant construction, and transmission-line costs. For the purposes of this study, a capital cost of $2,400/kW is considered competitive with other renewable resources. The amount of incremental geothermal capacity available at or below $2,400/kW is about 1,700 gross MW for the California/Nevada study area, and the same amount (within 50-MW rounding) for the state of California alone. The capital cost estimates are only approximate, because each developer would bring its own experience, bias, and opportunities to the development process. Nonetheless, the overall costs per project estimated in this study are believed to be reasonable.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Union County - La Grande, Oregon geothermal district heating: feasibility assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of geothermal district heating in the City of La Grande, Oregon. Eight study area districts were analyzed to determine their economic feasibility. Results from the analyses conclude that certain districts within the City of La Grande are economically feasible if certain assumptions are correct. Development of geothermal district heating for these areas would provide direct energy and dollar savings to the building owners and would also provide direct and indirect benefits to low and moderate income households within the City.

Jenkins, H. II; Giddings, M.; Hanson, P.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council Annual Report for Fiscal Year 1989 Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council was a multi-agency group charged with identifying and reducing barriers to geothermal energy development in the U.S. Many of the issues covered related to regulations for and progress in the leasing of Federal lands in the West for power development. The IGCC reports are important sources of historical information. Table 1 lists significant events in the history of use of geothermal energy in the U.S., starting in1884. That is useful for tracking which Federal departments and agencies managed aspects of this work over time. Table 2 gives a complete accounting for all Federal outlays for geothermal energy development for FY 1979 -1989, including non-DOE outlays. Table 3 shows the status of the U.S. Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program at end of FY 1989: of the $500 million authorized, $285 million was committed to eight projects, and about $40 million had been paid out on project defaults. An additional $101 million had been repaid by the borrowers. (DJE - 2005)

None

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS. PROGRESS REPORT BY 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Other Geothermal Energy Publications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find links to other organization's publications — including technical reports, newsletters, brochures, and more — about geothermal energy.

150

Final Technical Report; Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definitioni (GRED) Program-Phases I, II, and III for the Animas Valley, NM Geothermal Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definition (GRED) Program, and the work covers the time span from June 2001 through June 2004. Included in this new report are detailed results from the GRED Program, including: geophysical and geochemical surveys, reflection seismic surveys, aeromagnetic surveys, gravity and electrical resistivity surveys, soil thermal ion and soil carbon dioxide flux surveys, four temperature gradient holes, and one deep exploratory well.

Cunniff, Roy A.; Bowers, Roger L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Progress Report on Electrical Resistivity Studies Coso Geothermal Area Inyo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:JobInformationInformationOpenProeCounty

152

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Federal Assistance Program quarterly project progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the third quarter of FY98 (April--June, 1998). It describes 231 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with included requests for general information including material for high school and university students, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, spacing heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, snow melting and electric power. Research activities include work on model construction specifications for line shaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, and a comprehensive aquaculture developers package. A brochure on Geothermal Energy in Klamath County was developed for state and local tourism use. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 19, No. 2) with articles on research at the Geo-Heat Center, sustainability of geothermal resources, injection well drilling in Boise, ID and a greenhouse project in the Azores. Other outreach activities include dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisitions and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Final Report and Strategic Plan on the Feasibility Study to Assess Geothermal Potential on Warm Springs Reservation Lands. Report No. DOE/GO/15177  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005 the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Tribal Council authorized an evaluation of the geothermal development potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises obtained a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct a geological assessment and development estimate. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises utilized a team of expert consultants to conduct the study and develop a strategic plan. The resource assessment work was completed in 2006 by GeothermEx Inc., a consulting company specializing in geothermal resource assessments worldwide. The GeothermEx report indicates there is a 90% probability that a commercial geothermal resource exists on tribal lands in the Mt. Jefferson area. The geothermal resource assessment and other cost, risk and constraints information has been incorporated into the strategic plan.

James Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

154

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, April 1-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications incorporated in the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at Raft River Geothermal Test Site, system operational testing and maintenance activities at that plant, and the water treatment program's corrosion studies are summarized. Progress is reported on performance tests of the ORNL condenser and the direct-contact heat exchanger in the Prototype Power Plant. Production-injection tests associated with pump installation in monitor wells at Raft River are reported. Case studies conducted and publications prepared for the program of low-to moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource development are also reported. Monitoring activities and studies of the environmental program at Raft River are described and two new areas of research under the Environmental Support Injection Research Program: pressure monitoring, and dispersion studies. Progress of three successful proposers under the User-Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program is summarized. A program to encourage use of geothermal energy at Federal facilities was developed and initiated. Investigation of direct use of hydrothermal energy is reported. Progress is reported on the marketing Assistance Program, through which technical information and assistance are provided to potential users and developers of geothermal resources. Also reported is progress on DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Program demonstration projects and the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) Program study projects.

Parker, J.T. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program DOE Geothermal Technologies Program presentation...

157

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 November 1982-31 October 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes environmental monitoring of microseismic activity, land-surface elevations, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana.

Not Available

1984-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

National Geothermal Association Trade Mission to Central America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (US) geothermal industry, the world's most technically proficient, has been unable to achieve penetration into the markets of the developing nations. This report details the findings of an industry Trade Mission to Central America, tasked with determining the reasons for this shortfall and with developing a US industry geothermal export strategy designed to achieve immediate and long-term export benefits.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

Aureille, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office Releases...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2013 Annual Report The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2013 Annual Report February 7,...

163

Occidental Geothermal, Inc. , Oxy geothermal power plant No. 1. Final environmental impact report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project-specific environmental analysis covers the following: geology, soils, water resources, biology, air quality, noise, waste management, health, safety, transportation, energy and material resources, cultural resources, socioeconomics, public services, land use, and aesthetics. Other topics covered are: the cumulative envionmental analysis; unavoidable significant adverse environmental effects; irreversible environmental changes and irretrievable commitments of energy and materials; the relationship between local short-term uses of man's environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity; growth-inducing impacts; and alternatives to the proposed action. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Page 1 of 8 Reviewing Current Term Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Report Search (available Feb 09) function. When the current term reporting period closes, those reports will only be accessible from the Report Search function and the new term reports will be displayed. When the current term reporting period closes, reports are only accessible from the Report Search

Oxford, University of

167

GEOTHERMAL A N D HEAVY-OIL RESOURCES I N TEXAS TOPICAL REPORT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of geothermal fluids, examining permeability is necessary to characterize first-order geothermal prospeaivity (Bebout and others, 1 9 7 8 ) . Around the northern and...

168

Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Final report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities. April 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. USDOE Grant No. DE-FG01-99-EE35098  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association, and the Washington State University Energy Program.

Lund, John W.

2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geothermal Progress Monitor 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the more interesting articles in this GPM are: DOE supporting research on problems at The Geysers; Long-term flow test of Hot Dry Rock system (at Fenton Hill, NM) to begin in Fiscal Year 1992; Significant milestones reached in prediction of behavior of injected fluids; Geopressured power generation experiment yields good results. A number of industry-oriented events and successes are reported, and in that regard it is noteworthy that this report comes near the end of the most active decade of geothermal power development in the U.S. There is a table of all operating U.S. geothermal power projects. The bibliography of research reports at the end of this GPM is useful. (DJE 2005)

None

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geothermal space heating applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Final report, August 20, 1979-May 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a first-stage evaluation of the overall feasibility of utilizing geothermal waters from the Madison aquifer in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana for space heating are reported. A preliminary assessment of the resource characteristics, a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating district and an analysis of environmental and institutional issues are included. Preliminary investigations were also made into possible additional uses of the geothermal resource, including ethanol production. The results of the resource analysis showed that the depth to the top of the Madison occurs at approximately 5,500 feet at Poplar, and the Madison Group is characterized by low average porosity (about 5 percent) and permeability (about 0.004 gal/day-ft), and by hot water production rates of a few tens of gallons per minute from intervals a few feet thick. The preliminary heating district system effort for the town of Poplar included design heat load estimates, a field development concept, and preliminary design of heat extraction and hot water distribution systems. The environmental analysis, based on current data, indicated that resource development is not expected to result in undue impacts. The institutional analysis concluded that a Tribal geothermal utility could be established, but no clear-cut procedure can be identified without a more comprehensive evaluation of legal and jurisdistional issues. The economic evaluation found that, if the current trend of rapidly increasing prices for fossil fuels continues, a geothermal heating district within Poplar could be a long-term, economically attractive alternative to current energy sources.

Birman, J.H.; Cohen, J.; Spencer, G.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

National Conference of State Legislatures Geothermal Project. Final report, February 1978--September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the NCSL Geothermal Project was to stimulate and assist state legislative action to encourage the efficient development of geothermal resources, including the use of groundwater heat pumps. The project had the following work tasks: (1) initiate state geothermal policy reviews; (2) provide technical assistance to state geothermal policy reviews; (3) serve as liaison with geothermal community; and (4) perform project evaluation.

None

1983-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Joint Egypt/United States report...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Joint EgyptUnited States report on EgyptUnited States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 4 of 5 Vols. Annexes 6--10...

176

2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Technical Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provided in three sections, this comprehensive technical report assesses 100 projects in the GTO portfolio, based on presentations from GTO-funded principal investigators that were evaluated and...

177

Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 2, January/February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reviewed in the following aspects of the program: electrical uses; direct-heat uses; leases; outreach and technical assistance; general activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; and reports and publications. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of noise associated with geothermal-development activities. Final report, July 31, 1979-April 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the purpose of ascertaining the current state of noise generation, suppression, and mitigation techniques associated with geothermal development. A description of the geothermal drilling process is included as well as an overview of geothermal development activities in the United States. Noise sources at the well site, along geothermal pipelines, and at the power plants are considered. All data presented are measured values by workers in the field and by Marshall Long/Acoustics. One particular well site was monitored for a period of 55 continuous days, and includes all sources of noise from the time that the drilling rig was brought in until the time that it was moved off site. A complete log of events associated with the drilling process is correlated with the noise measurements including production testing of the completed well. Data are also presented which compare measured values of geothermal noise with federal, state, county, and local standards. A section on control of geothermal noise is also given. Volume I of this document presents summary information.

Long, M.; Stern, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the recommendations of the Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel, a panel of geothermal experts assembled in March 2011 for a discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the U.S.

180

Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal budget actual amounts are shown for FY 1989 -1992, broken down by about 15 categories. Here, the main Program categories are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology, Conversion Technology (power plants and materials), Industry-Coupled Drilling, Drilling Applications, Reservoir Engineering Applications, Direct Heat, Geopressured Wells Operation, and Hot Dry Rock Research. Here the title--Industry-Coupled Drilling--covered case studies of the Coso, CA, and Dixie Valley, NV, fields, and the Long Valley Exploratory Well (which had started as a magma energy exploration project, but reported here as a hydrothermal prospect evaluation well). (DJE 2005)

None

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Geothermal energy: 1992 program overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is described in general terms with drawings illustrating the technology. A map of known and potential geothermal resources in the US is included. The 1992 program activities are described briefly. (MHR)

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

2014 Annual Report, Geothermal Technologies Office | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural1222014 Annual Report,

184

Geothermal Technologies Office Annual Report 2012 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell VehicleEnergy (5 Activities)October 2011Annual Report 2012

185

Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

New Geothermal Data System Could Open Up Clean-Energy Reserves...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New geothermal data could open up clean energy reserves nationwide. Scientific American reported that the National Geothermal Data System is helping to isolate geothermal...

187

Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal...

188

Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

Ortego, P.K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Krafla Geothermal System. A Review of Geothermal Research...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System. A Review of Geothermal Research and Revision of the Conceptual Model Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: The Krafla Geothermal...

190

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodology calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal system in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. The overall project area is 2500km2 with the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) being about 170km2. The project was subdivided into five tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data; (2) design and populate a GIS database; (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area at 0.5km intervals to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km; (4) collect new geophysical and geochemical data, and (5) repeat Task 3 for the enhanced (baseline + new ) data. Favorability maps were based on the integrated assessment of the three critical EGS exploration parameters of interest: rock type, temperature and stress. A complimentary trust map was generated to compliment the favorability maps to graphically illustrate the cumulative confidence in the data used in the favorability mapping. The Final Scientific Report (FSR) is submitted in two parts with Part I describing the results of project Tasks 1 through 3 and Part II covering the results of project Tasks 4 through 5 plus answering nine questions posed in the proposal for the overall project. FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Direct utilization of geothermal energy resources in food processing. Final report, May 17, 1978-May 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1978 financial assistance was granted for a project to utilize geothermal energy at Ore-Ida Foods, Inc.'s food processing plant in Ontario, Oregon. Specifically, the project included exploring, testing, and developing the potential geothermal resource; retrofitting the existing gas/oil-fired steam system; utilizing the geothermal resource for food processing, space heating, and hot potable water; and injecting the spent geothermal water back into a disposal well. Based on preliminary investigations which indicated the presence of a local geothermal resource, drilling began in August 1979. Although the anticipated resource temperature of 380/sup 0/F was reached at total well depth (10,054 feet), adequate flow to meet processing requirements could not be obtained. Subsequent well testing and stimulation techniques also failed to produce the necessary flow, and the project was eventually abandoned. However, throughout the duration of the project, all activities were carefully monitored and recorded to ensure the program's value for future evaluation. This report presents a culmination of data collected during the Ore-Ida project.

Austin, J.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Final EIS/EIR) has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Proposed Action includes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a 48 megawatt (gross) geothermal power plant with ancillary facilities (10-12 production well pads and 3-5 injection well pads, production and injection pipelines), access roads, and a 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. Alternative locations for the power plant site within a reasonable distance of the middle of the wellfield were determined to be technically feasible. Three power plant site alternatives are evaluated in the Final EIS/EIR.

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

199

Texas geothermal R D and D program planning support document. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program planning support was provided by; developing a geothermal RD and D program structure, characterizing the status of geothermal RD and D through review of literature and interaction with the geothermal research community, developing a candidate list of future Texas geothermal projects, and prioritizing the candidate projects based on appropriate evaluation criteria. The method used to perform this study and the results thereof are presented. Summary reviews of selected completed and ongoing projects and summary descriptions and evaluations of the candidate RD and D projects ar provided. A brief discussion emerging federal RD and D policies is presented. References and independent project rankings by three of the GRP members are included. (MHR)

Davis, R.J.; Conover, M.F.; Keeney, R.C.; Personett, M.L.; Richmann, D.L.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Geothermal technology publications and related reports: a bibliography, January-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titles, authors and abstracts of papers are assembled into areas of Geothermal Technology, Magma and General Geoscience Studies with cross references listed by author.

Hudson, S.R. (ed.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. 2nd quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The completed geochemical analysis of groundwater in the Pine Creek area for evaluation of the geothermal potential of this location is presented. Also included is an environmental constraints analysis of Pine Creek noting any potential environmental problems if a geothermal system was developed onsite. Design of a geothermal system is discussed for site-specific applications and is discussed in detail with equipment recommendations and material specifications. A preliminary financial, economic, and institutional assessment of geothermal system located totally on Union Carbide property at Pine Creek is included. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Willens, C.A.; Walter, K.M.; Carrico, R.L.; Lowe, G.D.; Lacy, S.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

203

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geothermal energy for copper dump leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the possibility of using geothermal energy to heat a sulfuric acid leaching solution for the purpose of faster and more efficient copper recovery from copper-containing minerals. Experimental studies reported in the literature have shown that this technique can be economically feasible for the extraction of copper from low-grade dump ores. Its main advantage appears to be the considerable reduction in long-term leaching periods; it could also be less expensive than other conventional processing operations if an economical geothermal resource were provided. However, this process has some pitfalls which might restrict the extent of geothermal energy use. Nevertheless, the process is still technologically sound, especially if groundwaters are used directly in the leaching operation.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Geothermal Financing Workbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to help small firm search for financing for geothermal energy projects. There are various financial and economics formulas. Costs of some small overseas geothermal power projects are shown. There is much discussion of possible sources of financing, especially for overseas projects. (DJE-2005)

Battocletti, E.C.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Report on dipole-dipole resistivity and technology transfer at the Ahuachapan Geothermal field Ahuachapan, El Salvador  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 90 megawatt geothermal-sourced powerplant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the period November 1987 through May 1988 a deep resistivity survey and technology transfer was performed at the AGF at the request of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) project. The resistivity surveying is ongoing at the time of this report under the supervision of CEL personnel. LANL and contract personnel were present at the site during performance of the initial surveying for the purpose of technology transfer. This report presents the results and interpretation of the two initial resistivity survey lines performed on site during and shortly after the technology transfer period.

Fink, J.B. (Geophynque International, Tucson, AZ (United States))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal Data System Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal Data System July 29, 2014 - 8:20am...

213

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Final report, September 27, 1978-December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data analysis is based on the Brazoria Texas well and the balance of the modeling work is theoretical. Progress in the regional assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource in Louisiana is reported. Environmental monitoring effort established monitoring systems and baseline environmental measurements. Efforts to improve the technoeconomic model, improve the estimates of methane in solution, and to evaluate newly identified sites are described. (MHR)

Wrighton, F.M.; Bebout, D.; Carver, D.R.; Groat, C.C.; Johnson, A.E. Jr.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy production. Industrial advisors to the HDR Program have concluded that, while a longer testing period would certainly be desirable, a successful and well-documented flow test of this high-temperature, Phase II reservoir lasting at least one year should convince industry that HDR geothermal energy merits their investment in its commercial development. This test is called the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT), and its completion will be a major milestone in attaining the Level 1 objective. However, before the LTFT could be initiated, well EE-2 had to be repaired, as also briefly described in the ''History of Research''. During this repair operation, superb progress was made toward satisfying the next most critically important Level II objective: Improve the Performance of HDR Drilling and Completion Technology. During the repair of EE-2, Los Alamos sidetracked by drilling out of the damaged well at 2.96 km (9700 ft), and then completed drilling a new-wellbore (EE-2A) to a total depth of 3.78 km (12,360 ft). As a consequence of this drilling experience, Los Alamos believes that if the original wells were redrilled today their combined cost would be only $8 million rather than the $18.8 million actually spent (a 60% cost saving). Further details, particularly of the completion of the well, can be found in the major section, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, but it can be seen that the second, Level II objective is already nearing attainment.

Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermal Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) on the United States in the 21 st Century," Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2006 hereinafter "MIT Report"; and Geothermal...

217

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle...

218

Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Operation of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power Plants This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water...

219

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants This report summarizes what is...

220

Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program This report explains the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Report -- Geothermal Technologies Office DOE Project Partner AltaRock Energy drills for geothermal energy at the Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration site, near Bend, Oregon. A...

222

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in...

223

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in...

224

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Testing and sampling procedures...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Testing and sampling procedures for geothermal-compressured wells. Final report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

225

Direct utilization of geothermal energy in western South Dakota agribusiness. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved the direct utilization of geothermal energy for (1) space heating of farm and ranch buildings, (2) drying grain, and (3) providing warm stock water during the winter. The site for this demonstration project was the Diamond Ring Ranch north of Midland, South Dakota. Geothermal water flowing from an existing well into the Madison Aquifer was used to heat four homes, a shop, a hospital barn for cattle, and air for a barn and grain dryer. This site is centrally located in the western region of South Dakota where geothermal water is available from the Madison Aquifer. The first year of the project involved the design of the heating systems and its construction while the following years were for operation, testing, demonstrating, and monitoring the system. Required modifications and improvements were made during this period. Operating modifications and improvements were made during this period. Operating experience showed that such application of geothermal resources is feasible and can result in substantial fuel savings. Economic analyses under a variety of assumptions generally gave payback periods of less than ten years. Numerous technical recommendations are made. The most significant being the necessity of passive protection from freezing of remote geothermal systems subject to winter shut downs caused by power or equipment failure. The primary institutional recommendation is to incorporate a use for the geothermal water such as irrigation or stock watering into agribusiness-related geothermal development.

Howard, S.M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Direct utilization of geothermal energy for space and water heating at Marlin, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal heating project, which is one of nineteen direct-use geothermal projects funded principally by DOE, is documented. The five-year project encompassed a broad range of technical, institutional, and economic activities including: resource and environmental assessments; well drilling and completion; system design, construction, and monitoring; economic analyses; public awareness programs; materials testing; and environmental monitoring. Some of the project conclusions are that: (1) the 155/sup 0/F Central Texas geothermal resource can support additional geothermal development; (2) private-sector economic incentives currently exist, especially for profit-making organizations, to develop and use this geothermal resource; (3) potential uses for this geothermal resource include water and space heating, poultry dressing, natural cheese making, fruit and vegetable dehydrating, soft-drink bottling, synthetic-rubber manufacturing, and furniture manufacturing; (4) high maintenance costs arising from the geofluid's scaling and corrosion tendencies can be avoided through proper analysis and design; (5) a production system which uses a variable-frequency drive system to control production rate is an attractive means of conserving parasitic pumping power, controlling production rate to match heating demand, conserving the geothermal resource, and minimizing environmental impacts.

Conover, M.F.; Green, T.F.; Keeney, R.C.; Ellis, P.F. II; Davis, R.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Blood, F.B.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Environmental overview for the development of geothermal resources in the State of New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief overview of the present day geothermal applications for hydrothermal electrical generation and direct heat use and their environmental implications is provided. Technologies and environmental impacts are considered at all points on the pathway of development resource exploration; well field, plant and transmission line construction; and plant operation. The technologies for electrical generation-direct, dry steam conversion; separated steam conversion; single-flash conversion, separated-steam/single-flash conversion and binary cycle conversion and the technologies for direct heat use - direct use of geothermal waters, surface heat exhanger, down-the hole heat exchanger and heat pump are described. A summary of the geothermal technologies planned or in operation within New Mexico geothermal areas is provided. A review of regulations that affect geothermal development and its related environmental impact in New Mexico is presented. The regulatory pathway, both state and federal, of geothermal exploration after the securing of appropriate leases, development, and construction and implementation of a geothermal facility are described. Six categories (Geophysical, Water, Air, Noise, Biota and Socioeconomics) were selected for environmental assessment. The data available is described.

Bryant, M.; Starkey, A.H.; Dick-Peddie, W.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Direct utilization of geothermal energy for Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Final report, June 1979-June 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pagosa Springs Geothermal District Heating System was conceptualized, designed, and constructed between 1979 to 1984 under the US Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to demonstrate the feasibility for utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources for direct-use applications. The Pagosa Springs system successfully provides space heating to public buildings, school facilities, residences, and commercial establishments at costs significantly lower than costs of available conventional fuels. The Pagosa Springs project encompassed a full range of technical, institutional, and economic activities. Geothermal reservoir evaluations and testing were performed, and two productive approx.140/sup 0/F geothermal supply wells were successfully drilled and completed. Transmission and distribution system design, construction, startup, and operation were achieved with minimum difficulty. The geothermal system operation during the first two heating seasons has been fully reliable and well respected in the community. The project has proven that low to moderate-temperature waters can effectively meet required heating loads, even for harsh winter-mountain environments. The principal difficulty encountered has been institutional in nature and centers on the obtaining of the geothermal production well permits and the adjudicated water rights necessary to supply the geothermal hot water fluids for the full operating life of the system. 28 figs., 15 tabs.

Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the final report for ASHRAE Research Project 1004-RP: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents the results of the development and application of the methodology to Case Study #2...

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the engineering and economic feasibility study of utilizing geothermal energy for the mining and processing of tungsten ore at the Union Carbide-Metals Division Pine Creek tungsten complex near Bishop, Calfironia is reviewed. Results of geophysical data analysis including determination of assumed resource parameters are presented. The energy utilization evaluation identifies potential locations for substituting geothermal energy for fossil fuel energy using current technology. Preliminary analyses for local environmental and institutional barriers to development of a geothermal system are also provided.

Lane, C.K.; Erickson, M.V.; Lowe, G.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geothermal technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1981-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Technology Development Program is described. The program emphasizes research in rock penetration mechanics, fluid technology, borehole mechanics, diagnostics technology, and permeability enhancement.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Volume 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastward toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastware toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation of potential geothermal reservoirs in central and western New York state. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer processes geophysical well logs from central and western New York State were analyzed to evaluate the potential of subsurface formations as a source for low-temperature geothermal water. The analysis indicated that porous sandstone sections at the top of the Ordovician Theresa Formation and at the base of the Cambrian Potsdam Formation have the required depth, porosity, and permeability to act as a source for geothermal fluids over a relatively large area in the central part of the state. The fluid potential plus an advantageous geothermal gradient and the results of the test well drilled in the city of Auburn in Cayuga County suggest that low temperature geothermal energy may be a viable alternative to other more conventional forms of energy that are not indigenous to New York State.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of the geothermal resource at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, Texas. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geothermal resource under Lackland Air Force Base (AFB), San Antonio, Texas was studied. It is the conclusion of the investigators that a geothermal well drilled at the site recommended by this study has a high probability of delivering geothermal fluids in sufficient quantity and at adequate temperatures to support a projected space and domestic hot water heating system. An exploratory production well location is recommended in the southwest sector of the base, based upon geologic conditions and the availability of sufficient open space to support the drilling operation. It is projected that a production well drilled at the recommended location would produce geothermal fluid of 130 to 145/sup 0/F at a rate of approximately 1000 gpm with reasonable fluid drawdowns. The Environmental Assessment for the drilling portion of the project has been completed, and no irreversible or irretrievable impacts are anticipated as a result of this drilling program. The permitting process is proceeding smoothly.

Lawford, T.W.; Malone, C.R.; Allman, D.W.; Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geothermal technology publications and related reports: A bibliography, January 1986 through December 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia publications resulting from DOE programs in Geothermal Technologies, Magma Energy and Continental Scientific Drilling are listed for reference. The RandD includes borehole-related technologies, in situ processes, and wellbore diagnostics.

Tolendino, C.D. (ed.)

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Geothermal potential for commercial and industrial direct heat applications in Salida, Colorado. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salida Geothermal Prospect (Poncha Hot Springs) was evaluated for industrial and commercial direct heat applications at Salida, Colorado, which is located approximately five miles east of Poncha Hot Springs. Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd., holds the geothermal leases on the prospect and the right-of-way for the main pipeline to Salida. The Poncha Hot Springs are located at the intersection of two major structural trends, immediately between the Upper Arkansas graben and the Sangre de Cristo uplift. Prominent east-west faulting occurs at the actual location of the hot springs. Preliminary exploration indicates that 1600 gpm of geothermal fluid as hot as 250/sup 0/F is likely to be found at around 1500 feet in depth. The prospective existing endusers were estimated to require 5.02 x 10/sup 10/ Btu per year, but the total annual amount of geothermal energy available for existing and future endusers is 28.14 x 10/sup 10/ Btu. The engineering design for the study assumed that the 1600 gpm would be fully utilized. Some users would be cascaded and the spent fluid would be cooled and discharged to nearby rivers. The economic analysis assumes that two separate businesses, the energy producer and the energy distributor, are participants in the geothermal project. The producer would be an existing limited partnership, with Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. as one of the partners; the distributor would be a new Colorado corporation without additional income sources. Economic evaluations were performed in full for four cases: the Base Case and three alternate scenarios. Alternate 1 assumes a three-year delay in realizing full production relative to the Base Case; Alternate 2 assumes that the geothermal reservoir is of a higher quality than is assumed for the Base Case; and Alternate 3 assumes a lower quality reservoir. 11 refs., 34 figs., 40 tabs.

Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.; Galloway, M.J.; Gross, J.T.; Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Geothermal technology publications and related reports: a bibliography, January 1984-December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technological limitations restrict the commercial availability of US geothermal resources and prevent effective evaluation of large resources, as magma, to meet future US needs. The US Department of Energy has asked Sandia to serve as the lead laboratory for research in Geothermal Technologies and Magma Energy Extraction. In addition, technology development and field support has been provided to the US Continental Scientific Drilling Program. Published results for this work from January 1984 through December 1985 are listed in this bibliography.

Cooper, D.L. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thermally conductive cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98. The developed thermally conductive grout consists of cement, water, a particular grade of silica sand, superplasticizer and a small amount of bentonite. While the primary function of the grout is to facilitate heat transfer between the U-loop and surrounding formation, it is also essential that the grout act as an effective borehole sealant. Two types of permeability (hydraulic conductivity) tests was conducted to evaluate the sealing performance of the cement-sand grout. Additional properties of the proposed grout that were investigated include bleeding, shrinkage, bond strength, freeze-thaw durability, compressive, flexural and tensile strengths, elastic modulus, Poisson`s ratio and ultrasonic pulse velocity.

Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report, Tasks 1, 3, and 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New York State`s geothermal energy potential was evaluated based on a new resource assessment performed by the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY-Buffalo) and currently commercial technologies, many of which have become available since New York`s potential was last evaluated. General background on geothermal energy and technologies was provided. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed to evaluate the economics of using geothermal energy to generate electricity in upstate New York. A conventional rankine cycle, binary power system was selected for the economic evaluation, based on SUNY-Buffalo`s resource assessment. Binary power systems are the most technologically suitable for upstate New York`s resources and have the added advantage of being environmentally attractive. Many of the potential environmental impacts associated with geothermal energy are not an issue in binary systems because the geothermal fluids are contained in a closed-loop and used solely to heat a working fluid that is then used to generate the electricity Three power plant sizes were selected based on geologic data supplied by SUNY-Buffalo. The hypothetical power plants were designed as 5 MW modular units and sized at 5 MW, 10 MW and 15 MW. The life-cycle cost analysis suggested that geothermal electricity in upstate New York, using currently commercial technology, will probably cost between 14 and 18 cents per kilowatt-hour.

Manger, K.C.

1996-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Extracting and Applying SV-SV Shear Modes from Vertical Vibrator Data Across Geothermal Prospects Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3-year project was terminated at the end of Year 1 because the DOE Geothermal project-evaluation committee decided one Milestone was not met and also concluded that our technology would not be successful. The Review Panel recommended a ?no-go? decision be implemented by DOE. The Principal Investigator and his research team disagreed with the conclusions reached by the DOE evaluation committee and wrote a scientifically based rebuttal to the erroneous claims made by the evaluators. We were not told if our arguments were presented to the people who evaluated our work and made the ?no-go? decision. Whatever the case regarding the information we supplied in rebuttal, we received an official letter from Laura Merrick, Contracting Officer at the Golden Field Office, dated June 11, 2013 in which we were informed that project funding would cease and instructed us to prepare a final report before September 5, 2013. In spite of the rebuttal arguments we presented to DOE, this official letter repeated the conclusions of the Review Panel that we had already proven to be incorrect. This is the final report that we are expected to deliver. The theme of this report will be another rebuttal of the technical deficiencies claimed by the DOE Geothermal Review Panel about the value and accomplishments of the work we did in Phase 1 of the project. The material in this report will present images made from direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources using the software and research findings we developed in Phase 1 that the DOE Review Panel said would not be successful. We made these images in great haste when we were informed that DOE Geothermal rejected our rebuttal arguments and still regarded our technical work to be substandard. We thought it was more important to respond quickly rather than to take additional time to create better quality images than what we present in this Final Report.

Hardage, Bob [Bureau of Economic Geology] [Bureau of Economic Geology

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

State-of-the-art of liquid waste disposal for geothermal energy systems: 1979. Report PNL-2404  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art of geothermal liquid waste disposal is reviewed and surface and subsurface disposal methods are evaluated with respect to technical, economic, legal, and environmental factors. Three disposal techniques are currently in use at numerous geothermal sites around the world: direct discharge into surface waters; deep-well injection; and ponding for evaporation. The review shows that effluents are directly discharged into surface waters at Wairakei, New Zealand; Larderello, Italy; and Ahuachapan, El Salvador. Ponding for evaporation is employed at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Deep-well injection is being practiced at Larderello; Ahuachapan; Otake and Hatchobaru, Japan; and at The Geysers in California. All sites except Ahuachapan (which is injecting only 30% of total plant flow) have reported difficulties with their systems. Disposal techniques used in related industries are also reviewed. The oil industry's efforts at disposal of large quantities of liquid effluents have been quite successful as long as the effluents have been treated prior to injection. This study has determined that seven liquid disposal methods - four surface and three subsurface - are viable options for use in the geothermal energy industry. However, additional research and development is needed to reduce the uncertainties and to minimize the adverse environmental impacts of disposal. (MHR)

Defferding, L.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heating the New Mexico Tech Campus with geothermal energy. Final report, July 1, 1978-October 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An area between the base of Socorro Peak and the New Mexico Tech Campus (located in central New Mexico) has been proposed as a site for geothermal exploratory drilling. The existing site environment is summarized, a program for site monitoring is proposed, impacts of geothermal production and reinjection are listed, and problems associated with geothermal development are examined. The most critical environmental impact is the increased seismic activity that may be associated with geothermal fluid migration resulting from geothermal production and reinjection.

LeFebre, V.; Miller, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Exploration for geothermal resources in the Capital District of New York. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water chemistry, gas analyses, and geophysical methods including gravity and magnetic surveys, microseismic monitoring, and temperature gradient measurements were used in the Capital District area to evaluate the potential for a hydrothermal geothermal system. Water and gas chemistries provided indirect indicators, and temperature gradients provided direct indications of a geothermal system. Gravity results were supportive of gradient and chemistry data, but seismic and magnetic work have thus far provided little information on the potential system. Gradients throughout the area ranged from an average background value of about 10/sup 0/C/km to a high of roughly 44/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradient values, the most unusual water chemistries and largest carbon dioxide exhalations occur along the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, and indicate a good potential for a usable hydrothermal geothermal system at depth.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Science STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program, Department of Energy contract DE-AT03-80SFl1459 for their financial report Geothermal Program, Department of Energy contract DE-AT03-80SF11459 for their financial report. Also we would

Stanford University

257

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geo-Heat Center provides technical assistance on geothermal direct heat applications to developers, consultants and the public which could include: data and information on low-temperature (< 1500 C) resources, space and district heating, geothermal heat pumps, greenhouses, aquaculture, industrial processes and other technologies. This assistance could include preliminary engineering feasibility studies, review of direct-use project plans, assistance in project material and equipment selection, analysis and solutions of project operating problems, and information on resources and utilization. The following are brief descriptions of technical assistance provided during the second quarter of the program.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Engineering and economic evaluation of direct hot-water geothermal energy applications on the University of New Mexico campus. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential engineering and economic feasibility of low-temperature geothermal energy applications on the campus of the University of New Mexico is studied in detail. This report includes three phases of work: data acquisition and evaluation, system synthesis, and system refinement and implementation. Detailed process designs are presented for a system using 190/sup 0/F geothermal water to substitute for the use of 135 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/y (141 TJ/y) of fossil fuels to provide space and domestic hot water heating for approximately 23% of the campus. Specific areas covered in the report include economic evaluation, environmental impact and program implementation plans.

Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large centralized geothermal heat pump system was installed to provide ice making, space cooling, space heating, process water heating, and domestic hot water heating for an ice arena in Eagan Minnesota. This paper provides information related to the design and construction of the project. Additionally, operating conditions for 12 months after start-up are provided.

Nick Rosenberry, Harris Companies

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Preliminary reliability and availability analysis of the Heber geothermal binary demonstration plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the reliability and availability of the Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant on the basis of preliminary design information. It also identifies and ranks components of the plant in order of their criticality to system operation and their contribution to system unavailability. The sensitivity of the various components to uncertainties of data and the potential for reliability growth are also examined. The assessment results were obtained through the adaptation and application of an existing reliability and availability methodology to the Heber plant design. These preliminary assessments were made to assist (1) in evaluating design alternatives for the plant and (2) in demonstrating that the closed-loop, multiple-fluid, binary cycle geothermal concept is competitive with the more conventional flashed steam cycle technology. The Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant Project is a cooperative effort directed toward accelerating geothermal development for power generation and establishing the binary cycle technology as a proven alternative to the flashed steam cycle for moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. The binary power plant would have a capacity of 45 MW/sub e/ net and would derive its energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) fluid from the Heber reservoir in southern California.

Himpler, H.; White, J.; Witt, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.] [eds.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geopressured geothermal bibliography (Geopressure Thesaurus)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. A thesaurus is a compilation of terms displaying synonymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system, the system vocabulary. The Thesaurus' role in the Geopressured Geothermal Information System is to provide a controlled vocabulary of sufficient specificity for subject indexing and retrieval of documents in the geopressured geothermal energy field. The thesauri most closely related to the Geopressure Thesaurus in coverage are the DOE Energy Information Data Base Subject Thesaurus and the Geothermal Thesaurus being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The Geopressure Thesaurus differs from these thesauri in two respects: (1) specificity of the vocabulary or subject scope and (2) display format.

Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Short-Termed Integrated Forecasting System: 1993 Model documentation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) and describe its basic properties. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Energy Department (DOE) developed the STIFS model to generate short-term (up to 8 quarters), monthly forecasts of US supplies, demands, imports exports, stocks, and prices of various forms of energy. The models that constitute STIFS generate forecasts for a wide range of possible scenarios, including the following ones done routinely on a quarterly basis: A base (mid) world oil price and medium economic growth. A low world oil price and high economic growth. A high world oil price and low economic growth. This report is written for persons who want to know how short-term energy markets forecasts are produced by EIA. The report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geothermal Program Review XII: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the President's Climate Change Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Program Review XII, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of US Department of Energy, was held April 25--28, 1994, in San Francisco, California. This annual conference is designed to promote effective technology transfer by bringing together DOE-sponsored researchers; utility representatives; geothermal energy developers; suppliers of geothermal goods and services; representatives from federal, state, and local agencies; and others with an interest in geothermal energy. In-depth reviews of the latest technological advancements and research results are presented during the conference with emphasis on those topics considered to have the greatest potential to impact the near-term commercial development of geothermal energy.

Not Available

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stanford Geothermal Project Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Papers Presented a t the Second United Nations Symposium on t h e Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, May 19-29, 1975, San

Stanford University

267

Completion and testing report: INEL Geothermal Exploratory Well One (INEL-1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INEL Geothermal Exploratory Well One (INEL-1) was drilled in search of a goethermal resource beneath the Snake River Plain for use at the Chemical Processing Plant (CPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site. The drilling site was selected as the most promising location within reasonable distance of the CPP. The resource was thought to be located at a depth near 7500 ft (2300 m). Neither significant production nor high temperatures were noted at that depth, and the well was then drilled to 10,333 ft (3150 m) with similar findings. Rock cores, geophysical logs, and hydrologic tests of the well to date indicate that no useful geothermal resource exists at this location. Information is presented on the drilling, completion, and testing of INEL-1.

Prestwich, S.M.; Bowman, J.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Returned On Investment of Engineered Geothermal Systems Annual Report FY2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) are examined in this work. These include the input energy embodied into the system. The embodied energy includes the energy contained in the materials, as well as, that consumed in each stage of manufacturing from mining the raw materials to assembling the finished plant. Also critical are the system boundaries and value of the energy - heat is not as valuable as electrical energy.

Mansure, A.J.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Geothermal Orientation Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a useful overview of the Department of Energy's outlook on geothermal energy development in the U.S. as of late 1983. For example, Exhibit 4 shows how electric utility planners' estimates of likely amounts of geothermal power on line for 1990 and 2000 first increased and then declined over time as they were surveyed in 1977 through 1983 (date are from the EPRI Survey). Additions to direct heat uses in 1979 through 1981 are in Exhibit 7. A Table (not numbered) at the back of the report "Historical Development of Geothermal Power ..." shows world installed geothermal capacity by nation at decadal intervals from 1950 to 1980, and the first year of power production for each country. (DJE 2005)

None

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Short-term hydroelectric generation model. Model documentation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Short-Term Hydroelectric Generation Model (STHGM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on the model structure. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with the EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program Summary Report Compilation. Volume I, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured--geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity. The U. S. Department of Energy's geopressured-geothermal research program in the Gulf Coast achieved many significant findings and disproved and clarified many historical perceptions that had previously limited industry's interest in developing this resource. Though in today's economic market it may not be commercially profitable to exploit this resource, the rapid advance of technology in all its different aspects could potentially make this resource attractive in the not too distant future. The ideal situation would involve the development of a total energy system in which all three associated forms of energy--chemical, thermal and mechanical are utilized. The extraction of gas from brine combined with the large number of potential direct and indirect uses of this resource will add to its economic profitability. This U.S. DOE's visionary research program has essentially laid the foundations for characterization of this resource and all aspects connected with its development.

Chacko, J. John; Maciasz, Gina; Harder, Brian J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

NMOCD - Form G-103 - Sundry Notices & Reports on Geothermal Resource Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurrInformation NAMA-ProgrammeNF|Geothermal| Open

273

NMOCD - Form G-106 - Geothermal Resources Well Summary Report | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurrInformationInformation Geothermal Resources

274

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

Geothermal heating from Pinkerton Hot Springs at Colorado Timberline Academy, Durango, Colorado. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efforts to establish a greater pool of knowledge in the field of low temperature heat transfer for the application of geothermal spring waters to space heating are described. A comprehensive set of heat loss experiments involving passive radiant heating panels is conducted and the results presented in an easily interpretable form. Among the conclusions are the facts that heating a 65 to 70 F/sup 0/ space with 90 to 100 F/sup 0/ liquids is a practical aim. The results are compared with the much lower rates published in the American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers SYSTEMS, 1976. A heat exchange chamber consisting of a 1000 gallon three compartment, insulated and buried tank is constructed and a control and pumping building erected over the tank. The tank is intended to handle the flow of geothermal waters from Pinkerton Hot Springs at 50 GPM prior to the wasting of the spring water at a disposal location. Approximately 375,000 Btu per hour should be available for heating assuming a 15 F/sup 0/ drop in water temperature. A combination of the panel heat loss experiments, construction of the heat exchange devices and ongoing collection of heat loss numbers adds to the knowledge available to engineers in sizing low temperature heat systems, useful in both solar and geothermal applications where source temperature may be often below 110 F/sup 0/.

Allen, C.C.; Allen, R.W.; Beldock, J.

1981-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

State-coupled low-temperature geothermal-resource assessment program, Fiscal Year 1979. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of low-temperature geothermal energy resource assessment efforts in New Mexico during the period from 1 October 1978 to 30 June 1980 are summarized. The results of the efforts to extend the inventory of geothermal energy resources in New Mexico to low-temperature geothermal reservoirs with the potential for direct heating applications are given. These efforts focused on compiling basic geothermal data and new hydrology and temperature gradient data throughout New Mexico in a format suitable for direct transfer to the US Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for inclusion in the GEOTHERM data file and for preparation of New Mexico low-temperature geothermal resources maps. The results of geothermal reservoir confirmation studies are presented. (MHR)

Icerman, L.; Starkey, A.; Trentman, N. (eds.) [eds.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Center for Excellence in Rural Safety Mid-Term Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and public policies can act together to improve driver safety.We work in collaboration with federal, stateCenter for Excellence in Rural Safety Mid-Term Report July 2008 #12;#12;Contents Rural Safety safety................2 RESEARCH End-to-End Emergency Response

Levinson, David M.

279

Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this sedimentary section is sand-rich, suggesting good potential for a sediment-hosted geothermal reservoir in porous sands, similar to other fields in the region such as Heber and East Mesa. Sand porosity may remain higher in the eastern portion of the low resistivity zone. This is based on its location hydrologically downstream of the probable area of thermal upwelling, intense fracture development, and associated pore-filling hydrothermal mineral deposition to the west.

Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Geothermal Case Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2009) outlined a mean 30GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western US. One goal of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Blue Ribbon Panel (GTO, 2011) recommended that DOE focus efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont, et al, 1990) will give operators a single point of information to gather clean, unbiased information on which to build geothermal drilling prospects. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy laboratory (NREL) has been working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In fiscal year 2013, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In fiscal year 2014, ten additional case studies were completed, and additional features were added to the template to allow for more data and the direct citations of data. The template allows for: Data - a variety of data can be collected for each area, including power production information, well field information, geologic information, reservoir information, and geochemistry information. Narratives ? general (e.g. area overview, history and infrastructure), technical (e.g. exploration history, well field description, R&D activities) and geologic narratives (e.g. area geology, hydrothermal system, heat source, geochemistry.) Exploration Activity Catalog - catalog of exploration activities conducted in the area (with dates and references.) NEPA Analysis ? a query of NEPA analyses conducted in the area (that have been catalogued in the OpenEI NEPA database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

Young, Katherine

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

283

Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

Kristofferson, Keith

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, July-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities and findings of the seven state commercialization teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range commercialization program are described. The period covered is July through December 1981. Background information is provided, program objectives and the technical approach used are discussed, and the benefits of the program are described. Prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analyses, time-phased project plans, the aggregated prospective geothermal energy use, and institutional analyses are discussed. Public outreach activities are covered and findings and recommendations are summarized.

Lunis, B.C. (ed.)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, July-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities and findings of the seven state commercialization teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range commercialization program are described. Background information is provided; program objectives and the technical approach that is used are discussed; and the benefits of the program are described. The summary of findings is presented. Prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analyses, time-phased project plans, the aggregated prospective geothermal energy use, and institutional analyses are discussed. Public outreach activities are covered and findings and recommendations are summarized. The commercialization activities carried out by the respective state teams are described for the following: Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

Lunis, B. C.; Toth, W. J. [comps.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, January-July 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities and findings of the seven state commercialization teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range commercialization program are described. For each state (Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming), prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analyses, time-phased project plans, the aggregated prospective geothermal energy use, and institutional analyses are discussed. Public outreach activities are also covered, and findings and recommendations are given for each state. Some background information about the program is provided. (LEW)

Lunis, B.C.; Toth, W.J. (comps.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Application of the Australian Geothermal Reporting Code to "Conventional"  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy Information the Army Permit: Engineering FormGeothermal

289

Geothermal Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Geothermal energy can manifest on the surface of the Earth, or near the surface of the Earth, where humankind may harness it to serve our energy needs. Geothermal resources are reservoirs of hot water that exist at varying temperatures and depths below the Earth's surface. Wells can be drilled into these underground reservoirs to tap steam and very hot water that can be brought to the surface for a variety of uses.

290

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal resource data base: Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in Arizona up to 1993. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction. In recent years, the primary growth in geothermal use in Arizona has occurred in aquaculture. Other uses include minor space heating and supply of warm mineral waters for health spas.

Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Report on design, construction, and testing of CO/sub 2/ breakout system for geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A skid mounted test facility has been built for determining conditions at which CO/sub 2/ flashes from geothermal brines. The system has been checked and operated at one geothermal plant. It performed as designed. The equipment is designed to operate at temperatures and pressures typical of wells near Heber, California. (Nominally 180/sup 0/C and 300 to 500 psig). It has heat exchangers which can cool the brine to less than 70/sup 0/C. (The cooling water is recirculated after being cooled by a forced air heat exchanger). Breakout pressures can be determined for any temperature between 70/sup 0/C and wellhead temperature. An adjustable orifice provides final control on pressure required to initiate flashing. The orifice is at the bottom of a sight glass. A light beam shines through the sight glass and focuses on a photoelectric cell. The presence of bubbles scatters light and decreases the output of the cell. Results using the cell were more reproducible than those using the naked eye. Results from one test show a smooth curve over the temperature range 75/sup 0/C to 165/sup 0/C. Agreement between the experimental values and calculated ones is discussed.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1982 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed structural mapping at several horizons in selected study areas within the Frio growth-fault trend demonstrates a pronounced variability in structural style. At Sarita in South Texas, shale mobilization produced one or more shale ridges, one of which localized a low-angle growth fault trapping a wedge of deltaic sediments. At Corpus Christi, shale mobilization produced a series of large growth faults, shale-cored domed anticlines, and shale-withdrawal basins, which become progressively younger basinward. At Blessing, major growth faults trapped sands of the Greta/Carancahua barrier system with little progradation. At Pleasant Bayou, a major early growth-fault pattern was overprinted by later salt tectonics - the intrusion of Danbury Dome and the development of a salt-withdrawal basin. At Port Arthur, low-displacement, long-lived faults formed on a sand-poor shelf margin contemporaneously with broad salt uplifts and basins. Variability in styles is related to the nature and extent of Frio sedimentation and shelf-margin progradation and to the presence or absence of salt. Structural styles that are conducive to the development of large geothermal reservoirs include blocks between widely spaced growth faults having dip reversal, salt-withdrawal basins, and shale-withdrawal basins. These styles are widespread on the Texas Gulf Coast. However, actually finding a large reservoir depends on demonstrating the existence of sufficient sandstone with adequate quality to support geopressured geothermal energy production.

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Kaiser, W.R.; Finley, R.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Measurement of attitudes toward commercial development of geothermal energy in Federal Region IX. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of ten target study groups and subgroups for Klamath Falls, Oregon, and Susanville, California: local government, current and potential industry at the site, relocators to the site, current and potential financial community, regulators, and current and potential promoters and developers. The results of benchmark attitudinal measurement is presented separately for each target group. A literature review was conducted and Macro-environmental attitudes of a sample of local government and industry personnel at the sites were assessed. An assessment of capabilities was made which involved two measurements. The first was a measurement of a sample of promoters, developers, and industrial service companies active at the site to determine infrastructure capabilities required by industry for geothermal plants. The second measurement involved analyzing a sample of industry management in the area and defining their requirements for plant retrofit and expansion. Finally, the processes used by the study group to analyze information to reach commitment and regulatory decisions that significantly impact on geothermal energy projects at the site were identified and defined.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Two-phase flow in geothermal energy sources. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geothermal well consisting of single and two-phase flow sections was modeled in order to explore the variables important to the process. For this purpose a computer program was developed in a versatile form in order to be able to incorporate a variety of two phase flow void fraction and friction correlations. A parametric study indicated that the most significant variables controlling the production rate are: hydrostatic pressure drop or void fraction in the two-phase mixture; and, heat transfer from the wellbore to the surrounding earth. Downhole instrumentation was developed and applied in two flowing wells to provide experimental data for the computer program. The wells (East Mesa 8-1, and a private well) behaved differently. Well 8-1 did not flash and numerous shakedown problems in the probe were encountered. The private well did flash and the instrumentation detected the onset of flashing. A Users Manual was developed and presented in a workshop held in conjunction with the Geothermal Resources Council.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

New fluorocarbon elastomers for seals for geothermal and other aggressive environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saturated ethyllenic elastomers having a range of methyl group substitution, and a range of partial fluorine substitution were screened. Elastomers based on vinylidene fluoride hexafluoropropylene (VDFHFP) and those based on tetrafluoroethylenepropylene (TFEP) (alternating) were successfully cross-linked by electron-beam radiation and fluorinated to yield elastomeric products, but those based on ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) elastomer became brittle after fluorination. The best products were evaluated using tensile strength, elongation at break, solvent swelling, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared. A wide range of carbon-black filled compositions using the TFEP elastomer were cross-linked. The compositions were then fluorinated at or near room temperature for extended periods of time. After fluorination the samples were subjected to geothermal brine at 300/sup 0/C. The best carbon-black filled composition again lasted at least 100 days in the geothermal brine. This filler-elastomer composition was chosen for use in the production of 0-rings. The 0-rings were produced by compression molding using a 30 ton hydraulic press. Various sizes of 0-rings were produced ranging fro 0.8 to 2.0 inches in diameter and from 1/16 to 3/16 inches in width. The final 0-rings were cross-linked at 40 Mrad and fluorinated under the optimized conditions developed for the samples.

Lagow, R.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 3: Applied and direct uses, resource feasibility, economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant: design, testing, and operation summary; Feasibility of hydraulic energy recovery from geopressured-geothermal resources: economic analysis of the Pelton turbine; Brine production as an exploration tool for water drive gas reservoirs; Study of supercritical Rankine cycles; Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes; Conclusions on wet air oxidation, pyrolytic conversion, decomposition/detoxification process; Co-location of medium to heavy oil reservoirs with geopressured-geothermal resources and the feasibility of oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal fluids; Economic analysis; Application of geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses; Industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource; Power generation; Industrial desalination, gas use and sales, pollutant removal, thermal EOR, sulfur frasching, oil and natural gas pipelining, coal desulfurization and preparation, lumber and concrete products kilning; Agriculture and aquaculture applications; Paper and cane sugar industries; Chemical processing; Environmental considerations for geopressured-geothermal development. 27 figs., 25 tabs.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Report on a mission to the Philippines regarding the opportunities for private investment in geothermal power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Philippines has a rich potential for geothermal energy development, according to the assessment of opportunities for U.S. private investment in the sector. Areas covered in detail are the Philippines' geothermal resources, the legal structure of the geothermal industry, conditions acting as stimuli to geothermal power generation, and interest in private geothermal investment. Major finding are as follows. (1) The Philippine geothermal power industry is the world's second largest. (2) Geothermal resources are owned by the Government of the Philippines and a complex legal structure governs their exploitation. (3) Since the Philippines is poor in most energy resources (e.g., coal, oil, and gas), use of geothermal energy is necessary. (4) Despite legal and structural obstacles, various foreign private enterprises are interested in participating in geothermal development. Two possible options for U.S. investors are presented: a joint venture with the National Oil Company, and negotiation of a service contract, either alone or with a Philippine partner, for a concession on land administered by the Office of Energy Affairs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geothermal Power Development Resource Evaluation Aspects for Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., Fukuoka, Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a limited review of and presents comments on the geothermal resource exploration program of Kyushu Electric Power Company (KEPCO). This program is for developing geothermal resources to generate electric power on Kyushu Island, Japan. Many organizations in Japan and in particular Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. are actively exploring for and developing geothermal resources on Kyushu Island. KEPCO has already demonstrated an ability and expertise to explore for geothermal resources by their successful exploration and subsequent development of several fields (Hatchobaru and Otake) on the island of Kyushu for electric power generation. The review and comments are made relative to the geothermal resource aspects of Kyushu Electric Power Company's geothermal exploration program, and within the time, budget, and scope of the Rogers Engineering's effort under the existing contract. Rogers and its consultants have had a wide variety of geothermal exploration experience and have used such experience in the analysis of what has been presented by KEPCO. The remainder of the introduction section develops general knowledge concerning geothermal power development with particular emphasis on the resource exploration. The data received section describes the information available to perform the project work. There are no interpretative parts to the data received section. The philosophy section relates our understanding of the KEPCO thinking and conditions surrounding current geothermal resource development in Japan. The survey and methods sections presents three important items about each study KEPCO has performed in the resource exploration program. These three aspects are: what should be obtained from the method, what data was obtained and presented, and what is a review and analysis of where the KEPCO exploration program is currently in terms of progress and successful location of reservoirs. The final section presents recommendations on the many aspects of the resource exploration for geothermal power development.

None

1980-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Microseismic Study with LBNL - Monitoring the Effect of Injection of Fluids from the Lake County Pipeline on...

303

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Trace metal characterization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorpotion analysis. Annual progress report...

304

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determine the fracture surface area, heat content and heat transfer, flow rates, and chemistry of the geothermal fluids encountered by the exploration wells. - Write final report...

305

Integrated Geoscience Investigation and Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoscience Investigation and Geothermal Exploration at Chena Hot Springs, Alaska Abstract This document represents the final report for Phase I of the Chena Hot Springs...

306

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii)....

307

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Energy R&D Program...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

R&D Program - Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1990 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

308

Geothermal energy program summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division (GTD) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The GTD R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. It is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. This volume, Volume 2, contains a detailed compilation of each GTD-funded R D activity performed by national laboratories or under contract to industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project. Phase I status report, April 1981-April 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using remote geophysical techniques to monitor the movement of injected brine has been evaluated. It was established that no single approach is likely to be identified that can be used to accurately monitor the precise location of the injected fluid. Several approaches have been considered in parallel because they add new dimensions to the existing monitoring capabilities, and are likely to cover a range of applications at a variety of geothermal sites. These include: microseismicity - a seismic net is used to record small magnitude events associated with injection; streaming potential - self potential anomalies produced by a moving fluid identify fluid flow direction; cross borehole geotomography - two-dimensional image of flow pathways is constructed using electromagnetic waves; and well pressure response to solid earth tide - changes in pore pressures are used to discriminate fracture/pore porosity and estimate fracture orientations.

Younker, L.; Hanson, J.; Didwall, E.; Kasameyer, P.; Smith, A.; Hearst, J.; Daily, W.; Crow, N.; Younker, J.; Murray, W.

1982-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation and flow testing of the enlarged Phase I heat-extraction system at Fenton Hill continued throughout FY80. Temperature drawdown observed at that time indicated an effective fracture of approximately 40,000 to 60,000 m/sup 2/. In May 1980, hot dry rock (HDR) technology was used to produce electricity in an interface demonstration experiment at Fenton Hill. A 60-kVA binary-cycle electrical generator was installed in the Phase I surface system and heat from about 3 kg/s of geothermal fluid at 132/sup 0/C was used to boil Freon R-114, whose vapor drove a turboalternator. A Phase II system was designed and is now being constructed at Fenton Hill that should approach commercial requirements. Borehole EE-2, the injection well, was completed on May 12, 1980. It was drilled to a vertical depth of about 4500 m, where the rock temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C. The production well, EE-3 had been drilled to a depth of 3044 m and drilling was continuing. Environmental monitoring of Fenton Hill site continued. Development of equipment, instruments, and materials for technical support at Fenton Hill continued during FY80. Several kinds of models were also developed to understand the behavior of the Phase I system and to develop a predictive capability for future systems. Data from extensive resource investigations were collected, analyzed, and assembled into a geothermal gradient map of the US, and studies were completed on five specific areas as possible locations for HDR Experimental Site 2.

Cremer, G.M. (comp.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

California Geothermal Energy Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Geothermal Energy Collaborative Geothermal Education and Outreach Guide of California Davis, and the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We specifically would like to thank support of the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We also thank Charlene Wardlow of Ormat for her

314

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal...

315

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Abstract To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as...

316

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basalt K Eburru Geothermal Area Eburru Geothermal Area East African Rift System Kenya Rift Basalt Fukushima Geothermal Area Fukushima Geothermal Area Northeast Honshu Arc...

317

Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

318

Geothermal Project Data and Personnel Resumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rogers Engineering Co., Inc. is one of the original engineering companies in the US to become involved in geothermal well testing and design of geothermal power plants. Rogers geothermal energy development activities began almost twenty years ago with flow testing of the O'Neill well in Imperial Valley, California and well tests at Tiwi in the Philippines; a geothermal project for the Commission on Volcanology, Republic of the Philippines, and preparation of a feasibility study on the use of geothermal hot water for electric power generation at Casa Diablo, a geothermal area near Mammouth. This report has brief write-ups of recent geothermal resources development and power plant consulting engineering projects undertaken by Rogers in the US and abroad.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of a dual-porosity model for vapor-dominated fractured geothermal reservoirs using a semi-analytical fracture/matrix interaction term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of dual-porosity model is being developed to simulate two-phase flow processes in fractured geothermal reservoirs. At this time it is assumed that the liquid phase in the matrix blocks remains immobile. By utilizing the effective compressibility of a two-phase water/steam mixture in a porous rock, flow within the matrix blocks can be modeled by a single diffusion equation. This equation in turn is replaced by a non-linear ordinary differential equation that utilizes the mean pressure and mean saturation in the matrix blocks to calculate the rate of fluid flow between the matrix blocks and fractures. This equation has been incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH to serve as a source/sink term for computational gridblocks that represent the fracture system. The new method has been compared with solutions obtained using fully-discretized matrix blocks, on a problem involving a three-dimensional vapor-dominated reservoir containing an injection and a production well, and has been found to be quite accurate.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Geothermal Data Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) has designed and tested a comprehensive, federated information system that will make geothermal data widely available. This new National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) will provide access to all types of geothermal data to enable geothermal analysis and widespread public use, thereby reducing the risk of geothermal energy development.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Geothermal Prospects in the Western United States Show Promise...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

new 2013 Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and Development Report, published by the Geothermal Energy Association this week. With an estimate of more than 500 Megawatts of...

322

COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. (Coso Hot Springs KGRA) Abstract Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH No. 1) is the first deep exploratory...

323

Supplement to the technical assessment of geoscience-related research for geothermal energy technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed information (e.g., project title, sponsoring organization, research area, objective status, etc.) is presented for 338 geoscience/geothermal related projects. A summary of the projects conducted by sponsoring organization is presented and an easy reference to obtain detailed information on the number and type of efforts being sponsored is presented. The projects are summarized by research area (e.g., volcanology, fluid inclusions, etc.) and an additional project cross-reference mechanism is also provided. Subsequent to the collection of the project information, a geosciences classification system was developed to categorize each project by research area (e.g., isotope geochemistry, heat flow studies) and by type of research conducted (e.g., theoretical research, modeling/simulation). A series of matrices is included that summarize, on a project-by-project basis, the research area addressed and the type of R and D conducted. In addition, a summary of the total number of projects by research area and R and D type is given.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

City of El Centro geothermal energy utility core field experiment. Final report, February 16, 1979-November 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of El Centro was awarded a contract in late 1978 to cost share the development of a low to moderate temperature geothermal resource in the City. The resource would be utilized to heat, cool and provide hot water to the nearby Community Center. In December 1981, Thermal 1 (injector) was drilled to 3970 feet. In January 1982, Thermal 2 (producer) was drilled to 8510 feet. Before testing began, fill migrated into both wells. Both wells were cleaned out. A pump was installed in the producer, but migration of fill again into the injector precluded injection of produced fluid. A short term production test was undertaken and results analyzed. Based upon the analysis, DOE decided that the well was not useful for commercial production due to a low flow rate, the potential problems of continued sanding and gasing, and the requirement to lower the pump setting depth and the associated costs of pumping. There was no commercial user found to take over the wells. Therefore, the wells were plugged and abandoned. The site was restored to its original condition.

Province, S.G.; Sherwood, P.B.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

"Assistance to States on Geothermal Energy"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work carried out under agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, related to geothermal energy policy issues. This project has involved a combination of outreach and publications on geothermal energy—Contract Number DE-FG03-01SF22367—with a specific focus on educating state-level policymakers. Education of state policymakers is vitally important because state policy (in the form of incentives or regulation) is a crucial part of the success of geothermal energy. State policymakers wield a significant influence over all of these policies. They are also in need of high quality, non-biased educational resources which this project provided. This project provided outreach to legislatures, in the form of responses to information requests on geothermal energy and publications. The publications addressed: geothermal leasing, geothermal policy, constitutional and statutory authority for the development of geothermal district energy systems, and state regulation of geothermal district energy systems. These publications were distributed to legislative energy committee members, and chairs, legislative staff, legislative libraries, and other related state officials. The effect of this effort has been to provide an extensive resource of information about geothermal energy for state policymakers in a form that is useful to them. This non-partisan information has been used as state policymakers attempt to develop their own policy proposals related to geothermal energy in the states. Coordination with the National Geothermal Collaborative: NCSL worked and coordinated with the National Geothermal Collaborative (NGC) to ensure that state legislatures were represented in all aspects of the NGC's efforts. NCSL participated in NGC steering committee conference calls, attended and participated in NGC business meetings and reviewed publications for the NGC. Additionally, NCSL and WSUEP staff drafted a series of eight issue briefs published by the NGC. The briefs addressed: Benefits of Geothermal Energy Common Questions about Geothermal Energy Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Energy and Economic Development Geothermal Energy: Technologies and Costs Location of Geothermal Resources Geothermal Policy Options for States Guidelines for Siting Geothermal Power Plants and Electricity Transmission Lines

Linda Sikkema; Jennifer DeCesaro

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recipients. The Australian Geothermal Energy Group (AGEG) has also seen significant changes and developments. Additionally the joint AGEG ­ Australian Geothermal Energy Association (AGEA) Geothermal Reporting Code Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence at the University of Queensland, the Western Australian Geothermal

Stanford University

327

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

328

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

329

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or economical.

Patrick Laney

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or economical.

Not Available

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

333

Geothermal: About  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal

334

New Mexico State University campus geothermal demonstration project: an engineering construction design and economic evaluation. Final technical report, February 25, 1980-April 24, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed engineering construction cost estimate and economic evaluation of low temperature geothermal energy application for the New Mexico State University Campus are provided. Included are results from controlled experiments to acquire design data, design calculations and parameters, detailed cost estimates, and a comprehensive cost and benefit analysis. Detailed designs are given for a system using 140 to 145{sup 0}F geothermal water to displace 79 billion Btu per year of natural gas now being burned to generate steam. This savings represents a displacement of 44 to 46 percent of NMSU central plant natural gas consumption, or 32 to 35 percent of total NMSU natural gas consumption. The report forms the basis for the system construction phase with work scheduled to commence in July 1981, and target on-stream data of February 1982.

Cunniff, R.A.; Ferguson, E.; Archey, J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geothermal resource assessment for the state of Texas: status of progress, November 1980. Final report. Appendices A through D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These appendices include: a folio of county maps showing locations of well data across the state; a computerized tabulation of the wells depicted; an explanation of the computer coding procedures; and a selected bibliography on heat flow and geothermics. (MHR)

Woodruff, C.M. Jr.; Caran, S.C.; Gever, C.; Henry, C.D.; Macpherson, G.L.; McBride, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ris Energy Report 5 Hydro, ocean and geothermal 4 This chapter gives an overview of the development of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 2003. [1] OECD, 47% Latin America, 20% China, 11% Former USSR, 9% Other Asia, 7% Africa, 3% Non of the development of other renewable energy technologies such as hydro, ocean and geothermal. These technologies

337

Tank waste source term inventory validation. Volume 1. Letter report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sample data for selection of 11 radionuclides and 24 chemical analytes were extracted from six separate sample data sets, were arranged in a tabular format and were plotted on scatter plots for all of the 149 single-shell tanks, the 24 double-shell tanks and the four aging waste tanks. The solid and liquid sample data was placed in separate tables and plots. The sample data and plots were compiled from the following data sets: characterization raw sample data, recent core samples, D. Braun data base, Wastren (Van Vleet) data base, TRAC and HTCE inventories. This document is Volume I of the Letter Report entitled Tank Waste Source Term Inventory Validation.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final Scientific/Technical Report [Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion project performed by the Blaine County School District was part of a larger effort by the District to reduce operating costs, address deferred maintenance items, and to improve the learning environment of the students. This project evaluated three options for the ground source which were Open-Loop Extraction/Re-injection wells, Closed-Loop Vertical Boreholes, and Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approaches. In the end the Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approach had the lowest total cost of ownership but the majority of the sites associated with this project did not have enough available ground area to install the system so the second lowest option was used (Open-Loop). In addition to the ground source, this project looked at ways to retrofit existing HVAC systems with new high efficiency systems. The end result was the installation of distributed waterto- air heat pumps with water-to-water heat pumps installed to act as boilers/chillers for areas with a high ventilation demand such as they gymnasiums. A number of options were evaluated and the lowest total cost of ownership approach was implemented in the majority of the facilities. The facilities where the lowest total cost of ownership approaches was not selected were done to maintain consistency of the systems from facility to facility. This project had a number of other benefits to the Blaine County public. The project utilizes guaranteed energy savings to justify the levy funds expended. The project also developed an educational dashboard that can be used in the classrooms and to educate the community on the project and its performance. In addition, the majority of the installation work was performed by contractors local to Blaine County which acted as an economic stimulus to the area during a period of recession.

Chatterton, Mike

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

340

Geothermal technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of ongoing research in rock penetration mechanics, fluid technology, borehole mechanics, and diagnostics technology is reported. (MHR)

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2003 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste was created by the Federal Government and private industry at locations around the country in support of national defense, research, and civilian power-generation programs. If not controlled, much of this legacy waste would remain hazardous to human health and the environment indefinitely. Current technology does not allow us to render this waste harmless, so the available methods to control risk rely on consolidation, isolation, and long-term management of the waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an obligation to safely control the radioactive waste and to inform and train future generations to maintain and, perhaps, improve established protections. DOE is custodian for much of the radioactive and other hazardous waste under control of the Federal Government. DOE established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 and the Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program and the Surplus Facilities Management Program in the 1980s. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978. These federal programs and legislation were established to identify, remediate, and manage legacy waste. Remedial action is considered complete at a radioactive waste site when the identified hazardous material is isolated and the selected remedial action remedy is in place and functioning. Radioactive or other hazardous materials remain in place as part of the remedy at many DOE sites. Long-term management of radioactive waste sites incorporates a set of actions necessary to maintain protection of human health and the environment. These actions include maintaining physical impoundment structures in good repair to ensure that they perform as designed, preventing exposure to the wastes by maintaining access restrictions and warnings, and recording site conditions and activities for future custodians. Any actions, therefore, that will prevent exposure to the radioactive waste now or in the future are part of long-term site management. In response to post-closure care requirements set forth in UMTRCA, DOE Headquarters established the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Program in 1988 at the DOE office in Grand Junction, Colorado. The program assumed long-term management responsibility for sites remediated under UMTRCA and other programs. Since its inception, the LTS&M Program has evolved in response to changing stakeholder needs, improvements in technology, and the addition of more DOE sites as remediation is completed. The mission of the LTS&M Program was to fulfill DOE’s responsibility to implement all activities necessary to ensure regulatory compliance and to protect the public and the environment from long-lived wastes associated with the nation’s nuclear energy, weapons, and research activities. Key components of the LTS&M Program included stakeholder participation, site monitoring and maintenance, records and information management, and research and technology transfer. This report presents summaries of activities conducted in 2003 in fulfillment of the LTS&M Program mission. On December 15, 2003, DOE established the Office of Legacy Management (LM) to allow for optimum management of DOE’s legacy responsibilities. Offices are located in Washington, DC, Grand Junction, Colorado, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to perform long-term site management, land management, site transition support, records management, and other related tasks. All activities formerly conducted under the LTS&M Program have been incorporated into the Office of Land and Site Management (LM–50), as well as management of remedies involving ground water and surface water contaminated by former processing activities.

None

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field....

343

Development of a Plan to Implement Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) in the Animas Valley, New Mexico - Final Report - 07/26/2000 - 02/01/2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of producing energy from hot dry rock (HDR), originally proposed in 1971 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, contemplated the generation of electric power by injecting water into artificially created fractures in subsurface rock formations with high heat flow. Recognizing the inherent difficulties associated with HDR, the concept of Enhanced Geothermal Systems was proposed. This embraces the idea that the amount of permeability and fluid in geothermal resources varies across a spectrum, with HDR at one end, and conventional hydrothermal systems at the other. This report provides a concept for development of a ''Combined Technologies Project'' with construction and operation of a 6 MW (net) binary-cycle geothermal power plant that uses both the intermediate-depth hydrothermal system at 1,200 to 3,300 feet and a deeper EGS capable system at 3,000 to 4,000 feet. Two production/injection well pairs will be drilled, one couplet for the hydrothermal system, and one for the E GS system. High-pressure injection may be required to drive fluid through the EGS reservoir from the injection to the production well.

Schochet, Daniel N.; Cunniff, Roy A.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

Tatro, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The California Energy Commission's Geothermal Resources Development Account Geothermal Planning Projects support of geothermal resource elements, or geothermal components of energy elements, for inclusion in the localPublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT STRUCTURING A DIRECT

346

FY97 Geothermal R&D Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Sandia National Laboratories Geothermal program plan. This is a DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form. This one is of special interest for historical work because it contains what seems to be a complete list of Sandia geothermal program publications (citations / references) from about 1975 to late 1996. (DJE 2005)

None

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented including the following: Raft River Valley, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake, Hatchobaru, and Ahuachapan geothermal fields.

Arnold, S.C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL, SOLAR AND OTHER APPLICATIONS Prepared For REPORT (FAR) TWO-PHASE FLOW TURBINE FOR COGENERATION, GEOTHERMAL, SOLAR AND OTHER APPLICATIONS EISG://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Two-Phase Flow Turbine For Cogeneration, Geothermal, Solar And Other Applications EISG

349

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power Plants", Lawrenceof fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Choosing whatfor solid waste in geothermal power plants is the same as

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their Application to Geothermal Well Testing, in Geothermalthe Performance of Geothermal Wells, Geothermal Res.of Production Data from Geothermal Wells, Geothermal Res.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geothermal development opportunities in developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the Seminar on geothermal development opportunities in developing countries, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy and presented by the National Geothermal Association. The overall objectives of the seminar are: (1) Provide sufficient information to the attendees to encourage their interest in undertaking more geothermal projects within selected developing countries, and (2) Demonstrate the technological leadership of US technology and the depth of US industry experience and capabilities to best perform on these projects.

Kenkeremath, D.C.

1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Deep Geothermal Drilling Using Millimeter Wave Technology Final Technical Research Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional drilling methods are very mature, but still have difficulty drilling through very deep,very hard and hot rocks for geothermal, nuclear waste entombment and oil and gas applications.This project demonstrated the capabilities of utilizing only high energy beams to drill such rocks,commonly called ‘Direct Energy Drilling’, which has been the dream of industry since the invention of the laser in the 1960s. A new region of the electromagnetic spectrum, millimeter wave (MMW) wavelengths at 30-300 giga-hertz (GHz) frequency was used to accomplish this feat. To demonstrate MMW beam drilling capabilities a lab bench waveguide delivery, monitoring and instrument system was designed, built and tested around an existing (but non-optimal) 28 GHz frequency, 10 kilowatt (kW) gyrotron. Low waveguide efficiency, plasma generation and reflected power challenges were overcome. Real-time monitoring of the drilling process was also demonstrated. Then the technical capability of using only high power intense millimeter waves to melt (with some vaporization) four different rock types (granite, basalt, sandstone, limestone) was demonstrated through 36 bench tests. Full bore drilling up to 2” diameter (size limited by the available MMW power) was demonstrated through granite and basalt samples. The project also demonstrated that MMW beam transmission losses through high temperature (260oC, 500oF), high pressure (34.5 MPa, 5000 psi) nitrogen gas was below the error range of the meter long path length test equipment and instruments utilized. To refine those transmission losses closer, to allow extrapolation to very great distances, will require a new test cell design and higher sensitivity instruments. All rock samples subjected to high peak temperature by MMW beams developed fractures due to thermal stresses, although the peak temperature was thermodynamically limited by radiative losses. Therefore, this limited drill rate and rock strength data were not able to be determined experimentally. New methods to encapsulate larger rock specimens must be developed and higher power intensities are needed to overcome these limitations. It was demonstrated that rock properties are affected (weakening then strengthened) by exposure to high temperatures. Since only MMW beams can economically reach rock temperatures of over 1650oC, even exceeding 3000oC, that can cause low viscosity melts or vaporization of rocks. Future encapsulated rock specimens must provide sufficiently large sizes of thermally impacted material to provide for the necessary rock strength, permeability and other analyzes required. Multiple MMW field systems, tools and methods for drilling and lining were identified. It was concluded that forcing a managed over-pressure drilling operation would overcome water influx and hot rock particulates handling problems, while simultaneously forming the conditions necessary to create a strong, sealing rock melt liner. Materials that contact hot rock surfaces were identified for further study. High power windows and gases for beam transmission under high pressures are critical paths for some of the MMW drilling systems. Straightness/ alignment can be a great benefit or a problem, especially if a MMW beam is transmitted through an existing, conventionally drilled bore.

Oglesby, Kenneth [Impact Technologies LLC; Woskov, Paul [MIT; Einstein, Herbert [MIT

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1984 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains two sections, the first on a regional statistical survey of fault compartments, and the second on a revised theory of fluid migration and temperature history in the Frio formation. Separate abstracts were prepared for each section. (ACR)

Ewing, T.E.; Light, M.P.R.; Tyler, N.; Morton, R.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Geothermal utilization plan, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. Final report, March 1-September 1, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary engineering feasibility study of geothermal utilization was completed for the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. The study incorporated previous studies of the geology, geophysics, and environment performed for the Center. In addition, information about fuel consumption and current heating methodology was provided by the Center's personnel. This information was integrated with design assumptions based on the best estimates available for geothermal resource temperature and flow rate. The result of the study is a recommended pipeline alignment and suggested geothermal service area. The estimated costs for construction of the system range from $4.5 to $5 million. The estimated savings in offset natural gas consumption after capital recovery is $3.8 million over a twenty year period. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghusn, G. Jr.; Flynn, T.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

Matthews, H.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microseismic monitoring for evidence of geothermal heat in the capital district of New York. Final report, Phases I-III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seismic monitoring work of the geothermal project was initiated for the purpose of determining more exactly the relationship between seismicity and the postulated geothermal and related activity in the Albany-Saratoga Springs area in upstate New York. The seismic monitoring aspect of this work consisted of setting up and operating a network of seven seismograph stations within and around the study area capable of detecting and locating small earthquakes. To supplement the evidence from present day seismic activity, a list of all known historical and early instrumental earthquakes was compiled and improved from original sources for a larger region centered on the study area. Additional field work was done to determine seismic velocities of P and S phases by special recording of quarry blasts. The velocity results were used both as an aid to improve earthquake locations based on computer programs and to make inferences about the existence of temperature anomalies, and hence geothermal potential, at depths beneath the study area. Finally, the level in the continuous background earth vibration, microseisms, was measured throughout the study area to test a possibility that a relationship may exist at the surface between the level in microseisms and the geothermal or related activity. The observed seismic activity within the study area, although considerably higher (two to three times) than inferred from the historical and early instrumental data, is still not only low for a potential geothermal area but appears to be related to coherent regional tectonic stresses and not to the proposed more localized geothermal activity reflected in the mineralized, CO/sub 2/ rich spring discharge.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 October 1, 1978 through December 31, 1978. Research is performed under t h e Department of Energy Contract

Stanford University

360

Geothermal development issues: Recommendations to Deschutes County  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses processes and issues related to geothermal development. It is intended to inform planners and interested individuals in Deschutes County about geothermal energy, and advise County officials as to steps that can be taken in anticipation of resource development. (ACR)

Gebhard, C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GRED III Final Report Clifton Hot Springs Geothermal Greenlee County, AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black & Veatch Corporation has prepared this report for Arizona Public Service Company, Salt River Project, and Tucson Electric Power Company (APS/SRP/TEP). The purpose of this report is to assess the prospects for significant renewable energy development in Arizona. The scope of the study is limited to Arizona projects that would export power to the grid (that is, not distributed energy projects). This study includes a review of the current status of renewable energy in Arizona, characterization of renewable power generation technologies, assessment of Arizona''s renewable resources, and an assessment of key risk factors. This section summarizes the key findings in these areas.

Brown, David E.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Regional Operations Research Program for Commercialization of Geothermal Energy in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range. Final Technical Report, January 1980--March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work accomplished from January 1980 to March 1981 in the Regional Operations Research efforts for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Geothermal Commercialization Program. The scope of work is as described in New Mexico State University Proposal 80-20-207. The work included continued data acquisition and extension of the data base, enhancement and refinement of the economic models for electric and direct use applications, site-specific and aggregated analyses in support of the state teams, special analyses in support of several federal agencies, and marketing assistance to the state commercialization teams.

None

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

Normann, Randy A.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Director, Geothermal Technologies Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The mission of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development and deployment of clean, domestic geothermal resources that will promote a stronger, more productive economy...

366

Geothermal Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector.

367

Initial Report on the Development of a Monte Carlo-Markov Chain Joint Inversion Approach for Geothermal Exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and subsequent characterization of potential resources typically employ a variety of geophysical, geologic and geochemical techniques. However, since the data collected by each technique provide information directly on only one or a very limited set of the many physical parameters that characterize a geothermal system, no single method can be used to describe the system in its entirety. Presently, the usual approach to analyzing disparate data streams for geothermal applications is to invert (or forward model) each data set separately and then combine or compare the resulting models, for the most part in a more or less ad hoc manner. However, while each inversion may yield a model that fits the individual data set, the models are usually inconsistent with each other to some degree. This reflects uncertainties arising from the inevitable fact that geophysical and other exploration data in general are to some extent noisy, incomplete, and of limited sensitivity and resolution, and so yield non-unique results. The purpose of the project described here is to integrate the different model constraints provided by disparate geophysical, geological and geochemical data in a rigorous and consistent manner by formal joint inversion. The objective is to improve the fidelity of exploration results and reservoir characterization, thus addressing the goal of the DOE Geothermal Program to improve success in exploration for economically viable resources by better defining drilling targets, reducing risk, and improving exploration/drilling success rates.

Foxall, W; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Dyer, K; Sun, Y

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Utilization of geothermal energy for methane production for J. A. Albertson Land and Cattle Company. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of an integrated system to utilize a geothermal resource for a bioconversion plant. This integrated facility would use the manure from approximately 30,000 head of feedlot cattle as a feedstock for an anaerobic digestion plant. The findings on engineering design, geological assessment, environmental, economic, and institutional requirements of the proposed project are summarized. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1985 First Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection I I Tec hnology is a research area receiving special on geothermal energy. The Program publishes technical reports on all of its research projects. Research findings

Stanford University

370

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- A study of geothermal drilling...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A study of geothermal drilling and the production of electricity from geothermal energy Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search...

371

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL / SOLAR HYBRID DESIGNS...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL SOLAR HYBRID DESIGNS: USE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FOR CSP FEEDWATER HEATING Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

372

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Development of a geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

373

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Calpine geothermal visitor center...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Calpine geothermal visitor center upgrade project An interactive approach to geothermal outreach and education at The Geysers Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ |...

374

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rafferty, 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Rafferty, 1997)...

375

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

376

Hot Dry Rock Heat Mining Geothermal Energy Development Program - Annual Report Fiscal Year 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This was a year of significant accomplishment in the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program. Most importantly, the design, construction, and installation of the surface plant for the Phase II system neared completion by the end of the year. Basic process design work has been completed, and all major components of the system except the gas/particle separator have been procured. For this component, previous design problems have been resolved, and purchase during the first half of FY91 is anticipated. Installation of the surface plant is well underway. The system will be completed and ready for operation by the end of FY91 under the current funding scenario. The operational schedule to be followed will then depend upon the program funding level. Our goal is to start long-term flow testing as soon as possible. Of equal importance, from the standpoint of the long-term viability of HDR technology, during this year, for the first time, it has been demonstrated in field testing that it should be possible to operate HDR reservoirs with water losses of 1-3%, or even less. Our experience in the deep, hot, Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill is in sharp contrast to the significant water losses seen by Japanese and British scientists working in shallower, cooler, HDR reservoirs. Calculations and modeling based on field data have shown that water consumption declines with the log of time in a manner related to water storage in the reservoir. This work may be crucial in proving that HDR can be an economically viable means for producing energy, and that it is useful even in areas where water is in short supply. In addition, an engineering model was developed to predict and explain water consumption in HDR reservoirs under pressure, the collection and processing of seismic information was more highly automated, and the detection limits for reactive tracers were lowered to less than 1 part per billion. All of these developments will add greatly to our ability to conduct, analyze, and understand the long-term test (LTFT). Water-rights acquisition activities, site clean-up, and improvements in the 1 million gallon storage pond at Fenton Hill have assured that we will have adequate water to carry out a vigorous testing program in a safe and environmentally-sound manner. The 1 million gallon pond was recontoured, and lined with a sophisticated multi-layer plastic barrier. A large part of the work on the pond was paid for with funds from the Laboratory's Health, Safety and Environment Division. Almost all the expected achievements set forth in the FY90 Annual Operating Plan were substantially accomplished this past year, in spite of a $300,000 shortfall in funding. This funding shortfall did delay some work and result in some projects not being completed, however. They have had to go more slowly than they would like on some aspects of the installation of the surface plant for the LTFT, purchase of non-critical equipment, such as a back-up electric generator for Fenton Hill, has been delayed, and some work has not been brought to an adequate conclusion. The fracture healing work, for example, was completed but not written up. they simply did not have the funds to pay for the effort needed to fully document this work. As the program enters FY91, the completion of the surface plant at Fenton Hill is within sight. The long-awaited LTFT can then begin, and the large investment in science and technology represents by the HDR Program will begin to bear still greater dividends.

Duchane, David

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with geothermal energy development. These g o a lthe division of Geothermal Energy. TASK 1 Identify Areas forLaboratory, NSF Geothermal Energy Conference, Pasadena,

Lippmann, Marcello J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Video Resources on Geothermal Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Geothermal video offerings at the Department of Energy include simple interactive illustrations of geothermal power technologies and interviews on initiatives in the Geothermal Technologies Office.

379

GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Division of Geothermal Energy. Two teams ofassociated with geothermal energy development. These g o a lthe division of Geothermal Energy. TASK 1 Identify Areas for

Lippmann, Marcello J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Subsiding Areas and Geothermal Subsidence Potential25 Project 2-Geothermal Subsidence Potential Maps . . . . .Subsidence Caused by a Geothermal Project and Subsidence Due

Lippmann, Marcello J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal Today: 2005 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE/EERE Geothermal Technologies Program publication highlights accomplishments and activities of the program during the last two years.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Onshore permitting systems analysis for coal, oil, gas, geothermal and oil shale leases. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnitude and complexity of permit processes raises a question as to their impact on the rate and scope of industrial development activity. One particular area where this issue is of concern is in new energy extraction and development activities. The initiation of new energy projects has been a national priority for several years. But, energy projects, because of their potential for creating land disturbances, are subject to many environmental and other regulations. Because of this, the permitting required of energy resource developers is extensive. Within the energy field, a major portion of development activities occurs on federal lands. This is particularly true in the Rocky Mountain states and Alaska where the principal landholder is the federal government. The permitting requirements for federal lands' development differ from those for private lands. This report assesses the impact of permitting processes for energy resource development on federal lands. The permitting processes covered include all of the major environmental, land-use, and safety permits required by agencies of federal and state governments. The lands covered include all federal lands, with emphasis on eight states with major development activities.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Final Technical Report - 300Ă?Â?Ă?°C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System For Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A silicon carbide (SiC) based electronic temperature sensor prototype has been demonstrated to operate at 300���°C. We showed continuous operation of 1,000 hours with SiC operational amplifier and surface mounted discreet resistors and capacitors on a ceramic circuit board. This feasibility demonstration is a major milestone in the development of high temperature electronics in general and high temperature geothermal exploration and well management tools in particular. SiC technology offers technical advantages that are not found in competing technologies such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) at high temperatures of 200���°C to 300���°C and beyond. The SiC integrated circuits and packaging methods can be used in new product introduction by GE Oil and Gas for high temperature down-hole tools. The existing SiC fabrication facility at GE is sufficient to support the quantities currently demanded by the marketplace, and there are other entities in the United States and other countries capable of ramping up SiC technology manufacturing. The ceramic circuit boards are different from traditional organic-based electronics circuit boards, but the fabrication process is compatible with existing ceramic substrate manufacturing. This project has brought high temperature electronics forward, and brings us closer to commercializing tools that will enable and reduce the cost of enhanced geothermal technology to benefit the public in terms of providing clean renewable energy at lower costs.

Cheng-Po Chen; David Shaddock; Peter Sandvik; Rich Saia; Amita Patil, Alexey Vert; Tan Zhang

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geothermal News  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorge Waldmann George Waldmann Phonegeothermal/900546 Geothermal News en

385

Geothermal Tomorrow 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brochure describing the recent activities and future research direction of the DOE Geothermal Program.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Alaska geothermal bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geothermal Technologies Newsletter  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Newsletter features the latest information about its geothermal research and development efforts. The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC)— a tax-exempt, non-profit, geothermal educational association — publishes quarterly as an insert in its GRC Bulletin.

388

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT, January 2008, EMIGRANT SLIMHOLE DRILLING PROJECT, DOE GRED III (DE-FC36-04GO14339) Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

389

Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Abstract Geology...

390

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Research Program Update reports contain a fair amount of technical detail and management information at the individual project level. (DJE 2005)

None

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Research Program Update reports contain a fair amount of technical detail and management information at the individual project level. (DJE 2005)

None

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Research Program Update reports contain a fair amount of technical detail and management information at the individual project level. DJE 2005

None

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Research Program Update reports contain a fair amount of technical detail and management information at the individual project level. (DJE 2005)

None

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Abstract The...

395

Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern Great Basin- A Progress Report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterizing...

396

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Foundation Heat Exchanger Final...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

397

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

R.A. Cunniff, R.L. Bowers (2003) Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II: Animas Valley, New Mexico Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

398

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Abstract In...

399

Rye Patch geothermal development, hydro-chemistry of thermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

development, hydro-chemistry of thermal water applied to resource definition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Rye Patch geothermal...

400

Geothermal Exploration Best Practices: A Guide to Resource Data...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practices: A Guide to Resource Data Collection, Analysis and Presentation for Geothermal Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Programmatic Objectives of the Geothermal Technology Division: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form. (DJE - 2005)

Meridian Corporation, Alexandria, VA

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geothermal energy technology: issues, R and D needs, and cooperative arrangements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, the National Research Council, through its Energy Engineering Board, formed the Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. The committee's study addressed major issues in geothermal energy technology, made recommendations for research and development, and considered cooperative arrangements among government, industry, and universities to facilitate RandD under current severe budget constraints. The report addresses four types of geothermal energy: hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. Hydrothermal systems are the only type that are now economically competitive commercially. Further technology development by the Department of Energy could make the uneconomical hydrothermal resources commercially attractive to the industry. The economics are more uncertain for the longer-term technologies for extracting energy from geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. For some sites, the cost of energy derived from geopressured and hot dry rock systems is projected within a commercially competitive range. The use of magma energy is too far in the future to make reasonable economic calculations.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Geothermal program review 16: Proceedings. A strategic plan for geothermal research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings contain 21 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Exploration technology (4 papers); Reservoir technology (5 papers); Energy conversion technology (8 papers); Drilling technology (2 papers); and Direct use and geothermal heat pump technology (2 papers). An additional section contains a report on a workshop on dual-use technologies for hydrothermal and advanced geothermal reservoirs.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Surveys on the distribution and abundance of the Hawaiian hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) in the vicinity of proposed geothermal project subzones in the District of Puna, Hawaii. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) entered into an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct wildlife surveys relative to identifying potential impacts of geothermal resource development on the native biota of the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano in the Puna district on the island of Hawaii. This report presents data on the endangered Hawaiian hoary bat (Hawaiian bat), or opeapea (Lasiurus cinereus semotus), within the proposed Hawaii geothermal subzones. Potential effects of geothermal development on Hawaiian bat populations are also discussed. Surveys were conducted to determine the distribution and abundance of bats throughout the District of Puna. Baseline information was collected to evaluate the status of bats within the study area and to identify important foraging habitats. Little specific data exists in the published literature on the population status and potential limiting factors affecting the Hawaiian bat. A USFWS recovery plan does not exist for this endangered species.

Reynolds, M.; Ritchotte, G.; Dwyer, J.; Viggiano, A.; Nielsen, B.; Jacobi, J.D. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaii Research Station

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

407

National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification presentation...

408

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update, FY 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: 1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and 2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, Joel Lawrence

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1986 Second Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecastingl of field behavior with time. Injection al series of Proceedings that are a prominent literature source on geothermal energy. The Program

Stanford University

410

FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY of stimulation is induced shear on preexisting fractures, which increases their transmissibility by orders of magnitude. The processes that create fractured rock are discussed from the perspective of geology and rock

Stanford University

411

Twelve month follow-up report of the conference to promote international sales of US geothermal equipment (CORECT Project): Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reverse trade mission ''Conference to Promote International Sales of US Geothermal Equipment'' was organized and managed by the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) in collaboration with the California Energy Commission (CEC). The mission was held in late September/October of 1987 and was well received by the 23 participants from 18 different countries. Approximately $275,000 in immediate sales can be attributed directly to the program and the estimate of potential future sales runs as high as $4,765,000. It was felt by the attendees that the program was well organized and executed and that the caliber of persons invited to attend was optimum. All of the attendees stated that the function was very informative and beneficial and that they would recommend to others that they attend similar functions. In order to be really effective in exporting a company, a country must be highly visible to potential purchasers. Although this function lasted only two weeks it was considered as a prime first step in the development of a strong US geothermal technology export base program. As a part of the effort to maintain this presence the GRC recommends that this function be followed by other similar functions, courses, seminars, and specific field trips. In addition every effort should be made for US government and industry representatives to visit various countries as often as possible. The GRC is working toward developing an international information-dissemination program, which would include the development of courses for geothermal units in foreign countries.

Anderson, D.N.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Sandia National Laboratories: Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EnergyGeothermalGeothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Geothermal energy is an abundant energy resource that comes from tapping the natural...

413

Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015 State of Geothermal Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015 State of Geothermal February 24, 2015...

414

Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Detailed conceptual design of a high-temperature CO/sub 2/ sensor for geothermal applications. Final report, Task I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed on the development of a pCO/sub 2/ probe is documented. The recommended probe includes a solid state device which senses the pH of the internal electrolyte, a gas-permeable membrane that allows diffusion of CO/sub 2/ into the electrolyte, and a getter to inhibit incursion of H/sub 2/S. The results of the feasibility study indicate that such a probe holds promise of meeting all the operational and environmental requirements for in situ and down-hole measurement of carbon dioxide in geothermal fluids.

Phelan, D.M.; Taylor, R.M.; Baxter, R.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Geothermal Technologies Subject Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning FunNeuTel2011Programmatic Reports Geothermal Resource

418

Geothermal: Contact Us  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning FunNeuTel2011Programmatic ReportsContact Us Geothermal

419

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

None

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Guidebook to Geothermal Finance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Texasgulf solar cogeneration program. Mid-term topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of technical activities of the Texasgulf Solar Cogeneration Program at the Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine is described. The program efforts reported focus on preparation of a system specification, selection of a site-specific configuration, conceptual design, and facility performance. Trade-off studies performed to select the site-specific cogeneration facility configuration that would be the basis for the conceptual design efforts are described. Study areas included solar system size, thermal energy storage, and field piping. The conceptual design status is described for the various subsystems of the Comanche Creek cogeneration facility. The subsystems include the collector, receiver, master control, fossil energy, energy storage, superheat boiler, electric power generation, and process heat subsystems. Computer models for insolation and performance are also briefly discussed. Appended is the system specification. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation: final task report (year 4). Final report, 1 August 1979-31 July 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the short-term production tests run on the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are summarized. These tests were analyzed using conventional pressure test analysis methods. The effects of reservoir heterogeneties onm production behavior and, in particular, permeability distribution and faulting of reservoir sand were studied to determine the sensitivity of recovery to these parameters. A study on the effect of gas buildup around a producing well is reported. (MHR)

MacDonald, R.C.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Ohkuma, H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Design and fabrication of polymer-concrete-lined pipe for testing in geothermal-energy processes. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A specific polymer-concrete formulation was applied as a steel pipe liner in response to a need for durable, economical materials for use in contact with high temperature geothermal brine. Processes are described for centrifugally applying the liner to straight pipe, for casting the liner in pipe fittings, and for closure of field joints. Physical properties of the liner materials were measured. Compressive strengths of up to 165.8 MPa (24,045 psi) and splitting tensile strengths of 23.5 MPa (3408 psi) were measured at ambient temperature. Compressive strengths of 24 MPa (3490 psi) and splitting tensile strengths of 2.5 MPa (366 psi) were measured at about 150/sup 0/C (302/sup 0/F). A full-scale production plant is described which would be capable of producing about 950 m (3120 ft) of lined 305-mm-diam (12 in.) pipe per day. Capital cost of the plant is estimated to be about $8.6 million with a calculated return on investment of 15.4%. Cost of piping a geothermal plant with PC and PC-lined steel pipe is calculated to be $1.21 million, which compares favorably with a similar plant piped with alloy steel piping at a cost of $1.33 million. Life-cycle cost analysis indicates that the cost of PC-lined steel pipe would be 82% of that of carbon steel pipe over a 20-year plant operating life.

Kaeding, A.O.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Geysers geothermal cooling towers.   Geothermal in  Geysers  Geothermal  Cooling  Towers.   Aminzadeh, processes  –  Geothermal  resources  near  cooling 

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 3D Flow Modelling of the Medium-Term Circulation Test Performed in the Deep Geothermal Site of Soultz-Sous-forĂŞts (France) Sylvie Gentier, Xavier Rachez, Tien Dung Tran Ngoc, Mariane Peter-Borie, Christine Souque BRGM, Geothermal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

Documentation of the status of international geothermal power plants and a list by country of selected geothermally active governmental and private sector entities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes the printouts from the International Geothermal Power Plant Data Base and the Geothermally Active Entity Data Base. Also included are the explanation of the abbreviations used in the power plant data base, maps of geothermal installations by country, and data base questionnaires and mailing lists.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

US Geothermal Energy Program Multiyear Plan, 1988-1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. The Five Year Plans and Multi-Year Plans usually included more detailed rationales and projections than other similar reports. This is a final report. It contains significant data on cost of power from geothermal power systems, and is of historical (history) interest in that regard. (DJE 2005)

None

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The federal environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) can be complex and time consuming. Currently, a geothermal developer may have to complete the NEPA process multiple times during the development of a geothermal project. One mechanism to reduce the timeframe of the federal environmental review process for activities that do not have a significant environmental impact is the use of Categorical Exclusions (CXs), which can exempt projects from having to complete an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement. This study focuses primarily on the CX process and its applicability to geothermal exploration. In this paper, we Provide generalized background information on CXs, including previous NEPA reports addressing CXs, the process for developing CXs, and the role of extraordinary circumstances; Examine the history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs;Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the possibility of standardizing geothermal CXs across federal agencies; and Present analysis from the Geothermal NEPA Database and other sources on the potential for new geothermal exploration CXs. As part of this study, we reviewed Environmental Assessments (EAs) conducted in response to 20 geothermal exploration drilling permit applications (Geothermal Drilling Permits or Notices of Intents) since the year 2001, the majority of which are from the last 5 years. All 20 EAs reviewed for this study resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). While many of these FONSI's involved proponent proposed or federal agency required mitigation, this still suggests it may be appropriate to create or expand an exploration drilling CX for geothermal, which would have a significant impact on reducing geothermal exploration timelines and up-front costs. Ultimately, federal agencies tasked with permitting and completing environmental reviews for geothermal exploration drilling activities and/or legislative representatives are the responsible parties to discuss the merits and implementation of new or revised CXs for geothermal development.

Levine, A.; Young, K. R.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

Speer, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

432

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

433

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

434

GEOTHERM Data Set  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

GEOTHERM is a comprehensive system of public databases and software used to store, locate, and evaluate information on the geology, geochemistry, and hydrology of geothermal systems. Three main databases address the general characteristics of geothermal wells and fields, and the chemical properties of geothermal fluids; the last database is currently the most active. System tasks are divided into four areas: (1) data acquisition and entry, involving data entry via word processors and magnetic tape; (2) quality assurance, including the criteria and standards handbook and front-end data-screening programs; (3) operation, involving database backups and information extraction; and (4) user assistance, preparation of such items as application programs, and a quarterly newsletter. The principal task of GEOTHERM is to provide information and research support for the conduct of national geothermal-resource assessments. The principal users of GEOTHERM are those involved with the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey.

DeAngelo, Jacob

435

Geothermal Technologies Newsletter Archives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find past issues of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies program newsletter, which features information about its geothermal research and development efforts....

436

Annotated geothermal bibliography of Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography includes all the Utah geothermal references through 1984. Some 1985 citations are listed. Geological, geophysical, and tectonic maps and reports are included if they cover a high-temperature thermal area. The references are indexed geographically either under (1) United States (national studies), (2) regional - western United States or physiographic province, (3) Utah - statewide and regional, or (4) county. Reports concerning a particular hot spring or thermal area are listed under both the thermal area and the county names.

Budding, K.E.; Bugden, M.H. (comps.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Geothermal Industry Partnership Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find links to information about partnership opportunities and programs for the geothermal industry.

438

South Dakota geothermal handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geothermal Government Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find links to federal, state, and local government programs promoting geothermal energy development.

440

Geothermal-resource verification for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the various types of geothermal energy reviews some legal uncertainties of the resource and then describes a methodology to evaluate geothermal resources for applications to US Air Force bases. Estimates suggest that exploration costs will be $50,000 to $300,000, which, if favorable, would lead to drilling a $500,000 exploration well. Successful identification and development of a geothermal resource could provide all base, fixed system needs with an inexpensive, renewable energy source.

Grant, P.R. Jr.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Geothermal energy in Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature of goethermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of utilizing geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and State programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. The names, addresses, and phone numbers of various organizations actively involved in research, regulation, and the development of geothermal energy are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Industrial food processing and space heating with geothermal heat. Final report, February 16, 1979-August 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A competitive aware for a cost sharing program was made to Madison County, Idaho to share in a program to develop moderate-to-low temperature geothermal energy for the heating of a large junior college, business building, public shcools and other large buildings in Rexburg, Idaho. A 3943 ft deep well was drilled at the edge of Rexburg in a region that had been probed by some shallower test holes. Temperatures measured near the 4000 ft depth were far below what was expected or needed, and drilling was abandoned at that depth. In 1981 attempts were made to restrict downward circulation into the well, but the results of this effort yielded no higher temperatures. The well is a prolific producer of 70/sup 0/F water, and could be used as a domestic water well.

Kunze, J.F.; Marlor, J.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

Zyvoloski, G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coast geopressured-geothermal wells: Two studies, Pleasantinduced by geopressured-geothermal well development. In:

Majer, Ernest L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements in geothermal wells," Proceedings, Secondin Larderello Region geothermal wells for reconstruction of

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Geothermal NEPA Database on OpenEI (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Geothermal National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database as a platform for government agencies and industry to access and maintain information related to geothermal NEPA documents. The data were collected to inform analyses of NEPA timelines, and the collected data were made publically available via this tool in case others might find the data useful. NREL staff and contractors collected documents from agency websites, during visits to the two busiest Bureau of Land Management (BLM) field offices for geothermal development, and through email and phone call requests from other BLM field offices. They then entered the information into the database, hosted by Open Energy Information (http://en.openei.org/wiki/RAPID/NEPA). The long-term success of the project will depend on the willingness of federal agencies, industry, and others to populate the database with NEPA and related documents, and to use the data for their own analyses. As the information and capabilities of the database expand, developers and agencies can save time on new NEPA reports by accessing a single location to research related activities, their potential impacts, and previously proposed and imposed mitigation measures. NREL used a wiki platform to allow industry and agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users.

Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Future of Geothermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) on the United States in the 21st Century #12;The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS and Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID

Laughlin, Robert B.

448

THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A REPORT of experiments into the natural state of geothermal reservoirs have been conducted using porous medium models, even though geothermal systems are usually highly fractured. It is unclear whether a porous medium

Stanford University

449

CALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal energy exploration and development are most important. Geothermal resources in Costa Rica have of energy development in Costa Rica. The Miravalles geothermCALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES MIRAVALLES GEOTHERMAL FIELD COSTA RICA

Stanford University

450

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gains  with  geothermal  power.  Geothermal Resources gains  with  geothermal  power.  Geothermal Resources of Tables:  Table 1:  Geothermal Power Plants Operating at 

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Geothermal Region Big Windy Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Bingham Caribou Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Birdsville...

452

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Progress Report, 6-99, Revised 12-99  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the Spring 1999 progress report on ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents an update concerning the work that has been accomplished since the June...

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Geothermal policy development program: expediting the local geothermal permitting process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a number of years, concerns have been raised about the length of time and the complexity involved in obtaining required permits in order to develop the geothermal resource at the Geysers. Perhaps the most important factor is jurisdiction. At the Geysers, all three levels of government - local, state, and federal - exercise significant authority over various aspects of geothermal development. In addition, several agencies within each governmental level play an active role in the permitting process. The present study is concerned primarily with the local permitting process, and the ways in which this process could be expedited. This report begins by looking at the local role in the overall permitting process, and then reviews the findings and conclusions that have been reached in other studies of the problem. This is followed by a case study evaluation of recent permitting experience in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties, and the report concludes by outlining several approaches to expediting the local permitting process.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A geothermal resource data base: New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in New Mexico up to 1993. Economically important geothermal direct-use development in New Mexico and the widespread use of personal computers (PC) in recent years attest to the need for an easily used and accessible data base of geothermal data in a digital format suitable for the PC. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction.

Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Possibilities of Geothermal Energy and its Competitiveness  with Other Energy Sources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Geothermal Energy is one of the common talks at present. It has the potential to run long term and can provide base-load energy, at… (more)

Hasan, Farhan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

National Geothermal Data System: Transforming the Discovery, Access, and Analytics of Data for Geothermal Exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compendium of Papers from the 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California February 11-13, 2013 The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed, interoperable network of data collected from state geological surveys across all fifty states and the nation’s leading academic geothermal centers. The system serves as a platform for sharing consistent, reliable, geothermal-relevant technical data with users of all types, while supplying tools relevant for their work. As aggregated data supports new scientific findings, this content-rich linked data ultimately broadens the pool of knowledge available to promote discovery and development of commercial-scale geothermal energy production. Most of the up-front risks associated with geothermal development stem from exploration and characterization of subsurface resources. Wider access to distributed data will, therefore, result in lower costs for geothermal development. NGDS is on track to become fully operational by 2014 and will provide a platform for custom applications for accessing geothermal relevant data in the U.S. and abroad. It is being built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community. The basic structure of the NGDS employs state-of-the art informatics to advance geothermal knowledge. The following four papers comprising this Open-File Report are a compendium of presentations, from the 38th Annual Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, taking place February 11-13, 2013 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. “NGDS Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs,” outlines the efforts of a set of nationwide data providers to supply data for the NGDS. In particular, data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. The paper addresses the various types of data and metadata required and why simple links to existing data are insufficient for promoting geothermal exploration. Authors of this paper are Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office, David Blackwell, Southern Methodist University (SMU), Cathy Chickering (SMU), Toni Boyd, Oregon Institute of Technology’s GeoHeat Center, Roland Horne, Stanford University, Matthew MacKenzie, Uberity, Joe Moore, University of Utah, Duane Nickull, Uberity, Stephen Richard, Arizona Geological Survey, and Lisa Shevenell, University of Nevada, Reno. “NGDS User Centered Design: Meeting the Needs of the Geothermal Community,” discusses the user- centered design approach taken in the development of a user interface solution for the NGDS. The development process is research based, highly collaborative, and incorporates state-of-the-art practices to ensure a quality user interface for the widest and greatest utility. Authors of this paper are Harold Blackman, Boise State University, Suzanne Boyd, Anthro-Tech, Kim Patten, Arizona Geological Survey, and Sam Zheng, Siemens Corporate Research. “Fueling Innovation and Adoption by Sharing Data on the DOE Geothermal Data Repository Node on the National Geothermal Data System,” describes the motivation behind the development of the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) and its role in the NGDS. This includes the benefits of using the GDR to share geothermal data of all types and DOE’s data submission process. Authors of this paper are Jon Weers, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office. Finally, “Developing the NGDS Adoption of CKAN for Domestic & International Data Deployment,” provides an overview of the “Node-In-A-Box” software package designed to provide data consumers with a highly functional interface to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the system. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation and that the NGDS architecture is based on open standards, which means other server software can make resources available, a

Patten, Kim [Arizona Geological Survey

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

literature and how it affects access to land and mineral rights for geothermal energy production References B. C. Farhar (2002) Geothermal Access to Federal and Tribal Lands: A...

460

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Sustaining the National Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sustaining the National Geothermal Data System: Considerations for a System Wide Approach and Node Maintenance, Geothermal Resources Council 37th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hulin Geopressure-geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hulin Geopressure-geothermal test well: First order levels Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

462

Geothermal Program Review XI: proceedings. Geothermal Energy - The Environmental Responsible Energy Technology for the Nineties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers pertaining to current research and development of geothermal energy in the USA. The seven sections of the document are: Overview, The Geysers, Exploration and Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Energy Conversion, Advanced Systems, and Potpourri. The Overview presents current DOE energy policy and industry perspectives. Reservoir studies, injection, and seismic monitoring are reported for the geysers geothermal field. Aspects of geology, geochemistry and models of geothermal exploration are described. The Drilling section contains information on lost circulation, memory logging tools, and slim-hole drilling. Topics considered in energy conversion are efforts at NREL, condensation on turbines and geothermal materials. Advanced Systems include hot dry rock studies and Fenton Hill flow testing. The Potpourri section concludes the proceedings with reports on low-temperature resources, market analysis, brines, waste treatment biotechnology, and Bonneville Power Administration activities. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Contractor for geopressured-geothermal sites: Final contract report, Volume 1, fiscal years 1986--1990 (5 years), testing of wells through October 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field tests and studies were conducted to determine the production behavior of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and their potential as future energy sources. Results are presented for Gladys McCall Site, Pleasant Bayou Site, and Hulin Site.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

465

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Monitored energy use of homes with geothermal heat pumps: A compilation and analysis of performance. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) was assessed by comparing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and whole house energy use of GHP houses and control houses. Actual energy savings were calculated and compared to expected savings (based on ARI ratings and literature) and predicted savings (based on coefficient of performance - COP - measurements). Differences between GHP and control houses were normalized for heating degree days and floor area or total insulation value. Predicted savings were consistently slightly below expected savings but within the range of performance cited by the industry. Average rated COP was 3.4. Average measured COP was 3.1. Actual savings were inconsistent and sometimes significantly below predicted savings. No correlation was found between actual savings and actual energy use. This suggests that factors such as insulation and occupant behavior probably have greater impact on energy use than type of HVAC equipment. There was also no clear correlation between climate and actual savings or between climate and actual energy use. There was a trend between GHP installation date and savings. Newer units appear to have lower savings than some of the older units which is opposite of what one would expect given the increase in rated efficiencies of GHPs. There are a number of explanations for why actual savings are repeatedly below rated savings or predicted savings. Poor ground loop sizing or installation procedures could be an issue. Given that performance is good compared to ASHPs but poor compared to electric resistance homes, the shortfall in savings could be due to duct leakage. The takeback effect could also be a reason for lower than expected savings. Occupants of heat pump homes are likely to heat more rooms and to use more air-conditioning than occupants of electric resistance homes. 10 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

Stein, J.R.; Meier, A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Geothermal innovative technologies catalog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geothermal wells that are effectively cemented and durable poses a significant operational challenge used is critical to the long-term durability of a geothermal well. Conventional cement systems are high systems, they typically fail. More ductile cement systems have been introduced and applied in geothermal

Stanford University

469

Geothermal drilling technology update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.entek.chalmers.se/~anly/symp/symp2001.html) "CO2 sequestration by magnesium silicate mineral carbonation in Finland" Ron Zevenhoven of magnesium oxide-based mineral carbonation for CO2 sequestration" Ron Zevenhoven, Jens Kohlmann. underReport TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2 from flue gases Jens Kohlmann 1

Zevenhoven, Ron

471

Stanford Geothermal Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the continuous generating capacity of binary-cycle, medium-enthalpy geothermal power with solar thermal technology. SOURCE: Laura Garchar Characterizing and Predicting Resource...

472

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

474

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

injection wells capacity; temperature; costs; legal reviews by Oregon DoJ. * Partners: Johnson Controls?? Overview 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Project Objectives...

475

Geothermal Technologies Office: Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exploration Technologies (6) Geopressured Resources (1) Geothermal Analysis (14) Heat Pumps (8) High-Temperature Cements (2) High-Temperature Downhole MWD Tools for...

476

Engineered Geothermal Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Different concepts for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are presented and evaluated according to their potential for medium to large scale power production in Norwegian… (more)

Drange, Lars Anders

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Geothermal Outreach Publications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) most recent outreach publications about geothermal technologies, research, and development.

479

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF FOSSIL-FUEL NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal reporting terms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A REVIEW OF AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNIQUES. VOLUME 8 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Rosen, L.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Innovative Design of New Geothermal Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This very significant and useful report assessed state-of-the-art geothermal technologies. The findings presented in this report are the result of site visits and interviews with plant owners and operators, representatives of major financial institutions, utilities involved with geothermal power purchases and/or wheeling. Information so obtained was supported by literature research and data supplied by engineering firms who have been involved with designing and/or construction of a majority of the plants visited. The interviews were conducted by representatives of the Bonneville Power Administration, the Washington State Energy Office, and the Oregon Department of Energy during the period 1986-1989. [DJE-2005

Bloomquist, R. Gordon; Geyer, John D.; Sifford, B. Alexander III

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Potential of geothermal energy in China .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis provides an overview of geothermal power generation and the potential for geothermal energy utilization in China. Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in… (more)

Sung, Peter On

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." GeneralDesign and Optimize Geothermal Power Cycles." Presented atof Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Effects of Geothermal Power Production, 11the potential use of geothermal energy for power generationlargest producer of geothermal electric power in the world.

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Geothermal Drilling Project Canada The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project GermanyEU Toward the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

489

A Technical Databook for Geothermal Energy Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TECHNICAL DATABOOK FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY UTILIZATION S.L.Technical Databook for Geothermal Energy Utilization* s. L.Survey, Menlo Park, CA. Geothermal Energy Development, CA.

Phillips, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential use of geothermal energy for power generation47. Boldizsar, T. , 1970, "Geothermal energy production fromCoast Geopressure Geothermal Energy Conference, M.H. Dorfman

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model A guide to providing input to GETEM, the Geothermal Electricity...

492

Enhanced Geothermal Systems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Geothermal Technologies Office Enhanced Geothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems The Newberry Volcano near Bend, Oregon is one of five active Energy Department...

493

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential use of geothermal energy for power generationCoast Geopressure Geothermal Energy Conference, M.H. Dorfmanand Otte, C. , 1976, Geothermal energy-resources production,

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494