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1

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

4

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

8

Geothermal Power Plants in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine small experimental geothermal power plants are now operating at six sites in the People's Republic of China. These range in capacity from 50 kW to 3MW, and include plants of the flash-steam and binary type. All except two units utilize geofluids at temperatures lower than 100 C. The working fluids for the binary plants include normal- and iso-butane, ethyl chloride, and Freon. The first geothermal plant came on-line in 1970, the most recent ones in 1979. Figure 1 shows the location of the plants. Major cities are also shown for reference. Table 1 contains a listing of the plants and some pertinent characteristics. The total installed capacity is 5,186 kW, of which 4,386 kW is from flash-steam units. In the report, they given an example of the results of exploratory surveys, and show system diagrams, technical specifications, and test results for several of the power plants.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide an update of historical and current trends in geothermal power plant technology, extending the previous Next Generation Geothermal Power Plant (NGGPP) report originally developed by EPRI in 1996.BackgroundIn its 1996 study, EPRI evaluated a number of technologies with the potential to lower the cost of geothermal power production or to expand cost effective power production to lower temperature resources, thus opening ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

Peter Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

14

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

15

Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan geothermal power plant has been the subject of several recent reports and papers (1-7). This article is a condensation of the author's earlier writings (5-7), and incorporates new information on the geothermal activities in El Salvador obtained recently through a telephone conversation with Ing. R. Caceres of the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) who has been engaged in the design and engineering of the newest unit at Ahuachapan. El Salvador is the first of the Central American countries to construct and operate a geothermal electric generating station. Exploration began in the mid-1960's at the geothermal field near Ahuachapan in western El Salvador. The first power unit, a separated-steam or so-called ''single-flash'' plant, was started up in June 1975, and was followed a year later by an identical unit. In July 1980, the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) will complete the installation of a third unit, a dual-pressure (or ''double-flash'') unit rated at 35 MW. The full Ahuachapan plant will then constitute about 20% of the total installed electric generating capacity of the country. During 1977, the first two units generated nearly one-third of all the electricity produced in El Salvador. C.E.L. is actively pursuing several other promising sites for additional geothermal plants. There is the possibility that eventually geothermal energy will contribute about 450 MW of electric generating capacity. In any event it appears that by 1985 El Salvador should be able to meet its domestic needs for electricity by means of its indigenous geothermal and hydroelectric power plants, thus eliminating any dependence on imported petroleum for power generation.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact ...  

... Indonesia, and Turkey. Promising greater efficiency and reduced costs ADCC technology holds great promise for geothermal power plants seeking ...

18

Nevada geothermal power plant project approved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proposal to construct and test a 12.5-megawatt geothermal power plant in the Steamboat Hot Springs KGRA in Washoe County, Nevada, has been approved by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The power plant could be completed by October 1987. Several stipulations are included in the BLM approval. The stipulations include a program to monitor ground water, surface water, and hydrothermal features to detect any impacts on the hydrology in the Steamboat Hot Springs area. When plant operations are tested, an emission test will be required to verify that noncondensible gas concentrations are within federal and state standards. No geothermal fluid will be discharged on the land's surface. Other stipulations include the special construction of electrical distribution lines to protect birds of prey; the fencing of hazardous areas; and a minimal disturbance of surface areas.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Report on Geothermal Power Plant Cost and Comparative Cost of Geothermal and Coal Fired Steam Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to be used by Utah Power and Light Company (UP and L) in making studies of geothermal power plants. The dollars per kilowatt comparison between a geothermal plant and a UP and L coal-fired plant is to be developed. Geothermal gathering system costs and return to owner are to be developed for information.

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are commercially mature, dispatchable, base-loaded renewable energy sources. Most existing geothermal power plants exploit moderate- to high-temperature geothermal resources greater than 150C. These conditions exist in a few, relatively small geographic areas of the world, but these areas currently host thousands of megawatts of reliable, base-loaded renewable power, with thousands more megawatts in development. According to the Geothermal Resources Council, between 4000 and 7000 ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Designing geothermal power plants to avoid reinventing the corrosion wheel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses how designers can take into account, the necessary chemical and materials precautions that other geothermal power plants have learned. Current worldwide geothermal power plant capacity is presented as well as a comparison of steam composition from seven different geothermal resources throughout the world. The similarities of corrosion impacts to areas of the power plants are discussed and include the turbines, gas extraction system, heat rejection system, electrical/electronic systems, and structures. Materials problems and solutions in these corrosion impact areas are identified and discussed. A geothermal power plant design team organization is identified and the efficacy of a new corrosion/materials engineering position is proposed.

Conover, Marshall F.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole...

23

Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant General Information Name Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Facility Neal Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Malheur County, Oregon Coordinates 44.02239°, -117.4631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.02239,"lon":-117.4631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant General Information Name North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Facility North Brawley Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Imperial Valley, California Coordinates 33.015046°, -115.542267° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.015046,"lon":-115.542267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant August 26, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Joshua DeLung Chemetall supplies materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles $28.4 million in Recovery Act funding going toward geothermal plant Plant expected to produce 4 MW of electrical power, employ 25 full-time workers Chemetall produces lithium carbonate to customers in a wide range of industries, including for batteries used in electric vehicles, and now the

27

Five-megawatt geothermal-power pilot-plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a report on the Raft River Geothermal-Power Pilot-Plant Project (Geothermal Plant), located near Malta, Idaho; the review took place between July 20 and July 27, 1979. The Geothermal Plant is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) overall effort to help commercialize the operation of electric power plants using geothermal energy sources. Numerous reasons were found to commend management for its achievements on the project. Some of these are highlighted, including: (a) a well-qualified and professional management team; (b) effective cost control, performance, and project scheduling; and (c) an effective and efficient quality-assurance program. Problem areas delineated, along with recommendations for solution, include: (1) project planning; (2) facility design; (3) facility construction costs; (4) geothermal resource; (5) drilling program; (6) two facility construction safety hazards; and (7) health and safety program. Appendices include comments from the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications, the Controller, and the Acting Deputy Director, Procurement and Contracts Management.

Not Available

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at www.nrel.govpublications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants Final ARRA Project Report Desikan Bharathan Technical Report NREL...

29

In-line process instrumentation for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of geothermal power depend on satisfactory plant reliability of continuous operation. Plant problems and extended downtime due to corrosion failures, scale buildup, or injection well plugging have affected many past geothermal projects. If in-line instrumentation can be developed to alert plant operators to correctable problems, then the cost and reliability of geothermal power will be improved. PNL has completed a problem of development of in-line corrosion and chemical instrumentation for binary cycle plants, and this technology has been used to set up a monitoring program at the Heber Binary Demonstration Power Plant. The current emphasis has shifted to development of particle meters for use on injection lines and CO/sub 2/ and pH probes for use in control of calcite scaling. Plans have been outlined to develop and demonstrate flash plant instrumentation for corrosion monitoring, scaling, steam purity, and injection line particle counting. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

Shannon, D.W.; Robertus, R.J.; Sullivan, R.G.; Kindle, C.H.; Pierce, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Geothermal energy as a source of electricity. A worldwide survey of the design and operation of geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of geothermal power generation is presented. A survey of geothermal power plants is given for the following countries: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Turkey, USSR, and USA. A survey of countries planning geothermal power plants is included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Heber geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The binary power plant is to be a 45 MW net electrical facility deriving energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) Heber reservoir in Southern California. The optimized baseline design established for the power plant is described, and the design and optimization work that formed the basis for the baseline design is documented. The work accomplished during Phase II, Preliminary Design is also recorded, and a base provided from which detailed plant design could be continued. Related project activities in the areas of licensing, environmental, cost, and schedule are also described. The approach used to establish the Phase II optimized baseline design was to (1) review the EPRI Phase I conceptual design and feasibility studies; (2) identify current design criteria and state-of-the-art technology; and (3) develop a preliminary design optimized to the Heber site based on utiliity standards.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fluid Temperature and Power Estimation of Geothermal Power Plants by a Simplified Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an estimation of power generated in a given geothermal heat pipe system. Such power generation is basically controlled by the ultimate temperature of fluid flowing through the u-shape pipes and could also be affected by power consumption ... Keywords: energy, geothermal power plant, numerical model, heat conduction, optimum design

Ge Ou; Itai Einav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Economic assessment of polymer concrete usage in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study established to review the Heber and Niland, California 50 MWe conceptual geothermal power plants designs and to identify areas where non-metallic materials, such as polymer concrete, can be technically and economically employed are reported. Emphasis was directed toward determining potential economic advantages and resulting improvements in plant availability. It is estimated that use of polymer concrete in the Heber plant will effect a savings of 6.18 mills per KWH in the cost of power delivered to the network, a savings of 9.7%. A similar savings should be effected in the Niland plant.

Not Available

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Measurement and control techniques in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This information provided the background and source material used in preparing the chapter of the Geothermal Source Book on instrumentation, measurement, and control techniques. Here more complete and detailed information is presented than could be included in the source book chapter and is being published for reference. Included are detailed examples of instrumentation and control techniques currently being used in geothermal power plants. In addition, the basic guidelines and unique characteristics of instrumentation and control in geothermal systems, are presented. The instrumentation and control philosophy and the hardware involved in geothermal electric plants and their supply and injection systems are addressed. The intent is to address the unique characteristics of geothermal electric instrumentation and control (I and C) systems. Standard I and C practice is available in the general literature. Sources of information for standard I and C practice are listed in the Appendix. The information presents the philosophy of I and C system design; the development of the system, from power grid considerations through subsystem operation to specific system details; and component selection and operating considerations.

Whitbeck, J.F.; Dart, R.H.; Miller, J.D.; Brewer, D.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and injection systems necessary to serve the pilot power and mineral recovery plants planned for Phase 3. The scope of the Area Resource Test Facility Subprogram will include evaluation, costing, design, construction and operation of an ARTF that can serve as a field facility for testing and evaluating high temperature, high salinity geothermal brine utilization components and systems being developed by various organizations and laboratories in the United States. [DJE-2005

None

1975-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

Bharathan, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions at geothermal power plants was evaluated in laboratory scale equipment and by process engineering analysis. The process is based on scrubbing geothermal steam with a metal salt solution to selectively remove and precipitate the contained H/sub 2/S. The metal sulfide is roasted or oxygen/acid leached to regenerate the metal salt, and sulfur is rejected from the system as elemental sulfur or as sulfate. Up to 95 percent removal of H/sub 2/S from simulated geothermal steams was obtained in a 2'' diameter scrubbing column packed with 3 feet of 5/8'' Flexirings by use of a recirculating slurry of copper sulfate/copper sulfide. Information is included on the chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics and process control aspects of the process, scrubber system design, operation, and corrosion, and design proposals and cost estimates for a H/sub 2/S removal system. (LCL)

Harvey, W.W.; Brown, F.C.; Turchan, M.J.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling and optimization of geothermal power plants using the binary fluid cycle  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation of a binary fluid cycle power plant for use with geothermal energy sources, and the subsequent optimization of this power plant type over a range of geothermal source conditions are described. The optimization technique employed for this analysis was based upon the principle of maximum use of geothermal energy.

Walter, R.A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Cycle Research Program is currently investigating the potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperatures, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating with a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single boiling cycles. Recently, in addition to the supercritical Rankine Cycle, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This paper explores the limits on efficiency of a feasibility plant and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance so that the designer must weigh all considerations to find the best plant for a given service. 16 refs., 12 figs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Performance Assessment of Flashed Steam Geothermal Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five years of operating experience at the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) Cerro Prieto flashed steam geothermal power plant are evaluated from the perspective of U. S. utility operations. We focus on the design and maintenance of the power plant that led to the achievement of high plant capacity factors for Units No. 1 and 2 since commercial operation began in 1973. For this study, plant capacity factor is the ratio of the average load on the machines or equipment for the period of time considered to the capacity rating of the machines or equipment. The plant capacity factor is the annual gross output in GWh compared to 657 GWh (2 x 37.5 MW x 8760 h). The CFE operates Cerro Prieto at base load consistent with the system connected electrical demand of the Baja California Division. The plant output was curtailed during the winter months of 1973-1975 when the system electric demand was less than the combined output capability of Cerro Prieto and the fossil fuel plant near Tijuana. Each year the system electric demand has increased and the Cerro Prieto units now operate at full load all the time. The CFE added Units 3 and 4 to Cerro Prieto in 1979 which increased the plant name plate capacity to 150 MW. Part of this additional capacity will supply power to San Diego Gas and Electric Company through an interconnection across the border. The achievement of a high capacity factor over an extensive operating period was influenced by operation, design, and maintenance of the geothermal flash steam power plant.

Alt, Theodore E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Low-Temperature Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are commercially mature, dispatchable, base-loaded renewable energy sources. Most existing geothermal power plants exploit moderate-to-high-temperature geothermal resources greater than 150C (300F). These conditions exist in a few relatively small geographic areas of the world, which has limited the amount of geothermal deployment. Emerging technologies, new exploration and drilling techniques, and pre-engineered systems are contributing to make generation from lower-temperature r...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Worldwide Geothermal Power Plants: Status as of June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are 100 geothermal power units now in operation throughout 12 countries, with a total installed capacity of just over 2110 MW. The average unit thus is rated at 21.1 MW. Newer units may be broadly classified as follows: (a) wellhead units of less than 5 MW; (b) small plants of about 10 MW; (c) medium plants of 30-35 MW; (d) large plants of about 55 MW; and (e) complexes typically consisting of several 55 MW units in a large geothermal field. There is a trend toward turbine units of the double-flow type with a 55 MW rating, used either alone or in a tandem-compound arrangement giving 110 MW in a single power house. This is particularly evident at The Geysers field in California. Double-flash units (separated-steam followed by a surface flash) are suited to high quality reservoirs having high temperature, high steam fractions at the wellhead, and low scaling potential. Single-flash units (separated steam) may be called for where scaling by the spent brine is a potential problem for the liquid disposal system. Binary plants are being used for some very low temperature reservoirs, particularly in the People's Republic of China, albeit in extremely small units. A large-scale pilot plant of the binary type is being planned for the Imperial Valley of California.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Draft Environmental Assessment Ormat Nevada Northern Nevada Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Ormat Nevada Northern Nevada Geothermal Power Plant Projects Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for ORMAT LLC's Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant, Elko County, Nevada; Jersey Valley Geothermal Project, Pershing County, Nevada; and McGinness Hills Geothermal Project, Lander County, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, D.C. 20585 August 2011 NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANT PROJECTS - ORMAT NEVADA AUGUST 2011 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................1 1.1 SUMMARY AND LOCATION OF PROPOSED ACTION .....................................................1

45

SMUDGEO No. 1: economic impacts on geothermal power plant design  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) is currently in the design phase of a geothermal power plant located in The Geysers area of Northern California. The unit, SMUDGEO No. 1, has a turbine nameplate rating of 55 MWe at 4.0 in hgA, and is expected to be in commercial operation by December 1983. The benefits of efficient steam utilization for SMUDGEO No. 1 differ greatly from other units already installed due to the purchase of geothermal steam on a per pound basis. For this reason, SMUDGEO No. 1 will be the most efficient yet installed in The Geysers area. The efficiency-conscious design of the turbine cycle is described.

Tucker, R.E. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO); Kleinhans, P.V. Jr.; Keilman, L.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Cycle Research Program is investigating potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperature, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating in a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single or dual boiling cycles or supercritical cycles. Recently, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This report explores the feasible limits on efficiency of a plant given practical limits on equipment performance and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. (Here feasible is intended to mean reasonably achievable and not cost-effective.) No direct economic analysis has been made because of the sensitivity of economic results to site specific input. The limit of performance of three advanced plants were considered in this report. The performance predictions were taken from the developers of each concept. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance. Ultimately, the plant designer must weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the the different cycles to find the best plant for a given service. In addition, this report presents a standard of comparison of the work which has been done in the Heat Cycle Research Program and in the industrial sector by Exergy, Inc. and Polythermal Technologies. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

Kutscher, C.

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Floating power optimization studies for the cooling system of a geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The floating power concept was studied for a geothermal power plant as a method of increasing the plant efficiency and decreasing the cost of geothermal power. The stored cooling concept was studied as a method of reducing the power fluctuations of the floating power concept. The studies include parametric and optimization studies for a variety of different types of cooling systems including wet and dry cooling towers, direct and indirect cooling systems, forced and natural draft cooling towers, and cooling ponds. The studies use an indirect forced draft wet cooling tower cooling system as a base case design for comparison purposes.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Occidental Geothermal, Inc. , Oxy Geothermal Power Plant No. 1: draft environmental impact report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following aspects of the proposed geothermal power plant are discussed: the project description; the environment in the vicinity of project as it exists before the project begins, from both a local and regional perspective; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the growth inducing impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Modular 5 MW geothermal power plant design considerations and guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design considerations and guideline documents given define the principal design requirements for a nominal 5 MW geothermal power plant of a type to permit over-the-road transport of its several modules. The power plant system defined is supplied with steam from a single flash steam separator stage, located at the plant area, and supplied with steam from two wells at nominal pressure of 3.8 Kg/cm/sup 2/ Abs (54 psia). In some cases where the content of noxious noncondensable gases is high, a shell and tube condenser would be substituted for the direct contact type condenser specified and an additional module containing an H/sub 2/S removal system would be added. Guidelines are given for the following: site preparation, collection system, plant installation, assembly, and test; turbine generator module; condenser and noncondensable gas removal module; plant control and switchgear module; cooling water circulation pump module; steam-water separator module; maintenance, office, and lavatory module; reinjection pump module; cooling tower modules; spray pond installation and piping; and auxiliary generator module. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research project is developing the technology base that will permit a much greater utilization of the moderate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal resources, particularly for the generation of electrical power. The emphasis in the project has been the improvement of the performance of binary power cycles. The investigations have been examining concepts projected to improve the brine utilization by 20% relative to a ''Heber-type'' binary plant; these investigations are nearing completion. preparations are currently underway in the project to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. These investigations will evaluate whether the projected additional 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Future program efforts will focus on the problems associated with heat rejection and on the transfer of the technology being developed to industry.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Program Geothm: A thermodynamic process program for geothermal power plant cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program GEOTHM is a thermodynamic process program now under development for the LBL Geothermal Energy Program. To date, the program development has centered upon the modeling of working fluid properties, developing thermodynamic process models, and modeling the design performance of geothermal power plants. When the program is completed, it will be able to optimize a power plant or refrigeration plant for minimum cost power or refrigeration. Furthermore, operation of the thermodynamic cycles at off design conditions will be able to be simulated. Program GEOTHM is currently able to calculate several types of geothermal power cycles using a wide variety of working fluids.

Green, M.A.; Pines, H.S.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

System design verification of a hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This hybrid plant utilizes geothermal fluid for feedwater heating. With respect to the extraction of available work from the geothermal fluids, this cycle is approximately two times as efficient as the all geothermal plant. The System Design Verification Study presented verifies the technical and economic feasibility of the hybrid plant. This report is comprised of a conceptual design, cost estimate, and economic analysis of a one-unit 715 MW hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant. In addition to the use of geothermal fluid for feedwater heating, its use is also investigated for additional power generation, condensate and cooling tower makeup water, coal beneficiation, air preheating, flue gas reheating and plant space heating requirements. An engineering and construction schedule for the hybrid plant is also included.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Documentation of the status of international geothermal power plants and a list by country of selected geothermally active governmental and private sector entities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the printouts from the International Geothermal Power Plant Data Base and the Geothermally Active Entity Data Base. Also included are the explanation of the abbreviations used in the power plant data base, maps of geothermal installations by country, and data base questionnaires and mailing lists.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

Eskesen, J.H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

Eskesen, J.H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) process data for binary cycle plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) study provides the firm estimates - in the public domain - of the cost and performance of U.S. geothermal systems and their main components in the early 1990s. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Research Program, managed for DOE by Evan Hughes of the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, and conducted by John Brugman and others of the CE Holt Consulting Firm, Pasadena, CA. The printed NGGPP reports contain detailed data on the cost and performance for the flash steam cycles that were characterized, but not for the binary cycles. The nine Tables in this document are the detailed data sheets on cost and performance for the air cooled binary systems that were studied in the NGGPP.

Not Available

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

60

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geothermal power plants of Iceland: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical features of the geothermal electric power plants of Iceland are described. Some description is given of the geology of the geothermal regions, and recent volcanic eruptions are discussed relative to their impact on the geothermal plant sites. The 3 MW, single-flash plant at Namafjall, the 60 MW, double-flash plant at Krafla, and the 1 MW unit at Grindavik are included. Information is given on well arrangements, casing programs, energy conversion systems, capital investments, and operating experiences, where such information is available.

DiPippo, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Power-cycle studies for a geothermal electric plant for MX operating bases  

SciTech Connect

Binary geothermal plants were investigated for providing electrical power for MX missile bases. A number of pure hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal resource temperatures of 365, 400, and 450/sup 0/F. Cycle thermodynamic analyses were conducted for pure geothermal plants and for two types of coal-geothermal hybrid plants. Cycle performance results were presented as net geofluid effectiveness (net plant output in watts per geofluid flow in 1 bm/hr) and cooling water makeup effectiveness (net plant output in watts per makeup water flow in 1 bm/hr). A working fluid containing 90% (mass) isobutane/10% hexane was selected, and plant statepoints and energy balances were determined for 20MW(e) geothermal plants at each of the three resource temperatures. Working fluid heaters and condensers were sized for these plants. It is concluded that for the advanced plants investigated, geothermal resources in the 365 to 450/sup 0/F range can provide useful energy for powering MX missile bases.

Bliem, C.J.; Kochan, R.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Direct-flash-steam geothermal-power-plant assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to analyze the capacity and availability factors of an operating direct flash geothermal power plant. The analysis was to include consideration of system and component specifications, operating procedures, maintenance history, malfunctions, and outage rate. The plant studied was the 75 MW(e) geothermal power plant at Cerro Prieto, Mexico, for the years 1973 to 1979. To describe and assess the plant, the project staff reviewed documents, visited the plant, and met with staff of the operating utility. The high reliability and availability of the plant was documented and actions responsible for the good performance were identified and reported. The results are useful as guidance to US utilities considering use of hot water geothermal resources for power generation through a direct flash conversion cycle.

Alt, T.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary economic analysis of a hybrid geothermal/coal power plant has been completed for four geothermal Resource areas: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Coso Hot Springs, East Mesa and Long Valley. A hybrid plant would be economically viable at Roosevelt Hot Springs and somewhat less so at Coso Hot Springs. East Mesa and Long Valley show no economic promise. A well-designed hybrid plant could use geothermal energy for boiler feedwater heating, auxiliary power, auxiliary heating, and cooling water. Construction and operation of a hybrid plant at either Roosevelt Hot Springs or Coso Hot Springs is recommended. Brown University provided the theoretical basis for the hybrid study. A modified version of the Lawrence Berkeley Livermore GEOTHM Program is the major analytical tool used in the analysis. The Intermountain Power Project is the reference all coal-fired plant. Costing methods followed recommendations issued by the Energy research and Development Administration.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary economic analysis of a hybrid geothermal/coal power plant was completed for four geothermal resource areas: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Coso Hot Springs, East Mesa, and Long Valley. A hybrid plant would be economically viable at Roosevelt Hot Springs and somewhat less so at Coso Hot Springs. East Mesa and Long Valley show no economic promise. A well-designed hybrid plant could use geothermal energy for boiler feedwater heating, auxiliary power, auxiliary heating, and cooling water. Construction and operation of a hybrid plant at either Roosevelt Hot Springs or Coso Hot Springs is recommended. A modified version of the Lawrence Berkeley Livermore GEOTHM Program is the major analytical tool used in the analysis. The Intermountain Power Project is the reference all coal-fired plant.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Potential of hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants in Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Burbank and the Ralph M. Parsons Company studies showed several advantages for hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants, as follows: (1) the estimated cost of producing electricity in hybrid plant is about 18.3 mills/kWh, compared to 19.3 mills/kWh in an all-coal fired power plant; (2) the coal requirements for a given plant can be reduced about 12 to 17%; and (3) the geothermal brines can be used for power plant cooling water, and in some cases, as boiler feedwater. The pertinent results of the City of Burbank studies are summarized and applied to the geothermal and coal resources of Arizona for possible future utilization.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analytical effort to determine the cost effectiveness of hybrid geothermal/fossil-fuel electrical-power generating stations. The analysis is directed at combining hydrothermal and coal energy in a Rankine steam cycle, for electrical power generation for the City of Burbank, California. This effort develops a methodology for hybrid power-plant cost analysis so that preliminary plant designs can be optimized as a function of specific site conditions and characteristics. It also defines cost-optimized site-specific plant designs for four potential sites: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, Coso Thermal Area, California, East Mesa, California, and Long Valley, California. These optimized designs are compared for the costs, geothermal-resource utilization, and fossil fuel saved. The results indicate that development of geothermal resources to support a hybrid power plant are favorable for at least two of the four sites.

Anno, G.H.; Dore, M.A.; Grijalva, R.L.; Lang, G.D.; Thomas, F.J.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic analyses and site-specific applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of hybrid fossil-geothermal power plants is extended to compound hybrid systems which combine the features of previously analyzed systems: the geothermal-preheat and the fossil-superheat systems. Compound systems of the one- and two-stage type are considered. A compilation of working formulae from earlier studies is included for completeness. Results are given for parametric analyses of compound hybrid plants. System performance was determined for wellhead conditions of 150, 200, and 250/sup 0/C, and for steam fractions of 10, 20, 30, and 40%. For two-stage systems an additional cycle variable, the hot water flash fraction, was varied from 0 to 100% in increments of 25%. From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, compound hybrid plants are superior to individual all-geothermal and all-fossil plants, and are shown to have certain advantages over basic geothermal-preheat and fossil-superheat hybrid plants. The flexibility of compound hybrid systems is illustrated by showing how such plants might be used at six geothermal sites in the western United States. The question of the optimum match between the energy resources and the power plant is addressed, and an analysis given for a hypothetical geothermal resource.

DiPippo, R.; Avelar, E.M.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Changes related to "Geothermal/Power Plant" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pages linked to the given page instead Go 27 June 2013 (diff | hist) . . GRRSection 7 - Power Plant Siting, Construction, and Regulation Overview; 09:25 . . (+481) . ....

70

Geothermal commercial power plant study. Monthly progress report, January 29, 1977-February 25, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs and capital cost estimates were completed for the six different Heber power plants in this study. The six plants involve two types of operating modes, constant geothermal fluid flow rate and constant power output, each for net capacities of 50, 100, and 200 MWe. Conceptual designs were completed for the six plants by modifying and scaling-up the base case design. The capital costs for all six plants were estimated in fourth-quarter 1976 dollars.

1977-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Performance and operational experience of a prototype binary geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Raft River geothermal site in south central Idaho, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is investigating and demonstrating the production of electrical power from a moderate temperature (140/sup 0/ to 145/sup 0/C) geothermal resource. The initial production of electrical power at the Raft River site was accomplished with the Prototype Power Plant which was built to investigate and demonstrate the operation of binary power cycles where the energy in the geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This plant serves as a test bed for testing pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from moderate temperature geothermal resources. During the automatic run test the plant was able to produce a maximum of 59kW(e). Although the plant was not (and has not) operated at design turbine conditions, performance was predictable. During the automatic run test, the plant operation was stable and the facility was operated for 1357 hours producing electrical power approximately 87% of the time geothermal fluid was available for operation.

Mines, G.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geothermal power plants around the world. A sourcebook on the production of electricity from geothermal energy, draft of Chapter 10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report constitutes a consolidation and a condensation of several individual topical reports dealing with the geothermal electric power stations around the world. An introduction is given to various types of energy conversion systems for use with geothermal resouces. Power plant performance and operating factors are defined and discussed. Existing geothermal plants in the following countries are covered: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Turkey, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the United States. In each case, the geological setting is outlined, the geothermal fluid characteristics are given, the gathering system, energy conversion system, and fluid disposal method are described, and the environmental impact is discussed. In some cases the economics of power generation are also presented. Plans for future usage of geothermal energy are described for the above-mentioned countries and the following additional ones: the Azores (Portugal), Chile, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Nicaragua, and Panama. Technical data is presented in twenty-two tables; forty-one figures, including eleven photographs, are also included to illustrate the text. A comprehensive list of references is provided for the reader who wishes to make an in-depth study of any of the topics mentioned.

DiPippo, R.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

None

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

City of Klamath Falls, Oregon Geothermal Power Plant Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Klamath Falls project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combined thermal distribution system and power generation facility. The city of Klamath Falls operates a geothermal district heating system which would appear to be an attractive opportunity to install a power generation system. Since the two wells have operated reliably and consistently over many years, no new sources or resource exploration would be necessary. It appears that it will cost more to construct, operate, maintain and amortize a proposed geothermal facility than the long?term value of the power it would produce. The success of a future project will be determined by whether utility power production costs will remain low and whether costs of construction, operations, or financing may be reduced. There are areas that it would be possible to reduce construction cost. More detailed design could enable the city to obtain more precise quotes for components and construction, resulting in reduction in contingency projections. The current level of the contingency for uncertainty of costs is between $200,000 and $300,000. Another key issue with this project appears to be operation cost. While it is expected that only minimal routine monitoring and operating expenses will occur, the cost of water supply and waste water disposal represents nearly one quarter of the value of the power. If the cost of water alone could be reduced, the project could become viable. In addition, the projected cost of insurance may be lower than estimated under a city?wide policy. No provisions have been made for utilization of federal tax incentives. If a transaction with a third-party owner/taxpayer were to be negotiated, perhaps the net cost of ownership could be reduced. It is recommended that these options be investigated to determine if the costs and benefits could be brought together. The project has good potential, but like many alternative energy projects today, they only work economically if the federal tax incentives come into play.

Brian Brown, PE; Stephen Anderson, PE, Bety Riley

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geothermal power plants of the United States: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of geothermal energy as a source of electric power in the United States is reviewed. A thorough description is given of The Geysers geothermal power project in northern California. The recent efforts to exploit the hot-water resources of the Mexicali-Imperial Rift Valley are described. Details are given concerning the geology of the several sites now being used and for those at which power plants will soon be built. Attention is paid to the technical particulars of all existing plants, including wells, gathering systems, energy conversion devices, materials, environmental impacts, economics and operating characteristics. Specifically, plants which either exist or are planned for the following locations are covered: The Geysers, CA; East Mesa, CA; Heber, CA; Roosevelt Hot Springs, UT; Valles Caldera, NM; Salton Sea, CA; Westmorland, CA; Brawley, CA; Desert Peak, NV; and Raft River, ID. The growth of installed geothermal electric generating capacity is traced from the beginning in 1960 and is projected to 1984.

DiPippo, R.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Geothermal power plants of Italy: A technical survey of existing installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dry-steam geothermal power plants in the Boraciferous (Larderello), Monte Amiata, and Travale regions of Italy are described. The geology of these areas is described along with the nature of the geothermal steam. Details are given about the drilling techniques and the methods used to complete the wells. Noncondensing and condensing steam turbines are described in detail, including special features aimed at improving the flexibility of the machines to meet a variety of geofluid specifications while, at the same time, maintaining high performance. The type of materials used to resist the corrosive and erosive nature of the geothermal fluid are also covered. Economic data and operating experience are presented.

DiPippo, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of a superheater enhanced geothermal steam power plant in the Geysers area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the attainable generation increase and to evaluate the economic merits of superheating the steam that could be used in future geothermal steam power plants in the Geyser-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). It was determined that using a direct gas-fired superheater offers no economic advantages over the existing geothermal power plants. If the geothermal steam is heated to 900/sup 0/F by using the exhaust energy from a gas turbine of currently available performance, the net reference plant output would increase from 65 MW to 159 MW (net). Such hybrid plants are cost effective under certain conditions identified in this document. The power output from the residual Geyser area steam resource, now equivalent to 1437 MW, would be more than doubled by employing in the future gas turbine enhancement. The fossil fuel consumed in these plants would be used more efficiently than in any other fossil-fueled power plant in California. Due to an increase in evaporative losses in the cooling towers, the viability of the superheating concept is contingent on development of some of the water resources in the Geysers-Calistoga area to provide the necessary makeup water.

Janes, J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geothermal power plants of Mexico and Central America: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the fifth in a series describing the geothermal power plants of the world, the countries of Mexico and of Central America are studied. The geothermal plants are located in areas of recent and active volcanism; the resources are of the liquid-dominated type. Details are given about the plants located at Cerro Prieto in Mexico and at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. In both cases, attention is paid to the geologic nature of the fields, the well programs, geofluid characteristics, energy conversion systems, materials of construction, effluent handling systems, economic factors and plant operating experience. Exploration and development activities are described for other promising geothermal areas in Mexico and El Salvador, along with those in the countries of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama.

DiPippo. R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal power plants of Japan: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMEC/9  

SciTech Connect

The technical features of the existing and planned geothermal power plants in Japan are surveyed. A description is given of the Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co., Ltd. (GERD) which has capabilities in all areas of geothermal power development, from exploratory geological activities through construction and operation of the plants. The survey includes reports on four types of plants: natural, dry steam; separated steam or ''single flash;'' separated steam/flash or ''double flash;'' and binary fluid. For each geothermal power plant, the following are included or discussed: exploration and geology of the site; wells and gathering system; turbine-generator; condenser, gas extractor and cooling tower; economic data; environmental effects; and plant operations. Many tables and figures are included, and a summary is given of the geothermal resource utilization efficiency for each operating plant. Promising areas of new development are listed with estimates of potential capacity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geothermal power plants of Japan: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMEC/9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical features of the existing and planned geothermal power plants in Japan are surveyed. A description is given of the Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co., Ltd. (GERD) which has capabilities in all areas of geothermal power development, from exploratory geological activities through construction and operation of the plants. The survey includes reports on four types of plants: natural, dry steam; separated steam or ''single flash;'' separated steam/flash or ''double flash;'' and binary fluid. For each geothermal power plant, the following are included or discussed: exploration and geology of the site; wells and gathering system; turbine-generator; condenser, gas extractor and cooling tower; economic data; environmental effects; and plant operations. Many tables and figures are included, and a summary is given of the geothermal resource utilization efficiency for each operating plant. Promising areas of new development are listed with estimates of potential capacity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Prototype geothermal power plant summary of operation for automatic-run test phase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prototype Power Plant was built to demonstrate and learn the operation of a binary power cycle, and then serve as a test bed for pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from a moderate temperature geothermal fluid resource. The operation to date of the prototype plant is summarized with primary emphasis on the automatic-run phase, during which the plant was operated over a five-month period with minimal operator surveillance.

Mines, G.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Feasibility and Risk Study of a Geothermal Power Plant at the Salton Sea KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a feasibility and risk study performed by Bechtel National, Inc. and the Ben Holt Company under contract to the San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E). The purpose of the study was to define the most technically feasible and lowest cost near-term energy conversion process for a 50 MWe geothermal power plant at the Salton Sea known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Using the latest information from the Geothermal This report contains the results of a feasibility and risk study performed by Bechtel National, Inc. and the Ben Holt Company under contract to the San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E). The purpose of the study was to define the most technically feasible and lowest cost near-term energy conversion process for a 50 MWe geothermal power plant at the Salton Sea known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Using the latest information from the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF), which is currently in operation at the Salton Sea KGRA, conceptual designs, capital cost estimates, and busbar energy production cost estimates were developed for power plants employing several versions of flashed steam and flash binary energy conversion processes. A power plant and well field risk analysis was also performed. The results show that while the flashed steam plant has the advantage of lower plant capital cost, the brine flow rate required by the binary plant is lower. This results in busbar energy production costs for the two plants that are the same. However, the risk analysis indicates that the technical risks are less for the flashed steam further work at the GLEF. The version of the flashed steam process with lowest energy production cost was the dual-flash process with three 50 percent capacity trains of flash tanks with unmodified brine. Thus, it was determined that GLEF testing in the immediate future should be directed primarily toward this process. A series of GLEP tests and further studies were defined for the purpose of alleviating or minimizing the major risks associated with the flash steam process. The most important risks were found to be those associated with brine handling. They include producing the brine, carrying it through the plant, and injecting it into the subsurface formation. The report includes details of costs of a binary plant and a flash plant. [DJE-2005

None

1978-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant. Interim report No. 1, August 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed from August 1977 through January 1978 pertinent to the design of the Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant is summarized. The report discusses review of earlier baseline geothermal studies performed by Holt/Procon and the design optimization performed by Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and The Ben Holt Company. The Heber project objective is to design, construct and operate a power plant to produce a net power output of 45 MW/sub e/, deriving energy from a low-salinity, moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) brine heat source available from the Heber geothermal reservoir. A binary cycle conversion system employs a light aliphatic hydrocarbon mixture to derive heat from the brine supply, throuh heat exchangers, and drive the turbine-generator to produce power. Chevron Resources Company develops the geothermal resource for sale to San Diego Gas and Electric Company. Power output will be distributed to California's Imperial Valley by the Imperial Valley Irrigation District.

Unitt, S.G.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Floating dry cooling: a competitive alternative to evaporative cooling in a binary cycle geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the floating cooling concept to non-evaporative and evaporative atmospheric heat rejection systems was studied as a method of improving the performance of geothermal powerplants operating upon medium temperature hydrothermal resources. The LBL thermodynamic process computer code GEOTHM is used in the case study of a 50 MWe isobutane binary cycle power plant at Heber, California. It is shown that operating a fixed capacity plant in the floating cooling mode can generate significantly more electrical energy at a higher thermodynamic efficiency and reduced but bar cost for approximately the same capital investment. Floating cooling is shown to benefit a plant which is dry cooled to an even greater extent than the same plant operating with an evaporative heat rejection system. Results of the Heber case study indicate that a dry floating cooling geothermal binary cycle plant can produce energy at a bus bar cost which is competitive with the cost of energy associated with evaporatively cooled systems.

Pines, H.S.; Green, M.A.; Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

East Mesa Magmamax Power Process Geothermal Generating Plant, A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

During recent months, Magma Power Company has been involved in the shakedown and startup of their 10 MW binary cycle power plant at East Mesa in the Imperial Valley of Southern California. This pilot plant has been designed specifically as an R & D facility, with its primary goal to explore the necessary technology improvements required to make the binary cycle an efficient, cost effective and reliable conversion process. Magma Power's exploration activities, carried out in other parts of the Western United States after the initial discovery and development at The Geyser's, gave evidence that The Geyser's type of steam reservoir was unique and that the majority of geothermal resources would be of the hydrothermal, or pressurized hot water type. Initial flow tests throughout different locations where this type of resource was discovered indicated that well bore scaling occurred at the flash point in the wells. Initial evaluations indicated that if the well fluid could be maintained under pressure as it traversed the well bore, the potential for scaling would be mitigated. Tests carried out in the late 60's at Magma's Brady Hot Springs development in Nevada indicated that scaling was mitigated with the installation of a pump in the geothermal well. Subsequently, designs were developed of a binary process, utilizing heat exchangers for power generation. Magma was able to acquire process patents associated with this and had a patent issued (Magmamax Power Process). This incorporates the concept of pumping a geothermal well and transferring the heat in the geothermal fluid to a secondary power fluid in heat exchangers. Magma's desire to demonstrate this technology was one of the prime motivations associated with the installation of the East Mesa plant.

Hinrichs, T.C.; Dambly, B.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 Martin Vorum, P.E. Englewood, Colorado Eugene A. Fritzler, P.E. Fort Morgan, Colorado Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants April 1999-March 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants April 1999-March 2000 Martin Vorum, P.E. Englewood, Colorado Eugene A. Fritzler, P.E. Fort Morgan, Colorado NREL Technical Monitor: C. Kutscher

95

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Internal Technical Report, Heat Exchanger Sizing for 20 MW Geothermal Power Plants at MX Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the analyses used to size the heaters, steam condenser, and working fluid condenser for a proposed 20 MW geothermal power plant application at MX sites in the southwest. These units would use a mixture of hydrocarbons (90% isobutane--10% n-hexane) to extract energy from moderate temperature resources (resource temperatures of 365 F, 400 F, and 450 F were considered). The working fluid will be maintained at supercritical pressures in the heater units. Studies have shown that this cycle will provide a significant net power increase over standard dual boiling single fluid cycles currently in use, e.g., the Raft River 5 MW pilot plant.

Kochan, R.J.; Bliem, C.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Heat rejection from geothermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Comprehensive computer programs are developed for purposes of determining cooling makeup water requirements and electricity production costs for evaporative (wet) and dry/wet-peaking cooling towers, which are the principal cooling technologies for rejecting the heat from hydrothermal power plants. Parametric economic analyses were performed for both flash steam and binary conversion processes for various combinations of resource temperatures, climatological types, hydrothermal fuel costs, and cooling system makeup water costs. Results of these analyses are presented in a number of curves showing relative busbar cost of electricity as a function of relative amount of cooling makeup water required. These curves show that use of wet/dry cooling systems can cut makeup water requirements by factors of about 2 to 4 at the cost of an additional 10% to 25% in the busbar price of electricity. Turbine-generator performance curves are constructed for a range of condensing conditions for both the flash steam and hydrocarbon binary-cycle turbines. Estimates of hydrothermal resources in the western United States are also given.

Horsak, R.D.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of geothermal energy as a power source for US aluminum reduction plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using hydrothermal resources as a primary power source for both existing and future aluminum reduction plants in the United States is explored. Applicable hydrothermal resources that should be considered by the aluminum industry for this purpose were identified and evaluated. This work also identified the major institutional parameters to be considered in developing geothermal energy resources for aluminum industry use. Based on the findings of this study, it appears technically and economically feasible to power existing aluminum reduction plants in the Pacific Northwest using electricity generated at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. It may also be feasible to power existing plants located on the Gulf Coast from Roosevelt Hot Springs, depending on the cost of transmitting the power.

Enderlin, W.I.; Blahnik, D.E.; Davis, A.E.; Jacobson, J.J.; Schilling, A.H.; Weakley, S.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

103

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

104

Field tests of corrosion and chemical sensors for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes approximately two years of continuous monitoring of corrosion (and other variables that affect corrosion) in a 10-megawatt binary cycle geothermal power plant. The project goal was to develop methods for detecting adverse plant conditions soon enough to prevent equipment failures. The instruments tested were: (1) resistance-type corrosion probes; (2) linear polarization corrosion probes; (3) oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) probes for oxygen detection; (4) high-temperature pH electrodes; and (5) electrodeless conductivity cells for gas bubble detection.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.; Mackey, D.B.; Koski, O.H.; McBarron, F.O.; Duce, J.L.; Pierce, D.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Comparative analysis of alternative means for removing noncondensable gases from flashed-steam geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geothermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time.

Vorum, M.; Fitzler, E.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

SURVEY OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-RELATED MATERIALS NEEDS IN GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views research and development priorities. A. wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent's perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

ALLAN,M.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Survey of operation and maintenance-related materials needs in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views on research and development priorities. A wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent`s perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

Allan, M.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

SURVEY OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-RELATED MATERIALS NEEDS IN GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views research and development priorities. A. wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent's perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

ALLAN,M.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the potential to supply vast amounts of clean energy. But continuing to produce geothermal power efficiently and inexpensively can require innovative adjustments to the technology used to process it. Located in the Mayacamas Mountains of northern California, The Geysers is the world's larg- est geothermal complex. Encompassing 45 square miles along the Sonoma and Lake County border, the complex harnesses natural steam reservoirs to create clean renewable energy that accounts for one-fifth of the green power produced in California. In the late 1990s, the pressure of geothermal steam at The Geysers was falling, reducing the output of its power plants. NREL teamed with Pacific

110

Summary of the technical specifications of the geothermal power plants in the world: revision 1. Report no. CATMEC/21  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Worldwide geothermal power plant installed capacity is listed by country with year of startup. Tables containing technical data are given for each of the geothermal power units installed in the world and for some of those under construction or in planning. The data cover the primary mechanical areas of the power station including the turbine, condenser, gas extraction system, and heat extraction system. In the case of plants which are in the planning stage or under construction, the plant design specifications are listed but must be viewed as preliminary. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Modelling of a magma energy geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are currently investigating the engineering feasibility of drilling into an active magma body at a depth of roughly 5 km from the earth's surface, establishing a downhole heat exchange region, and extracting thermal energy from the magma body by circulating fluid through this heat exchange region. In the present paper, we evaluate the overall thermodynamic performance of various conceptual magma energy systems in which energy is added as heat to the fluid within the magma region and is converted to useful work in a power conversion cycle at the surface. Unusually high return temperatures and pressures may be available at the wellhead of such a circulating well. Cycles investigated here are an open Rankine power system in which steam from the magma well is circulated directly through a power conversion cycle and a closed Rankine cycle where the heated fluid from downhole is circulated through an aboveground heat exchanger to heat the cycle fluid. The downhole heat exchange region is established during the drilling process. As drilling proceeds into the magma, a solidified layer forms about the drilling tube due to heat exchange to the fluid. This solidified layer thermally fractures because of large temperature gradients between the cooled inner region and the heated outer region, thereby opening secondary flow paths. Two models of the downhole behavior have been used. In the simplest approach, denoted as the ''infinite area model,'' the water entering the pipe to return to the surface is assumed to be always at the temperature of the magma, independent of mass flow rate and other parameters. The other model is more detatiled and the fractured heat exchange region is modelled as a cylindrical porous layer through which fluid flows vertically. The net power and the performance aspects for the systems are investigated in terms of various parameters, including the characteristics of the downhole heat transfer.

Boehm, R.F.; Berg, D.L.; Jr.; Ortega, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Large-scale Ocean-based or Geothermal Power Plants by Thermoelectric Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat resources of small temperature difference are easily accessible, free and unlimited on earth. Thermoelectric effects provide the technology for converting these heat resources directly into electricity. We present designs of electricity generators based on thermoelectric effects and using heat resources of small temperature difference, e.g., ocean water at different depths and geothermal sources, and conclude that large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects are feasible and economically competitive. The key observation is that the power factor of thermoelectric materials, unlike the figure of merit, can be improved by orders of magnitude upon laminating good conductors and good thermoelectric materials. The predicted large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects, if validated, will have a global economic and social impact for its scalability, and the renewability, free and unlimited supply of heat resources of small temperature difference on earth.

Liu, Liping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geothermal commercial power plant study. Monthly progress report, January 1-January 28, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The major effort was concentrated on plant operating modes. The 50 MWe (Net) base case plant conceptual design, developed during the initial effort of this project, was modified to reflect substantially improved turbine-generator efficiencies. A capital cost estimate was prepared for the new base case using the fourth-quarter 1976 price level. Curves showing the geothermal fluid temperature decline with time, for all cases under study, were calculated by Chevron with their reservoir computer model, using input data provided by Bechtel. With this data, curves of required brine flow rate versus time were prepared for the 50,100 and 200 MWe plants that employ the constant power output operating mode. These flow rate curves form the bases for conceptual designs and corresponding capital cost estimates which are the next work items. The capital cost estimates for the Niland multistage-flash/binary plants with and without regeneration were escalated from fourth-quarter 1975 to fourth-quarter 1976.

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Interim report, June 15, 1975-March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary analysis is described in a study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. The analysis is based on three different brines whose temperatures and composition span the range that is of practical interest for power generation. Only two kinds of cycles were considered in the analysis - the steam turbine cycle and the binary cycle, in which energy from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine cycle. The performance of several condidate working fluids has been investigated, and the most attracive binary cycles have been selected for the various resource conditions. The results show that if brine is utilized directly in the primary heat exchange process with the secondary working fluid, the binary cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash steam turbine cycle. However, if the brine is flashed to steam and the steam is used for the heat exchange process, the steam turbine cycle will produce more power per pound of brine flow. Preliminary turbine designs have been formulated for steam and also for the most promising working fluids in the secondary or binary cycle. For all cycle configurations at least 50 MW of electrical power can be generated by a single unit without exceeding mechanical design or manufacturing limitations even when the resource temperature is as low as 400/sup 0/F. Plant economics were not considered.

Eskesen, J.H.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Investigations of supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 Rankine cycles are investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that describe the thermodynamic cycle is solved using a Newton-Rhapson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency of the model when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. Numerical simulation results are presented for different cycle configurations in order to assess the influences of heat source temperature, waste heat rejection temperatures and internal heat exchanger design on cycle efficiency. The results show that thermodynamic cycle efficiencies above 10% can be attained with the supercritical brayton cycle while lower efficiencies can be attained with the transcritical CO2 Rankine cycle.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessment of Evaporative Cooling Enhancement Methods for Air-Cooled Geothermal Power Plants: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many binary-cycle geothermal power plants are air cooled because insufficient water is available to provide year-round water cooling. The performance of air-cooled geothermal plants is highly dependent on the dry bulb temperature of the air (much more so than fossil fuel plants that operate at higher boiler temperatures), and plant electric output can drop by 50% or more on hot summer days, compared to winter performance. This problem of reduced summer performance is exacerbated by the fact that electricity has a higher value in the summer. This paper describes a spreadsheet model that was developed to assess the cost and performance of four methods for using supplemental evaporative cooling to boost summer performance: (1) pre-cooling with spray nozzles, (2) pre-cooling with Munters media, (3) a hybrid combination of nozzles and Munters media, and (4) direct deluge cooling of the air-cooled condenser tubes. Although all four options show significant benefit, deluge cooling has the potential to be the most economic. However, issues of scaling and corrosion would need to be addressed.

Kutscher, C.; Costenaro, D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Final Environmental Assessment Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant and Direct-Use Geothermal Application at AmeriCulture Inc., Cotton City, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado 80401-3393 Colorado 80401-3393 August 26, 2002 DOE/EA-1396 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT For the SMALL-SCALE POWER PLANT AND DIRECT-USE GEOTHERMAL APPLICATION At AMERICULTURE, INC., COTTON CITY, NEW MEXICO AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Small-Scale Power Plant and Direct-Use Application at AmeriCulture, Inc. to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operations that would be funded in part by DOE. Small geothermal power plants have the potential for widespread application, but achieving cost- effectiveness in small plant sizes presents a number of challenges. To address these challenges, DOE is supporting the small-scale field verification projects to (1) determine and validate the

118

Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When power production at The Geysers geothermal power complex began to falter, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) stepped in, developing advanced condensing technology that dramatically boosted production efficiency - and making a major contribution to the effective use of geothermal power. NREL developed advanced direct-contact condenser (ADCC) technology to condense spent steam more effectively, improving power production efficiency in Unit 11 by 5%.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Abstract Two binary geothermal power plants inaugurated today with a total capacity of 65 MW: They will generate enough energy to meet the needs of some 40 thousand American households. Author Hank Sennott Published Press Release, 04/15/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Citation Hank Sennott. 04/15/2009. Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada. Press Release. 1-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enel_Green_Power-_Innovative_Geothermal_Power_for_Nevada&oldid=680547"

122

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST  

SciTech Connect

The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, supercritical/transcritical thermodynamic cycles using mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids were investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that described the thermodynamic cycle was solved using a Newton-Raphson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency even when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. The thermophysical properties of the mixtures were obtained from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) REFPROP software and constituent cubic equations. The local heat transfer coefficients in the heat exchangers were calculated based on the local properties of the working fluid, geothermal brine, and cooling water. The heat exchanger areas required were calculated. Numerical simulation results presented for different cycle configurations were used to assess the effects of the SF6 fraction in CO2, brine temperature, and recuperator size on the cycle thermal efficiency, and size of heat exchangers for the evaporator and condenser. Optimal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies were calculated to be approximately 13 and 15% mole content of SF6 in a CO2- SF6 mixture for a Brayton cycle and a Rankine cycle, respectively.

Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Heber Binary-Cycle Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant, Half-Load Testing, Performance, and Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its second year of operation, the Heber binary-cycle geothermal demonstration plant met design expectations for part-load operation. The plant, located in Heber, California, also demonstrated the environmental acceptability and design thermodynamic performance capabilities of the binary-cycle process.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Optimization of non-condensable gas removal system in geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of non-condensable gas (hereinafter called N.C.G.) removal system in geothermal power station, in a special case that the geothermal steam contains large amount of noncondensable gas, is discussed. Four different alternative N.C.G. removal systems are studied, which are steam jet gas ejectors, centrifugal gas compressors, combined systems of steam ejectors and centrifugal compressors and back pressure turbine-without N.C.G. removal system. This report summarizes the results and gives recommendations as to the most suitable gas removal system and also as to optimum condenser pressure, in cases of large quantity N.C.G. content in geothermal steam.

Tajima, S.; Nomura, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Geothermal Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION A PRIMER ON LOW-TEMPERATURE, SMALL-SCALE APPLICATIONS by Kevin Rafferty Geo-Heat Center January 2000 REALITY CHECK Owners of low-temperature...

129

Assessment of H/sub 2/S control technologies for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Techniques for controlling hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) from geothermal development are analyzed. Several technologies for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions from power plants are examined. The Hydrogen Peroxide Combination System, Stretford System and possibly EIC or Coury upstream controls appear capable of compliance with the emission limitations of 100 grams per hour per gross megawatt in 1980 (and 50 q/hr/(g) MW in 1985 or 1990) at the Geysers Dry stream field in Northern California. Unresolved problems still plague all these options. Well field operations result in H/sub 2/S releases from well drilling, well venting and steam stacking. Hydrogen peroxide reduces H/sub 2/S emissions during drilling and venting can be controlled with vent gathering (condensation/reinjection) systems. Steam stacking during power plant outages emit more H/sub 2/S over shorter periods than other field operations. Potential controls for stacking are: (1) upstream abatement, (2) automated well operation, (3) computerized wellfield operation (as of PG and E's Geysers Unit No. 15), and (4) further steamfield interconnection (cross-overs).

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. [Public health hazards of fossil-fuel, combined cycle, combustion turbine, and geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Public health and safety hazards have been identified for five types of power plants: coal-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. The results of the analysis show that air pollutants are the major hazard that affects the health and safety of the general public. A total of ninety plant hazards were identified for the five plant types. Each of these hazards were rated in six categories as to their affect on the general public. The criteria used in the analysis were: area/population exposed; duration; mitigation; quantity to toxicity ratio; nature of health effects; and public attitude. Even though ninety hazards were identified for the five plants analyzed, the large majority of hazards were similar for each plant. Highest ratings were given to the products of the combustion cycle or to hydrogen sulfide emissions from geothermal plants. Water pollution, cooling tower effects and noise received relatively low ratings. The highest rated of the infrequent or hypothetical hazards were those associated with potential fires, explosions, and chlorine releases at the plant. Hazards associated with major cooling water releases, water pollution and missiles received the lowest ratings. Since the results of the study clearly show that air pollutants are currently considered the most severe hazard, additional effort must be made to further understand the complex interactions of pollutants with man and his environment. Of particular importance is the determination of dose-response relationships for long term, low level exposure to air pollutants. (EDB)

Roman, W.S.; Israel, W.J.; Sacramo, R.F.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Conceptual design of a 10MW regenerative isobutane geothermal power plant. Technical report No. 18  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, there are basically three different systems for converting energy in geothermal fluid into power: vapor-flashing system, total flow system, and binary system. A comparison of the power production processes was made on the basis of work output in Kwh per 1000 pounds of geothermal fluid for self flowing wells with wellhead pressure of 100 psia and for wells with downhole pumps. For simplicity, the assumptions were made that the enthalpy of the geothermal fluid in the reservoir is approximately equal to that at the wellhead, that the thermodynamic properties of geothermal fluid may be approximated by those of water, and that the pressure effects on the properties of fluid are negligible. The results showed that the performance of the two-stage vapor-flashing system is not appreciably improved by using a downhole pump. The total flow system is simple, but its success depends mainly on the development of a reliable machine with sufficiently high thermal efficiency. The regenerative isobutane system is impractical, if the geothermal fluid temperature is below 380/sup 0/F. But, when the brine temperatures range from 485 to 600/sup 0/F, the regenerative isobutane system with downhole pump exhibits superior performance as compared to two-stage vapor-flashing system, basic isobutane system, or total flow system.

Gupta, A.K.; Chou, J.C.S.

1976-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced design and economic considerations for commercial geothermal power plants at Heber and Niland, California. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two separate studies, involving advanced design and economic considerations for commercial geothermal power plants using liquid-dominated hydrothermal resources, are presented. In the first study, the effects on design, capital cost, and bus bar electric energy production cost caused by an anticipated decline in available geothermal fluid temperature over the lifetime of power plants are described. A two-stage, flashed-steam energy conversion process was used for the conceptual design of the power plants, which operate from the moderate-temperature, low-salinity reservoir at Heber, California. Plants with net capacities of 50, 100, and 200 MWe (net) were investigated. The results show that it is important to include provision for geothermal fluid temperature decline in the design of power plants to prevent loss of electric energy production capability and to reduce bus bar electric energy costs. In the second study, the technical, economic, and environmental effects of adding regeneration to a 50 MWe (net) power plant employing the multistage-flash/binary process are described. Regeneration is potentially attractive because it recovers waste heat from the turbine exhaust and uses it in the power cycle. However, the pressure drop caused by the introduction of the regenerator decreases the turbine expansion and thus decreases system performance. An innovative approach was taken in the design of the regenerator, which minimized the expected performance degradation of the turbine. The result was that the performance, capital cost, and bus bar electric energy production cost are nearly the same for the processes with and without regeneration. On the other hand, the addition of regeneration has the environmental benefits of substantially reducing heat rejection to the atmosphere and cooling tower makeup and blowdown water requirements. It also increases the temperature of the brine returned to the field for reinjection.

Not Available

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE/EA-1621: Oregon Institute of Technology Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project (September 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: MHA Environmental Consulting, An RMT Business 4 West Fourth Avenue, Suite 303 San Mateo, CA 94402 www.mha-inc.com - www.rmtinc.com Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Klamath Falls, OR 97601 Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: MHA Environmental Consulting, An RMT Business 4 West Fourth Avenue, Suite 303 San Mateo, CA 94402 www.mha-inc.com - www.rmtinc.com Geo-Heat Center

135

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal resources for electric power generation. i. PlantOF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation SystemsUSE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Guidebook to Geothermal Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance The Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance (the Guidebook), funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides insights and conclusions related to past influences and recent trends in the geothermal power project financing market before and after the 2008 economic downturn. Using the information in the Guidebook, developers and investors can innovate in new ways and develop partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal power projects in a dynamic and evolving marketplace. The Guidebook relies heavily on interviews conducted with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. It includes detailed information on

137

Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California. Identification of environmental issues, second phase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GeoProducts Corporation and the California Department of Water Resources have jointly proposed to develop a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize geothermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power, the first attempt to utilize these resources together on a commercial scale. This report identifies requirements for new environmental information that must be generated for permit applications and for preparation of environmental documents required by CEOA and NEPA; presents a schedule for generating new environmental data, for preparing and submitting permit applications, and for obtaining permits; presents a budget for permitting, licensing and environmental assessments as required by applicable laws, regulations and procedures; and investigates the step needed to qualify for a Small Power Plant Exemption by the State Energy Commission.

Not Available

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Serious pitting hazard in the raft river 5MW(e) Geothermal Power Plant isobutane cooling loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 5MW(e) Dual Boiling Cycle Geothermal Power Plant, hence referred to as the Raft River plant, is being developed for DOE by EG and G, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. This pilot power plant is of the binary concept and utilizes isobutane as the working second fluid. The plant will demonstrate the feasibility of power generation from an intermediate temperature ({approx} 290 F) resource. The plant is schematically diagrammed in Figure 1. During the final design phase and after the major components were specified to be made of carbon steel, and ordered, various conditions forced the power plant design to switch from surface water to geothermal fluid for the condenser cooling loop make-up water. Because the geothermal fluid contains significant concentrations of chlorides and sulfates, about 1000 ppm and 65 ppm respectively, aeration in the cooling tower causes this water to become extremely aggressive, especially in the pitting of carbon steel components. Although essentially all of the condenser cooling loop materials are carbon steel, the isobutane condenser and turbine lube oil cooler are the most vulnerable. These components are tubed with carbon steel tubes of 0.085 and 0.075 inch wall thickness. These two components are extremely leak critical heat exchangers. For example, even a single pit perforation in the isobutane condenser can cause plant shutdown through loss of isobutane. Such a leak also poses an explosion or fire hazard. As isobutane pressure falls, the incursion of cooling water into the isobutane loop could occur, causing damage to anhydrous service seals. Under a DOE contract for geothermal failure analysis, Radian Corporation has made a preliminary investigation of the pitting hazard presented by the aggressive cooling fluid and the corrosion inhibition treatment that has thus far been proposed. This report documents Radian's understanding of the present situation and the results of its investigation on possible mitigation of this hazard. Finally, various conclusions and recommendations are made that may, if pursued, lead to a satisfactory solution that will avert a certain early prolonged plant shutdown due to failure of the thin walled isobutane and turbine lube oil cooler tubes.

Ellis, Peter F.

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geothermal Sourcebook, Section 2.0 - Plant Control (Draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Section discusses (1) requirements for control of an individual power plant for both base loaded or load following plants, (2) operations during upset conditions, and (3) the degree of automation which may be applicable to a geothermal power plant.

None

1978-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geothermal Power Development in the Phillippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of electric power to meet the needs of industrial growth and dispersal in the Philippines is aimed at attaining self-reliance through availment of indigenous energy resources. The Philippines by virtue of her position in the high-heat flow region has in abundance a number of exploitable geothermal fields located all over the country. Results indicate that the geothermal areas of the Philippines presently in various stages of exploration and development are of such magnitude that they can be relied on to meet a significant portion of the country's power need. Large scale geothermal energy for electric power generation was put into operation last year with the inauguration of two 55-MW geothermal generating units at Tiwi, Albay in Southern Luzon. Another two 55-MW units were added to the Luzon Grid in the same year from Makiling-Banahaw field about 70 kilometers south of Manila. For 1979 alone, therefore, 220-MW of generating capacity was added to the power supply coming from geothermal energy. This year a total of 220-MW power is programmed for both areas. This will bring to 443-MW of installed generating capacity from geothermal energy with 3-MW contributed by the Tongonan Geothermal pilot plant in Tongonan, Leyte, Central Philippines in operation since July 1977. Financial consideration of Philippine experience showed that electric power derived from geothermal energy is competitive with other sources of energy and is a viable source of baseload electric power. Findings have proven the technical and economic acceptability of geothermal energy resources development. To realize the benefits that stem from the utilization of indigenous geothermal resources and in the light of the country's ever increasing electric power demand and in the absence of large commercial oil discovery in the Philippines, geothermal energy resource development has been accelerated anew. The program includes development of eight fields by 1989 by adding five more fields to the currently developed and producing geothermal areas.

Jovellanos, Jose U.; Alcaraz, Arturo; Datuin, Rogelio

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 6 total. G GeothermalExploration GeothermalLand Use GeothermalLeasing GeothermalPower Plant GeothermalTransmission GeothermalWell Field Retrieved from "http:...

143

COMPOUND H Y B R I D GEOTHERMAL-FOSSIL POWER PLANTS BY Ronald DiPippo  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

f f - r h COO-405 1 -44 COMPOUND H Y B R I D GEOTHERMAL-FOSSIL POWER PLANTS BY Ronald DiPippo MASTER Eileen M. Avelar June 1979 Work Performed Under Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4051 Division of Engineering Brown University Providence, Rhode Island U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Geothermal Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

144

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of laboratory and pilot plant tests, detailed process and project engineering work, and process engineering and economic evaluation studies has been carried out in support of the design of a test facility for demonstration of the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions. A demonstration plant has been designed which is capable of removing 99% of the H/sub 2/S, 90% of the NH/sub 3/, and significant amounts of H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and particulates from 100,000 lb/hr of geothermal steam of The Geysers composition. Criteria for the mechanical and process design of the scrubber have been confirmed in field tests of fifty hours duration on an eight-inch diameter scrubber at PG and E's Unit No. 7, The Geysers. The background of the problem and the technical approach to its solution, the scope and results of the first-phase laboratory testing, the scope and results of the experimental and analytical studies carried out in the second phase, and a description of the configuration of the demonstration plant and the test plan for its operation are summarized. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

MEMS Materials and Temperature Sensors for Down Hole Geothermal System Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal power plants. US DOE EERE Geothermal Technologieswas made for the US DOE EERE Geothermal Technologies

Wodin-Schwartz, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative-condenser size on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A special study was conducted to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 30/sup 0/F in order to achieve the lowest cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Heber Binary-Cycle Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant: Startup and Low-Power Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 45-MWe demonstration plant, the first of its kind, could lead to full-scale commercial development of moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. In startup, shakedown, and lowpower testing from October 1984 to June 1986, the facility confirmed the feasibility of binary-conversion technology.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of turbine driven centrifugal compressors for non-condensible gas removal at geothermal power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Initial field tests have been completed for a Non-Condensible Gas (NCG) turbocompressor for geothermal power plants. It provides alternate technology to steam-jet ejectors and liquid-ring vacuum pumps that are currently used for NCG removal. It incorporates a number of innovative design features to enhance reliability, reduce steam consumption and reduce O&M costs. During initial field tests, the turbocompressor has been on-line for more than 4500 hours as a third stage compressor at The Geysers Unit 11 Power Plant. Test data indicates its overall efficiency is about 25% higher than a liquid-ring vacuum pump, and 250% higher than a steam-jet ejector when operating with compressor inlet pressures of 12.2 in-Hga and flow rates over 20,000 lbm/hr.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Planning and Timing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Financing Geothermal Power Projects Geothermal Technologies Financing Geothermal Power Projects Search...

153

Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Innovative Design of New Geothermal Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect

This very significant and useful report assessed state-of-the-art geothermal technologies. The findings presented in this report are the result of site visits and interviews with plant owners and operators, representatives of major financial institutions, utilities involved with geothermal power purchases and/or wheeling. Information so obtained was supported by literature research and data supplied by engineering firms who have been involved with designing and/or construction of a majority of the plants visited. The interviews were conducted by representatives of the Bonneville Power Administration, the Washington State Energy Office, and the Oregon Department of Energy during the period 1986-1989. [DJE-2005

Bloomquist, R. Gordon; Geyer, John D.; Sifford, B. Alexander III

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative condenser pinch points on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief study was conducted in support of the DOE/DGHT Heat Cycle Research Program to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F (3 to 4/sup 0/C) for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 15/sup 0/F (8/sup 0/C) in order to achieve the highest plant net geofluid effectiveness, and approximately 30/sup 0/F (17/sup 0/C) to attain the minimum cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Preliminary performance estimates and value analyses for binary geothermal power plants using ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids in binary geothermal power generation systems is investigated. The available thermodynamic data is discussed and the methods of extrapolating this data to give the quantities needed to perform analyses of the system is given. Results indicated that for a system without a recuperator and with a working fluid which is 50 percent by mass of each constituent, the geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) is 84 percent of that for the 50MW Heber Plant. The cost of generating electric power for this system was estimated to be 9 percent greater than for the Heber Plant. However, if a recuperator is incorporated in the system (using the turbine exhaust to preheat and partially boil the working fluid) the geofluid effectiveness becomes 102 percent of that for the Heber Plant, and the cost of electricity is 5-1/4 percent lower (relative to the Heber Plant) because of less expensive equipment resulting from lower pressure, better heat transfer, and less working fluid to handle for the ammonia-water plant. These results do not necessarily represent the optimum system. Because of uncertainty in thermodynamic properties, it was felt that detailed optimization was not practical at this point. It was concluded that use of nonazeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons as working fluids should be studied before expending further effort in the investigation of the ammonia-water mixtures.

Bliem, C.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Environmental summary document for the Republic Geothermal, Inc. application for a geothermal loan guaranty project: 64 MW well field and 48 MW (net) geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review and analysis is provided of the environmental consequences of (1) guaranteeing a load for the completion of the 64 MW well field and the 48 MW (net) power plant or (2) denying a guaranteed load that is needed to finish the project. Mitigation measures are discussed. Alternatives and their impacts are compared and some discussion is included on unavoidable adverse impacts. (MHR)

Layton, D.W.; Powers, D.J.; Leitner, P.; Crow, N.B.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Ricker, Y.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV Summary...

160

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal power plants of New Zealand, Philippines, and Indonesia: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMET/17  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the fourth in a series dealing with the geothermal power plants of the world. Here the existing and planned stations in the south Pacific area are surveyed including New Zealand, the Philippines and Indonesia. Details are given for the plants at Wairakei and Kawerau, and for the one proposed at Broadlands in New Zealand; for the plants proposed for Tiwi and Los Banos, and the wellhead units operating at Los Banos and Tongonan in the Philippines; and for the wellhead unit soon to be installed at Kawah Kamojang on Java in Indonesia. The geologic characteristics of the fields are described along with wellflow particulars, energy conversion systems, environmental impacts, economic factors and operating experiences, where available. The geothermal resource utilization efficiency is computed or estimated for the power plants covered. Furthermore, some discussion is devoted to the other sites which may prove exploitable for the production of electricity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the identification and evaluation of methods by which the net power output of an air-cooled geothermal power plant can be enhanced during hot ambient conditions with a minimal amount of water use.

Ashwood, A.; Bharathan, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Load Following in Geothermal Plants: Capabilities and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, geothermal power plants are baseload facilities, but they may be operated in a load-following mode in the same manner as conventional steam plants. As grid penetration of renewable resources increases - especially those generation types with diurnal variations such as wind and solar - the ability of other power plants to load-follow becomes increasingly valuable.Load following is challenging in terms of the design, operations, and maintenance of flash and binary geothermal ...

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Today's geothermal power economics and risks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capital and power generation costs are developed as a parameterized composite of a number of ongoing geothermal power projects, and evaluates several of the most commonly accepted risks of geothermal power in terms of cost penalties to a basic cost of power. The status of geothermal power in the US is also reviewed briefly.

Lawford, T.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Waste-heat disposal from US Geothermal Power Plants: an update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the more interesting and significant methods that are currently being studied in the US for reducing waste heat dissipation system costs and water consumption are: (1) allowing plant power output to vary with ambient conditions; (2) use of ammonia to transport waste heat from the turbine condenser to air-cooled coils; (3) development of a plastic-membrane type wet/dry tower; (4) marketing of steam turbines that can tolerate a wider range of back pressures: (5) use of circulating water storage to delay heat dissipation until more favorable ambient conditions exist; (6) development of tubes with enhanced heat transfer surfaces to reduce condenser capital costs; and (7) use of evaporative condensers to reduce costs in binary cycles. Many of these projects involve large-scale tests that are now fully installed and producing some preliminary data.

Robertson, R.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

168

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geothermal Power Generation as Related to Resource Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past several years geothermal exploratory work has been conducted in northern Nevada. In conjunction with that effort a proposed 55-MW steam geothermal power plant was considered for initial installation in one of the fields being developed. The characteristics of the geothermal fields under consideration were not firm, with data indicating widely varying downhole temperatures. Thus, neither the resource nor the plant operating conditions could be set. To assist both the ultimate user of the resource, the utility, and the developer of the geothermal field, a series of parametric sensitivity studies were conducted for the initial evaluation of a field vis-a-vis the power plant. Using downhole temperature as the variable, the amount of brine, brine requirements/kWh, and pounds brine/pound of steam to the turbine were ascertained. This was done over a range of downhole temperatures of from 350F to 475F. The studies illustrate the total interdependence of the geothermal resource and its associated power plant. The selection of geothermal steam power plant design conditions must be related to the field in which the plant is located. The results of the work have proven to be valuable in two major respects: (1) to determine the production required of a particular geothermal field to meet electrical generation output and (2) as field characteristics become firm, operating conditions can be defined for the associated power plant.

Falcon, J. A.; Richards, R. G.; Keilman, L. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidebook to Geothermal Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance J. Pater Salmon, J. Meurice, N. Wobus, F. Stern, and M. Duaime Navigant Consulting Boulder, Colorado Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-49391 March 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance J. Pater Salmon, J. Meurice, N. Wobus, F. Stern, and M. Duaime Navigant Consulting Boulder, Colorado NREL Technical Monitor: Paul Schwabe Prepared under Subcontract No. LGJ-0-40242-01 Subcontract Report

171

Development and Implementation of a Condition Based Maintenance Program for Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the development of the RCM team, identifying plant assets and developing an asset hierarchy, the development of sample Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEAs), identifying and prioritizing plant systems and components for RCM analysis, and identifying RCM/CBM software/hardware vendors. It also includes the Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) for all Class I Systems, Maintenance Task Assignments, use of Conditioned Based Maintenance (CBM) Tools and Displays of the RCM software System Development to date.

Steve Miller; Jim Eddy; Murray Grande; Shawn Bratt; Manuchehr Shirmohamadi

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links View these websites for more information on geothermal power project financing. NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebooks NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebooks Learn the five key steps for creating effective policy and increasing the deployment of geothermal electricity generation technologies. California Energy Commission's Geothermal Program Here you'll find information on the California Energy Commission's geothermal program, including geothermal energy, funding opportunities, and contacts. Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Energy Efficiency This database of state, local, utility, and federal incentives and policies that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency can help you find financing incentives and opportunities in your state.

173

Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Design and operation of a geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following appendices are included: process flow diagram, piping and instrumentation diagram, new equipment specifications, main single line diagram, shutdown and start-up procedures, data sheets for tests, plant outages, detailed process equations, computer program and sample output, chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy results, and management report data sheets for January 5, 1990 to May 29, 1990. (MHR)

Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal Power of America | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power of America Power of America Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Power of America Place Los Angeles, California Sector Geothermal energy Product A Nevada-based company focusing on geothermal project development and operation. References Geothermal Power of America[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Geothermal Power of America is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Geothermal Power of America" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Power_of_America&oldid=345810" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

176

Heber Plant Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Geothermal Facility Plant Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Heber Plant Geothermal Facility General Information Name Heber Plant Geothermal Facility Facility Heber Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Imperial Valley, California Coordinates 33.03743°, -115.621591° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.03743,"lon":-115.621591,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

New Hampshire/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Hampshire Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Hampshire No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Hampshire No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Hampshire Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region White Mountains Geothermal Area Other GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Hampshire Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

178

Exergetic Performance Investigation of Medium-Low Enthalpy Geothermal Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewable energy sources are becoming attractive solutions for clean and sustainable energy needs. Geothermal energy is increasingly contributing to the power supply worldwide. In evaluating the efficiency of energy conservation systems, the most ... Keywords: geothermal energy, power generation, binary cycle, exergetic efficiency, exergy analysis, geothermal power plant

Junkui Cui; Jun Zhao; Chuanshan Dai; Bin Yang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an appendix to Volume 1 of the report by the same name. Items included are: process flow diagram; piping and instrumentation diagram; new equipment specifications; main single line diagram; shutdown start-up procedures; data sheets for tests; plant outages; detailed process equations; computer program and sample output; chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy results; and management report data sheets January 5, 1990 -- May 29, 1990.

Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase IV: Resource Production and Power Plant Construction GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation

182

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary Cycle Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators.

183

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing

184

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste heat rejection systems for geothermal power stations have a significantly greater influence on plant operating performances and costs than do corresponding systems in fossil- and nuclear-fueled stations. With thermal efficiencies of only about 10%, geothermal power cycles can reject four times as much heat per kilowatt of output. Geothermal sites in the United States tend to be in water-short areas that could require use of more expensive wet/dry or dry-type cooling towers. With relatively low-temperature heat sources, the cycle economics are more sensitive to diurnal and seasonal variations in sink temperatures. Factors such as the necessity for hydrogen sulfide scrubbers in off-gas systems or the need to treat cooling tower blowdown before reinjection can add to the cost and complexity of goethermal waste heat rejection systems. Working fluids most commonly considered for geothermal cycles are water, ammonia, Freon-22, isobutane, and isopentane. Both low-level and barometric-leg direct-contact condensers are used, and reinforced concrete has been proposed for condenser vessels. Multipass surface condensers also have wide application. Corrosion problems at some locations have led to increased interest in titanium tubing. Studies at ORNL indicate that fluted vertical tubes can enhance condensing film coefficients by factors of 4 to 7.

Robertson, R C

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

186

Materials selection guidelines for geothermal power systems. First edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine potential power cycles are defined and diagrammed for the generation of electricity from geothermal fluids. General fluid properties that influence the applicability of power cycles to a particular geothermal resource are discussed. The corrosivity of individual process streams in power cycles is described based on variations in chemical composition and temperature. Results of materials performance tests are analyzed based on the chemical composition of the corrosive medium and physical factors such as temperature, duration of exposure, and fluid velocity. The key chemical components in geothermal fluids that are significant in determining corrosivity are identified. Both summarized and detailed results of materials performance tests in U.S. liquid-dominated resources are given. Seven U.S. liquid-dominated KGRA's are classified according to relative corrosiveness and their key chemical components are defined. The various forms and mechanisms of corrosive attack that can occur in geothermal process streams are described. The application of nonmetallic materials in geothermal environments is discussed. The appendices contain information on (1) operating experience at geothermal power plants, (2) corrosion in desalination facilities, (3) reliability of geothermal plants, (4) elastomeric materials, (5) comparative alloy costs, and (6) geothermal equipment manufacturers. (MHR)

DeBerry, D.W.; Ellis, P.F.; Thomas, C.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

188

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing (except water vapor) is emitted to the atmosphere. Resources below 400°F

189

High geothermal energy utilization geothermal/fossil hybrid power cycle: a preliminary investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combining geothermal and fossil fuel energy into the so-called hybrid cycle is compared with a state-of-the-art double-flash geothermal power cycle using resources which vary from 429/sup 0/K (312/sup 0/F) to 588/sup 0/K (598/sup 0/F). It is demonstrated that a hybrid plant can compete thermodynamically with the combined output from both a fossil-fired and a geothermal plant operating separately. Economic comparison of the hybrid and double-flash cycles is outlined, and results are presented that indicate the performance of marginal hydrothermal resources may be improved enough to compete with existing power cycles on a cost basis. It is also concluded that on a site-specific basis a hybrid cycle is capable of complementing double-flash cycles at large-capacity resources, and can operate in a cycling load mode at constant geothermal fluid flow rate.

Grijalva, R. L.; Sanemitsu, S. K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume III. Final report: demonstration plant equipment descriptions, test plan, and operating instructions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The elements of the final, detailed design of the demonstration plant for the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam are summarized. Descriptions are given of all items of equipment in sufficient detail that they can serve as purchase specifications. The process and mechanical design criteria which were used to develop the specifications, and the process descriptions and material and energy balance bases to which the design criteria were applied are included. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

192

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

193

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

194

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

195

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

196

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

197

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

198

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

199

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

200

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

202

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

203

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

204

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

205

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

206

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

207

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

208

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

209

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

210

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

211

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

212

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

213

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

214

Field tests of a vertical-fluted-tube condenser in the prototype power plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vertical-fluted-tube condenser was designed, fabricated, and tested with isobutane as the shell-side working fluid in a binary prototype power plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site. After shakedown and contamination removal operations were completed, the four-pass water-cooled unit (with 102 outside-fluted Admiralty tubes) achieved performance predictions while operating with the plant surface evaporator on-line. A sample comparison shows that use of this enhanced condenser concept offers the potential for a reduction of about 65% from the size suggested by corresponding designs using conventional horizontal-smooth-tube concepts. Subsequent substitution of a direct-contact evaporator for the surface evaporator brought drastic reductions in system performance, the apparent consequence of high concentrations of noncondensible gases introduced by the brine/working-fluid interaction.

Murphy, R.W.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (5) Power Plants (0) Projects...

216

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~Iilora and J. W. Tester, Geothermal Energy as a Source ofpresented at the Susanville Geothermal Energy Converence,of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Details Areas (24) Power Plants (0) Projects (1)...

218

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants to Assess PlantStandards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Brawley Power Plant Abandoned | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abandoned Abandoned Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Abstract N/A Authors California Division of Oil, Gas and and Geothermal Resources Published Journal Geothermal Hot Line, 1985 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Citation California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources. 1985. Brawley Power Plant Abandoned. Geothermal Hot Line. 15(2):76-77. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brawley_Power_Plant_Abandoned&oldid=682727" Categories: References Uncited References Geothermal References What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

220

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of Geothermal Resources for Electric Generation in the Pacific Northwest, Draft Issue Paper for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the geothermal history, technology, costs, and Pacific Northwest potentials. The report discusses geothermal generation, geothermal resources in the Pacific Northwest, cost and operating characteristics of geothermal power plants, environmental effects of geothermal generation, and prospects for development in the Pacific Northwest. This report was prepared expressly for use by the Northwest Power Planning Council. The report contains numerous references at the end of the document. [DJE-2005

Geyer, John D.; Kellerman, L.M.; Bloomquist, R.G.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Strategies for steam handling and H/sub 2/S abatement at geothermal power plants in The Geysers area of northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Strict limitations on the emission of H/sub 2/S from new geothermal power plants in The Geysers area of northern California have been imposed by Lake and Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control Districts. Lake County, under new source review rules, has stipulated that specific technologies shall be utilized to limit H/sub 2/S emissions to 5 lb/h as a condition for determination of compliance. The status of these technologies as well as other ongoing technology development efforts to conserve steam and abate H/sub 2/S are evaluated. Although projections indicate that it may be possible to meet the 5 lb/h limit, there is no firm assurance of achievement at this time because of the unproven, full-scale performance status of some key technologies specified by the air pollution control districts.

Morris, W.F.; Stephens, F.B.

1981-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

223

Removal of boron from wastewater of geothermal power plant by selective ion-exchange resins. 1: Batch sorption-elution studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron removal was studied using N-glucamine-type resins Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108. The resin Diaion CRB 02 exhibited a higher sorption capacity for boron removal from 0.01 M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} solution than did Purolite S 108. The presence of calcium, sodium, and chloride ions did not make a large interference on boron removal by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. The sorption behavior of these two chelating resins obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model. Kinetic tests were performed to find the mass transfer mechanism of the sorption process of boron by Diaion CRB 02 resin. Five kinetic models were applied to fit the kinetic data obtained by using glucamine type-resin Diaion CRB 02. The results showed that the rate-determining step is particle diffusion for boron removal by Diaion CRB 02. The quantitative stripping of boron from both chelating resins was obtained with either 0.05 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 0.1 M HCl solutions. Boron in wastewater of the Kizildere geothermal field was effectively removed by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. Preliminary column tests showed that Diaion CRB 02 is a potential resin for column removal of boron from wastewater of a geothermal power plant.

Badruk, M. [MTA, Izmir (Turkey)] [MTA, Izmir (Turkey); Kabay, N.; Demircioglu, M. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering] [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering; Mordogan, H.; Ipekoglu, U. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering] [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nicaragua-San Jacinto-Tizate Geothermal Power Project | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Power Project AgencyCompany Organization Inter-American Development Bank Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Geothermal Topics Background analysis...

225

Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of Colburn j-factor) associated with deployment of the winglets with circular as well as oval tubes. In general, toe-in (common flow up) type winglets appear to have better performance than the toe-out (common flow down) type winglets. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. During the course of their independent research, all of the researchers have established that about 10 to 30% enhancement in Colburn j-factor is expected. However, actual increase in heat transfer rate from a heat exchanger employing finned tubes with winglets may be smaller, perhaps on the order of 2 to 5%. It is also concluded that for any specific application, more full-size experimentation is needed to optimize the winglet design for a specific heat exchanger application. If in place of a circular tube, an oval tube can be economically used in a bundle, it is expected that the pressure drop across the tube bundle with the application of vortex generators (winglets) will be similar to that in a conventional circular tube bundle. It is hoped that the results of this research will demonstrate the benefits of applying vortex generators (winglets) on the fins to improve the heat transfer from the air-side of the tube bundle.

Manohar S. Sohal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Economic Study of Geothermal Steam Production and Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the study to determine the required selling price of geothermal flash steam in order for Phillips Petroleum Company to obtain a rate of return on investment of 10, 15 or 20% on its discovery in Nevada. The economic evaluations are based on an order-of-magnitude type of estimate of capital costs for the flash steam production, steam gathering and brine reinjection system to supply steam to a 55 MW (Gross) geothermal power generating plant, using mixed pressure (double flash steam) and turbine design. Geothermal well costs, brine quality and well productivity data were provided by Phillips Petroleum Company and are based on the discovery wells in Nevada. Power plant costs are based on current technology and available hardware, under construction at the present time. Costs have been escalated to 1977.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

New Mexico/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico/Geothermal Mexico/Geothermal < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Mexico Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Mexico Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Lightning Dock I Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, New Mexico Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Lightning Dock II Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, NV Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Mexico

229

Small geothermal electric systems for remote powering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes conditions and costs at which quite small (100 to 1,000 kilowatt) geothermal systems could be used for off-grid powering at remote locations. This is a first step in a larger process of determining locations and conditions at which markets for such systems could be developed. The results suggest that small geothermal systems offer substantial economic and environmental advantages for powering off-grid towns and villages. Geothermal power is most likely to be economic if the system size is 300 kW or greater, down to reservoir temperatures of 100{degree}C. For system sizes smaller than 300 kW, the economics can be favorable if the reservoir temperature is about 120{degree}C or above. Important markets include sites remote from grids in many developing and developed countries. Estimates of geothermal resources in many developing countries are shown.

Entingh, Daniel J.; Easwaran, Eyob.; McLarty, Lynn

1994-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility Type Commercial Online Date Geothermal Area

231

South Dakota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota Dakota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Dakota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Dakota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Dakota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Dakota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Dakota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

232

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

233

Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

234

Tennessee/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Tennessee Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Tennessee No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Tennessee No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Tennessee No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Tennessee Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

235

South Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

236

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

237

Today's geothermal power economics and risks  

SciTech Connect

Capital and power generation costs are developed as a parameterized composite of a number of ongoing geothermal power projects, and evaluates several of the most commonly accepted risks of geothermal power in terms of cost penalties to a basic cost of power. The status of geothermal power in the US is also reviewed briefly.

Lawford, T.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (21) Power Plants (0) Projects (2)...

239

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal...

240

Kenya geothermal private power project: A prefeasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-eight geothermal areas in Kenya were evaluated and prioritized for development. The prioritization was based on the potential size, resource temperature, level of exploration risk, location, and exploration/development costs for each geothermal area. Suswa, Eburru and Arus are found to offer the best short-term prospects for successful private power development. It was found that cost per kill developed are significantly lower for the larger (50MW) than for smaller-sized (10 or 20 NW) projects. In addition to plant size, the cost per kill developed is seen to be a function of resource temperature, generation mode (binary or flash cycle) and transmission distance.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase the accuracy and value of information presented in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report, the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) developed a reporting system, known as the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions, in 2010. The Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve as a guideline to project developers in reporting geothermal project development information to the GEA. A basic understanding of the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions will also aid the reader in fully understanding the information presented in this

242

Property:GeothermalDevelopmentPhases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalDevelopmentPhases GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalDevelopmentPhases" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + Geothermal/Power Plant + C CA-017-05-051 + Geothermal/Well Field + CA-170-02-15 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-650-2005-086 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-670-2010-CX + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-96062042 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + D DOE-EA-1116 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + DOE-EA-1621 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1676 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1733 + Geothermal/Well Field +

243

HL Power Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » HL Power Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home HL Power Geothermal Facility General Information Name HL Power Geothermal Facility Facility HL Power Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Wendel, California Coordinates 40.3482346°, -120.2335461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3482346,"lon":-120.2335461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Empire Geothermal Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power LLC Power LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Empire Geothermal Power LLC Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89509 Sector Geothermal energy Product Empire owns and operates a 3.5MW geothermal project in Nevada. Coordinates 32.944065°, -97.578279° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.944065,"lon":-97.578279,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

Vaporization at supercritical pressures and counterflow condensing of pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Current testing involves supercritical vaporization and counterflow in-tube condensing in an organic Rankine cycle. Results of the experiments are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids. The heater and condenser behavior predicted by the Heat Transfer Research, Inc. computer codes used for correlation of the data was in excellent agreement with experimental results. A special series of tests, conducted with propane and up to approximately 40% isopentane concentration indicated that a close approach to ''integral'' condensation was occurring in the vertically-oriented condenser.

Bliem, C.J.; Demuth, O.J.; Mines, G.L.; Swank, W.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

247

Colorado/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado/Geothermal Colorado/Geothermal < Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Colorado Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Colorado No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Colorado No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Colorado Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 4.615 MW4,614.868 kW 4,614,868.309 W 4,614,868,309 mW 0.00461 GW 4.614868e-6 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Poncha Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.274 MW5,273.619 kW 5,273,618.589 W

248

Chemistry, Scale, and Performance of the Hawaii Geothermal Project-A Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-and-a-half-year monitoring study of a geothermal power plant showed that the chemistry of the resource fluid strongly influenced power plant performance. Changes in the fluid chemistry--such as higher salinity and lower pH--substantially increased the rate of scale formation and corrosion in plant components.

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-and RelatedStandards for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant Project. Volume 1. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic feasibility study of the engineering aspects of a hybrid wood-fired geothermal electrical generating plant is presented. The proposed plant location is in Lassen County, California, near the Wendel Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. This power plant uses moderate temperature geothermal fluid to augment the heat supplied from a wood waste fired boiler. This report defines major plant systems for implementation into the plant conceptual design and provides sufficient design information for development of budgetary cost estimates. Emphasis is placed on incorporation of geothermal heat into the power generation process. Plant systems are designed and selected based on economic justification and on proven performance. The culminating economic analysis provides the financial information to establish the incentives for construction of the plant. The study concludes that geothermal energy and energy from wood can be combined in a power generating plant to yield attractive project economics.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study of waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations is concerned only with the heat rejected from the power cycle. The heat contained in reinjected or otherwise discharged geothermal fluids is not included with the waste heat considered here. The heat contained in the underflow from the flashtanks in such systems is not considered as part of the heat rejected from the power cycle. By following this definition of the waste heat to be rejected, various methods of waste heat dissipation are discussed without regard for the particular arrangement to obtain heat from the geothermal source. Recent conceptual design studies made for 50-MW(e) geothermal power stations at Heber and Niland, California, are of particular interst. The former uses a flashed-steam system and the latter a binary cycle that uses isopentane. In last-quarter 1976 dollars, the total estimated capital costs were about $750/kW and production costs about 50 mills/kWhr. If wet/dry towers were used to conserve 50% of the water evaporation at Heber, production costs would be about 65 mills/kWhr.

Robertson, R.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Texas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas/Geothermal Texas/Geothermal < Texas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Texas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Texas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Texas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Texas Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Texas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

253

Preliminary conceptual design of commercial geopressured geothermal fuel plants  

SciTech Connect

Previous feasibility studies Bechtel (1975), TRW (1975) for electric power generation utilizing geothermal resources have tended to focus primarily on the power plant and have neglected the fuel production and effluent disposal facilities. The Dow Chemical USA study (1974) for the Governor's Energy Advisory Council, State of Texas, placed equal emphasis on the power plant and the fuel plant. The study reported in Chapter II and in what follows in this chapter, also places equal emphasis on the two types of facilities. It is important that the fuel plant, the well field, the fuel processing plant, and the effluent disposal facility be the subject of a preliminary conceptual design and costing activity so that economic and net energetics analysis can be performed. The activity also serves to assess technological maturity of the fuel plant and to identify technical problems requiring further study. The resource considered was the model resource outlined in Sectio B, Chapter II. Fuel plants were outlined for three power generation plants: single-stage flash steam, two-stage flash steam, and propane secondary working fluid plant.

Underhill, Gary K.; Carlson, Ronald A.; Clendinning, William A.; Erdos, Jozsef, Erdos; Gault, John; Hall, James W.; Jones, Robert L.; Michael, Herbert K.; Powell, Paul H.; Riemann, Carl F.; Rios-Castellon, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Burchard P.; Wilson, John S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants. Volume One. Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of a particular hybrid plant must be evaluated with respect to a specific site. This volume focuses on the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. The temperature, pressure, and flow rate data given suggests the site deserves serious consideration for a hybrid plant. Key siting considerations which must be addressed before an economic judgment can be attempted are presented as follows: the availability, quality, and cost of coal; the availability of water; and the availability of transmission. Seismological and climate factors are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Environmental impacts of nonfusion power systems. [Data on environmental effects of all power sources that may be competitive with fusion reactor power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data were collected on the environmental effects of power sources that may be competitive with future fusion reactor power plants. Data are included on nuclear power plants using HTGR, LMBR, GCFR, LMFBR, and molten salt reactors; fossil-fuel electric power plants; geothermal power plants; solar energy power plants, including satellite-based solar systems; wind energy power plants; ocean thermal gradient power plants; tidal energy power plants; and power plants using hydrogen and other synthetic fuels as energy sources.

Brouns, R.J.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

GeoPowering the West: Hawaii; Why Geothermal?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Hawaii. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Overview of Financing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Financing Geothermal Power Projects Overview of Financing Geothermal Power Projects Financing geothermal power projects involves specific processes, costs, and risks. There are also several advantages and challenges to developing and financing geothermal power projects. The financing strategies presented apply to geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey completed an assessment of moderate- and high-temperature geothermal resources in 13 states. These data help lower project costs and risks for project developers by shortening the resource identification phase of project development; yet geothermal resource development still has risk. Financing Processes, Costs, and Risks

258

Wyoming/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Wyoming Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Wyoming No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Wyoming No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Wyoming Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Huckleberry Hot Springs Geothermal Area 38.744 MW38,744.243 kW 38,744,243.17 W 38,744,243,170 mW 0.0387 GW 3.874424e-5 TW Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Wyoming Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal

259

Arizona/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arizona/Geothermal Arizona/Geothermal < Arizona Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arizona Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arizona No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arizona No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arizona Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Clifton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 14.453 MW14,453.335 kW 14,453,335.43 W 14,453,335,430 mW 0.0145 GW 1.445334e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Gillard Hot Springs Geothermal Area 11.796 MW11,796.115 kW 11,796,114.7 W 11,796,114,700 mW 0.0118 GW 1.179611e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region

260

Montana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana/Geothermal Montana/Geothermal < Montana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Montana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Montana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Montana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Montana Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Boulder Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.21 MW5,210.319 kW 5,210,318.609 W 5,210,318,609 mW 0.00521 GW 5.210319e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Broadwater Hot Spring Geothermal Area 5.256 MW5,255.823 kW 5,255,823.43 W 5,255,823,430 mW 0.00526 GW 5.255823e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

263

Geothermal Electricity Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Production Geothermal Electricity Production August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California....

264

Railroad Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Nevada Exploration Region Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase...

265

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Phases of a Geothermal Development...

266

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in...

267

Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilizatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office EETD Safety Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in the West Speaker(s):...

268

Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

before it was harnessed as a power source. Since the first modest 250-kilowatt geothermal power plant came online near Pisa, Italy in 1913, geothermal electricity production has...

269

Geotechnical environmental aspects of geothermal power generation at Herber, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source was assessed. Here, the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California were investigated. Geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence are discussed in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. Estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds, are discussed.

Not Available

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Power plant  

SciTech Connect

A two stroke internal combustion engine is described that has at least one cylinder within which a piston reciprocates. The engine is joined to a gearbox which includes a ring gear. A pair of gears having diameters half that of the ring gear move within the latter. At least one of the pair of gears is connected to a piston by a pin extending between the piston and the periphery of said gear. An additional pair of gears are fixed to respective ones of the first-mentioned gear pair and are operatively joined to a pinion to which a drive shaft is secured. A turbine and filter arrangement is positioned on the side of the engine opposite the gearbox whereby exhaust gases from the engine are directed to the turbine to develop power at an output drive shaft joined to the turbine and to filter pollutants from the gases.

Finn, H.I. Jr.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower...

272

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience forResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Comparison of elementary geothermal-brine power-production processes  

SciTech Connect

From applied technology geothermal committee meeting; Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA (7 Aug 1973). A comparison of three simple geothermal power- production systems shows that the flashed steam and the compound systems are favored for use with high-temperature brines. The binary system becomes economically competitive only when used on low-temperature brines (enthalpies less than 350 Btu/lb). Geothermal power appears to be economically attractive even when low-temperature brines are used. (auth)

Green, M.A.; Laird, A.D.K.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

North Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina/Geothermal Carolina/Geothermal < North Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF North Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in North Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in North Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in North Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for North Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

277

Iowa/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Geothermal Iowa/Geothermal < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Iowa Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Iowa No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Iowa No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Iowa No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Iowa Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

278

New York/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Geothermal New York/Geothermal < New York Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New York Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New York No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New York No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New York No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New York Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

279

West Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Geothermal West Virginia/Geothermal < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF West Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in West Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in West Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in West Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for West Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

280

New Jersey/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey/Geothermal Jersey/Geothermal < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Jersey Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Jersey No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Jersey No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Jersey No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Jersey Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. ,2010. GeyserspowerplantH 2 Sabatement update. operationsatTheGeyserspowerplant,GeothermalResourcesTable1:GeothermalPowerPlantsOperatingatTheGeysers(

Brophy, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Policies and Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies and Regulations Affecting Geothermal Power Project Financing Policies and Regulations Affecting Geothermal Power Project Financing Federal and state policies, including leasing and permitting, federal financial incentives, renewable portfolio standards, and greenhouse gas emission reduction regulations, can affect geothermal power project development financing processes and timelines. The related issues that should be considered during the project development cycle regarding these policies are summarized in the following table and described in more detail below. Note that this table is not meant to guide developers through the entire policy landscape, and should not be assumed to include all related issues in geothermal power development. Roles of Policies and Regulations in the Geothermal Power Project Development Process*

283

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Financing Options for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financing Options for Geothermal Power Projects Financing Options for Geothermal Power Projects Different financing options are used at each stage in geothermal power project development, which include the exploration and drilling stage and construction and operation stage. The financing option in each stage earns a return proportionate with the risk accepted at that stage in the project's development. For each financing option, both financial and non-financial elements should be considered. Financing options and considerations for a typical geothermal power project are shown in the table below. Your project financing options and considerations may be different. Financing Options and Considerations for a Typical Geothermal Power Project* Financial Considerations Financing Stage Exploration and Drilling Construction and Operation

284

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

District Energy SW 40th Street Thermal Plant Geothermal Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plant. In fact, although the geothermal system requires a higher initial investment, the energy savings results in an 8.7% total savings over a 25 year period. The energy savings...

286

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field Cameron Parish, Louisiana Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field Cameron Parish, Louisiana Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Geopressured Resources Project Description Within the Sweet Lake Oil and Gas Field, the existence of a geopressured-geothermal system was confirmed in the 1980s as part of the DOE's Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program. At the close of that program it was determined that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and job creation it would entail, provide the opportunity to develop thousands of megawatts of geopressured-geothermal power in the South Eastern United States.

287

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Author BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Citation BRIAN D. FAIRBANK. 2012. STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility. N/Ap. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=STATEMENT_OF_BRIAN_D._FAIRBANK_Nevada_Geothermal_Power_Inc.%27s_Blue_Mountain_Geothermal_Power_Facility&oldid=682760

288

Sunrise II Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial...

289

Solar Thermal Augmentation of a Flash Geothermal Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal flash-plant output often declines over time as the supporting reservoir cools and less steam is produced from the fluid from each well. While this decline is often mitigated by makeup well drilling, another technique would be to use solar thermal energy to offset the decline and restore generation. The 2011 EPRI report 1024675, Geothermal/Solar Hybrid Applications, examined the use of solar thermal energy to augment a binary plant using a low-temperature resource: the current ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project  

SciTech Connect

The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a listing of 221 baseload power plant units currently in the planning stage. The list shows the plant owner, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, major equipment suppliers (steam generator, turbogenerator, and flue gas desulfurization system), partner, and date the plant is to be online. This data is a result of a survey by the journal of power plant owners.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

294

Washington/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Washington/Geothermal < Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Washington Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Washington No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Washington No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Washington Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Baker Hot Spring Geothermal Area 22.7 MW22,700 kW 22,700,000 W 22,700,000,000 mW 0.0227 GW 2.27e-5 TW Cascades Geothermal Region

295

Preliminary reliability and availability analysis of the Heber geothermal binary demonstration plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the reliability and availability of the Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant on the basis of preliminary design information. It also identifies and ranks components of the plant in order of their criticality to system operation and their contribution to system unavailability. The sensitivity of the various components to uncertainties of data and the potential for reliability growth are also examined. The assessment results were obtained through the adaptation and application of an existing reliability and availability methodology to the Heber plant design. These preliminary assessments were made to assist (1) in evaluating design alternatives for the plant and (2) in demonstrating that the closed-loop, multiple-fluid, binary cycle geothermal concept is competitive with the more conventional flashed steam cycle technology. The Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant Project is a cooperative effort directed toward accelerating geothermal development for power generation and establishing the binary cycle technology as a proven alternative to the flashed steam cycle for moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. The binary power plant would have a capacity of 45 MW/sub e/ net and would derive its energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) fluid from the Heber reservoir in southern California.

Himpler, H.; White, J.; Witt, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comparison of Geothermal Power Conversion Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal power conversion cycles are compared with respect to recovery of the available wellhead power. The cycles compared are flash steam, in which steam turbines are driven by steam separated from one or more flash states; binary, in which heat is transferred from flashed steam to an organic turbine cycle; and dual steam, in which two-phase expanders are driven by the flashing steam-brine mixture and steam turbines by the separated steam. Expander efficiencies assumed are 0.7 for steam turbines, 0.8 for organic turbines, and 0.6 for two-phase expanders. The fraction of available wellhead power delivered by each cycle is found to be about the same at all brine temperatures: 0.65 with one stage and 0.7 with four stages for dual stream; 0.4 with one stage and 0.6 with four stages for flash steam; 0.5 for binary; and 0.3 with one stage and 0.5 with four stages for flash binary.

Elliott, David G.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in the West Speaker(s): Jon Wellinghoff Steve Munson Date: January 30, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Existing data indicates that extensive geothermal resources of power production grade exist throughout the western United States. These resources may be capable of producing clean, reliable electric power in sufficient quantities to act as a hedge against the price volatility of gas-fired electric generation. The challenge facing energy policy makers is developing effective strategies and appropriate incentives to assist developers in moving competitive quantities of geothermal electric capacity into the western power marketplace. Issues related to achieving this goal

298

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Maximum Rebate 1,000/ton Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $800 - $1,000/ton Provider Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Program funds currently exhausted, additional funds have been requested. Visit the program website for the most up to date information on fund availability and to register for the waiting list for this program. The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) and the Oklahoma Department of Commerce currently offer the Oklahoma Comfort Program for geothermal

299

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report...

300

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume II. Laboratory results and process...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- High-potential Working Fluids...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

302

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

303

Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production Andrea Ashwood and Desikan Bharathan Technical Report NREL...

304

Raft River 5MW Geothermal Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Elements of design of the 5 MW(e) binary cycle plant to be built in the Raft River Valley in Idaho are discussed. Advantages of the dual boiling cycle for use with moderate temperature (250 to 350/sup 0/F) resources are discussed. A breakdown of the heat loads and power requirements is presented. Various components, including pumps, heat exchangers, cooling tower, turbine-generators, and production and injection systems, are described. (JGB)

Whitbeck, J.F.; Piscitella, R.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.Fuel and Geo- thermal Power Plants," by G.D. Case, T.A.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Geothermal Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating geothermal development. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Geothermal energy is heat derived below the earth's surface which can be harnessed to generate clean, renewable energy. This vital, clean energy resource supplies renewable power around the clock and emits little or no greenhouse gases -- all while requiring a small environmental footprint to develop. The Energy Department is committed to responsibly developing, demonstrating, and deploying innovative technologies to support the continued expansion of the geothermal industry across the United States. Featured Pinpointing America's Geothermal Resources with Open Source Data

310

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Northern California Power Association--Shell Oil Company Geothermal Project No. 2: energy and materials resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental impact of the energy and material resources expended in site preparation, construction, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of all phases of the Northern California Power Association--Shell Geothermal Project in The Geysers--Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area is described. The impact of well field development, operation, and abandonment is insignificant, with the possible exception of geothermal resource depletion due to steam withdrawal from supply wells during operation. The amount of resource renewal that may be possible through reinjection is unknown because of uncertainties in the exact amount of heat available in the steam supply field. Material resources to be used in construction, operation, and abandonment of the power plant and transmission lines are described. Proposed measures to mitigate the environmental impacts from the use of these resources are included. Electric power supply and demand forecasts to the year 2005 are described for the area served by the NCPA.

Hall, C.H.; Ricker, Y.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System October 2, 2013 (All day) Flyer for the National Geothermal Data System workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting on October 2, 2013 in Las Vegas. Drilling Down: How Legacy and New Research Data Can Advance Geothermal Development-The Power of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) A workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada Abstract: The National Geothermal Data System's (NGDS) launch in 2014 will provide open access to millions of datasets, sharing technical geothermal-relevant data across the geosciences to propel geothermal development and production forward. By aggregating findings from the Energy Department's RD&D projects

315

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amounts released from coal-fired plants without particulatethorium emissions from coal-fired plants may be compared toemissions from coal-fired plants. This comparison, though,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hawaii/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Geothermal Hawaii/Geothermal < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hawaii Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Hawaii Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Haleakala SW Rift Zone Exploration Ormat Technologies Inc , US Department of Energy Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Puna Geothermal Venture Ormat Technologies Inc Pahoa, Hawaii 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Hawaii Owner Facility Type Capacity (MW) Commercial Online

320

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG Place Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip 30559 Sector Geothermal energy Product German-based fund that will invest in geothermal projects to be developed by Green Energy Group. References Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG is a company located in Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany . References ↑ "Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Green_Energy_Geotherm_Power_Fonds_GmbH_Co_KG&oldid=346014"

322

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Geothermal Maps These maps show existing and developing geothermal power plants, geothermal...

323

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Abstract From 1955 to 1962, approximately 40 wells were drilled in 15 California thermal areas for the purpose of exploring and developing natural steam to utilize for electric power generation. Twenty-four of the wells were drilled in the three areas which at present seem to have the greatest potential for the production of natural steam: The Geysers, Sonoma County; Casa Diablo, Mono County; and the Salton Sea area, Imperial County.Since June 1960, steam from The Geysers thermal area, produced at a rate of approximately 250,000 Ib/hr, has been utilized to operate a 12,500 kw

324

Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant: Design, Construction, and Early Startup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary-cycle technology could almost double the electric energy yield from known hydrothermal resources. The 45-MWe Heber geothermal demonstration plant--now in a three-year test and demonstration program--has successfully passed through a series of feasibility studies, design stages, and field experiments that show its promise to tap these resources.

1987-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Review of air quality modeling techniques. Volume 8. [Assessment of environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air transport and diffusion models which are applicable to the assessment of the environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation are reviewed. The general classification of models and model inputs are discussed. A detailed examination of the statistical, Gaussian plume, Gaussian puff, one-box and species-conservation-of-mass models is given. Representative models are discussed with attention given to the assumptions, input data requirement, advantages, disadvantages and applicability of each.

Rosen, L.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs. #12;15 Pre-feasibility investigation of water and energy options utilising geothermal energy program to investigate and encourage the use of geothermal and waste heat resources for heat-driven pre with an economic, technical and market analysis of various scales of technology application where geothermal energy

Scheel, David

327

Mono County geothermal activity  

SciTech Connect

Three geothermal projects have been proposed or are underway in Mono County, California. The Mammoth/Chance geothermal development project plans to construct a 10-MW geothermal binary power plant which will include 8 production and 3 injection wells. Pacific Lighting Energy Systems is also planning a 10-MW binary power plant consisting of 5 geothermal wells and up to 4 injection wells. A geothermal research project near Mammoth Lakes has spudded a well to provide a way to periodically measure temperature gradient, pressure, and chemistry of the thermal waters and to investigate the space-heating potential of the area in the vicinity of Mammoth Lakes. All three projects are briefly described.

Lyster, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

329

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

330

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

331

Power Plant Closure Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that are planning to decommission an aged power plant face a host of issues that must be addressed and many tasks that must be properly executed in order to ensure a successful closure of the facility.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy October 3, 2011 - 7:03pm Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs As Secretary Chu noted this weekend, America finds itself in a fierce global competition for the clean energy jobs and industries of the future - with countries like China, Germany and others investing tens of billions of dollars to expand their domestic renewable energy industry and capture the lead in a rapidly growing field. In this context, the Department of Energy's loan programs have played a crucially important role in helping the United States compete, by providing affordable financing to innovative projects that might not otherwise happen but that hold the potential to seed entire new industries for U.S.

333

Economic Study for Geothermal Steam Production of Electric Power  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of economic analyses of geothermal electric power production facilities using selected geothermal resource temperature characteristics and relates the cost of power and rate of return on investment thus obtained to those being experienced at present and as projected from nuclear and fossil-fuel generating facilities. The results are set down in a manner to permit easy economic comparison of the various options of electric power generation. It is intended that this study will be a management assist in evaluating the rate of return on invested project capital and the resulting cost of electricity generated from geothermal resources as related to existing alternative generation methods. The resulting electric energy cost is compared with the selected alternative electric generation and their costs.

1977-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

334

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Major Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) The Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) was established in October 2000 to further the commercial-scale...

335

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

336

Vulcan Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bend, Oregon Zip 97702 Sector Geothermal energy Product Oregon-based geothermal power plant developer active in California. References Vulcan Power Company1 LinkedIn...

337

Potential growth of electric power production from Imperial Valley geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of geothermal electric power operations in Imperial Valley, California is projected over the next 40 years. With commercial power forecast to become available in the 1980's, the scenario considers three subsequent growth rates: 40, 100, and 250 MW per year. These growth rates, along with estimates of the total resource size, result in a maximum level of electric power production ranging from 1000 to 8000 MW to be attained in the 2010 to 2020 time period. Power plant siting constraints are developed and used to make siting patterns for the 400- through 8000-MW level of power production. Two geothermal technologies are included in the scenario: flashed steam systems that produce cooling water from the geothermal steam condensate and emit noncondensable gases to the atmosphere; and high pressure, confined flow systems that inject the geoghermal fluid back into the ground. An analysis of the scenario is made with regard to well drilling and power plant construction rates, land use, cooling water requirements, and hydrogen sulfide emissions.

Ermak, D.L.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/0l4), October 1975. u ICooled Reactors (GESMO), NUREG -0002,ES, August 1976. W. B.Plants", report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), October 1975. See

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

340

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

342

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

344

Geotechnical Environmental Aspects of Geothermal Power Generation at Heber, Imperial Valley, California. Topical report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a portion of the results from a one-year feasibility study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assess the feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source. The impact of power generation from hydrothermal resources on subsurface water flow, seismicity and subsidence are of acute interest in the determination of the environmental acceptance of geothermal energy. At the same time, the experience and data bases in these areas are very limited. The objective of the project was to assess the technical, geotechnical, environmental and economic feasibility of producing electricity from hydrothermal resources like those known to exist in the US. The objective of this part of the study was to investigate the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California. This report discusses geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. it also discusses estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds.

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Evaluation of geothermal energy in Arizona. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the following: legislative and institutional program, cities program, geothermal applications utilization technology, integrated alcohol/feedlot/geothermal operation, geothermal energy in the mining industry, geothermal space heating and cooling, identification of a suitable industry for a remote geothermal site, irrigation pumping, coal-fired/geothermal-assisted power plants, area development plans, and outreach. (MHR)

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Open-File Report 12-3 Data Tables and Graphs of Geothermal Power Production in Nevada,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes statistics on geothermal power production in Nevada from initial plant construction in 1985 through 2011. Data are compiled on nameplate capacity, gross production, and net production by producing geothermal area. Graphs illustrate trends for individual areas and for Nevada overall. The data and graphs are in an Excel spreadsheet, which is also available online with this document, at

Lisa Shevenell; Jonathan G. Price; Ronald H. Hess

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

349

Backgrounder: Geothermal resource production, steam gathering, and power generation at Salton Sea Unit 3, Calipatria, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 10,000-kilowatt Salton Sea Unit 1 power plant was designed to demonstrate that electrical power generation, using the highly saline brines from the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir, was technically and economically feasible. Unit 1, owned by Earth Energy, a Unocal subsidiary, began operating in 1982, initiating an intensive testing program which established the design criteria necessary to construct the larger 47,500-kilowatt Unit 3 power plant, unit 3 contains many of the proprietary or patented technological innovations developed during this program. Design, construction and start-up of the Unit 3 power generating facility began in December, 1986, and was completed in 26 months. By the end of 1988, the brine handling system was in full operation, and the turbine had been tested at design speed. Desert Power Company, a Unocal subsidiary, owns the power generating facility. Unocal owns the brine resource production facility. Power is transmitted by the Imperial Irrigation District to Southern California Edison Company.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking in materials for geothermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the performance of alloys used in geothermal power systems are reported. Alloys which are commercially available and those which have modified metallurgical structures and/or composition modifications were tested to determine the corrosive effects of the H/sub 2/S and thermal environments in geothermal fluids. Hydrogen embrittlement and sulfide stress corrosion cracking were tested. Test results showing the effects of alloy composition, tempering temperatures, fluid temperature and salt content, and ageing on sulfide stress cracking are tabulated. (LCL)

Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.; Abu-Khater, B.; Ferrigno, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

GeoPowering the West: Geothermal Energy--The Bountiful, Clean Energy Source for the West  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General fact sheet describing U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West program. Geothermal energy represents a major economic opportunity for the American West, an area characterized by a steadily increasing population that requires reliable sources of heat and power. GeoPowering the West is pursuing this opportunity by: (1) Bringing together national, state and local stakeholders for state-sponsored geothermal development workshops; (2) Working with public power companies and rural electric cooperatives to promote use of geothermal power; (3) Promoting increased federal use of geothermal energy; (4) Helping American Indians identify and develop geothermal resources on tribal lands; and (5) Sponsoring non-technical educational workshops.

Not Available

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CE Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CE Geothermal CE Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search Name CE Geothermal Place California Sector Geothermal energy Product CE Geothermal previously owned the assets of Western States Geothermal Company, which owns the 10MW nameplate Desert Peak Geothermal Power Plant. References CE Geothermal[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CE Geothermal is a company located in California . References ↑ "CE Geothermal" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CE_Geothermal&oldid=343310" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

353

MIXTURES OF CO2-SF6 AS WORKING FLUIDS FOR GEOTHERMAL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, mixtures of CO2 and SF6 were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal plants based on property measurements, molecular dynamics modeling, thermodynamic cycle analysis, and materials compatibility assessment. The CO2 - SF6 was evaluated for a reservoir temperature of 160 oC. Increasing the efficiency for these low reservoir sources will increase the options available for geothermal energy utilization in more sites across the country. The properties for the mixtures were obtained either from thermodynamic property measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. Optimum compositions of the CO2 - SF6 were identified for a well reservoir temperature and a given water-cooling condition. Concerning the global warming potential, it was estimated that the equivalent CO2 emissions per 1kWh for a Rankine cycle operating with 100% SF6 would be approximately of 7.6% than those for a coal-fired power plant.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Agency/Company /Organization: J. Pater Salmon, J. Meurice, N. Wobus, F. Stern, and M. Duaime Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/49391.pdf Country: United States Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Water Use Geothermal/Water Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

358

Outside a Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outside a Geothermal Region Outside a Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Outside a Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (1) Projects (0) Techniques (0) This is a category for geothermal areas added that do not fall within an existing geothermal region. As a number of these accumulate on OpenEI, new regions can be created and areas moved into those regions accordingly. Geothermal Regions Map[1] References ↑ "Geothermal Regions Map" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Colorado Area USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential Undiscovered Mean Potential Planned Capacity Planned Capacity Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Geothermal Areas within the Outside a Geothermal Region

359

SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan Program (Saskatchewan, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SaskPower offers a loan program for residential and farm customers who choose to install a Canadian Geoexchange Coalition (CGC) certified geothermal heating and/or a renewable electricity system.

360

Analysis of the potential use of geothermal energy for power generation along the Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three forms of potential geothermal energy may exist in the State of Texas: hot rocks in the Trans Pecos region, convection type geothermal water in the Rio Grande Rift basin, and geopressured geothermal water along the Gulf Coast. Of these, only the geopressured waters have been verified. Exploration wells for oil and gas have established the presence of deep hot water deposits along the coastal area, offshore and inland for 75 miles. These exist in thick shale and sand beds in the geopressured zone. The most favorable area appears to be at depths of 12,000 to 15,000 feet where the temperatures range from 300 to 400/sup 0/F. Indications are that a series of relatively small, 10 to 50 megawatt, power plants could be located along the coastal plain of Texas. These plants could produce at least 20,000 megawatts and possibly as much as 100,000 megawatts under the most favorable conditions. Cost of the power appears to be in the range of 25 to 35 mills per kilowatt hour in 1980 providing the water is saturated with natural gas which could be sold to offset some of the cost. If the gas is present, at least 6 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas would be produced. Unit capital investment for such plants would exceed projected costs for nuclear or fossil fueled power plants. Successful development of a demonstration plant with public funds could establish the viability of geopressured waters as a source of power and natural gas and encourage private investment to exploit this energy source, should it prove competitive with other sources of electric power generation.

Wilson, J.S.; Shepherd, B.P.; Kaufman, S.

1975-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dual-temperature Kalina cycle for geothermal-solar hybrid power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the thermodynamics of a power system coupling two renewable heat sources: low-temperature geothermal and a high-temperature solar. The process, referred to as a dual-temperature geothermal-solar Kalina ...

Boghossian, John G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applies, not only to the nuclear reactor, but also to otherdetailed de- sign of nuclear reactor power s tations is vgreat importance in nuclear reactor accidents. 3.2 Increase

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Pages that link to "Annual US Geothermal Power Production and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Exploration and Confirmation ( links) Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction ( links) Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification...

364

Aspects of the Kalina technology applied to geothermal power production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of studies conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) concerning the applicability of the Kalina technology to geothermal (hydrothermal) power production. This report represents a correction and addition to that report. The Heat Cycle Research Program (HCRP) has as its primary goal the cost-effective production of electric power from moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. Recent work has included the study of supercritical cycles with counterflow condensation which utilize mixtures as working fluids. These advanced concepts are projected to give a 20 to 30% improvement in power produced per unit geofluid flow rate (geofluid effectiveness, w hr/lb). The original Kalina cycle is a system which is similar to the cycles being studied in the Heat Cycle Research program and it was felt that this new cycle should be studied in the geothermal context. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.

1989-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geothermal Energy Technology: a current-awareness bulletin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin announces on a semimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technology required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use either directly or for production of electric power. The subject content encompasses: resource status and assessment, geology and hydrology of geothermal systems, geothermal exploration, legal and institutional aspects, economic and final aspects, environmental aspects and waste disposal, by-products, geothermal power plants, geothermal engineering, direct energy utilization, and geothermal data and theory.

Smith, L.B. (ed.)

1983-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Report on Preliminary Engineering Study for Installation of an Air Cooled Steam Condenser at Brawley Geothermal Plant, Unit No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Brawley Geothermal Project comprises a single 10 MW nominal geothermal steam turbine-generator unit which has been constructed and operated by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE). Geothermal steam for the unit is supplied through contract by Union Oil Company which requires the return of all condensate. Irrigation District (IID) purchases the electric power generated and provides irrigation water for cooling tower make-up to the plant for the first-five years of operation, commencing mid-1980. Because of the unavailability of irrigation water from IID in the future, SCE is investigating the application and installation of air cooled heat exchangers in conjunction with the existing wet (evaporative) cooling tower with make-up based on use of 180 gpm (nominal) of the geothermal condensate which may be made available by the steam supplier.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

369

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

370

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

371

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

372

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

373

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

374

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

375

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

376

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

377

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

378

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

379

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

380

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

382

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

383

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

384

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

385

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

386

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

387

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

388

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

389

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

390

Economics of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected summary is presented of the resource, technical, and financial considerations which influence the economics of geothermal energy in the US. Estimates of resource base and levelized busbar cost of base load power for several types of geothermal resources are compared with similar estimates for more conventional energy resources. Current geothermal electric power plants planned, under construction, and on-line in the US are noted.

Morris, G.E.; Tester, J.W.; Graves, G.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal(Redirected from Leasing) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties,

392

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties, Nevada (May 2008)

393

Development of an Enhanced Two-Phase Production System at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method was developed to enhance geothermal steam production from two-phase wells at THE Geysers Geothermal Field. The beneficial result was increased geothermal production that was easily and economically delivered to the power plant.

Steven Enedy

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

IMPROVEMENTS IN POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A power plant for nuclear reactors is designed for improved cycle efficiency. In addition to the usual heat exchanger for heat transfer from gaseous reactor coolant to water for vaporization, a second heat exchanger is provided between the first heat exchanger and a point betwveen the intermediate- pressure and low-pressure turbine stages. In this way, interstage reheating of the steam is obtained without passage of the steam back to the first heat exchanger. (D.L.C.) Research Reactors

Peters, M.C.

1961-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

397

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

398

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

399

Use of Geothermal Energy for Electric Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and its 1,000 member systems are involved in the research, development and utilization of many different types of supplemental and alternative energy resources. We share a strong commitment to the wise and efficient use of this country's energy resources as the ultimate answer to our national prosperity and economic growth. WRECA is indebted to the United States Department of Energy for funding the NRECA/DOE Geothermal Workshop which was held in San Diego, California in October, 1980. We would also like to express our gratitude to each of the workshop speakers who gave of their time, talent and experience so that rural electric systems in the Western U. S. might gain a clearer understanding of the geothermal potential in their individual service areas. The participants were also presented with practical, expert opinion regarding the financial and technical considerations of using geothermal energy for electric power production. The organizers of this conference and all of those involved in planning this forum are hopeful that it will serve as an impetus toward the full utilization of geothermal energy as an important ingredient in a more energy self-sufficient nation. The ultimate consumer of the rural electric system, the member-owner, expects the kind of leadership that solves the energy problems of tomorrow by fully utilizing the resources at our disposal today.

Mashaw, John M.; Prichett, III, Wilson (eds.)

1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GRR/Section 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant Exception < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant Exception 07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Energy Commission Regulations & Policies California Code of Regulations, Title 20 - Public Utilities and Energy Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

402

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Reliability-Availability and State Regulation,"Report on Equipment Availability: Fossil and NuclearBasic Definitions* Availability: Reliability: Base Loading:

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Performance Summaries Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Project Performance Summaries Project Performance Summaries are written after project completion. These...

404

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled near-term, NIF based, NIC-derivative fusion performance § 3 allows small, thin Fresnel lenses ­ enables

405

Installed Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Capacity Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Installed Geothermal Capacity International Market Map of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants List of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants Throughout the world geothermal energy is looked at as a potential source of renewable base-load power. As of 2005 there was 8,933 MW of installed power capacity within 24 countries. The International Geothermal Association (IGA) reported 55,709 GWh per year of geothermal electricity. The generation from 2005 to 2010 increased to 67,246 GWh, representing a 20% increase in the 5 year period. The IGA has projected that by 2015 the new installed capacity will reach 18,500 MW, nearly 10,000 MW greater than 2005. [1] Countries with the greatest increase in installed capacity (MW) between

406

Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology Abstract N/A Authors Terra-Gen Power and LLC Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology Citation Terra-Gen Power, LLC. Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology [Internet]. [updated 2011;cited 2011]. Available from: http://www.terra-genpower.com/News/TERRA-GEN-POWER-AND-TAS-CELEBRATE-INNOVATIVE-BINAR.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Terra-Gen_Power_and_TAS_Celebrate_Innovative_Binary_Geothermal_Technology&oldid=682514

407

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

409

Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A LUNAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A concept of a nuclear power plant to be assembled on earth and operated on the moon is presented. The two principal design objectives are reliability and high specific power. Wherever there is an incompatibility between these two objectives, the decision favors reliability. The design is based on the premise that the power plant must be designed on the basis of current technology and with a minimum amount of research and development. The principal components consist of a fast reactor in a direct cycle with a mercury-vapor turbine. The high- frequency generator, hydrogen compressor for the generator cooling system, mercury-recirculating pump, and condensate pump are on an extension of the turbine shaft. Ths mercury vapor is condensed and the hydrogen cooled in wing radiators. The reactor is of a construction quite similar to EBR-I Mark IlI for which there is a large amount of operating experience. The radiator is a vertical tube-and-fin type built in concentric cylindrical sections of increseing diameter. The curved headers are connected by swivel joints so that, upon arrival, the radiator can be quickly unfolded from the compact cylindrical package it formed during transportation. (auth)

Armstrong, R.H.; Carter, J.C.; Hummel, H.H.; Janicke, M.J.; Marchaterre, J.F.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Results of the development and field demonstration program on cavitation descaling techniques for pipes and tubes used in geothermal energy plants. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of geothermal energy into usable electrical power has become increasingly important to the overall national energy needs. A major area of technical interest which has resulted from the initial development of geothermal power plants is the scale formation developed in the facility pipes and related components. This scale formation is due to the concentration of minerals in the geothermal water and steam. The current state-of-technology utilized for descaling consists of a combination of sandblasting, water blasting, acid soaking and scraping. These cleaning methods, used individually or collectively, do not provide an acceptable descaling operation due to excessive facility downtime and cost.

Graham, F.C.; Thiruvengadam, A.P.; Hochrein, A.A., Jr.

1978-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Power Production from Geothermal Brine with the Rotary Separator Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The rotary separator turbine is a new turbine device that operates with gas-liquid mixtures. This device achieves complete gas-liquid separation, generates power from the liquid and repressurizes the liquid. The use of the rotary separator turbine for geothermal power generation was investigated on this program. A pilot scale unit was designed and tested. Tests were conducted with a clean water/steam mixture and with geothermal brine/steam flows at East Mesa, California; Raft River, Idaho; and Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. The test results were used to calculate the performance advantage of a rotary separator turbine power system compared to a flash steam power system and a binary power system. The calculated performance advantages were then used to estimate market potential for wellhead and central station Biphase units. The measured performance in the laboratory and in the field agreed to within {+-} 10% of the predicted values. The design goal of 20 kWe was generated both in the laboratory and from brine. Separated steam quality was measured to be greater than 99.96% at all three geothermal resources and in the laboratory. Brine pressure leaving the test unit was greater than reinjection pressure requirements. Maximum brine outlet pressure of 90 psig was demonstrated. The measured performance values would result in a 34% increase in electric power production above a single stage flash steam system. Increasing the size from the pilot size unit (20kWe) to a wellhead unit (2000 kWe) gave a calculated performance advantage of 40%. Based on these favorable results, design, construction and testing of a full-size well-head unit was initiated.

Cerini, Donald J.; Hays, Lance G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean,...

414

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project EA at San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant USG Nevada LLC Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Comments USG Nevada submitted Utilization POU on 7/25/2013 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office BLM Black Rock

415

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal power) Geothermal power) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

416

NREL: Learning - Student Resources on Geothermal Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Student Resources on Geothermal Electricity Production Photo of the Geysers power plants in California. Students can...

417

Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this study will allow the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits include the transfer of new...

418

Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric and Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source of heat that is key to developing the Tilapia based aquaculture. The geothermal power plant will create up to 30 jobs during construction, and one permanent maintenance...

419

Klamath Falls Geothermal Low Temperature Power Plant Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be the operation and monitoring of economic, performance and operating characteristics. A final report will include a validation of technical and economic assumptions and...

420

Program in geothermal well technology directed toward achieving DOE/DGE power-on-line goals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the material used in an oral presentation to the DOE/Division of Geothermal Energy, which was designed to illustrate the importance of well technology development in reducing geothermal well costs, and to achieve geothermal power-on-line goals. Examination of recent studies of the economics of geothermal energy leads to the conclusion that the overall sensitivity of geothermal power-on-line to well cost is in the range of one to two. Current data suggest that a vigorous R and D program in rotary drilling technology can reduce geothermal drilling costs by about 20%, but a reduction of 40 to 50% is needed to achieve DOE/DGE goals. Research in advanced drilling systems is needed to satisfy this more stringent requirement. Some critical technological deficiencies that occur when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal drilling are discussed. A broadly based development program directed at correcting these deficiencies is defined.

Polito, J.; Varnado, S.G.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal power plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Electricity Production Photo of a geothermal power plant. This geothermal power plant generates electricity for the Imperial Valley in California. Geothermal power plants use steam produced from reservoirs of hot water found a few miles or more below the Earth's surface to produce electricity. The steam rotates a turbine that activates a generator, which produces electricity. There are three types of geothermal power plants: dry steam, flash steam, and binary cycle. Dry Steam Dry steam power plants draw from underground resources of steam. The steam is piped directly from underground wells to the power plant where it is directed into a turbine/generator unit. There are only two known underground resources of steam in the United States: The Geysers in northern California and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, where there's

422

Molokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Geothermal Area Molokai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Molokai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

423

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

424

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

425

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

426

ATOMIC POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactor power plants and discloses a design of a reactor utilizing a mixture of discrete units of a fissionable material, such as uranium carbide, a neutron moderator material, such as graphite, to carry out the chain reaction. A liquid metal, such as bismuth, is used as the coolant and is placed in the reactor chamber with the fissionable and moderator material so that it is boiled by the heat of the reaction, the boiling liquid and vapors passing up through the interstices between the discrete units. The vapor and flue gases coming off the top of the chamber are passed through heat exchangers, to produce steam, for example, and thence through condensers, the condensed coolant being returned to the chamber by gravity and the non- condensible gases being carried off through a stack at the top of the structure.

Daniels, F.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Geothermal/Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transmission Transmission < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Transmission General Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (5) The Geysers power plant showing condensers being retrofitted with direct contact condensers (DCCs). The DCCs were designed by NREL researchers working with Calpine Corporation for improved efficiency. With a 750-megawatt output from 14 units, the Geysers is the largest producer of geothermal power in the world. Geothermal power plants are located very close to the geothermal resource because the hot water/steam would cool down before reaching the power plant, unlike a natural gas plant which pipe gas hundreds or even thousands

428

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

429

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

430

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

432

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

433

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region