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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (5) Power Plants (0) Projects...

2

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Details Areas (24) Power Plants (0) Projects (1)...

3

Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (2)...

4

Outside a Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outside a Geothermal Region Outside a Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Outside a Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (1) Projects (0) Techniques (0) This is a category for geothermal areas added that do not fall within an existing geothermal region. As a number of these accumulate on OpenEI, new regions can be created and areas moved into those regions accordingly. Geothermal Regions Map[1] References ↑ "Geothermal Regions Map" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Colorado Area USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential Undiscovered Mean Potential Planned Capacity Planned Capacity Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Geothermal Areas within the Outside a Geothermal Region

5

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Property:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalRegion" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + Adak Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Aidlin Geothermal Facility + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Geothermal Project + Alaska Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Area + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Project + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region +

7

Alaska Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Alaska Geothermal Region Details Areas (54) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[2] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Alaska Area 1,717,854 km²1,717,854,000,000 m² 663,091.644 mi² 18,490,808,670,600 ft² 2,054,553,384,000 yd² 424,490,312.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 677 MW677,000 kW

8

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region (Redirected from Holocene Magmatic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Details...

9

Category:Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermalpower.jpg Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geothermal Regions page? For detailed information on Geothermal Regions, click here. Category:Geothermal Regions Add.png Add a new Geothermal Region Pages in category "Geothermal Regions" The following 22 pages are in this category, out of 22 total. A Alaska Geothermal Region C Cascades Geothermal Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region H Hawaii Geothermal Region Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region N cont. Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region O Outside a Geothermal Region R Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region S San Andreas Geothermal Region San Andreas Split Geothermal Region

10

Template:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalRegion GeothermalRegion Jump to: navigation, search This is the GeothermalRegion template. To define a new Geothermal Region, please use the Geothermal Region form. Parameters Map - The map of the region. State - The state in which the resource area is located. Area - The estimated size of the area in which the resource area is located, in km². IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential - The identified hydrothermal electricity generation potential in megawatts, from the USGS resource estimate. UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential - The estimated undiscovered hydroelectric generation potential in megawatts from the USGS resource estimate. PlannedCapacity - The total planned capacity for the region in megawatts. Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate - The number of plants

11

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW 0.385 GW 3.85e-4 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 4 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 9 Geothermal Areas within the Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

12

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details...

13

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region (Redirected from Idaho Batholith) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Details Areas...

14

Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regions Regions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Regions RegionsMap2012.jpg Geothermal regions were outlined for the western United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) to identify geothermal areas, projects, and exploration trends for each region. These regions were developed based on the USGS physiographic regions (U.S. Geological Survey), and then adjusted to fit geothermal exploration parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects (weather, vegetation patterns, groundwater flow), and other relevant factors. The 21 regions can be seen outlined in red and overlain on the 2008 USGS Geothermal Favorability Map in Figure 1.[1] Add a new Geothermal Region List of Regions Area (km2) Mean MW

15

Northern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} Province is situated in northern Idaho and western Montana and includes folded mountains, fault-bounded uplifts, and volcanics formed during middle Cretaceous to late Eocene mountain period. The region is structtually cojmplex with faulting and folding asociated with eastward thrust faulting. Western Montana and northwestern Wyoming contain large areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks, including smaller localized Quaternary silicic volcanic rocks. Replace Citation[1] References ↑ "Replace Citation" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Idaho, Montana Area 97,538 km²97,538,000,000 m²

16

Hawaii Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hawaii Geothermal Region Details Areas (16) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data State(s) Hawaii Area 28,311 km²28,311,000,000 m² 10,928.046 mi² 304,736,772,900 ft² 33,859,956,000 yd² 6,995,789.655 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 181 MW181,000 kW 181,000,000 W 181,000,000,000 mW 0.181 GW 1.81e-4 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 2,435 MW2,435,000 kW 2,435,000,000 W 2,435,000,000,000 mW 2.435 GW 0.00244 TW Planned Capacity Planned Capacity 50 MW50,000 kW 50,000,000 W 50,000,000,000 mW 0.05 GW 5.0e-5 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 1 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 0 Geothermal Areas within the Hawaii Geothermal Region

17

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the

19

San Andreas Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Andreas Geothermal Region San Andreas Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home San Andreas Geothermal Region Details Areas (4) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (1) Map: {{{Name}}} The topographic texture of western California is controlled by the San Andreas fault system, the tectonic expression of the Pacific Plate sliding northwestward along the western margin of the North American Plate. Hundreds of miles long and in places up to a mile wide, the San Andreas Fault Zone has been active since its origin in the Tertiary. About 10 percent of the present plate motion is compressional, shortening and wrinkling the crust to create the parallel coastal northwest-southeast mountain ranges. USGS Physiographic Regions[1] References ↑ "USGS Physiographic Regions"

20

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

San Andreas Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Andreas Geothermal Region San Andreas Geothermal Region (Redirected from San Andreas) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home San Andreas Geothermal Region Details Areas (4) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (1) Map: {{{Name}}} The topographic texture of western California is controlled by the San Andreas fault system, the tectonic expression of the Pacific Plate sliding northwestward along the western margin of the North American Plate. Hundreds of miles long and in places up to a mile wide, the San Andreas Fault Zone has been active since its origin in the Tertiary. About 10 percent of the present plate motion is compressional, shortening and wrinkling the crust to create the parallel coastal northwest-southeast mountain ranges. USGS Physiographic Regions[1]

22

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Colorado, New Mexico Area 128,454 km²128,454,000,000 m² 49,583.244 mi² 1,382,666,010,600 ft² 153,630,984,000 yd² 31,741,625.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 1,010 MW1,010,000 kW 1,010,000,000 W 1,010,000,000,000 mW 1.01 GW 0.00101 TW Planned Capacity

23

Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascades Geothermal Region Cascades Geothermal Region (Redirected from Cascades) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (3) Techniques (5) Map: {{{Name}}} The Cascade Range is part of a vast mountain chain that extends from British Columbia to northern California and has been volcanically active for ~ 40 million years as a result of the convergence of the of the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. Two physiographic sub-provinces make up the Cascade Range; the Western Cascades and the High Cascades on the east. Middle Eocene to early Pliocene (40 - 5 million years) thick mafic lava flows, primarily of andesitic composition are associated with ash flows, tuffs, and silicic intrusive bodies and stocks that decrease in age

24

Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascades Geothermal Region Cascades Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (3) Techniques (5) Map: {{{Name}}} The Cascade Range is part of a vast mountain chain that extends from British Columbia to northern California and has been volcanically active for ~ 40 million years as a result of the convergence of the of the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. Two physiographic sub-provinces make up the Cascade Range; the Western Cascades and the High Cascades on the east. Middle Eocene to early Pliocene (40 - 5 million years) thick mafic lava flows, primarily of andesitic composition are associated with ash flows, tuffs, and silicic intrusive bodies and stocks that decrease in age eastward to the High Cascades. Miocene to Holocene volcanic rocks make up

25

Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Details Areas (3) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (25) Map: {{{Name}}} Replace Citation[1] References ↑ "Replace Citation" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Idaho, Montana Area 11,841 km²11,841,000,000 m² 4,570.626 mi² 127,455,339,900 ft² 14,161,836,000 yd² 2,925,970.305 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 44.0 MW44,000 kW 44,000,000 W 44,000,000,000 mW 0.044 GW 4.4e-5 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 209.9 MW209,900 kW 209,900,000 W 209,900,000,000 mW 0.21 GW 2.099e-4 TW Planned Capacity Planned Capacity 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 0 Plants with Unknown

26

Sierra Nevada Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Sierra Nevada Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} California's Sierra Nevada is a west-tilting 350-mile (560-km)-long block of granite. Extending from 14,494 feet (Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the lower 48 states) in the east to near sea level in the west, it contains the spectacular Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks (not indicated on the map). The massive granite intruded the crust in Mesozoic time and was uplifted and faulted in the Tertiary during formation of the basin and range to the east. USGS[1] References ↑ "USGS" Geothermal Region Data State(s) California Area 56,363 km²56,363,000,000 m² 21,756.118 mi² 606,685,695,700 ft²

27

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (15)...

28

San Andreas Split Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » San Andreas Split Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home San Andreas Split Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) California Area 18,246 km²18,246,000,000 m² 7,042.956 mi² 196,398,119,400 ft² 21,822,216,000 yd² 4,508,677.83 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region

29

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

30

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

31

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Regional issue identification...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

issue identification and assessment (RIIA). Volume I. An analysis of the TRENDLONG MID-MID Scenario for Federal Region 10 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

35

Geothermal Power Plants in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine small experimental geothermal power plants are now operating at six sites in the People's Republic of China. These range in capacity from 50 kW to 3MW, and include plants of the flash-steam and binary type. All except two units utilize geofluids at temperatures lower than 100 C. The working fluids for the binary plants include normal- and iso-butane, ethyl chloride, and Freon. The first geothermal plant came on-line in 1970, the most recent ones in 1979. Figure 1 shows the location of the plants. Major cities are also shown for reference. Table 1 contains a listing of the plants and some pertinent characteristics. The total installed capacity is 5,186 kW, of which 4,386 kW is from flash-steam units. In the report, they given an example of the results of exploratory surveys, and show system diagrams, technical specifications, and test results for several of the power plants.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Heber Plant Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Geothermal Facility Plant Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Heber Plant Geothermal Facility General Information Name Heber Plant Geothermal Facility Facility Heber Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Imperial Valley, California Coordinates 33.03743°, -115.621591° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.03743,"lon":-115.621591,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Range Geothermal Region and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (34) Power Plants (3) Projects (7) Techniques (33) Map: {{{Name}}} Examination of seismicity and late Quaternary faults in Montana and Idaho north of the Snake River Plain shows a geographic correspondence between high seismicity and 24 faults that have experienced surface rupture during the late Quaternary. The Lewis and Clark Zone delineates the northern boundary of this tectonically active extensional region. Earthquakes greater than magnitude 5.5 and all identified late Quaternary faults are confined to the Montana-Idaho portion of the Basin and Range Province south of the Lewis and Clark Zone. Furthermore, all 12 Holocene faults are

38

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (48) Power Plants (8) Projects (15) Techniques (33) The Basin and Range Province in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California is characterized by late Cretaceous - early Cenozoic regional erosion, Oligocene - Miocene volcanism, and subsequent late Miocene extension. Extensional faulting in northwestern Nevada began everywhere at 12 Ma and has continued up to the present. Faulting in the Warner Range in northeastern California can only be constrained to have begun between 14 and 3 Ma, but may represent westward migration of Basin and Range extension during the Pliocene. Compared to the many parts of the Basin and Range in

39

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide an update of historical and current trends in geothermal power plant technology, extending the previous Next Generation Geothermal Power Plant (NGGPP) report originally developed by EPRI in 1996.BackgroundIn its 1996 study, EPRI evaluated a number of technologies with the potential to lower the cost of geothermal power production or to expand cost effective power production to lower temperature resources, thus opening ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Colorado Plateau is a high standing crustal block of relatively undeformed rocks surrounded by the highly deformed Rocky Mountains, and Basin and Range Provinces. The Uinta Mountains of Utah and Rocky Mountains of Colorado define the northern and northeastern boundaries of the Plateau. The Rio Grande Rift Valley in New Mexico defines the eastern boundary. The southern boundary is marked by the Mogollon Rim, an erosional cuesta that separates the Colorado Plateau from the extensively faulted Basin and Rang Province. To the west is a broad transition zone where the geologic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (Redirected from Snake River Plain) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Details Areas (8) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (11) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Snake River Plain is a large arcuate structural trough that characterizes the topography of southern Idaho that can be divided into three sections: western, central, and eastern. The western Snake River Plain is a large tectonic graben or rift valley filled with several km of lacustrine (lake) sediments; the sediments are underlain by rhyolite and basalt, and overlain by basalt. The western plain began to form around 11-12 Ma with the eruption of rhyolite lavas and ignimbrites. The western plain is not parallel to North American Plate motion, and lies at a high

42

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (37) Power Plants (15) Projects (10) Techniques (30) Map: {{{Name}}} The northern Walker Lane (NWL) is a structurally complex zone of transition between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate and the Basin and Range Province. It is a major right-lateral shear zone which has been defined on both physiographic and geologic grounds Evidence from seismic and geologic studies together indicate that this 100 km wide zone is actively deforming and accommodates 20% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern Walker Lane and Basin and Range from GPS velocities[1]

43

Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin and Range Geothermal Region Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} North-south-striking and west-dipping Basin and Range province normal faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km between the San Bernardino basin in the north and the Sahuaripa basin in the south. Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake [1] References ↑ "Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake"

44

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Walker-Lane Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (37) Power Plants (15) Projects (10) Techniques (30) Map: {{{Name}}} The northern Walker Lane (NWL) is a structurally complex zone of transition between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate and the Basin and Range Province. It is a major right-lateral shear zone which has been defined on both physiographic and geologic grounds Evidence from seismic and geologic studies together indicate that this 100 km wide zone is actively deforming and accommodates 20% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern

45

New Hampshire/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Hampshire Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Hampshire No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Hampshire No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Hampshire Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region White Mountains Geothermal Area Other GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Hampshire Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

46

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Gulf of California Rift Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone...

47

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For...

48

Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Blackwell,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West...

49

Micro-Earthquake At Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1976) Exploration Activity Details...

50

Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

51

Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

Peter Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

54

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

New Mexico/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico/Geothermal Mexico/Geothermal < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Mexico Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Mexico Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Lightning Dock I Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, New Mexico Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Lightning Dock II Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, NV Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Mexico

56

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

57

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

58

Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1990) Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

60

Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan geothermal power plant has been the subject of several recent reports and papers (1-7). This article is a condensation of the author's earlier writings (5-7), and incorporates new information on the geothermal activities in El Salvador obtained recently through a telephone conversation with Ing. R. Caceres of the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) who has been engaged in the design and engineering of the newest unit at Ahuachapan. El Salvador is the first of the Central American countries to construct and operate a geothermal electric generating station. Exploration began in the mid-1960's at the geothermal field near Ahuachapan in western El Salvador. The first power unit, a separated-steam or so-called ''single-flash'' plant, was started up in June 1975, and was followed a year later by an identical unit. In July 1980, the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) will complete the installation of a third unit, a dual-pressure (or ''double-flash'') unit rated at 35 MW. The full Ahuachapan plant will then constitute about 20% of the total installed electric generating capacity of the country. During 1977, the first two units generated nearly one-third of all the electricity produced in El Salvador. C.E.L. is actively pursuing several other promising sites for additional geothermal plants. There is the possibility that eventually geothermal energy will contribute about 450 MW of electric generating capacity. In any event it appears that by 1985 El Salvador should be able to meet its domestic needs for electricity by means of its indigenous geothermal and hydroelectric power plants, thus eliminating any dependence on imported petroleum for power generation.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact ...  

... Indonesia, and Turkey. Promising greater efficiency and reduced costs ADCC technology holds great promise for geothermal power plants seeking ...

62

Innovative Design of New Geothermal Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect

This very significant and useful report assessed state-of-the-art geothermal technologies. The findings presented in this report are the result of site visits and interviews with plant owners and operators, representatives of major financial institutions, utilities involved with geothermal power purchases and/or wheeling. Information so obtained was supported by literature research and data supplied by engineering firms who have been involved with designing and/or construction of a majority of the plants visited. The interviews were conducted by representatives of the Bonneville Power Administration, the Washington State Energy Office, and the Oregon Department of Energy during the period 1986-1989. [DJE-2005

Bloomquist, R. Gordon; Geyer, John D.; Sifford, B. Alexander III

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Report on Geothermal Power Plant Cost and Comparative Cost of Geothermal and Coal Fired Steam Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to be used by Utah Power and Light Company (UP and L) in making studies of geothermal power plants. The dollars per kilowatt comparison between a geothermal plant and a UP and L coal-fired plant is to be developed. Geothermal gathering system costs and return to owner are to be developed for information.

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Details Areas (8) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (11) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Snake River Plain is a large arcuate structural trough that characterizes the topography of southern Idaho that can be divided into three sections: western, central, and eastern. The western Snake River Plain is a large tectonic graben or rift valley filled with several km of lacustrine (lake) sediments; the sediments are underlain by rhyolite and basalt, and overlain by basalt. The western plain began to form around 11-12 Ma with the eruption of rhyolite lavas and ignimbrites. The western plain is not parallel to North American Plate motion, and lies at a high angle to the central and eastern Snake River Plains. Its morphology is

66

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area (Redirected from Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

67

Occidental Geothermal, Inc. , Oxy Geothermal Power Plant No. 1: draft environmental impact report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following aspects of the proposed geothermal power plant are discussed: the project description; the environment in the vicinity of project as it exists before the project begins, from both a local and regional perspective; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the growth inducing impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Colorado/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado/Geothermal Colorado/Geothermal < Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Colorado Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Colorado No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Colorado No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Colorado Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 4.615 MW4,614.868 kW 4,614,868.309 W 4,614,868,309 mW 0.00461 GW 4.614868e-6 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Poncha Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.274 MW5,273.619 kW 5,273,618.589 W

69

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are commercially mature, dispatchable, base-loaded renewable energy sources. Most existing geothermal power plants exploit moderate- to high-temperature geothermal resources greater than 150C. These conditions exist in a few, relatively small geographic areas of the world, but these areas currently host thousands of megawatts of reliable, base-loaded renewable power, with thousands more megawatts in development. According to the Geothermal Resources Council, between 4000 and 7000 ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nevada geothermal power plant project approved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proposal to construct and test a 12.5-megawatt geothermal power plant in the Steamboat Hot Springs KGRA in Washoe County, Nevada, has been approved by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The power plant could be completed by October 1987. Several stipulations are included in the BLM approval. The stipulations include a program to monitor ground water, surface water, and hydrothermal features to detect any impacts on the hydrology in the Steamboat Hot Springs area. When plant operations are tested, an emission test will be required to verify that noncondensible gas concentrations are within federal and state standards. No geothermal fluid will be discharged on the land's surface. Other stipulations include the special construction of electrical distribution lines to protect birds of prey; the fencing of hazardous areas; and a minimal disturbance of surface areas.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal power plants of Iceland: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical features of the geothermal electric power plants of Iceland are described. Some description is given of the geology of the geothermal regions, and recent volcanic eruptions are discussed relative to their impact on the geothermal plant sites. The 3 MW, single-flash plant at Namafjall, the 60 MW, double-flash plant at Krafla, and the 1 MW unit at Grindavik are included. Information is given on well arrangements, casing programs, energy conversion systems, capital investments, and operating experiences, where such information is available.

DiPippo, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Regional operation research...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

operation research program for development of geothermal energy in the southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978 Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

74

Railroad Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Nevada Exploration Region Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase...

75

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary...

76

Designing geothermal power plants to avoid reinventing the corrosion wheel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses how designers can take into account, the necessary chemical and materials precautions that other geothermal power plants have learned. Current worldwide geothermal power plant capacity is presented as well as a comparison of steam composition from seven different geothermal resources throughout the world. The similarities of corrosion impacts to areas of the power plants are discussed and include the turbines, gas extraction system, heat rejection system, electrical/electronic systems, and structures. Materials problems and solutions in these corrosion impact areas are identified and discussed. A geothermal power plant design team organization is identified and the efficacy of a new corrosion/materials engineering position is proposed.

Conover, Marshall F.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole...

78

Geothermal Sourcebook, Section 2.0 - Plant Control (Draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Section discusses (1) requirements for control of an individual power plant for both base loaded or load following plants, (2) operations during upset conditions, and (3) the degree of automation which may be applicable to a geothermal power plant.

None

1978-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Texas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas/Geothermal Texas/Geothermal < Texas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Texas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Texas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Texas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Texas Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Texas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

80

Wyoming/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Wyoming Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Wyoming No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Wyoming No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Wyoming Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Huckleberry Hot Springs Geothermal Area 38.744 MW38,744.243 kW 38,744,243.17 W 38,744,243,170 mW 0.0387 GW 3.874424e-5 TW Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Wyoming Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Arizona/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arizona/Geothermal Arizona/Geothermal < Arizona Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arizona Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arizona No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arizona No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arizona Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Clifton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 14.453 MW14,453.335 kW 14,453,335.43 W 14,453,335,430 mW 0.0145 GW 1.445334e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Gillard Hot Springs Geothermal Area 11.796 MW11,796.115 kW 11,796,114.7 W 11,796,114,700 mW 0.0118 GW 1.179611e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region

82

Montana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana/Geothermal Montana/Geothermal < Montana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Montana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Montana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Montana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Montana Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Boulder Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.21 MW5,210.319 kW 5,210,318.609 W 5,210,318,609 mW 0.00521 GW 5.210319e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Broadwater Hot Spring Geothermal Area 5.256 MW5,255.823 kW 5,255,823.43 W 5,255,823,430 mW 0.00526 GW 5.255823e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

83

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

84

Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant General Information Name Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Facility Neal Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Malheur County, Oregon Coordinates 44.02239°, -117.4631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.02239,"lon":-117.4631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant General Information Name North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Facility North Brawley Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Imperial Valley, California Coordinates 33.015046°, -115.542267° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.015046,"lon":-115.542267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

86

Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Skokan, 1993...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region...

87

Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Geothermal Literature Review At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

88

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

89

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Body and surface wave tomography are two of the primary methods for estimation of regional scale seismic velocity variations. Seismic velocity is affected by temperature and rock composition in complex ways, but when combined with geologic and structural maps, relative temperature can in some cases be estimated. We present preliminary tomographic models for compressional and shear-wave velocity using local and regional earthquakes recorded by Earthscope Transportable Array stations, network

91

Five-megawatt geothermal-power pilot-plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a report on the Raft River Geothermal-Power Pilot-Plant Project (Geothermal Plant), located near Malta, Idaho; the review took place between July 20 and July 27, 1979. The Geothermal Plant is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) overall effort to help commercialize the operation of electric power plants using geothermal energy sources. Numerous reasons were found to commend management for its achievements on the project. Some of these are highlighted, including: (a) a well-qualified and professional management team; (b) effective cost control, performance, and project scheduling; and (c) an effective and efficient quality-assurance program. Problem areas delineated, along with recommendations for solution, include: (1) project planning; (2) facility design; (3) facility construction costs; (4) geothermal resource; (5) drilling program; (6) two facility construction safety hazards; and (7) health and safety program. Appendices include comments from the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications, the Controller, and the Acting Deputy Director, Procurement and Contracts Management.

Not Available

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal Trans Geotherm Resour Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Citation Gregory Nimz,Cathy Janik,Fraser Goff,Charles Dunlap,Mark Huebner,Dale

93

Load Following in Geothermal Plants: Capabilities and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, geothermal power plants are baseload facilities, but they may be operated in a load-following mode in the same manner as conventional steam plants. As grid penetration of renewable resources increases - especially those generation types with diurnal variations such as wind and solar - the ability of other power plants to load-follow becomes increasingly valuable.Load following is challenging in terms of the design, operations, and maintenance of flash and binary geothermal ...

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

95

Geothermal power plants of Italy: A technical survey of existing installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dry-steam geothermal power plants in the Boraciferous (Larderello), Monte Amiata, and Travale regions of Italy are described. The geology of these areas is described along with the nature of the geothermal steam. Details are given about the drilling techniques and the methods used to complete the wells. Noncondensing and condensing steam turbines are described in detail, including special features aimed at improving the flexibility of the machines to meet a variety of geofluid specifications while, at the same time, maintaining high performance. The type of materials used to resist the corrosive and erosive nature of the geothermal fluid are also covered. Economic data and operating experience are presented.

DiPippo, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant August 26, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Joshua DeLung Chemetall supplies materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles $28.4 million in Recovery Act funding going toward geothermal plant Plant expected to produce 4 MW of electrical power, employ 25 full-time workers Chemetall produces lithium carbonate to customers in a wide range of industries, including for batteries used in electric vehicles, and now the

97

Geothermal energy as a source of electricity. A worldwide survey of the design and operation of geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of geothermal power generation is presented. A survey of geothermal power plants is given for the following countries: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Turkey, USSR, and USA. A survey of countries planning geothermal power plants is included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at www.nrel.govpublications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants Final ARRA Project Report Desikan Bharathan Technical Report NREL...

99

District Energy SW 40th Street Thermal Plant Geothermal Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plant. In fact, although the geothermal system requires a higher initial investment, the energy savings results in an 8.7% total savings over a 25 year period. The energy savings...

100

Solar Thermal Augmentation of a Flash Geothermal Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal flash-plant output often declines over time as the supporting reservoir cools and less steam is produced from the fluid from each well. While this decline is often mitigated by makeup well drilling, another technique would be to use solar thermal energy to offset the decline and restore generation. The 2011 EPRI report 1024675, Geothermal/Solar Hybrid Applications, examined the use of solar thermal energy to augment a binary plant using a low-temperature resource: the current ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project  

SciTech Connect

The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Methods for regional assessment of geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The techniques in geothermal resource assessment are summarized, terminology and assumptions are clarified, and a foundation for the development of optimum geothermal resource assessment methodology is provided. A logical, sequential subdivision of the geothermal resource base is proposed, accepting its definition as all the heat in the earth's crust under a given area, measured from mean annual temperature. That part of the resource base which is shallow enough to be tapped by production drilling is termed the accessible resource base, and it in turn is divided into useful and residual components. The useful component (i.e., the heat that could reasonably be extracted at costs competitive with other forms of energy at some specified future time) is termed the geothermal resource. This in turn is divided into economic and subeconomic components, based on conditions existing at the time of assessment. In the format of a McKelvey diagram, this logic defines the vertical axis (degree of economic feasibility). The horizontal axis (degree of geologic assurance) contains identified and undiscovered components. Reserve is then designated as the identified economic resource. All categories should be expressed in units of heat, with resource and reserve figures calculated at wellhead, prior to the inevitable large losses inherent in any practical thermal use or in conversion to electricity. Methods for assessing geothermal resources can be grouped into 4 classes: (a) surface thermal flux, (b) volume, (c) planar fracture, and (d) magmatic heat budget. The volume method appears to be most useful.

Muffler, P.; Cataldi, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

In-line process instrumentation for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of geothermal power depend on satisfactory plant reliability of continuous operation. Plant problems and extended downtime due to corrosion failures, scale buildup, or injection well plugging have affected many past geothermal projects. If in-line instrumentation can be developed to alert plant operators to correctable problems, then the cost and reliability of geothermal power will be improved. PNL has completed a problem of development of in-line corrosion and chemical instrumentation for binary cycle plants, and this technology has been used to set up a monitoring program at the Heber Binary Demonstration Power Plant. The current emphasis has shifted to development of particle meters for use on injection lines and CO/sub 2/ and pH probes for use in control of calcite scaling. Plans have been outlined to develop and demonstrate flash plant instrumentation for corrosion monitoring, scaling, steam purity, and injection line particle counting. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

Shannon, D.W.; Robertus, R.J.; Sullivan, R.G.; Kindle, C.H.; Pierce, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

105

Washington/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Washington/Geothermal < Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Washington Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Washington No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Washington No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Washington Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Baker Hot Spring Geothermal Area 22.7 MW22,700 kW 22,700,000 W 22,700,000,000 mW 0.0227 GW 2.27e-5 TW Cascades Geothermal Region

106

Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hawaii/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Geothermal Hawaii/Geothermal < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hawaii Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Hawaii Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Haleakala SW Rift Zone Exploration Ormat Technologies Inc , US Department of Energy Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Puna Geothermal Venture Ormat Technologies Inc Pahoa, Hawaii 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Hawaii Owner Facility Type Capacity (MW) Commercial Online

108

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

109

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

110

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

111

Regional geothermal exploration in north central New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad-based geothermal resource reconnaissance study covering Bernalillo, Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Taos, Torrance, and Valencia counties in north central New Mexico was conducted from June 15, 1981, through September 30, 1983. Specific activities included the compilation of actual temperature, bottom-hole temperature gradient, and geotemperature data; tabulation of water chemistry data; field collection of temperature-depth data from existing wells; and drilling of temperature gradient holes in the Ojo Caliente, San Ysidro, Rio Puerco, and Polvadera areas. The data collected were used to perform: (1) a regional analysis of the geothermal energy potential of north central New Mexico; (2) two site-specific studies of the potential relationship between groundwater constrictions and geothermal resources; (3) an evaluation of the geothermal energy potential at Santa Ana Pueblo; (4) a general analysis of the geothermal energy resources of the Rio Grande Rift, including specific data on the Valles Caldera; and (5) an evaluation of the use of geothermometers on New Mexico groundwaters. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual chapters.

Icerman, L. (ed.) [ed.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

Amador, M. [ed.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Measurement and control techniques in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This information provided the background and source material used in preparing the chapter of the Geothermal Source Book on instrumentation, measurement, and control techniques. Here more complete and detailed information is presented than could be included in the source book chapter and is being published for reference. Included are detailed examples of instrumentation and control techniques currently being used in geothermal power plants. In addition, the basic guidelines and unique characteristics of instrumentation and control in geothermal systems, are presented. The instrumentation and control philosophy and the hardware involved in geothermal electric plants and their supply and injection systems are addressed. The intent is to address the unique characteristics of geothermal electric instrumentation and control (I and C) systems. Standard I and C practice is available in the general literature. Sources of information for standard I and C practice are listed in the Appendix. The information presents the philosophy of I and C system design; the development of the system, from power grid considerations through subsystem operation to specific system details; and component selection and operating considerations.

Whitbeck, J.F.; Dart, R.H.; Miller, J.D.; Brewer, D.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant: Design, Construction, and Early Startup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary-cycle technology could almost double the electric energy yield from known hydrothermal resources. The 45-MWe Heber geothermal demonstration plant--now in a three-year test and demonstration program--has successfully passed through a series of feasibility studies, design stages, and field experiments that show its promise to tap these resources.

1987-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

Bharathan, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

117

Modeling and optimization of geothermal power plants using the binary fluid cycle  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation of a binary fluid cycle power plant for use with geothermal energy sources, and the subsequent optimization of this power plant type over a range of geothermal source conditions are described. The optimization technique employed for this analysis was based upon the principle of maximum use of geothermal energy.

Walter, R.A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions at geothermal power plants was evaluated in laboratory scale equipment and by process engineering analysis. The process is based on scrubbing geothermal steam with a metal salt solution to selectively remove and precipitate the contained H/sub 2/S. The metal sulfide is roasted or oxygen/acid leached to regenerate the metal salt, and sulfur is rejected from the system as elemental sulfur or as sulfate. Up to 95 percent removal of H/sub 2/S from simulated geothermal steams was obtained in a 2'' diameter scrubbing column packed with 3 feet of 5/8'' Flexirings by use of a recirculating slurry of copper sulfate/copper sulfide. Information is included on the chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics and process control aspects of the process, scrubber system design, operation, and corrosion, and design proposals and cost estimates for a H/sub 2/S removal system. (LCL)

Harvey, W.W.; Brown, F.C.; Turchan, M.J.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Economic assessment of polymer concrete usage in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study established to review the Heber and Niland, California 50 MWe conceptual geothermal power plants designs and to identify areas where non-metallic materials, such as polymer concrete, can be technically and economically employed are reported. Emphasis was directed toward determining potential economic advantages and resulting improvements in plant availability. It is estimated that use of polymer concrete in the Heber plant will effect a savings of 6.18 mills per KWH in the cost of power delivered to the network, a savings of 9.7%. A similar savings should be effected in the Niland plant.

Not Available

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Low-Temperature Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are commercially mature, dispatchable, base-loaded renewable energy sources. Most existing geothermal power plants exploit moderate-to-high-temperature geothermal resources greater than 150C (300F). These conditions exist in a few relatively small geographic areas of the world, which has limited the amount of geothermal deployment. Emerging technologies, new exploration and drilling techniques, and pre-engineered systems are contributing to make generation from lower-temperature r...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The tectonic setting of Egypt, in the northeastern corner of the African continent, suggests that it may possess significant geothermal resources, especially along its eastern margin. The most promising areas for geothermal development in the NW Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift system are locations along the eastern shore of the Gulf of Suez that are characterized by surface thermal manifestations, including a cluster of hot springs with varied temperatures. The Gulf of Suez region is one of the most interesting geothermal areas in Egypt because of the high temperatures

123

Draft Environmental Assessment Ormat Nevada Northern Nevada Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Ormat Nevada Northern Nevada Geothermal Power Plant Projects Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for ORMAT LLC's Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant, Elko County, Nevada; Jersey Valley Geothermal Project, Pershing County, Nevada; and McGinness Hills Geothermal Project, Lander County, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, D.C. 20585 August 2011 NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANT PROJECTS - ORMAT NEVADA AUGUST 2011 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................1 1.1 SUMMARY AND LOCATION OF PROPOSED ACTION .....................................................1

124

Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and injection systems necessary to serve the pilot power and mineral recovery plants planned for Phase 3. The scope of the Area Resource Test Facility Subprogram will include evaluation, costing, design, construction and operation of an ARTF that can serve as a field facility for testing and evaluating high temperature, high salinity geothermal brine utilization components and systems being developed by various organizations and laboratories in the United States. [DJE-2005

None

1975-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

125

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

126

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

127

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

128

Documentation of the status of international geothermal power plants and a list by country of selected geothermally active governmental and private sector entities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the printouts from the International Geothermal Power Plant Data Base and the Geothermally Active Entity Data Base. Also included are the explanation of the abbreviations used in the power plant data base, maps of geothermal installations by country, and data base questionnaires and mailing lists.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location General Us Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_General_Us_Region_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510806"

130

Area development plan of the geothermal potential in planning region 8, Roosevelt - Custer area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resource data, the Roosevelt-Custer Region development plan, and energy, economic, and institutional considerations are presented. Environmental considerations and water availability are discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heber geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The binary power plant is to be a 45 MW net electrical facility deriving energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) Heber reservoir in Southern California. The optimized baseline design established for the power plant is described, and the design and optimization work that formed the basis for the baseline design is documented. The work accomplished during Phase II, Preliminary Design is also recorded, and a base provided from which detailed plant design could be continued. Related project activities in the areas of licensing, environmental, cost, and schedule are also described. The approach used to establish the Phase II optimized baseline design was to (1) review the EPRI Phase I conceptual design and feasibility studies; (2) identify current design criteria and state-of-the-art technology; and (3) develop a preliminary design optimized to the Heber site based on utiliity standards.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Worldwide Geothermal Power Plants: Status as of June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are 100 geothermal power units now in operation throughout 12 countries, with a total installed capacity of just over 2110 MW. The average unit thus is rated at 21.1 MW. Newer units may be broadly classified as follows: (a) wellhead units of less than 5 MW; (b) small plants of about 10 MW; (c) medium plants of 30-35 MW; (d) large plants of about 55 MW; and (e) complexes typically consisting of several 55 MW units in a large geothermal field. There is a trend toward turbine units of the double-flow type with a 55 MW rating, used either alone or in a tandem-compound arrangement giving 110 MW in a single power house. This is particularly evident at The Geysers field in California. Double-flash units (separated-steam followed by a surface flash) are suited to high quality reservoirs having high temperature, high steam fractions at the wellhead, and low scaling potential. Single-flash units (separated steam) may be called for where scaling by the spent brine is a potential problem for the liquid disposal system. Binary plants are being used for some very low temperature reservoirs, particularly in the People's Republic of China, albeit in extremely small units. A large-scale pilot plant of the binary type is being planned for the Imperial Valley of California.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Cycle Research Program is currently investigating the potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperatures, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating with a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single boiling cycles. Recently, in addition to the supercritical Rankine Cycle, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This paper explores the limits on efficiency of a feasibility plant and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance so that the designer must weigh all considerations to find the best plant for a given service. 16 refs., 12 figs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 6 total. G GeothermalExploration GeothermalLand Use GeothermalLeasing GeothermalPower Plant GeothermalTransmission GeothermalWell Field Retrieved from "http:...

135

SMUDGEO No. 1: economic impacts on geothermal power plant design  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) is currently in the design phase of a geothermal power plant located in The Geysers area of Northern California. The unit, SMUDGEO No. 1, has a turbine nameplate rating of 55 MWe at 4.0 in hgA, and is expected to be in commercial operation by December 1983. The benefits of efficient steam utilization for SMUDGEO No. 1 differ greatly from other units already installed due to the purchase of geothermal steam on a per pound basis. For this reason, SMUDGEO No. 1 will be the most efficient yet installed in The Geysers area. The efficiency-conscious design of the turbine cycle is described.

Tucker, R.E. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO); Kleinhans, P.V. Jr.; Keilman, L.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Performance Assessment of Flashed Steam Geothermal Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five years of operating experience at the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) Cerro Prieto flashed steam geothermal power plant are evaluated from the perspective of U. S. utility operations. We focus on the design and maintenance of the power plant that led to the achievement of high plant capacity factors for Units No. 1 and 2 since commercial operation began in 1973. For this study, plant capacity factor is the ratio of the average load on the machines or equipment for the period of time considered to the capacity rating of the machines or equipment. The plant capacity factor is the annual gross output in GWh compared to 657 GWh (2 x 37.5 MW x 8760 h). The CFE operates Cerro Prieto at base load consistent with the system connected electrical demand of the Baja California Division. The plant output was curtailed during the winter months of 1973-1975 when the system electric demand was less than the combined output capability of Cerro Prieto and the fossil fuel plant near Tijuana. Each year the system electric demand has increased and the Cerro Prieto units now operate at full load all the time. The CFE added Units 3 and 4 to Cerro Prieto in 1979 which increased the plant name plate capacity to 150 MW. Part of this additional capacity will supply power to San Diego Gas and Electric Company through an interconnection across the border. The achievement of a high capacity factor over an extensive operating period was influenced by operation, design, and maintenance of the geothermal flash steam power plant.

Alt, Theodore E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

138

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

139

Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

Kutscher, C.

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Raft River 5MW Geothermal Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Elements of design of the 5 MW(e) binary cycle plant to be built in the Raft River Valley in Idaho are discussed. Advantages of the dual boiling cycle for use with moderate temperature (250 to 350/sup 0/F) resources are discussed. A breakdown of the heat loads and power requirements is presented. Various components, including pumps, heat exchangers, cooling tower, turbine-generators, and production and injection systems, are described. (JGB)

Whitbeck, J.F.; Piscitella, R.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Us Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000) General Us Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At General US Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location General US Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M.C . Richards, J. L. Steele (2000) Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_General_Us_Region_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2000)&oldid=601622" Categories: Exploration Activities

142

Preliminary conceptual design of commercial geopressured geothermal fuel plants  

SciTech Connect

Previous feasibility studies Bechtel (1975), TRW (1975) for electric power generation utilizing geothermal resources have tended to focus primarily on the power plant and have neglected the fuel production and effluent disposal facilities. The Dow Chemical USA study (1974) for the Governor's Energy Advisory Council, State of Texas, placed equal emphasis on the power plant and the fuel plant. The study reported in Chapter II and in what follows in this chapter, also places equal emphasis on the two types of facilities. It is important that the fuel plant, the well field, the fuel processing plant, and the effluent disposal facility be the subject of a preliminary conceptual design and costing activity so that economic and net energetics analysis can be performed. The activity also serves to assess technological maturity of the fuel plant and to identify technical problems requiring further study. The resource considered was the model resource outlined in Sectio B, Chapter II. Fuel plants were outlined for three power generation plants: single-stage flash steam, two-stage flash steam, and propane secondary working fluid plant.

Underhill, Gary K.; Carlson, Ronald A.; Clendinning, William A.; Erdos, Jozsef, Erdos; Gault, John; Hall, James W.; Jones, Robert L.; Michael, Herbert K.; Powell, Paul H.; Riemann, Carl F.; Rios-Castellon, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Burchard P.; Wilson, John S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

144

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

145

Financing geothermal resource development in the Pacific Region states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and federal tax treatment as an incentive to development and non-tax financial incentives such as: the federal geothermal loan guarantee program, the federal geothermal reservoir insurance, and state financial incentives are discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Cycle Research Program is investigating potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperature, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating in a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single or dual boiling cycles or supercritical cycles. Recently, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This report explores the feasible limits on efficiency of a plant given practical limits on equipment performance and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. (Here feasible is intended to mean reasonably achievable and not cost-effective.) No direct economic analysis has been made because of the sensitivity of economic results to site specific input. The limit of performance of three advanced plants were considered in this report. The performance predictions were taken from the developers of each concept. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance. Ultimately, the plant designer must weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the the different cycles to find the best plant for a given service. In addition, this report presents a standard of comparison of the work which has been done in the Heat Cycle Research Program and in the industrial sector by Exergy, Inc. and Polythermal Technologies. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean,...

148

System design verification of a hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This hybrid plant utilizes geothermal fluid for feedwater heating. With respect to the extraction of available work from the geothermal fluids, this cycle is approximately two times as efficient as the all geothermal plant. The System Design Verification Study presented verifies the technical and economic feasibility of the hybrid plant. This report is comprised of a conceptual design, cost estimate, and economic analysis of a one-unit 715 MW hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant. In addition to the use of geothermal fluid for feedwater heating, its use is also investigated for additional power generation, condensate and cooling tower makeup water, coal beneficiation, air preheating, flue gas reheating and plant space heating requirements. An engineering and construction schedule for the hybrid plant is also included.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

150

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

151

Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Property:Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Property Type String Description Number of plants with unknown planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 1 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 2 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 9 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 0 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 0 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 11 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + R Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region + 1 +

153

Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

154

Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1993) Geothermal Region (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

155

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Colorado Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

156

Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region, New Zealand - M A Mongillo, Geothermics, 23(5-6), 1994, Pp 511-526 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region, New Zealand - M A Mongillo, Geothermics, 23(5-6), 1994, Pp 511-526 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Science & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1995 Document Number: Unavailable

157

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: As part of the resource evaluation and exploration program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for the national Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, a regional magnetotelluric (MT) survey of New Mexico and Arizona is being performed. The MT lines are being located in areas where the results of analysis of residual gravity anomaly maps of Arizona and New Mexico, integrated with other geologic and geophysical studies indicate the greatest potential for HDR resources. The residual

158

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) process data for binary cycle plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) study provides the firm estimates - in the public domain - of the cost and performance of U.S. geothermal systems and their main components in the early 1990s. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Research Program, managed for DOE by Evan Hughes of the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, and conducted by John Brugman and others of the CE Holt Consulting Firm, Pasadena, CA. The printed NGGPP reports contain detailed data on the cost and performance for the flash steam cycles that were characterized, but not for the binary cycles. The nine Tables in this document are the detailed data sheets on cost and performance for the air cooled binary systems that were studied in the NGGPP.

Not Available

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modular 5 MW geothermal power plant design considerations and guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design considerations and guideline documents given define the principal design requirements for a nominal 5 MW geothermal power plant of a type to permit over-the-road transport of its several modules. The power plant system defined is supplied with steam from a single flash steam separator stage, located at the plant area, and supplied with steam from two wells at nominal pressure of 3.8 Kg/cm/sup 2/ Abs (54 psia). In some cases where the content of noxious noncondensable gases is high, a shell and tube condenser would be substituted for the direct contact type condenser specified and an additional module containing an H/sub 2/S removal system would be added. Guidelines are given for the following: site preparation, collection system, plant installation, assembly, and test; turbine generator module; condenser and noncondensable gas removal module; plant control and switchgear module; cooling water circulation pump module; steam-water separator module; maintenance, office, and lavatory module; reinjection pump module; cooling tower modules; spray pond installation and piping; and auxiliary generator module. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal power plants around the world. A sourcebook on the production of electricity from geothermal energy, draft of Chapter 10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report constitutes a consolidation and a condensation of several individual topical reports dealing with the geothermal electric power stations around the world. An introduction is given to various types of energy conversion systems for use with geothermal resouces. Power plant performance and operating factors are defined and discussed. Existing geothermal plants in the following countries are covered: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Turkey, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the United States. In each case, the geological setting is outlined, the geothermal fluid characteristics are given, the gathering system, energy conversion system, and fluid disposal method are described, and the environmental impact is discussed. In some cases the economics of power generation are also presented. Plans for future usage of geothermal energy are described for the above-mentioned countries and the following additional ones: the Azores (Portugal), Chile, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Nicaragua, and Panama. Technical data is presented in twenty-two tables; forty-one figures, including eleven photographs, are also included to illustrate the text. A comprehensive list of references is provided for the reader who wishes to make an in-depth study of any of the topics mentioned.

DiPippo, R.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fluid Temperature and Power Estimation of Geothermal Power Plants by a Simplified Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an estimation of power generated in a given geothermal heat pipe system. Such power generation is basically controlled by the ultimate temperature of fluid flowing through the u-shape pipes and could also be affected by power consumption ... Keywords: energy, geothermal power plant, numerical model, heat conduction, optimum design

Ge Ou; Itai Einav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Power-cycle studies for a geothermal electric plant for MX operating bases  

SciTech Connect

Binary geothermal plants were investigated for providing electrical power for MX missile bases. A number of pure hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal resource temperatures of 365, 400, and 450/sup 0/F. Cycle thermodynamic analyses were conducted for pure geothermal plants and for two types of coal-geothermal hybrid plants. Cycle performance results were presented as net geofluid effectiveness (net plant output in watts per geofluid flow in 1 bm/hr) and cooling water makeup effectiveness (net plant output in watts per makeup water flow in 1 bm/hr). A working fluid containing 90% (mass) isobutane/10% hexane was selected, and plant statepoints and energy balances were determined for 20MW(e) geothermal plants at each of the three resource temperatures. Working fluid heaters and condensers were sized for these plants. It is concluded that for the advanced plants investigated, geothermal resources in the 365 to 450/sup 0/F range can provide useful energy for powering MX missile bases.

Bliem, C.J.; Kochan, R.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Program Geothm: A thermodynamic process program for geothermal power plant cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program GEOTHM is a thermodynamic process program now under development for the LBL Geothermal Energy Program. To date, the program development has centered upon the modeling of working fluid properties, developing thermodynamic process models, and modeling the design performance of geothermal power plants. When the program is completed, it will be able to optimize a power plant or refrigeration plant for minimum cost power or refrigeration. Furthermore, operation of the thermodynamic cycles at off design conditions will be able to be simulated. Program GEOTHM is currently able to calculate several types of geothermal power cycles using a wide variety of working fluids.

Green, M.A.; Pines, H.S.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research project is developing the technology base that will permit a much greater utilization of the moderate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal resources, particularly for the generation of electrical power. The emphasis in the project has been the improvement of the performance of binary power cycles. The investigations have been examining concepts projected to improve the brine utilization by 20% relative to a ''Heber-type'' binary plant; these investigations are nearing completion. preparations are currently underway in the project to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. These investigations will evaluate whether the projected additional 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Future program efforts will focus on the problems associated with heat rejection and on the transfer of the technology being developed to industry.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

167

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area (Redirected from Maui Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

168

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

169

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

170

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kauai Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

171

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

172

Molokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Geothermal Area Molokai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Molokai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

173

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

174

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

175

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

176

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

177

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

178

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

179

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kawaihae Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

180

Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

MEMS Materials and Temperature Sensors for Down Hole Geothermal System Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal power plants. US DOE EERE Geothermal Technologieswas made for the US DOE EERE Geothermal Technologies

Wodin-Schwartz, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic analyses and site-specific applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of hybrid fossil-geothermal power plants is extended to compound hybrid systems which combine the features of previously analyzed systems: the geothermal-preheat and the fossil-superheat systems. Compound systems of the one- and two-stage type are considered. A compilation of working formulae from earlier studies is included for completeness. Results are given for parametric analyses of compound hybrid plants. System performance was determined for wellhead conditions of 150, 200, and 250/sup 0/C, and for steam fractions of 10, 20, 30, and 40%. For two-stage systems an additional cycle variable, the hot water flash fraction, was varied from 0 to 100% in increments of 25%. From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, compound hybrid plants are superior to individual all-geothermal and all-fossil plants, and are shown to have certain advantages over basic geothermal-preheat and fossil-superheat hybrid plants. The flexibility of compound hybrid systems is illustrated by showing how such plants might be used at six geothermal sites in the western United States. The question of the optimum match between the energy resources and the power plant is addressed, and an analysis given for a hypothetical geothermal resource.

DiPippo, R.; Avelar, E.M.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

185

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hualalai Northwest Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

187

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area (Redirected from Chena Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

188

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

189

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

190

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

191

Direct-flash-steam geothermal-power-plant assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to analyze the capacity and availability factors of an operating direct flash geothermal power plant. The analysis was to include consideration of system and component specifications, operating procedures, maintenance history, malfunctions, and outage rate. The plant studied was the 75 MW(e) geothermal power plant at Cerro Prieto, Mexico, for the years 1973 to 1979. To describe and assess the plant, the project staff reviewed documents, visited the plant, and met with staff of the operating utility. The high reliability and availability of the plant was documented and actions responsible for the good performance were identified and reported. The results are useful as guidance to US utilities considering use of hot water geothermal resources for power generation through a direct flash conversion cycle.

Alt, T.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chemistry, Scale, and Performance of the Hawaii Geothermal Project-A Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-and-a-half-year monitoring study of a geothermal power plant showed that the chemistry of the resource fluid strongly influenced power plant performance. Changes in the fluid chemistry--such as higher salinity and lower pH--substantially increased the rate of scale formation and corrosion in plant components.

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Preliminary design manual for a Geothermal Demonstration Plant at Heber, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary design of a 50 MWe Geothermal Demonstration Plant for Heber, California is presented. A site description, design basis, process design, trade-off studies to optimize plant operations, and an economic analysis of the plant are included. The plant design provides flow diagrams and equipment specifications for the energy conversion system, the cooling water system, the plant and instrument air system, the flare system, the firewater system, the electrical system, the piping system, instruments and controls, and buildings and structures.

Holt, B.; Ghormley, E.L.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant in Churchill County Plant in Churchill County Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Mark Struble Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 02/13/2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Citation Mark Struble. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County [Internet]. 02/13/2005. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2005/02/13;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/info/newsroom/Carson_City_News_Archives/2005/02/blm_approves_salt.html

195

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary economic analysis of a hybrid geothermal/coal power plant has been completed for four geothermal Resource areas: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Coso Hot Springs, East Mesa and Long Valley. A hybrid plant would be economically viable at Roosevelt Hot Springs and somewhat less so at Coso Hot Springs. East Mesa and Long Valley show no economic promise. A well-designed hybrid plant could use geothermal energy for boiler feedwater heating, auxiliary power, auxiliary heating, and cooling water. Construction and operation of a hybrid plant at either Roosevelt Hot Springs or Coso Hot Springs is recommended. Brown University provided the theoretical basis for the hybrid study. A modified version of the Lawrence Berkeley Livermore GEOTHM Program is the major analytical tool used in the analysis. The Intermountain Power Project is the reference all coal-fired plant. Costing methods followed recommendations issued by the Energy research and Development Administration.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary economic analysis of a hybrid geothermal/coal power plant was completed for four geothermal resource areas: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Coso Hot Springs, East Mesa, and Long Valley. A hybrid plant would be economically viable at Roosevelt Hot Springs and somewhat less so at Coso Hot Springs. East Mesa and Long Valley show no economic promise. A well-designed hybrid plant could use geothermal energy for boiler feedwater heating, auxiliary power, auxiliary heating, and cooling water. Construction and operation of a hybrid plant at either Roosevelt Hot Springs or Coso Hot Springs is recommended. A modified version of the Lawrence Berkeley Livermore GEOTHM Program is the major analytical tool used in the analysis. The Intermountain Power Project is the reference all coal-fired plant.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Potential of hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants in Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Burbank and the Ralph M. Parsons Company studies showed several advantages for hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants, as follows: (1) the estimated cost of producing electricity in hybrid plant is about 18.3 mills/kWh, compared to 19.3 mills/kWh in an all-coal fired power plant; (2) the coal requirements for a given plant can be reduced about 12 to 17%; and (3) the geothermal brines can be used for power plant cooling water, and in some cases, as boiler feedwater. The pertinent results of the City of Burbank studies are summarized and applied to the geothermal and coal resources of Arizona for possible future utilization.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

200

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

Eskesen, J.H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

Eskesen, J.H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

Staub, W.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

204

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

205

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from...

206

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (6) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Arizona Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

207

Geothermal power plants of Mexico and Central America: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the fifth in a series describing the geothermal power plants of the world, the countries of Mexico and of Central America are studied. The geothermal plants are located in areas of recent and active volcanism; the resources are of the liquid-dominated type. Details are given about the plants located at Cerro Prieto in Mexico and at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. In both cases, attention is paid to the geologic nature of the fields, the well programs, geofluid characteristics, energy conversion systems, materials of construction, effluent handling systems, economic factors and plant operating experience. Exploration and development activities are described for other promising geothermal areas in Mexico and El Salvador, along with those in the countries of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama.

DiPippo. R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analytical effort to determine the cost effectiveness of hybrid geothermal/fossil-fuel electrical-power generating stations. The analysis is directed at combining hydrothermal and coal energy in a Rankine steam cycle, for electrical power generation for the City of Burbank, California. This effort develops a methodology for hybrid power-plant cost analysis so that preliminary plant designs can be optimized as a function of specific site conditions and characteristics. It also defines cost-optimized site-specific plant designs for four potential sites: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, Coso Thermal Area, California, East Mesa, California, and Long Valley, California. These optimized designs are compared for the costs, geothermal-resource utilization, and fossil fuel saved. The results indicate that development of geothermal resources to support a hybrid power plant are favorable for at least two of the four sites.

Anno, G.H.; Dore, M.A.; Grijalva, R.L.; Lang, G.D.; Thomas, F.J.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Performance and operational experience of a prototype binary geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Raft River geothermal site in south central Idaho, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is investigating and demonstrating the production of electrical power from a moderate temperature (140/sup 0/ to 145/sup 0/C) geothermal resource. The initial production of electrical power at the Raft River site was accomplished with the Prototype Power Plant which was built to investigate and demonstrate the operation of binary power cycles where the energy in the geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This plant serves as a test bed for testing pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from moderate temperature geothermal resources. During the automatic run test the plant was able to produce a maximum of 59kW(e). Although the plant was not (and has not) operated at design turbine conditions, performance was predictable. During the automatic run test, the plant operation was stable and the facility was operated for 1357 hours producing electrical power approximately 87% of the time geothermal fluid was available for operation.

Mines, G.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Geothermal commercial power plant study. Monthly progress report, January 29, 1977-February 25, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs and capital cost estimates were completed for the six different Heber power plants in this study. The six plants involve two types of operating modes, constant geothermal fluid flow rate and constant power output, each for net capacities of 50, 100, and 200 MWe. Conceptual designs were completed for the six plants by modifying and scaling-up the base case design. The capital costs for all six plants were estimated in fourth-quarter 1976 dollars.

1977-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Heber Binary-Cycle Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant, Half-Load Testing, Performance, and Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its second year of operation, the Heber binary-cycle geothermal demonstration plant met design expectations for part-load operation. The plant, located in Heber, California, also demonstrated the environmental acceptability and design thermodynamic performance capabilities of the binary-cycle process.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geothermal power plants of Japan: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMEC/9  

SciTech Connect

The technical features of the existing and planned geothermal power plants in Japan are surveyed. A description is given of the Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co., Ltd. (GERD) which has capabilities in all areas of geothermal power development, from exploratory geological activities through construction and operation of the plants. The survey includes reports on four types of plants: natural, dry steam; separated steam or ''single flash;'' separated steam/flash or ''double flash;'' and binary fluid. For each geothermal power plant, the following are included or discussed: exploration and geology of the site; wells and gathering system; turbine-generator; condenser, gas extractor and cooling tower; economic data; environmental effects; and plant operations. Many tables and figures are included, and a summary is given of the geothermal resource utilization efficiency for each operating plant. Promising areas of new development are listed with estimates of potential capacity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Geothermal power plants of Japan: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMEC/9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical features of the existing and planned geothermal power plants in Japan are surveyed. A description is given of the Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co., Ltd. (GERD) which has capabilities in all areas of geothermal power development, from exploratory geological activities through construction and operation of the plants. The survey includes reports on four types of plants: natural, dry steam; separated steam or ''single flash;'' separated steam/flash or ''double flash;'' and binary fluid. For each geothermal power plant, the following are included or discussed: exploration and geology of the site; wells and gathering system; turbine-generator; condenser, gas extractor and cooling tower; economic data; environmental effects; and plant operations. Many tables and figures are included, and a summary is given of the geothermal resource utilization efficiency for each operating plant. Promising areas of new development are listed with estimates of potential capacity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

New Mexico Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 9 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the findings and conclusions of the New Mexico Team during the first project year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. The purpose of this project is to help realize a goal of the USDOE , Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), to accelerate the actual commercial utilization of geothermal energy. This was done by: (1) identifying the potential for development of geothermal energy in the five-state regions of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah; and (2) identifying the actions needed to accomplish that development.

Ortiz, Thomas A.; Fedor, Dennis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Geothermal power plants of the United States: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of geothermal energy as a source of electric power in the United States is reviewed. A thorough description is given of The Geysers geothermal power project in northern California. The recent efforts to exploit the hot-water resources of the Mexicali-Imperial Rift Valley are described. Details are given concerning the geology of the several sites now being used and for those at which power plants will soon be built. Attention is paid to the technical particulars of all existing plants, including wells, gathering systems, energy conversion devices, materials, environmental impacts, economics and operating characteristics. Specifically, plants which either exist or are planned for the following locations are covered: The Geysers, CA; East Mesa, CA; Heber, CA; Roosevelt Hot Springs, UT; Valles Caldera, NM; Salton Sea, CA; Westmorland, CA; Brawley, CA; Desert Peak, NV; and Raft River, ID. The growth of installed geothermal electric generating capacity is traced from the beginning in 1960 and is projected to 1984.

DiPippo, R.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

None

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

218

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

219

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

220

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

222

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

223

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

224

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

225

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

226

Separation Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Separation Creek Geothermal Area Separation Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Separation Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

227

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

228

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

229

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

230

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

231

Feasibility study for a 10 MM GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume II. Geothermal resource, agricultural feedstock, markets and economic viability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The issues of the geothermal resource at Brady's Hot Springs are dealt with: the prospective supply of feedstocks to the ethanol plant, the markets for the spent grain by-products of the plant, the storage, handling and transshipment requirements for the feedstocks and by-products from a rail siding facility at Fernley, the probable market for fuel ethanol in the region, and an assessment of the economic viability of the entire undertaking.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Wyoming Exploration Region: Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

233

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

234

Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

235

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

236

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

237

Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Evaluation of a superheater enhanced geothermal steam power plant in the Geysers area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the attainable generation increase and to evaluate the economic merits of superheating the steam that could be used in future geothermal steam power plants in the Geyser-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). It was determined that using a direct gas-fired superheater offers no economic advantages over the existing geothermal power plants. If the geothermal steam is heated to 900/sup 0/F by using the exhaust energy from a gas turbine of currently available performance, the net reference plant output would increase from 65 MW to 159 MW (net). Such hybrid plants are cost effective under certain conditions identified in this document. The power output from the residual Geyser area steam resource, now equivalent to 1437 MW, would be more than doubled by employing in the future gas turbine enhancement. The fossil fuel consumed in these plants would be used more efficiently than in any other fossil-fueled power plant in California. Due to an increase in evaporative losses in the cooling towers, the viability of the superheating concept is contingent on development of some of the water resources in the Geysers-Calistoga area to provide the necessary makeup water.

Janes, J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Preliminary reliability and availability analysis of the Heber geothermal binary demonstration plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the reliability and availability of the Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant on the basis of preliminary design information. It also identifies and ranks components of the plant in order of their criticality to system operation and their contribution to system unavailability. The sensitivity of the various components to uncertainties of data and the potential for reliability growth are also examined. The assessment results were obtained through the adaptation and application of an existing reliability and availability methodology to the Heber plant design. These preliminary assessments were made to assist (1) in evaluating design alternatives for the plant and (2) in demonstrating that the closed-loop, multiple-fluid, binary cycle geothermal concept is competitive with the more conventional flashed steam cycle technology. The Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant Project is a cooperative effort directed toward accelerating geothermal development for power generation and establishing the binary cycle technology as a proven alternative to the flashed steam cycle for moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. The binary power plant would have a capacity of 45 MW/sub e/ net and would derive its energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) fluid from the Heber reservoir in southern California.

Himpler, H.; White, J.; Witt, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Floating power optimization studies for the cooling system of a geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The floating power concept was studied for a geothermal power plant as a method of increasing the plant efficiency and decreasing the cost of geothermal power. The stored cooling concept was studied as a method of reducing the power fluctuations of the floating power concept. The studies include parametric and optimization studies for a variety of different types of cooling systems including wet and dry cooling towers, direct and indirect cooling systems, forced and natural draft cooling towers, and cooling ponds. The studies use an indirect forced draft wet cooling tower cooling system as a base case design for comparison purposes.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the resulting constraints on potentially developable electrical power in each geothermal resource area. Analyses were completed for 11 major geothermal areas in California: four in the Imperial Valley, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers-Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Glass Mountain, Wendel Amedee, and Lassen. One area in Hawaii, the Puna district, was also included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process were estimated based upon a specific existing or proposed type of geothermal power plant. The make-up water requirements for each type of conversion process at each resource location were then estimated as a basis for analyzing any constraints on the megawatts which potentially could be developed.

Sakaguchi, J.L.

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

243

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

244

Kamchatka geothermal resources development: Problems and perspectives  

SciTech Connect

There are four long-term exploited geothermal fields in Kamchatka: one steam-water field Pauzhetka (south of Kamchatka peninsula) and three hot water fields: Paratunka (near by town of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) and Esso and Anavgay (center of peninsula). Pauzhetka and Paratunka fields are exploited during almost 28 years. Esso and Anavgay fields are exploited during 25 years. In Pauzhetka 11 MWe geothermal power plant work and on the other fields thermal energy of hot water is directly used. Kamchatka region satisfies energetic demands mainly by organic imported fuels. At the same time electricity produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 2 per cent of total region electricity production, and thermal energy produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 3 per cent of total region thermal energy production. The main reasons of small geothermal portion in the energy production balance of Kamchatka are briefly discussed. The geothermal development reserves and perspectives of geothermal energy use increase in Kamchatka are outlined.

Pashkevich, Roman I.

1966-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 8. Heat flow study of the Snake River Plain region, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain of Idaho has recent lava flows and a large number of thermal springs and wells. A heat flow study was initiated which, together with available geological and geophysical information, allows a better definition of the geothermal resource and evaluation of the geothermal potential. Local geothermal anomalies were not the objects of this study and have not been studied in detail. The quality of the heat flow values obtained varies as interpretation was necessary to determine geothermal gradients for many of the holes which had disturbances. A major problem in determining the heat flow values is the lack of knowledge of the in situ porosity of the rocks. The heat flow values obtained for the Eastern Snake River Plain are from shallow wells (< 200 m), hence the heat flow there is low (< 0.5 HFU) because of the water movement in the Snake Plain aquifer. The anomalous regional heat flow pattern around the Snake River Plain, together with other geophysical and geological data, suggest the presence of a major crustal heat source. With the exception of the area of the Snake Plain aquifer, high geothermal gradients were found in all areas of southern Idaho (40 to 100/sup 0/C/km). Temperatures hot enough for space heating can be found most anywhere in the Plain at relatively shallow depths (1 to 2 km). Temperatures hot enough for electrical power generation (200/sup 0/C) can be found beneath southern Idaho almost anywhere at depths of 3 to 4 kilometers. The Plain is fault bounded and hot water circulating along the fault zones from depths can be a very important geothermal resource at shallow depths. The margins of the Plain have the highest heat flow values, are the most faulted, and have possibly the highest geothermal resource potential.

Brott, C.A.; Blackwell, D.D.; Mitchell, J.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Direct application of east coast geothermal resources in a frozen food plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic viability of retrofitting an existing frozen food plant in Salisbury, Maryland to utilize the anticipated geothermal resources in that area was evaluated, via a budgetary level design and cost estimating analysis. Based on predicted reservoir data, a design concept was developed from production well through the plant to final brine disposal. A parametric analysis of capital and operating costs was performed which covered the range of geothermal design data developed. Relevant social, financial, environmental, legal, and regulatory institutional relationships were examined and ways to eliminate any barriers they presented against the proposed application were explored. Based on results from the other tasks, the existing DOE East Coast Geothermal Development Plan was evaluated and possible alterations were proposed. (MHR)

Ammerlaan, A.C.F.; Knebel, M.E.; Czarnecki, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Floating dry cooling: a competitive alternative to evaporative cooling in a binary cycle geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the floating cooling concept to non-evaporative and evaporative atmospheric heat rejection systems was studied as a method of improving the performance of geothermal powerplants operating upon medium temperature hydrothermal resources. The LBL thermodynamic process computer code GEOTHM is used in the case study of a 50 MWe isobutane binary cycle power plant at Heber, California. It is shown that operating a fixed capacity plant in the floating cooling mode can generate significantly more electrical energy at a higher thermodynamic efficiency and reduced but bar cost for approximately the same capital investment. Floating cooling is shown to benefit a plant which is dry cooled to an even greater extent than the same plant operating with an evaporative heat rejection system. Results of the Heber case study indicate that a dry floating cooling geothermal binary cycle plant can produce energy at a bus bar cost which is competitive with the cost of energy associated with evaporatively cooled systems.

Pines, H.S.; Green, M.A.; Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

250

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

251

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

252

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

253

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

254

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

255

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

256

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

257

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

258

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

259

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

260

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

262

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

263

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

264

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

265

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

266

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

267

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

268

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

269

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

270

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

271

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

272

Regional-scale analysis of the geothermal regime in the western Canada sedimentary basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that radiogenic heat generation at the top of the crystalline Precambrian basement underneath the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin is highly variable, on average higher than for the exposed Canadian Shield, and reflects the basement tectonic structure. The areal distribution of the geothermal gradient across the sediments shows a regional-scale northerly increase, with intermediate- and local-state features correlating with anomalies in heat generation at the top of the basement. Only in the northeast and southeast corners of the basin can high geothermal gradients not be explained by heat generation; there they may be caused by convective fluid flow effects. The temperature distribution at the base of the sediments is highly correlated with the thickness of the sedimentary cover and reflects major topographic and basement features. Overall, the characteristics of the geothermal regime in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin are indicative of a conduction dominated system.

Bachu, S. (Alberta Geological Survey, Alberta Research Council, P.O. Box 8330, Postal Station F, Edmonton, Alberta T6H 5X2 (CA)); Burwash, R.A. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Alberta, 1-26 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Puna Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Puna Geothermal Project Puna Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Puna Geothermal Project Project Location Information Location Puna, Hawaii County Hawaii County, Hawaii Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Geothermal Project Profile Developer Puna Geothermal Venture Project Type Hybrid Flash/Binary GEA Development Phase Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property. Planned Capacity (MW) 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW GEA Report Date

274

Feasibility and Risk Study of a Geothermal Power Plant at the Salton Sea KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a feasibility and risk study performed by Bechtel National, Inc. and the Ben Holt Company under contract to the San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E). The purpose of the study was to define the most technically feasible and lowest cost near-term energy conversion process for a 50 MWe geothermal power plant at the Salton Sea known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Using the latest information from the Geothermal This report contains the results of a feasibility and risk study performed by Bechtel National, Inc. and the Ben Holt Company under contract to the San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E). The purpose of the study was to define the most technically feasible and lowest cost near-term energy conversion process for a 50 MWe geothermal power plant at the Salton Sea known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Using the latest information from the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF), which is currently in operation at the Salton Sea KGRA, conceptual designs, capital cost estimates, and busbar energy production cost estimates were developed for power plants employing several versions of flashed steam and flash binary energy conversion processes. A power plant and well field risk analysis was also performed. The results show that while the flashed steam plant has the advantage of lower plant capital cost, the brine flow rate required by the binary plant is lower. This results in busbar energy production costs for the two plants that are the same. However, the risk analysis indicates that the technical risks are less for the flashed steam further work at the GLEF. The version of the flashed steam process with lowest energy production cost was the dual-flash process with three 50 percent capacity trains of flash tanks with unmodified brine. Thus, it was determined that GLEF testing in the immediate future should be directed primarily toward this process. A series of GLEP tests and further studies were defined for the purpose of alleviating or minimizing the major risks associated with the flash steam process. The most important risks were found to be those associated with brine handling. They include producing the brine, carrying it through the plant, and injecting it into the subsurface formation. The report includes details of costs of a binary plant and a flash plant. [DJE-2005

None

1978-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

276

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

277

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants. At several regions, hot spa owners against to construct geothermal power plants and this is one of reason of preventing to development of geothermal in Japan. And owners of geothermal power plants have to monitor of flow and geochemical condition of nearby hot spa. Figure 7 Hot spa monitoring site near Hijiori

Stanford University

278

Altheim geothermal Plant for electricity production by Organic Rankine Cycle turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes the plan of the town Altheim in Upper Austria to produce electricity by an Organic Rankine Cycle-turbogenerator in the field of utilization of low temperatured thermal water. The aim of the project is to improve the technical and economic situation of the geothermal plant.

Pernecker, Gerhard; Ruhland, Johannes

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

280

Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Heat Source 11 Geofluid Geochemistry 12 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 13 Exploration Activities (9) 14 References Map: Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Milford, Utah Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area (Redirected from Obsidian Cliff Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

282

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Pueblo Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

283

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Socorro Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

284

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

285

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

286

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

289

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

290

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

291

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

292

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

293

Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

294

Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lahaina-Kaanapali Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

295

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

296

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

297

Local population impacts of geothermal energy development in the Geysers: Calistoga region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The country-level population increase implications of two long-term geothermal development scenarios for the Geysers region in California are addressed. This region is defined to include the counties of Lake, Sonoma, Mendocino and Napa, all four in northern California. The development scenarios include two components: development for electrical energy production and direct use applications. Electrical production scenarios are derived by incorporating current development patterns into previous development scenarios by both industry and research organizations. The scenarios are made county-specific, specific to the type of geothermal system constructed, and are projected through the year 2000. Separate high growth rate and low growth rate scenarios are developed, based on a set of specified assumptions. Direct use scenarios are estimated from the nature of the available resource, existing local economic and demographic patterns, and available experience with various separate direct use options. From the composite development scenarios, required numbers of direct and indirect employees and the resultant in-migration patterns are estimated. In-migration patterns are compared to current county level population and ongoing trends in the county population change for each of the four counties. From this comparison, conclusions are drawn concerning the contributions of geothermal resource development to future population levels and the significance of geothermally induced population increase from a county planning perspective.

Haven, K.F.; Berg, V.; Ladson, Y.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Regional and local networks of horizontal control, Cerro Prieto Geothermal Area, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto geothermal area in the Mexicali Valley 30 km southeast of Mexicali, Baja California, is probably deforming due to (1) the extraction of large volumes of steam and hot water, and (2) active tectonism. Two networks of precise horizontal control were established in Mexicali Valley by the US Geological Survey in 1977-78 to measure both types of movement as they occur. These networks consisted of (1) a regional trilateration net brought into the mountain ranges west of the geothermal area from survey stations on an existing US Geological Survey crustal-strain network north of the international border, and (2) a local net tied to stations in the regional net and encompassing the area of present and planned geothermal production. Survey lines in this net were selected to span areas of probable ground-surface movements in and around the geothermal area. Electronic distance measuring (EDM) instruments, operating with a modulated laser beam, were used to measure the distances between stations in both networks. The regional net was run using a highly precise long-range EDM instrument, helicopters for transportation of men and equipment to inaccessible stations on mountain peaks, and a fixed wing airplane flying along the line of sight. Precision of measurements with this complex long-range system approached 0.2 parts per million of line length. The local net was measured with medium range EDM instrument requiring minimal ancillary equipment. Precision of measurements with this less complex system approached 3 parts per million for the shorter line lengths. The detection and analysis of ground-surface movements resulting from tectonic strains or induced by geothermal fluid withdrawal is dependent on subsequent resurveys of these networks.

Massey, B.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heat flow and hot dry rock geothermal resources of the Clearlake Region, northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal anomaly is an area of high heat flow in northern California. The anomaly is caused by abnormally high heat flows generated by asthenospheric uplift and basaltic magmatic underplating at a slabless window created by passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. The Clear Lake volcanic field is underlain by magmatic igneous bodies in the form of a stack of sill-form intrusions with silicic bodies generally at the top and basic magmas at the bottom. The tabular shape and wide areal extent of the heat sources results in linear temperature gradients and near-horizontal isotherms in a broad region at the center of the geothermal anomaly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) portion of The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal field is that part of the geothermal anomaly that is external to the steamfield, bounded by geothermal gradients of 167 mW/m2 (4 heat flow units-hfu) and 335 mW/m2 (8 hfu). The HDR resources, to a depth of 5 km, were estimated by piece-wise linear summation based on a sketch map of the heat flow. Approximately, the geothermal {open_quotes}accessible resource base{close_quotes} (Qa) is 1.68E+21 J; the {open_quotes}HDR resource base{close_quotes} (Qha) is 1.39E+21 J; and the {open_quotes}HDR power production resource{close_quotes} (Qhp) is 1.01E+21 J. The HDR power production resource (Qhp) is equivalent to 2.78E+ 11 Mwht (megawatt hours thermal), or 1.72E+11 bbls of oil.

Burns, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: near Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

302

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

303

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tibuleac Published: GRC, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009)...

305

Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (<20 ka) to recent (<50a). Valley groundwater is older than water from perennial springs and artesian wells in adjacent ranges, with Clan Alpine range (east) much younger (most <50a) than Stillwater range (west; most >1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~Iilora and J. W. Tester, Geothermal Energy as a Source ofpresented at the Susanville Geothermal Energy Converence,of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant. Interim report No. 1, August 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed from August 1977 through January 1978 pertinent to the design of the Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant is summarized. The report discusses review of earlier baseline geothermal studies performed by Holt/Procon and the design optimization performed by Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and The Ben Holt Company. The Heber project objective is to design, construct and operate a power plant to produce a net power output of 45 MW/sub e/, deriving energy from a low-salinity, moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) brine heat source available from the Heber geothermal reservoir. A binary cycle conversion system employs a light aliphatic hydrocarbon mixture to derive heat from the brine supply, throuh heat exchangers, and drive the turbine-generator to produce power. Chevron Resources Company develops the geothermal resource for sale to San Diego Gas and Electric Company. Power output will be distributed to California's Imperial Valley by the Imperial Valley Irrigation District.

Unitt, S.G.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geothermal environmental studies, Heber Region, Imperial Valley, California. Environmental baseline data acquisition. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been studying the feasibility of a Low Salinity Hydrothermal Demonstration Plant as part of its Geothermal Energy Program. The Heber area of the Imperial Valley was selected as one of the candidate geothermal reservoirs. Documentation of the environmental conditions presently existing in the Heber area is required for assessment of environmental impacts of future development. An environmental baseline data acquisition program to compile available data on the environment of the Heber area is reported. The program included a review of pertinent existing literature, interviews with academic, governmental and private entities, combined with field investigations and meteorological monitoring to collect primary data. Results of the data acquisition program are compiled in terms of three elements: the physical, the biological and socioeconomic settings.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geothermal development and the Salton Sea  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The relationship of the Salton Sea, a key element of the Imperial Valley water system, to potential geothermal development in that region is studied. The effects of direct discharge of brines into the Sea are discussed along with the use of Salton Sea water for cooling the geothermal power plants. Methods for controlling the salinity of the Salton Sea are described. (MOW)

Goldsmith, M.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Prototype geothermal power plant summary of operation for automatic-run test phase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prototype Power Plant was built to demonstrate and learn the operation of a binary power cycle, and then serve as a test bed for pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from a moderate temperature geothermal fluid resource. The operation to date of the prototype plant is summarized with primary emphasis on the automatic-run phase, during which the plant was operated over a five-month period with minimal operator surveillance.

Mines, G.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

City of Klamath Falls, Oregon Geothermal Power Plant Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Klamath Falls project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combined thermal distribution system and power generation facility. The city of Klamath Falls operates a geothermal district heating system which would appear to be an attractive opportunity to install a power generation system. Since the two wells have operated reliably and consistently over many years, no new sources or resource exploration would be necessary. It appears that it will cost more to construct, operate, maintain and amortize a proposed geothermal facility than the long?term value of the power it would produce. The success of a future project will be determined by whether utility power production costs will remain low and whether costs of construction, operations, or financing may be reduced. There are areas that it would be possible to reduce construction cost. More detailed design could enable the city to obtain more precise quotes for components and construction, resulting in reduction in contingency projections. The current level of the contingency for uncertainty of costs is between $200,000 and $300,000. Another key issue with this project appears to be operation cost. While it is expected that only minimal routine monitoring and operating expenses will occur, the cost of water supply and waste water disposal represents nearly one quarter of the value of the power. If the cost of water alone could be reduced, the project could become viable. In addition, the projected cost of insurance may be lower than estimated under a city?wide policy. No provisions have been made for utilization of federal tax incentives. If a transaction with a third-party owner/taxpayer were to be negotiated, perhaps the net cost of ownership could be reduced. It is recommended that these options be investigated to determine if the costs and benefits could be brought together. The project has good potential, but like many alternative energy projects today, they only work economically if the federal tax incentives come into play.

Brian Brown, PE; Stephen Anderson, PE, Bety Riley

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Amedee Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Amedee Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Amedee Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

318

LOCAL POPULATION IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE GEYSERS - CALISTOGA REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socio-Economic Impacts of Geothermal Develop- ment. LawrenceMatlock, 1978. Summary of 1977 Geothermal Drilling - WesternUnited States, Geothermal Energy Magazine vo. 6, no. 5, pp.

Haven, Kendal F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 Martin Vorum, P.E. Englewood, Colorado Eugene A. Fritzler, P.E. Fort Morgan, Colorado Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants April 1999-March 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants April 1999-March 2000 Martin Vorum, P.E. Englewood, Colorado Eugene A. Fritzler, P.E. Fort Morgan, Colorado NREL Technical Monitor: C. Kutscher

320

MIXTURES OF CO2-SF6 AS WORKING FLUIDS FOR GEOTHERMAL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, mixtures of CO2 and SF6 were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal plants based on property measurements, molecular dynamics modeling, thermodynamic cycle analysis, and materials compatibility assessment. The CO2 - SF6 was evaluated for a reservoir temperature of 160 oC. Increasing the efficiency for these low reservoir sources will increase the options available for geothermal energy utilization in more sites across the country. The properties for the mixtures were obtained either from thermodynamic property measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. Optimum compositions of the CO2 - SF6 were identified for a well reservoir temperature and a given water-cooling condition. Concerning the global warming potential, it was estimated that the equivalent CO2 emissions per 1kWh for a Rankine cycle operating with 100% SF6 would be approximately of 7.6% than those for a coal-fired power plant.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nevada Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 8 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By the end of the first year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Project, the Nevada State Team has defined over 300 geothermal sites. Because of the multitude of sites and data, scenarios for this first project-year have been completed for the twenty-six Nevada Geothermal Areas, which include all the specific sites. It is not improbable that fully one-third of the sites will eventually prove to be of high to intermediate temperature (i.e. > 150 C and 90-150 C) resources. Low temperature sites are also prominent, not only in number, but also in their distribution--each of Nevada's 17 counties has several such sites.

Clark, Noel A.; Booth, G. Martin, III; Weber, Dorismae; Helseth, Barbara K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Region 8: 1977 power plant summary  

SciTech Connect

This document provides summary information on power generation facilities located in the U.S. EPA, Region VIII states of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming. When available, plant specific information is presented.

Parker, G.E.; Boulter, G.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Changes related to "Geothermal/Power Plant" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pages linked to the given page instead Go 27 June 2013 (diff | hist) . . GRRSection 7 - Power Plant Siting, Construction, and Regulation Overview; 09:25 . . (+481) . ....

324

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

South Dakota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota Dakota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Dakota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Dakota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Dakota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Dakota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Dakota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

326

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

327

Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

328

Tennessee/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Tennessee Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Tennessee No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Tennessee No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Tennessee No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Tennessee Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

329

South Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

330

SURVEY OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-RELATED MATERIALS NEEDS IN GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views research and development priorities. A. wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent's perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

ALLAN,M.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Survey of operation and maintenance-related materials needs in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views on research and development priorities. A wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent`s perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

Allan, M.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SURVEY OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-RELATED MATERIALS NEEDS IN GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views research and development priorities. A. wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent's perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

ALLAN,M.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

336

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Arizona Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

337

Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Idaho Batholith GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

338

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mt St Helens Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

339

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (26) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

340

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

342

Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

343

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

344

Final Environmental Assessment Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant and Direct-Use Geothermal Application at AmeriCulture Inc., Cotton City, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado 80401-3393 Colorado 80401-3393 August 26, 2002 DOE/EA-1396 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT For the SMALL-SCALE POWER PLANT AND DIRECT-USE GEOTHERMAL APPLICATION At AMERICULTURE, INC., COTTON CITY, NEW MEXICO AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Small-Scale Power Plant and Direct-Use Application at AmeriCulture, Inc. to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operations that would be funded in part by DOE. Small geothermal power plants have the potential for widespread application, but achieving cost- effectiveness in small plant sizes presents a number of challenges. To address these challenges, DOE is supporting the small-scale field verification projects to (1) determine and validate the

345

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the potential to supply vast amounts of clean energy. But continuing to produce geothermal power efficiently and inexpensively can require innovative adjustments to the technology used to process it. Located in the Mayacamas Mountains of northern California, The Geysers is the world's larg- est geothermal complex. Encompassing 45 square miles along the Sonoma and Lake County border, the complex harnesses natural steam reservoirs to create clean renewable energy that accounts for one-fifth of the green power produced in California. In the late 1990s, the pressure of geothermal steam at The Geysers was falling, reducing the output of its power plants. NREL teamed with Pacific

346

East Mesa Magmamax Power Process Geothermal Generating Plant, A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

During recent months, Magma Power Company has been involved in the shakedown and startup of their 10 MW binary cycle power plant at East Mesa in the Imperial Valley of Southern California. This pilot plant has been designed specifically as an R & D facility, with its primary goal to explore the necessary technology improvements required to make the binary cycle an efficient, cost effective and reliable conversion process. Magma Power's exploration activities, carried out in other parts of the Western United States after the initial discovery and development at The Geyser's, gave evidence that The Geyser's type of steam reservoir was unique and that the majority of geothermal resources would be of the hydrothermal, or pressurized hot water type. Initial flow tests throughout different locations where this type of resource was discovered indicated that well bore scaling occurred at the flash point in the wells. Initial evaluations indicated that if the well fluid could be maintained under pressure as it traversed the well bore, the potential for scaling would be mitigated. Tests carried out in the late 60's at Magma's Brady Hot Springs development in Nevada indicated that scaling was mitigated with the installation of a pump in the geothermal well. Subsequently, designs were developed of a binary process, utilizing heat exchangers for power generation. Magma was able to acquire process patents associated with this and had a patent issued (Magmamax Power Process). This incorporates the concept of pumping a geothermal well and transferring the heat in the geothermal fluid to a secondary power fluid in heat exchangers. Magma's desire to demonstrate this technology was one of the prime motivations associated with the installation of the East Mesa plant.

Hinrichs, T.C.; Dambly, B.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Field tests of corrosion and chemical sensors for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes approximately two years of continuous monitoring of corrosion (and other variables that affect corrosion) in a 10-megawatt binary cycle geothermal power plant. The project goal was to develop methods for detecting adverse plant conditions soon enough to prevent equipment failures. The instruments tested were: (1) resistance-type corrosion probes; (2) linear polarization corrosion probes; (3) oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) probes for oxygen detection; (4) high-temperature pH electrodes; and (5) electrodeless conductivity cells for gas bubble detection.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.; Mackey, D.B.; Koski, O.H.; McBarron, F.O.; Duce, J.L.; Pierce, D.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Internal Technical Report, Heat Exchanger Sizing for 20 MW Geothermal Power Plants at MX Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the analyses used to size the heaters, steam condenser, and working fluid condenser for a proposed 20 MW geothermal power plant application at MX sites in the southwest. These units would use a mixture of hydrocarbons (90% isobutane--10% n-hexane) to extract energy from moderate temperature resources (resource temperatures of 365 F, 400 F, and 450 F were considered). The working fluid will be maintained at supercritical pressures in the heater units. Studies have shown that this cycle will provide a significant net power increase over standard dual boiling single fluid cycles currently in use, e.g., the Raft River 5 MW pilot plant.

Kochan, R.J.; Bliem, C.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oregon/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Geothermal Oregon/Geothermal < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oregon Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oregon Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Nevada Geo Power, Ormat Utah 80 MW80,000 kW 80,000,000 W 80,000,000,000 mW 0.08 GW 8.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region

350

California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)...

351

Measurement of attitudes toward commercial development of geothermal energy in Federal Region IX. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of ten target study groups and subgroups for Klamath Falls, Oregon, and Susanville, California: local government, current and potential industry at the site, relocators to the site, current and potential financial community, regulators, and current and potential promoters and developers. The results of benchmark attitudinal measurement is presented separately for each target group. A literature review was conducted and Macro-environmental attitudes of a sample of local government and industry personnel at the sites were assessed. An assessment of capabilities was made which involved two measurements. The first was a measurement of a sample of promoters, developers, and industrial service companies active at the site to determine infrastructure capabilities required by industry for geothermal plants. The second measurement involved analyzing a sample of industry management in the area and defining their requirements for plant retrofit and expansion. Finally, the processes used by the study group to analyze information to reach commitment and regulatory decisions that significantly impact on geothermal energy projects at the site were identified and defined.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

353

Modelling of a magma energy geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are currently investigating the engineering feasibility of drilling into an active magma body at a depth of roughly 5 km from the earth's surface, establishing a downhole heat exchange region, and extracting thermal energy from the magma body by circulating fluid through this heat exchange region. In the present paper, we evaluate the overall thermodynamic performance of various conceptual magma energy systems in which energy is added as heat to the fluid within the magma region and is converted to useful work in a power conversion cycle at the surface. Unusually high return temperatures and pressures may be available at the wellhead of such a circulating well. Cycles investigated here are an open Rankine power system in which steam from the magma well is circulated directly through a power conversion cycle and a closed Rankine cycle where the heated fluid from downhole is circulated through an aboveground heat exchanger to heat the cycle fluid. The downhole heat exchange region is established during the drilling process. As drilling proceeds into the magma, a solidified layer forms about the drilling tube due to heat exchange to the fluid. This solidified layer thermally fractures because of large temperature gradients between the cooled inner region and the heated outer region, thereby opening secondary flow paths. Two models of the downhole behavior have been used. In the simplest approach, denoted as the ''infinite area model,'' the water entering the pipe to return to the surface is assumed to be always at the temperature of the magma, independent of mass flow rate and other parameters. The other model is more detatiled and the fractured heat exchange region is modelled as a cylindrical porous layer through which fluid flows vertically. The net power and the performance aspects for the systems are investigated in terms of various parameters, including the characteristics of the downhole heat transfer.

Boehm, R.F.; Berg, D.L.; Jr.; Ortega, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geothermal commercial power plant study. Monthly progress report, January 1-January 28, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The major effort was concentrated on plant operating modes. The 50 MWe (Net) base case plant conceptual design, developed during the initial effort of this project, was modified to reflect substantially improved turbine-generator efficiencies. A capital cost estimate was prepared for the new base case using the fourth-quarter 1976 price level. Curves showing the geothermal fluid temperature decline with time, for all cases under study, were calculated by Chevron with their reservoir computer model, using input data provided by Bechtel. With this data, curves of required brine flow rate versus time were prepared for the 50,100 and 200 MWe plants that employ the constant power output operating mode. These flow rate curves form the bases for conceptual designs and corresponding capital cost estimates which are the next work items. The capital cost estimates for the Niland multistage-flash/binary plants with and without regeneration were escalated from fourth-quarter 1975 to fourth-quarter 1976.

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 12 Exploration Activities (8) 13 References Map: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Beowawe, Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

356

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Redirected from Beowawe Hot Springs Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 12 Exploration Activities (8) 13 References Map: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Beowawe, Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

357

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Summary of the technical specifications of the geothermal power plants in the world: revision 1. Report no. CATMEC/21  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Worldwide geothermal power plant installed capacity is listed by country with year of startup. Tables containing technical data are given for each of the geothermal power units installed in the world and for some of those under construction or in planning. The data cover the primary mechanical areas of the power station including the turbine, condenser, gas extraction system, and heat extraction system. In the case of plants which are in the planning stage or under construction, the plant design specifications are listed but must be viewed as preliminary. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Assessment of Evaporative Cooling Enhancement Methods for Air-Cooled Geothermal Power Plants: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many binary-cycle geothermal power plants are air cooled because insufficient water is available to provide year-round water cooling. The performance of air-cooled geothermal plants is highly dependent on the dry bulb temperature of the air (much more so than fossil fuel plants that operate at higher boiler temperatures), and plant electric output can drop by 50% or more on hot summer days, compared to winter performance. This problem of reduced summer performance is exacerbated by the fact that electricity has a higher value in the summer. This paper describes a spreadsheet model that was developed to assess the cost and performance of four methods for using supplemental evaporative cooling to boost summer performance: (1) pre-cooling with spray nozzles, (2) pre-cooling with Munters media, (3) a hybrid combination of nozzles and Munters media, and (4) direct deluge cooling of the air-cooled condenser tubes. Although all four options show significant benefit, deluge cooling has the potential to be the most economic. However, issues of scaling and corrosion would need to be addressed.

Kutscher, C.; Costenaro, D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Petrologic considerations for hot dry rock geothermal site selection in the Clear Lake Region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Clear Lake area is well known for anomalous heat flow, thermal springs, hydrothermal mineral deposits, and Quaternary volcanism. These factors, along with the apparent lack of a large reservoir of geothermal fluid north of Collayomi fault make the Clear Lake area an attractive target for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. Petrologic considerations provide some constraints on site selection for HDR development. Spatial and temporal trends in volcanism in the Coast Ranges indicate that magmatism has migrated to the north with time, paralleling passage of the Mendocino triple junction and propagation of the San Andreas fault. Volcanism in the region may have resulted from upwelling of hot asthenosphere along the southern margin of the subducted segment of the Gorda plate. Spatial and temporal trends of volcanism within the Clear Lake volcanic field are similar to larger-scale trends of Neogene volcanism in the Cost Ranges. Volcanism (especially for silicic compositions) shows a general migration to the north over the {approximately}2 Ma history of the field, with the youngest two silicic centers located at Mt. Konocti and Borax Lake. The Mt. Konocti system (active from {approximately} 0.6 to 0.3 Ma) was large and long-lived, whereas the Borax Lake system is much smaller but younger (0.09 Ma). Remnants of silicic magma bodies under Mt. Konocti may be in the latter stages of cooling, whereas a magma body centered under Borax Lake may be in the early stages of development. The existence of an upper crustal silicic magma body of under Borax Lake has yet to be demonstrated by passive geophysics, however, subsurface temperatures in the area as high (> 200{degrees}C at 2000 m) as those beneath the Mt. Konocti area. Based on petrologic considerations alone, the Mt. Konocti-Borax Lake area appears to be the most logical choice for HDR geothermal development in the region.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hearn, B.C. Jr. (US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, Branch of Lithospheric Processes (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fenton Hill Hdr Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (26) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

362

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

363

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area (Redirected from Dixie Meadows Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

364

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

365

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Winnemucca Dry Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

366

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Walker Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

367

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

368

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

369

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Alkali Flat Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

370

Imperial County geothermal development. Quarterly report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three areas are reported: Geothermal Administration, Geothermal Planning; and other Geothermal Activities. Geothermal Administration addresses the status of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) transfer, update of the Geothermal Resource Center, and findings of Geothermal field inspections. Field inspections will cover the four new wells drilled by Magma at the Salton Sea in preparation for 28 MW power plant, the progress at Sperry at East Mesa, and the two on-line power plants in East Mesa and North Brawley. Evaluation of cooperative efforts will cover the Geothermal Subsidence Detection Network Resurvey, Master EIR for the Salton Sea and the Annual Imperial County Geothermal meeting. The status of Geothermal development throughout the County will cover existing proposed facilities. The summary of the Geothermal meeting (Appendix A) will also provide the status of several projects. Geothermal Planning addresses the EIR Notice of Exemption from CEQA, progress on the Master EIR for the Salton Sea, and the EIR for Phillips Petroleum for 6 exploratory wells in the Truckhaven area. Other Geothermal Activity addresses the Department of Energy Region IX meeting hosted by Imperial County, the Annual Imperial County Geothermal meeting, Class II-1 geothermal hazardous waste disposal siting study, and Imperial County Geothermal Direct Heat Study.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of laboratory and pilot plant tests, detailed process and project engineering work, and process engineering and economic evaluation studies has been carried out in support of the design of a test facility for demonstration of the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions. A demonstration plant has been designed which is capable of removing 99% of the H/sub 2/S, 90% of the NH/sub 3/, and significant amounts of H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and particulates from 100,000 lb/hr of geothermal steam of The Geysers composition. Criteria for the mechanical and process design of the scrubber have been confirmed in field tests of fifty hours duration on an eight-inch diameter scrubber at PG and E's Unit No. 7, The Geysers. The background of the problem and the technical approach to its solution, the scope and results of the first-phase laboratory testing, the scope and results of the experimental and analytical studies carried out in the second phase, and a description of the configuration of the demonstration plant and the test plan for its operation are summarized. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comparative analysis of alternative means for removing noncondensable gases from flashed-steam geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geothermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time.

Vorum, M.; Fitzler, E.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Investigations of supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles are investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that describe the thermodynamic cycle is solved using a Newton-Rhapson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency of the model when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. Numerical simulation results are presented for different cycle configurations in order to assess the influences of heat source temperature, waste heat rejection temperatures and internal heat exchanger design on cycle efficiency. The results show that thermodynamic cycle efficiencies above 10% can be attained with the supercritical brayton cycle while lower efficiencies can be attained with the transcritical CO2 Rankine cycle.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Assessment of geothermal energy as a power source for US aluminum reduction plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using hydrothermal resources as a primary power source for both existing and future aluminum reduction plants in the United States is explored. Applicable hydrothermal resources that should be considered by the aluminum industry for this purpose were identified and evaluated. This work also identified the major institutional parameters to be considered in developing geothermal energy resources for aluminum industry use. Based on the findings of this study, it appears technically and economically feasible to power existing aluminum reduction plants in the Pacific Northwest using electricity generated at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. It may also be feasible to power existing plants located on the Gulf Coast from Roosevelt Hot Springs, depending on the cost of transmitting the power.

Enderlin, W.I.; Blahnik, D.E.; Davis, A.E.; Jacobson, J.J.; Schilling, A.H.; Weakley, S.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Report on Preliminary Engineering Study for Installation of an Air Cooled Steam Condenser at Brawley Geothermal Plant, Unit No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Brawley Geothermal Project comprises a single 10 MW nominal geothermal steam turbine-generator unit which has been constructed and operated by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE). Geothermal steam for the unit is supplied through contract by Union Oil Company which requires the return of all condensate. Irrigation District (IID) purchases the electric power generated and provides irrigation water for cooling tower make-up to the plant for the first-five years of operation, commencing mid-1980. Because of the unavailability of irrigation water from IID in the future, SCE is investigating the application and installation of air cooled heat exchangers in conjunction with the existing wet (evaporative) cooling tower with make-up based on use of 180 gpm (nominal) of the geothermal condensate which may be made available by the steam supplier.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Regional systems development for geothermal energy resources: Pacific region (California and Hawaii). Task I: implementation plan development, topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eleven implementation plans were prepared. They represent some 21 reservoir-site developments and 48 geothermal power plant developments. The plans consist of three integrated elements: (1) a bar-chart schedule that depicts interdependencies among activities and shows significant milestones on the path from initial exploration to power on-line, (2) task descriptions, and (3) the responsible performers. During the preparation of the implementation plans, the tasks required for resource development at each KGRA were defined on a generalized work breakdown structure (WBS) diagram. A generalized WBS dictionary (task descriptions) was also compiled. In addition, a specific WBS for each KGRA was prepared in a tabular and indented format. The tasks formed the basis for the schedular activities. Institutional responsibilities, based upon the WBS, were identified and are also shown on the tabular WBS. In this manner, implementation plans evolved whose schedular, task, and responsibility elements were integrated with one another. In order to provide logically consistent time estimates, and a reasonable basis for comparison, schedule modules were developed for some recurring activities which are essentially common to all KGRAs. In the preparation of multiple plant schedules for a given KGRA, the interactive effects of power development on the ancillary resources of the area were considered so that interfaces and constraining situations would be identified. Within Imperial County, this process was taken one step further to include the influence that development at the several close-lying KGRAs would have upon one another. A set of recommendations for the accelerated development of geothermal energy resources was prepared and the potential implementors were suggested.

Michler, D.W.

1979-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Heat rejection from geothermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Comprehensive computer programs are developed for purposes of determining cooling makeup water requirements and electricity production costs for evaporative (wet) and dry/wet-peaking cooling towers, which are the principal cooling technologies for rejecting the heat from hydrothermal power plants. Parametric economic analyses were performed for both flash steam and binary conversion processes for various combinations of resource temperatures, climatological types, hydrothermal fuel costs, and cooling system makeup water costs. Results of these analyses are presented in a number of curves showing relative busbar cost of electricity as a function of relative amount of cooling makeup water required. These curves show that use of wet/dry cooling systems can cut makeup water requirements by factors of about 2 to 4 at the cost of an additional 10% to 25% in the busbar price of electricity. Turbine-generator performance curves are constructed for a range of condensing conditions for both the flash steam and hydrocarbon binary-cycle turbines. Estimates of hydrothermal resources in the western United States are also given.

Horsak, R.D.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chloride/magnesium ratio of shallow groundwaters as a regional geothermal indicator in Hawaii. Assessment of geothermal resources in Hawaii: Number 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the complex geological and hydrological conditions and the virtual lack of thermal springs, regional geothermal investigations in Hawaii require the use of techniques substantially different from those conventionally applied in other geothermal environments. The large number of hydrological wells in the state provides an appreciable source of groundwater chemical data. However, largely because of the island environment, interpretation of much of these data as geothermal indicators becomes ambiguous. Initially, SiO/sub 2/ and temperature of groundwaters were used to identify thermally anomalous zones, but on a regional basis it has been found that these criteria are not always successful. As a further criterion for assessment, the Cl/Mg ratio of the groundwater has been used. On a state-wide basis, this ratio has been successful in further screening the SiO/sub 2/-temperature selected sites, and in defining more specific areas which warrant further investigation. Temperature, SiO/sub 2/ and Cl/Mg values for nearly 400 groundwater samples are included.

Cox, M.E.; Thomas, D.M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Property:GeothermalDevelopmentPhases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalDevelopmentPhases GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalDevelopmentPhases" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + Geothermal/Power Plant + C CA-017-05-051 + Geothermal/Well Field + CA-170-02-15 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-650-2005-086 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-670-2010-CX + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-96062042 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + D DOE-EA-1116 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + DOE-EA-1621 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1676 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1733 + Geothermal/Well Field +

383

Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Geothermal Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating geothermal development. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Geothermal energy is heat derived below the earth's surface which can be harnessed to generate clean, renewable energy. This vital, clean energy resource supplies renewable power around the clock and emits little or no greenhouse gases -- all while requiring a small environmental footprint to develop. The Energy Department is committed to responsibly developing, demonstrating, and deploying innovative technologies to support the continued expansion of the geothermal industry across the United States. Featured Pinpointing America's Geothermal Resources with Open Source Data

384

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Interim report, June 15, 1975-March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary analysis is described in a study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. The analysis is based on three different brines whose temperatures and composition span the range that is of practical interest for power generation. Only two kinds of cycles were considered in the analysis - the steam turbine cycle and the binary cycle, in which energy from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine cycle. The performance of several condidate working fluids has been investigated, and the most attracive binary cycles have been selected for the various resource conditions. The results show that if brine is utilized directly in the primary heat exchange process with the secondary working fluid, the binary cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash steam turbine cycle. However, if the brine is flashed to steam and the steam is used for the heat exchange process, the steam turbine cycle will produce more power per pound of brine flow. Preliminary turbine designs have been formulated for steam and also for the most promising working fluids in the secondary or binary cycle. For all cycle configurations at least 50 MW of electrical power can be generated by a single unit without exceeding mechanical design or manufacturing limitations even when the resource temperature is as low as 400/sup 0/F. Plant economics were not considered.

Eskesen, J.H.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal...

386

Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Large-scale Ocean-based or Geothermal Power Plants by Thermoelectric Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat resources of small temperature difference are easily accessible, free and unlimited on earth. Thermoelectric effects provide the technology for converting these heat resources directly into electricity. We present designs of electricity generators based on thermoelectric effects and using heat resources of small temperature difference, e.g., ocean water at different depths and geothermal sources, and conclude that large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects are feasible and economically competitive. The key observation is that the power factor of thermoelectric materials, unlike the figure of merit, can be improved by orders of magnitude upon laminating good conductors and good thermoelectric materials. The predicted large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects, if validated, will have a global economic and social impact for its scalability, and the renewability, free and unlimited supply of heat resources of small temperature difference on earth.

Liu, Liping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Investigation of Tunable Diode Spectroscopy for Monitoring Gases in Geothermal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an investigation directed at the development of instrument-tation for the real-time monitoring of gases, such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and chloride (HCl), in geothermal process streams is described. The geothermal power industry has an interest in the development of new low maintenance techniques since improved capabilities could lead to considerable cost savings through the optimization of various gas abatement processes. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy was identified as a candidate tech-nology for this application and a commercial instrument was specified and procured for testing. The measurement principle involved the use of solid state diode lasers and frequency modulation techniques. The gallium arsenide diode lasers employed emit light in the 0.7 to 2.0 micron region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This region contains the overtone and combination absorption bands of a number of species of industrial interest, including H2S and HCl. A particular device can be tuned over a small range to match the absorption line by changing its applied temperature and current. The diode current can also be sinusoidally modulated in frequency as it is tuned across the line. This modulation allows measurements to be conducted at frequencies where the laser intensity noise is minimal; and therefore, very high signal-to-noise measurements are possible. The feasibility of using this technology in various types of geothermal process streams has been explored. The results of laboratory and field studies are presented along with new advances in laser technology that could allow more sensitive and selective measurements to be performed.

J. K. Partin

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber reservoir for industrial processing purposes at Valley Nitrogen Producers Inc. , El Centro agricultural chemical plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber KGRA for industrial processing purposes at the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc. El Centro, California agricultural chemical plant was investigated. The analysis proceeds through the preliminary economics to determine the restraints imposed by geothermal modification size on internal rates of return, and through the energy utilization evaluation to determine the best method for substituting geothermal energy for existing fossil fuel energy. Finally, several geothermal utilization schemes were analyzed for detailed cost-benefit evaluation. An economically viable plan for implementing geothermal energy in the VNP Plant was identified and the final conclusions and recommendations were made based on these detailed cost-benefit analyses. Costs associated with geothermal energy production and implementation were formulated utilizing a modified Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories' ''GEOCOST'' program.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

391

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

McCoy Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McCoy Geothermal Area McCoy Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mccoy Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: McCoy Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

393

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Direct application of geothermal energy at the L'eggs Product Plant, Las Cruces, New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study program to determine the feasibility of interfacing a potential geothermal resource of Dona Ana County, New Mexico L'eggs Product industrial process is discussed in this final report. Five separate sites were evaluated initially as to geothermal potential and technical feasibility. Preliminary analysis revealed that three sites were considered normal, but that two sites (about three miles from the L'eggs Plant) had very high shallow subsurface temperature gradients (up to 14.85/sup 0/F/100 ft). An initial engineering analysis showed that to meet the L'eggs plant temperature and energy requirements a geothermal fluid temperature of about 250/sup 0/F and 200 gpm flow rate would be necessary. A brief economic comparison indicated that the L'eggs plant site and a geothermal site approximately four miles from the plant did merit further investigation. Detailed engineering and economic design and analysis of these two sites (including the drilling of an 1873 feet deep temperature gradient test hole at the L'eggs Plant) showed that development of the four mile distant site was technically feasible and was the more economic option. It was determined that a single-stage flash system interface design would be most appropriate for the L'eggs Plant. Approximately 39 billion Btu/yr of fossil fuel could be replaced with geothermal energy at the L'eggs facility for a total installed system cost of slightly over $2 million. The projected economic payback period was calculated to be 9.2 years before taxes. This payback was not considered acceptable by L'eggs Products, Inc., to merit additional design or construction work at this time.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Direct application of geothermal energy at the L'eggs Product Plant, Las Cruces, New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study program to determine the feasibility of interfacing a potential geothermal resource of Dona Ana County, New Mexico L'eggs Product industrial process is discussed in this final report. Five separate sites were evaluated initially as to geothermal potential and technical feasibility. Preliminary analysis revealed that three sites were considered normal, but that two sites (about three miles from the L'eggs Plant) had very high shallow subsurface temperature gradients (up to 14.85/sup 0/F/100 ft). An initial engineering analysis showed that to meet the L'eggs plant temperature and energy requirements a geothermal fluid temperature of about 250/sup 0/F and 200 gpm flow rate would be necessary. A brief economic comparison indicated that the L'eggs plant site and a geothermal site approximately four miles from the plant did merit further investigation. Detailed engineering and economic design and analysis of these two sites (including the drilling of an 1873 feet deep temperature gradient test hole at the L'eggs Plant) showed that development of the four mile distant site was technically feasible and was the more economic option. It was determined that a single-stage flash system interface design would be most appropriate for the L'eggs Plant. Approximately 39 billion Btu/yr of fossil fuel could be replaced with geothermal energy at the L'eggs facility for a total installed system cost of slightly over $2 million. The projected economic payback period was calculated to be 9.2 years before taxes. This payback was not considered acceptable by L'eggs Products, Inc., to merit additional design or construction work at this time.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the feasibility study for utilizing low temperature geothermal heat in the City of San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant are summarized. The study is presented in terms of preliminary engineering design, economic analysis, institutional issues, environmental impacts, resource development, and system implementation.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, supercritical/transcritical thermodynamic cycles using mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids were investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that described the thermodynamic cycle was solved using a Newton-Raphson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency even when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. The thermophysical properties of the mixtures were obtained from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) REFPROP software and constituent cubic equations. The local heat transfer coefficients in the heat exchangers were calculated based on the local properties of the working fluid, geothermal brine, and cooling water. The heat exchanger areas required were calculated. Numerical simulation results presented for different cycle configurations were used to assess the effects of the SF6 fraction in CO2, brine temperature, and recuperator size on the cycle thermal efficiency, and size of heat exchangers for the evaporator and condenser. Optimal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies were calculated to be approximately 13 and 15% mole content of SF6 in a CO2- SF6 mixture for a Brayton cycle and a Rankine cycle, respectively.

Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Southwest regional geothermal operations research program. Summary report. First project year, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary report is given of the information, data, and results presented by New Mexico Energy Institute and the five State Teams in their separate draft reports. The objective is to develop scenarios for the development of each identified geothermal resource area in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah. Included are an overview; an economic analysis; institutitional procedures, contraints, and incentives; location of geothermal resources in the southwest; geothermal development postulations, state by state; and recommended actions for promoting and accelerating geothermal development. (MHR)

Meyer, R.T.; Davidson, R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed by Unocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this development included building and operating a 10 MWe power plant. Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning the project in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potential of the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeable sands contained moderately saline water, high porosity, and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, Ormat Nevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmed the

403

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

404

Geothermal data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the Valles Caldera - southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field, chemical, and isotopic data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico are presented. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, near San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal and derivative waters (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. The object of the data is to help interpret geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and to provide background data for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Goff, F.; McCormick, Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

North Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina/Geothermal Carolina/Geothermal < North Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF North Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in North Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in North Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in North Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for North Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

406

Iowa/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Geothermal Iowa/Geothermal < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Iowa Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Iowa No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Iowa No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Iowa No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Iowa Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

407

New Jersey/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey/Geothermal Jersey/Geothermal < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Jersey Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Jersey No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Jersey No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Jersey No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Jersey Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

408

New York/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Geothermal New York/Geothermal < New York Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New York Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New York No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New York No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New York No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New York Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

409

West Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Geothermal West Virginia/Geothermal < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF West Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in West Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in West Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in West Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for West Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

410

Idaho/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Geothermal Idaho/Geothermal < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Idaho Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Idaho Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Raft River II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Raft River, AK 114 MW114,000 kW 114,000,000 W 114,000,000,000 mW 0.114 GW 1.14e-4 TW Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Raft River Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Raft River III Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Raft River, ID 114 MW114,000 kW 114,000,000 W 114,000,000,000 mW 0.114 GW 1.14e-4 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Raft River Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

411

Utah Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 10 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southeast United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Geothermal Operations/Research project was initiated to investigate geothermal development in the five states within the region: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Although the region changed during the first year to include Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the project objectives and procedures remained unchanged. The project was funded by the DOE/DGE and the Four Corners Regional Commission with participation by the New Mexico Energy Resources Board. The study was coordinated by the New Mexico Energy Institute at New Mexico State University, acting through a 'Core Team'. A 'state' team, assigned by the states, conducted the project within each state. This report details most of the findings of the first year's efforts by the Utah Operations/Research team. It is a conscientious effort to report the findings and activities of the Utah team, either explicitly or by reference. The results are neither comprehensive nor final, and should be regarded as preliminary efforts to much of what the Operations/Research project was envisioned to accomplish. In some cases the report is probably too detailed, in other cases too vague; hopefully, however, the material in the report, combined with the Appendices, will be able to serve as source material for others interested in geothermal development in Utah.

Green, Stanley; Wagstaff, Lyle W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Utah Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 10 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southeast United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Regional Geothermal Operations/Research project was initiated to investigate geothermal development in the five states within the region: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Although the region changed during the first year to include Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the project objectives and procedures remained unchanged. The project was funded by the DOE/DGE and the Four Corners Regional Commission with participation by the New Mexico Energy Resources Board. The study was coordinated by the New Mexico Energy Institute at New Mexico State University, acting through a 'Core Team'. A 'state' team, assigned by the states, conducted the project within each state. This report details most of the findings of the first year's efforts by the Utah Operations/Research team. It is a conscientious effort to report the findings and activities of the Utah team, either explicitly or by reference. The results are neither comprehensive nor final, and should be regarded as preliminary efforts to much of what the Operations/Research project was envisioned to accomplish. In some cases the report is probably too detailed, in other cases too vague; hopefully, however, the material in the report, combined with the Appendices, will be able to serve as source material for others interested in geothermal development in Utah.

Green, Stanley; Wagstaff, Lyle W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

New York Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New York Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New York Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Lovelock, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

414

Template:GeothermalResourceArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Template Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Template:GeothermalResourceArea Jump to: navigation, search This is the GeothermalResourceArea template. To define a new Geothermal Resource Area, please use the Geothermal Resource Area form. Contents 1 Parameters 2 Dependencies 3 Usage 4 Example Parameters Map - The map of the resource area. Place - The city or state in which the resource area is located. GeothermalRegion - The geothermal exploration region in which the resource area is located. GEADevelopmentPhase - The phase of plant construction, as defined by GEA (can have more than one phase if more than one project)

415

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

416

Geothermal Power Development in the Phillippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of electric power to meet the needs of industrial growth and dispersal in the Philippines is aimed at attaining self-reliance through availment of indigenous energy resources. The Philippines by virtue of her position in the high-heat flow region has in abundance a number of exploitable geothermal fields located all over the country. Results indicate that the geothermal areas of the Philippines presently in various stages of exploration and development are of such magnitude that they can be relied on to meet a significant portion of the country's power need. Large scale geothermal energy for electric power generation was put into operation last year with the inauguration of two 55-MW geothermal generating units at Tiwi, Albay in Southern Luzon. Another two 55-MW units were added to the Luzon Grid in the same year from Makiling-Banahaw field about 70 kilometers south of Manila. For 1979 alone, therefore, 220-MW of generating capacity was added to the power supply coming from geothermal energy. This year a total of 220-MW power is programmed for both areas. This will bring to 443-MW of installed generating capacity from geothermal energy with 3-MW contributed by the Tongonan Geothermal pilot plant in Tongonan, Leyte, Central Philippines in operation since July 1977. Financial consideration of Philippine experience showed that electric power derived from geothermal energy is competitive with other sources of energy and is a viable source of baseload electric power. Findings have proven the technical and economic acceptability of geothermal energy resources development. To realize the benefits that stem from the utilization of indigenous geothermal resources and in the light of the country's ever increasing electric power demand and in the absence of large commercial oil discovery in the Philippines, geothermal energy resource development has been accelerated anew. The program includes development of eight fields by 1989 by adding five more fields to the currently developed and producing geothermal areas.

Jovellanos, Jose U.; Alcaraz, Arturo; Datuin, Rogelio

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Brine chemistry: scaling and corrosion. Geothermal research study in the Salton Sea region of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a reasonable program of brine chemistry research that will result in the development of methods for predicting and controlling scale deposition, and in guidelines for the selection of corrosion-resistant construction materials. First, background information, which is necessary for the understanding of the problems of scaling and corrosion in the Salton Sea KGRA, is presented through a review of the history of geothermal exploration and development in the Salton Sea. Second, literature relevant to the geochemistry of the Salton Sea field is reviewed and important results are emphasized. Third, current research efforts directed toward actual power plant construction are summarized and evaluated. Fourth, research which has been proposed but is not currently funded is discussed. Fifth, because silica scaling has been the most troublesome problem in the past, the basic chemistry of silica and its relationship to scaling is discussed. Sixth, recommendations for future research are made in which a fundamental engineering approach is emphasized. In this approach, experiments would be conducted on actual process equipment and detailed chemical analyses would be performed on site in well-equipped field laboratories. 88 references.

Hoffmann, M.R.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Geothermal Electricity Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Production Geothermal Electricity Production August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California....

420

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Phases of a Geothermal Development...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal region plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in...