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1

Category:Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Relict Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Category:Relict Geothermal Features Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Relict Geothermal Features page? For detailed information on Relict Geothermal Features, click here. Pages in category "Relict Geothermal Features" The following 13 pages are in this category, out of 13 total. A Alunite Argillic-Advanced Argillic Alteration C Carbonate Deposition H Hydrothermal Alteration Hydrothermal Deposition H cont. Hydrothermally Altered Rock Hydrothermally Deposited Rock L Leach Capping

2

Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relict Geothermal Features Relict Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Relict Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Relict Geothermal Features: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Relict geothermal surface feature, include the mineral formations left behind by hot springs, fumaroles, and geysers as well as the alteration of minerals by geothermal waters (e.g. opalization of sediments). Such alteration and deposits are indicators of past hydrothermal activity. Though surface activity has ceased in many areas, relict geothermal features may indicate the presence of a still active geothermal system below the surface. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Relict_Geothermal_Features&oldid=600720"

3

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND...

4

Modern Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modern Geothermal Features Modern Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Modern Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Modern Geothermal Features: Active geothermal manifestations such as hot springs, fumaroles, steaming ground, mud pots, mud pools, mud volcanoes, or geysers. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle When geothermal systems have conduits available to the surface, they cause surface manifestations (or geothermal features). These features may vary between steam seeps (fumaroles) or pure fluid manifestations (geysers and hot springs) causing spectacular mineral formations (e.g. sinter terraces, tufa mounds). These types of manifestations are clear indications of an underlying geothermal system. Geothermal systems with no modern surface

5

Environmental Assessment -- Hydrothermal Geothermal Subprogram  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact assessment addresses the design, construction, and operation of an electric generating plant (3 to 4 MWe) and research station (Hawaii Geothermal Research Station (HGRS)) in the Puna district on the Island of Hawaii. The facility will include control and support buildings, parking lots, cooling towers, settling and seepage ponds, the generating plant, and a visitors center. Research activities at the facility will evaluate the ability of a successfully flow-tested well (42-day flow test) to provide steam for power generation over an extended period of time (two years). In future expansion, research activities may include direct heat applications such as aquaculture and the effects of geothermal fluids on various plant components and specially designed equipment on test modules. Construction-related impacts would be relatively minor. Construction of the facility will require the distance of about 1.7 ha (4.1 acres). No further disturbance is anticipated, unless it becomes necessary to replace the seepage pond with an injection well, because the production well is in service and adjacent roads and transmission lines are adequate. Disruption of competing land uses will be minimal, and loss of wildlife habitat will be acceptable. Noise should not significantly affect wildlife and local residents; the most noise activities (well drilling and flow testing) have been completed. Water use during construction will not be large, and impacts on competing uses are unlikely. Socio-economic impacts will be small because the project will not employ a large number of local residents and few construction workers will need to find local housing.

None

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration"

7

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei Abstract Though exploring for hydrothermal resources is not new, advances in exploration technologies and the pursuit of less visible resources have created a need to outline exploration best practices. This multi-year study outlines 21 geothermal exploration regions in the Western United States. These regions were developed based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) physiographic regions, then adjusted to fit geothermal parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects

8

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

9

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

10

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gps Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With...

11

Geothermal Technologies Office: Hydrothermal and Resource Confirmation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

12

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description Potter Drilling has recently demonstrated hydrothermal spallation drilling in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface without contact between the rock and the drill head. This process virtually eliminates the need for tripping. Previous tests of flame-jet spallation achieved ROP of 50 ft/hr and higher in hard rock with minimal wear on the drilling assembly, but operating this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology in a fluid-filled borehole and as a result has the potential to achieve similarly high ROP that is uncompromised by stability or cuttings transport issues.

13

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interviews were conducted with exploration experts with both geothermal and oil-and-gas industry experience to identify the exploration challenges and best practices for the...

14

Controls on the geomorphic expression and evolution of gryphons, pools, and caldera features at hydrothermal seeps in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(reviewed in [6,7]). This area has received considerable interest lately, propelled by developments in Biotechnology 2006, 17:250­255 www.sciencedirect.com #12;geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park as environmental, community genomics or metagenomics. Few areas of biology have witnessed such a surge in interest

Mazzini, Adriano

15

Potential benefits of geothermal electrical production from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential national benefits of geothermal electric energy development from the hydrothermal resources in the West are estimated for several different scenarios. The U.S. electrical economy is simulated by computer using a linear programming optimization technique. Under most of the scenarios, benefits are estimated at $2 to $4 billion over the next 50 years on a discounted present value basis. The electricity production from hydrothermal plants reaches 2 to 4 percent of the national total, which will represent 10 to 20 percent of the installed capacity in the West. Installed geothermal capacity in 1990 is estimated to be 9,000 to 17,000 Mw(e). The geothermal capacity should reach 28,000 to 65,000 Mw(e) by year 2015. The ''most likely'' scenario yields the lower values in the above ranges. Under this scenario geothermal development would save the utility industry $11 billion in capital costs (undiscounted); 32 million separative work units; 64,000 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/; and 700 million barrels of oil. The most favorable scenario for geothermal energy occurs when fossil fuel prices are projected to increase at 5 percent/year. The benefits of geothermal energy then exceed $8 billion on a discounted present value basis. Supply curves were developed for hydrothermal resources based on the recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment, resource characteristics, and projected power conversion technology and costs. Geothermal plants were selected by the optimizing technique to fill a need for ''light load'' plants. This infers that geothermal plants may be used in the future primarily for load-following purposes.

Bloomster, C.H.; Engel, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GPS Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...

17

Geothermal hydrothermal direct heat use: US market size and market penetration estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study estimates the future regional and national market penetration path of hydrothermal geothermal direct heat applications in the United States. A Technology Substitution Model (MARPEN) is developed and used to estimate the energy market shares captured by low-temperature (50 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal geothermal energy systems over the period 1985 to 2020. The sensitivity of hydrothermal direct heat market shares to various government hydrothermal commercialization policies is examined. Several substantive recommendations to help accelerate commercialization of geothermal direct heat utilization in the United States are indicated and possible additional analyses are discussed.

El Sawy, A.H.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps Units And Pocket Computers Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hand-held global positioning system (GPS) units and pocket personal computers (PCs) were used to map surface geothermal features at the Bradys Hot Springs and Salt Wells geothermal systems, Churchill County, Nevada, in less time and with greater accuracy than would have been possible with conventional mapping methods. Geothermal features that were mapped include fumaroles, mud pots, warm ground, sinter, and a variety of silicified rocks. In both areas, the digital mapping was able to resolve

19

Specific features of geothermal steam turbine control and emergency system  

SciTech Connect

There are significant construction as well as operational differences between geothermal and conventional steam turbines. These result in specific features associated with geothermal steam turbine control and emergency system. Several aspects of geothermal steam turbine control have been considered. Some proposals of geothermal steam turbine control have been presented. Among others the following operation modes have been considered: Driving turbine, driving well, turbine power and well steam pressure coupled control.

Domachowski, Z.; Gutierrez, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS Units And Pocket Computers Abstract Hand-held global positioning system (GPS) units and pocket personal computers (PCs) were used to map surface geothermal features at the Bradys Hot Springs and Salt Wells geothermal systems, Churchill County, Nevada, in less time and with greater accuracy than would have been possible with conventional mapping methods. Geothermal features that were mapped include fumaroles, mud pots, warm ground, sinter, and a variety of silicified rocks. In both areas, the digital mapping was able to resolve structural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tapping the earth's geothermal resources: Hydrothermal today, magma tomorrow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper discusses geothermal resources, what it is, where it is, and how to extract energy from it. The materials research activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory related to geothermal energy extraction are discussed. These include high-temperature, light-weight polymer cements, elastomers, biochemical waste processing techniques, and non-metallic heat exchanger tubing. The economics of geothermal energy is also discussed. (ACR)

Kukacka, L.E.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

SciTech Connect

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.

Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)); Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal System Hydrothermal System (Redirected from Hydrothermal Systems) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Systems: A hydrothermal system is one that included fluid, heat, and permeability in a naturally occurring geological formation for the production of electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Geothermal production well at Imperial Valley, California. The drilling of production wells, such as this one in southern California, results in

27

Faults and gravity anomalies over the East Mesa hydrothermal-geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed interpretations of gravity anomalies over geothermal systems may be extremely useful for mapping the fracture or fault systems that control the circulation of the thermal waters. This approach seems to be particularly applicable in areas like the Salton Trough where reactions between the thermal waters and the porous sediments produce authigenic-hydrothermal minerals in sufficient quantity to cause distinct gravity anomalies at the surface. A 3-D inversion of the residual Bouguer gravity anomaly over the East Mesa geothermal field was made to examine the densified volume of rock. We show that the data not only resolve a north-south and an intersecting northwest structure, but that it may be possible to distinguish between the active present-day hydrothermal system and an older and cooler part of the system. The densified region is compared spatially to self-potential, thermal and seismic results and we find a good concordance between the different geophysical data sets. Our results agree with previous studies that have indicated that the main feeder fault recharging the East Mesa reservoir dips steeply to the west.

Goldstein, N.E.; Carle, S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrothermal Geothermal Subprogram, Hawaii Geothermal Research Station, Hawaii County, Hawaii: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact assessment addresses the design, construction, and operation of an electric generating plant (3 to 4 MWe) and research station (Hawaii Geothermal Research Station (HGRS)) in the Puna district on the Island of Hawaii. The facility will include control and support buildings, parking lots, cooling towers, settling and seepage ponds, the generating plant, and a visitors center. Research activities at the facility will evaluate the ability of a successfully flow-tested well (42-day flow test) to provide steam for power generation over an extended period of time (two years). In future expansion, research activities may include direct heat applications such as aquaculture and the effects of geothermal fluids on various plant components and specially designed equipment on test modules. 54 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Property:RelictGeoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RelictGeoFeatures RelictGeoFeatures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name RelictGeoFeatures Property Type String Description Describes evidence of ancient surface manifestations in the vicinity of the resource area (e.g. hydrothermally altered rock, hydrothermally deposited rock) This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 8 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area S cont. Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "RelictGeoFeatures" Showing 9 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal Deposition +

30

Category:Geothermal Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Systems (EGS) G Geothermal Direct Use G cont. GeothermalExploration Ground Source Heat Pumps H Hydrothermal System S Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Retrieved from...

31

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 5 August, 2013 - 13:18 geothermal NREL OpenEI regulatory roadmap Navigating the complex system of federal and state regulations to secure project approvals is one of the biggest hurdles geothermal power developers face-but not if they've got a map outlining every twist and turn. DOE's Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap, a new online tool for agency, industry, and policymaker use, helps developers make it through regulatory requirements at every level of government more easily to deploy geothermal energy projects. Designed to help strengthen collaboration between federal and state agencies, the roadmap should also speed the review of proposed projects and

32

Evaluation of land ownership, lease status, and surface features in five geopressured geothermal prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was accomplished for the purpose of gathering information pertaining to land and lease ownership, surface features and use and relevant environmental factors in the Lake Theriot (West and East), Kaplan, Bayou Hebert and Freshwater Bayou geopressured geothermal prospects in Louisiana, and the Blessing geopressured geothermal prospect in Texas. This information and recommendations predicated upon it will then be used to augment engineering and geological data utilized to select geopressured geothermal test well sites within the prospects. The five geopressured geothermal prospects are briefly described and recommendations given.

Hackenbracht, W.N.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Hydrothermal) (Redirected from Hydrothermal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Systems: A hydrothermal system is one that included fluid, heat, and permeability in a naturally occurring geological formation for the production of electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Geothermal production well at Imperial Valley, California. The drilling of production wells, such as this one in southern California, results in one-third to one-half of the cost of a geothermal project. Copyright ©

34

Correlation of wireline log characteristics with hydrothermal alteration and other reservoir properties of the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal fields, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed study of wireline logs from 11 wells in the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal systems was undertaken in order to determine the effects of hydrothermal alteration on the response of electrical and gamma-gamma density well logs. For the Salton Sea geothermal field, definite correspondence between log responses and hydrothermal mineralogy is evident, which in turn is related to the physical properties of the rocks. Three hydrothermal and one unaltered zone can be identified from log data on shales. These are: (1) the unaltered montmorillonite zone (290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C). The characteristic responses on well logs by which these zones are identified result primarily from changes in clay mineralogy of the shales and increases in density with progressive hydrothermal metamorphism. In the Westmorland geothermal field, differentiating mineral zones from log responses was only partially successful. However, analyses of both well log and petrologic data for wells Landers 1 and Kalin Farms 1 suggest that the former is heating up and the latter is cooling.

Muramoto, F.S.; Elders, W.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Correlation of wireline log characteristics with hydrothermal alteration and other reservoir properties of the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal fields, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of wireline logs from 11 wells in the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal systems was undertaken in order to determine the effects of hydrothermal alteration on the response of electrical and gamma-gamma density well logs. For the Salton Sea geothermal field, definite correspondence between log responses and hydrothermal mineralogy is evident, which in turn is related to the physical properties of the rocks. Three hydrothermal and one unaltered zone can be identified from log data on shales. These are: (1) the unaltered montmorillonite zone (<100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C); (2) the illite zone (100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C to 230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C); (3) the chlorite zone (230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C to 290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C); and (4) the feldspar zone (>290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C). The characteristic responses on well logs by which these zones are identified result primarily from changes in clay mineralogy of the shales and increases in density with progressive hydrothermal metamorphism. In the Westmorland geothermal field, differentiating mineral zones from log responses was only partially successful. However, analyses of both well log and petrologic data for wells Landers 1 and Kalin Farms 1 suggest that the former is heating up and the latter is cooling.

Muramoto, F.S.; Elders, W.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydrothermal spallation drilling and advanced energy conversion technologies for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to study the various factors affecting the economic and technical feasibility of Engineered Geothermal Systems, with a special emphasis on advanced drilling technologies. The first part of ...

Augustine, Chad R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Systems: A hydrothermal system is one that included fluid, heat, and permeability in a naturally occurring geological formation for the production of electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Geothermal production well at Imperial Valley, California. The drilling of production wells, such as this one in southern California, results in one-third to one-half of the cost of a geothermal project. Copyright ©

38

Geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

White, D.E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

40

Shallow hydrothermal regime of the East Brawley and Glamis known geothermal resource areas, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal gradients and thermal conductivities were obtained in real time using an in situ heat-flow technique in 15 shallow (90 to 150 m) wells drilled between Brawley and Glamis in the Imperial Valley, Southern California. The in situ measurements were supplemented by follow-up conventional temperature logs in seven of the wells and by laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity on drill cuttings. The deltaic sedimentary material comprising the upper approx. 100 m of the Salton Trough generally is poorly sorted and high in quartz resulting in quite high thermal conductivities (averaging 2.0 Wm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ as opposed to 1.2 to 1.7 for typical alluvium). A broad heat-flow anomaly with maximum of about 200 mWm/sup -2/ (approx. 5 HFU) is centered between Glamis and East Brawley and is superimposed on a regional heat-flow high in excess of 100 mWm/sup -2/ (> 2.5 HFU). The heat-flow high corresponds with a gravity maximum and partially with a minimum in electrical resistivity, suggesting the presence of a hydrothermal system at depth in this area.

Mase, C.W.; Sass, J.H.; Brook, C.A.; Munroe, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps EGS Links Related documents and websites DOE EGS Technical Roadmap DOE EGS Systems Demonstration Projects How EGS Works (Animation) EGS Development (Animation) EGS Schematic.jpg ] Dictionary.png Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are human engineered hydrothermal reservoirs developed for commercial use as an alternative to naturally

42

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Monitoring Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hidden geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the

43

Sedimentary Geothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geopressured Geothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Sedimentary Geothermal Links Related documents and websites Estimate of the Geothermal Energy Resource in the Major Sedimentary Basins in the United States Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana EGS Schematic.jpg ] Dictionary.png Sedimentary Geothermal Systems: Sedimentary Geothermal Systems produce electricity from medium temperature,

44

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

White, D.E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

District space heating potential of low temperature hydrothermal geothermal resources in the southwestern United States. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation model (GIRORA-Nonelectric) is developed to study the economics of district space heating using geothermal energy. GIRORA-Nonelectric is a discounted cashflow investment model which evaluates the financial return on investment for space heating. This model consists of two major submodels: the exploration for and development of a geothermal anomaly by a geothermal producer, and the purchase of geothermal fluid by a district heating unit. The primary output of the model is a calculated rate of return on investment earned by the geothermal producer. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the model subject to changes in physical and economic parameters are given in this report. Using the results of the economic analysis and technological screening criteria, all the low temperature geothermal sites in Southwestern United States are examined for economic viability for space heating application. The methodology adopted and the results are given.

McDevitt, P.K.; Rao, C.R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

Ballantyne, J.M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geothermal Direct Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct Use Direct Use Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF [edit] Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Direct Use Links Related documents and websites EERE's Direct Use Report National Institute of Building Science's Whole Building Design Guide Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Dictionary.png Geothermal Direct Use: Low- to moderate-temperature water from geothermal reservoirs can be used to provide heat directly to buildings, or other applications that require

50

Gravity and magnetic features and their relationship to the geothermal system in southwestern South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to determine the sources that are responsible for producing geothermal anomalies observed within the southern Black Hills region. Lithologic and structural boundaries residing in the upper crust and their relationship to the geothermal system are discussed. A regional gravity survey was supplemented by a regional aeromagnetic survey.

Hildenbrand, T.G.; Kucks, R.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hydrothermal Alteration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Hydrothermal Alteration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Alteration Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Alteration: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Opalized rock is often valued for its spectacular colors and it may indicate past hydrothermal activity (reference: https://uwaterloo.ca/earth-sciences-museum/what-earth/what-earth-minerals/what-earth-precious-opal) The heat and minerals of hydrothermal waters may result in the chemical alteration of rocks that it comes in contact with. The minerals that result from this alteration may be evidence of past hydrothermal activity. Opalization - alteration to opal. Argillization- alteration to clay minerals such as smectite, illite, and kaolinite which often form caprocks.

52

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

53

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Iceland Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_Iceland_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510812

54

Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalExplorationAtAkutan,Alaska-FavorableIndicationsForAHigh-EnthalpyHydrothermalResourceNearARemoteMarket&oldid38813...

55

Figure 4.17 Geothermal Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 4.17 Geothermal Resources 124 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: Data are for locations of identified hydrothermal ...

56

Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Hydrothermal Program is to develop concepts which allow better utilization of geothermal energy to reduce the life-cycle cost of producing electricity from liquid-dominated, hydrothermal resources. Research in the program is currently ongoing in three areas: (1) Heat Cycle Research, which is looking at methods to increase binary plant efficiencies; (2) Materials Development, which is developing materials for use in geothermal associated environments; and (3) Advanced Brine Chemistry, with work taking place in both the brine chemistry modeling area and waste disposal area. The presentations during this session reviewed the accomplishments and activities taking place in the hydrothermal energy conversion program. Lawrence Kukacka, Brookhaven National Laboratory, discussed advancements being made to develop materials for use in geothermal applications. This research has identified a large number of potential materials for use in applications from pipe liners that inhibit scale buildup and reduce corrosion to elastomers for downhole use. Carl J. Bliem, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, discussed preparations currently underway to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. The research will evaluate whether the projected 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Eugene T. Premuzic, Brookhaven National Laboratory, discussed advancements being made using biotechnology for treatment of geothermal residual waste; the various process options were discussed in terms of biotreatment variables. A treatment scenario and potential disposal costs were presented. John H. Weare, University of California, San Diego, discussed the present capabilities of the brine chemistry model he has developed for geothermal applications and the information it can provide a user. This model is available to industry. The accomplishments from the research projects presented in this session have been many. It is hoped that these accomplishments can be integrated into industrial geothermal power plant sites to assist in realizing the goal of reducing the cost of energy produced from the geothermal resource.

Robertson, David W.; LaSala, Raymond J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geothermal Energy Program Overview: Fiscal Year 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In FY 1990-1991, the Geothermal Energy Program made significant strides in hydrothermal, geopressured brine, hot dry rock, and magma research, continuing a 20-year tradition of advances in geothermal technology.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers Begins. The Net-Zero house features a geothermal heat pump ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hydrothermal Deposition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Deposition Hydrothermal Deposition Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Deposition Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Deposition: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Quartz veins indicate ancient fluid flow, possibly the result of a hydrothermal system (reference: http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/dc_rocks/) Tufa mounds indicate the location of extinct hot springs. In this photo they show the ancient extent of the surface manifestations at Mono Lake, CA (reference: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/climatechange/page.aspx?id=170704)(photo by Scott Stine) Hydrothermal water carries minerals as it travels through the crust. These minerals are often deposited as pressure decreases as the fluid approaches

60

Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Trough Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

62

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) (Redirected from EGS) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps EGS Links Related documents and websites DOE EGS Technical Roadmap DOE EGS Systems Demonstration Projects How EGS Works (Animation) EGS Development (Animation)

63

Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal outflow occurs most commonly at the terminations of individual faults and where multiple faults interact. These areas of fault propagation and interaction are sites of elevated stress termed breakdown regions. Here, stress concentrations cause active fracturing and continual re-opening of fluid-flow conduits, permitting long-lived hydrothermal flow despite potential clogging of fractures due to mineral precipitation. As

64

Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radar and infrared remote sensing of geothermal features at Pilgrim Springs, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-altitude radar and thermal imagery collected by the NASA research aircraft WB57F were used to examine the structural setting and distribution of radiant temperatures of geothermal anomalies in the Pilgrim Springs, Alaska area. Like-polarized radar imagery with perpendicular look directions provides the best structural data for lineament analysis, although more than half the mapped lineaments are easily detectable on conventional aerial photography. Radiometer data and imagery from a thermal scanner were used to evaluate radiant surface temperatures, which ranged from 3 to 17 C. The evening imagery, which utilized density-slicing techniques, detected thermal anomalies associated with geothermal heat sources. The study indicates that high-altitude predawn thermal imagery may be able to locate relatively large areas of hot ground in site-specific studies in the vegetated Alaskan terrain. This imagery will probably not detect gentle lateral gradients.

Dean, K.G. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks,); Forbes, R.B.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and temperature, Coso Hot Springs geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and temperature, Coso Hot Springs geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Petrographic and geochemical analyses of cuttings from six wells in the Coso Hot Springs geothermal field show a systematic variation in the occurrence, texture, and composition of sericite that can be correlated with high permeability production zones and temperature. The wells studied intersect rhyolitic dikes and sills in the fractured granitic and dioritic

67

hydrothermal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrothermal hydrothermal Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released July 03rd, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated July 03rd, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords biopower csp geothermal hydropower hydrothermal Renewable Energy Technical Potential rooftop United States utility-scale wind Data text/csv icon United States Renewable Energy Technical Potential (csv, 7.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

68

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Italy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area, Italy International Geothermal Area, Italy (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Italy (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Italy Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_Italy_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510813

69

HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN A FAULT-CONTROLLED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR CHARGED AT CONSTANT PRESSURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1975. Heat Transfer in Geothermal Systems, 11 in Advances inHydrothermal Systems, Geothermal Resources (eds. L. RybackI. G. , The Simulation of Geothermal Systems with a Simple

Goyal, K.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Indications of mineral zoning in a fossil hydrothermal system at the Meager Creek geothermal prospect, British Columbia, Canada, from induced polarization studies  

SciTech Connect

By measuring the induced-polarization parameters m (chargeability) and tau (time-constant) we have found evidence that the center of a presumed fossil hydrothermal system at Meager Creek, British Columbia, lies south of the main manifestation of the present-day convective hydrothermal system. What implication this finding has for development of the present-day system is unknown. However, some of the fractures formed during the development of the fossil hydrothermal system may serve as conduits for fluids of the present-day system. The analysis is limited by the lack of availability of a good subsurface distribution of core samples. Nevertheless, a surface induced-polarization survey is expected to yield information about the geometry of the fossil system. Such knowledge would have implications not only for Meager Creek but for other hydrothermal systems of Cascades volcano type. 16 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Ward, S.H.; Zhao, J.X.; Groenwald, J.; Moore, J.N.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hydrothermal Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow

73

Proceedings, New Zealand Geothermal Workshop 2007 LBNL-63627  

This paper summarizes our research to date into operating EGS with CO 2. ... Geothermal energy extraction is currently limited to the highest grade hydrothermal

74

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the...

75

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

76

Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Geothermal Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating geothermal development. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Geothermal energy is heat derived below the earth's surface which can be harnessed to generate clean, renewable energy. This vital, clean energy resource supplies renewable power around the clock and emits little or no greenhouse gases -- all while requiring a small environmental footprint to develop. The Energy Department is committed to responsibly developing, demonstrating, and deploying innovative technologies to support the continued expansion of the geothermal industry across the United States. Featured Pinpointing America's Geothermal Resources with Open Source Data

77

Exploration strategy for high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin and Range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15-phase strategy of exploration for high-temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the Basin and Range province features a balanced mix of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, hydrologic, and drilling activities. The strategy, based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program, provides justification for inclusion or exclusion of all pertinent exploration methods. With continuing research on methods of exploration for, and modeling of, convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. The basic strategy may vary with the geology or hydrology. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy should be particularly useful; many of its elements may apply in other geologic settings.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Strategy of exploration for high temperature hydrothermal systems in the basin and range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fifteen phase strategy of exploration for high temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the basin and range province, recommended herein, features a balanced mix of geological, geochemical, geophysical, hydrological, and drilling activities. The strategy is based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program. Justification for inclusion in or exclusion from the strategy of all pertinent geoscientific methods is given. With continuing research on methods of exploration for and modeling of convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. Variations on the basic strategy are to be expected where the geology or hydrology requires it. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy is expected to be particularly useful.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

80

Template:GeothermalProject | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This is the 'GeothermalProject' template. To define a new Geothermal This is the 'GeothermalProject' template. To define a new Geothermal Development Project, please use the Geothermal Development Project Form. Parameters Place - The city and state in which the development project is located. County - The county in which the development project is located GeothermalArea - The geothermal area in which the development project is located. Coordinates - The coordinates (lat, lon) of the resource area. Developer - Project developer ProjectType - The type of project. Typically one of the following: Conventional Hydrothermal (Unproduced) Resource, Conventional Hydrothermal (Produced) Resource, Conventional Hydrothermal Expansion, Coproduction, Geopressured Geopressured System, EGS GEADevelopmentPhase - The phase of plant construction, as defined by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

82

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

83

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

84

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

85

Geothermal reservoir technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Selected geothermal resources data: hydrothermal convection systems in the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's research and land classification programs, from professional publications, and industry sources has been compiled in computer format. Location, surface manifestations, chemistry, physical properties, exploratory and development work, and references pertinent to 290 hydrothermal convection systems comprise the data base.

Renner, J.L.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the magma beneath melt zones Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters were analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems. These were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510800"

88

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

89

Blind Geothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blind Geothermal System Blind Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Blind Geothermal System Dictionary.png Blind Geothermal System: An area with a geothermal heat source, but no modern surface manifestations. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Many geothermal areas show no signs of geothermal activity at the surface if the heated water is too far below or no conduits to the surface are available. An area of geothermal activity with no surface features is referred to as a "blind geothermal system." Examples Want to add an example to this list? Select a Geothermal Resource Area to

90

Convective heat transport in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nevada geothermal power plant project approved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proposal to construct and test a 12.5-megawatt geothermal power plant in the Steamboat Hot Springs KGRA in Washoe County, Nevada, has been approved by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The power plant could be completed by October 1987. Several stipulations are included in the BLM approval. The stipulations include a program to monitor ground water, surface water, and hydrothermal features to detect any impacts on the hydrology in the Steamboat Hot Springs area. When plant operations are tested, an emission test will be required to verify that noncondensible gas concentrations are within federal and state standards. No geothermal fluid will be discharged on the land's surface. Other stipulations include the special construction of electrical distribution lines to protect birds of prey; the fencing of hazardous areas; and a minimal disturbance of surface areas.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program, Status Report: Foreign Research on Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) research outside the United States. The term ''enhanced geothermal systems'' refers to the use of advanced technology to extract heat energy from underground in areas with higher than average heat flow but where the natural permeability or fluid content is limited. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from low permeability hydrothermal to hot dry rock.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area, New Zealand Area, New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Lake Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_New_Zealand_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510814

94

Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Direct use of hydrothermal energy: a review of environmental aspects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental impacts of the exploration, development, and production of hydrothermal geothermal energy for direct use applications are reviewed and evaluated. Mitigation strategies and research and development needs are included. (MHR)

O'Banion, K.; Layton, D.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

NREL: Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebooks - Policymakers' Guidebook for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation The Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation outlines five steps for implementing geothermal policy and provides links to helpful resources. Developing policy that reduces barriers and results in market deployment will lead to greater implementation of geothermal electricity generation. Geothermal technologies that can be used for electricity generation include co-production, conventional hydrothermal, enhanced geothermal systems, and low temperature geothermal resources. Learn more about geothermal energy at NREL's renewable energy Web site. Increased Development Step 5 Implement Policies Step 4 Consider Policy Options Step 3 Evaluate Current Policy Step 2 Identify Challenges to Local Development Step 1 Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential

97

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Geysers_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510811

98

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

99

Study and analysis of selected legal, institutional, and public-policy problems effecting hydrothermal geothermal commercialization in the five Pacific Rim States. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries and updates of sixteen technical reports issued on this project are included. They cover: in depth analyses of the Federal land management-related problems present at major target prospect KGRA's throughout the Pacific Rim States; financial incentives; transmission line access; substantive environmental requirements in air, water, and solid wastes; water law; and the geothermal-impacting activities of the legislative and regulatory agencies of the State of California. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Template:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalRegion GeothermalRegion Jump to: navigation, search This is the GeothermalRegion template. To define a new Geothermal Region, please use the Geothermal Region form. Parameters Map - The map of the region. State - The state in which the resource area is located. Area - The estimated size of the area in which the resource area is located, in km². IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential - The identified hydrothermal electricity generation potential in megawatts, from the USGS resource estimate. UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential - The estimated undiscovered hydroelectric generation potential in megawatts from the USGS resource estimate. PlannedCapacity - The total planned capacity for the region in megawatts. Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate - The number of plants

102

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

103

Co-Produced Geothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Produced Geothermal Systems Produced Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Co-Produced Geothermal System: Co-Produced water is the water that is produced as a by-product during oil and gas production. If there is enough water produced at a high enough temperature co-produced water can be utilized for electricity production. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle General Air Cooled Co-Produced geothermal system demonstration at RMOTC oil site.

104

Site specific analysis of geothermal development. Volume 1. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

MITRE/Metrek has analyzed development scenarios for 37 hydrothermal and geopressured prospects in the United States to assist DOE's Division of Geothermal Energy in mission-oriented planning of geothermal resource development. A summary of the site-specific analyses is presented with particular emphasis on possible recommendations for the Federal Geothermal Program.

Leigh, J.; Cohen, A.; Jacobsen, W.; Trehan, R.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Proceedings and findings of the geothermal commercialization workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings are presented of a Geothermal Commercialization Workshop conducted by the Division of Geothermal Resource Management, Department of Energy. The workshop was held in January-February 1979 at The MITRE Corporation facility in McLean, Virginia. The workshop addressed geothermal hydrothermal commercialization achievements and needs in the areas of Marketing and Outreach, Economics, Scenarios, and Progress Monitoring.

Anderson, J.; Dhillon, H.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Exploration strategies based on an understanding of the geologic processes that transfer heat from the mantle to the upper crust, and foster the conditions for shallow hydrothermal circulation or enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) exploration, are required to search efficiently for 'blind' geothermal resources. We propose a genetically based screening protocol to assess potentially prospective geothermal resources, beginning at the plate boundary scale and progressively focusing in on the scale of a producing

107

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The LBL geothermal reservoir technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the DOE/GD-funded Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is the development and testing of new and improved methods and tools needed by industry in its effort to delineate, characterize, evaluate, and exploit hydrothermal systems for geothermal energy. This paper summarizes the recent and ongoing field, laboratory, and theoretical research activities being conducted as part of the Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Colorado Geothermal Commercialization Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chaffee County, located in central Colorado, has immense potential for geothermal development. This report has been prepared to assist residents and developers in and outside the area to develop the hydrothermal resources of the county. Data has been collected and interpreted from numerous sources in order to introduce a general description of the area, estimate energy requirements, describe the resources and postulate a development plan. Electric power generation and direct heat application potential for the region are described.

Healy, F.C.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data System  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data System Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), with Examples from the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot Area Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), with Examples from the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot Area Agency/Company /Organization: University of Nevada-Reno Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Publications Website: www.unr.edu/geothermal/pdffiles/PenfieldGRC2010_GeothermalSiteAssessme Cost: Free Language: English References: Paper[1] "This paper examines the features and functionality of the existing database, its integration into the 50-state NGDS, and its usage in

113

Geothermal program review 16: Proceedings. A strategic plan for geothermal research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings contain 21 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Exploration technology (4 papers); Reservoir technology (5 papers); Energy conversion technology (8 papers); Drilling technology (2 papers); and Direct use and geothermal heat pump technology (2 papers). An additional section contains a report on a workshop on dual-use technologies for hydrothermal and advanced geothermal reservoirs.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow,...

115

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

116

Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A once massive hydrothermal system was disgorged from the summit of Mount Rainier in a highly destructive manner about 5000 years ago. Today, hydrothermal processes are depositing clayey alteration products that have the potential to reset the stage for similar events in the future. Areas of active hydrothermal alteration occur in three representative settings: 1. (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m2) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82°C at

117

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Maps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

118

Geothermal Energy Program overview  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cascades geothermal program  

SciTech Connect

The Cascades region is an area with high geothermal potential but few surface manifestations and limited subsurface data. To stimulate further development of hydrothermal resources, DOE-Idaho Operations Office issued Solicitation Number DE-SC07-85IDI2580. The reason for this solicitation was to secure cost sharing agreements with industry to drill gradient holes that would penetrate the rain curtain and obtain deep thermal, lithologic, and structural data. The data obtained and studies conducted under this program are to be released to the public for the benefit of the geothermal industry and the scientific community. The first thermal gradient hole to be drilled under this program was finished November 1985 by GEO-Newberry Crater, Inc. on the south flank of Newberry volcano. Data for additional wells drilled under the Cascades Geothermal Drilling Program will be released as they become available.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Geothermal energy program summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division (GTD) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The GTD R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. It is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. This volume, Volume 2, contains a detailed compilation of each GTD-funded R D activity performed by national laboratories or under contract to industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geothermal energy program summary  

SciTech Connect

The Geothermal Technology Division (GTD) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The GTD R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. It is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. This volume, Volume 2, contains a detailed compilation of each GTD-funded R D activity performed by national laboratories or under contract to industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1990) Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

123

Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

129

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

130

Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

131

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

133

An organized effort to develop the hydrothermal energy resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a response to America's need for alternate energy sources, the US Department of Energy has a Geothermal Program. Within this program is a Hydrothermal category. Currently, a wide range of tasks are being addressed as part of the Hydrothermal Program. The tasks include Industrialization, Reservoir Technology, Hard Rock Penetration and Conversion Technology. It is thought that successes already made in this program combined with upcoming successes will increase the likelihood of geothermal energy becoming a contributor to our nation's future energy needs. 4 refs.

Taylor, K.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

An Organized Effort to Develop the Hydrothermal Energy Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a response to America's need for Alternate Energy sources, the U.S. Department of Energy has a Geothermal Program. Within this program is a Hydrothermal category. Currently, a wide range of tasks are being addressed as part of the Hydrothermal Program. The tasks include Industrialization, Reservoir Technology, Hard Rock Penetration and Conversion Technology. It is thought that successes already made in this program combined with upcoming successes will increase the likelihood of geothermal energy becoming a contributor to our nations future energy needs.

Taylor, Kenneth J.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

Pearl, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Strategic plan for the geothermal energy program  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy (natural heat in the Earth`s crust) represents a truly enormous amount of energy. The heat content of domestic geothermal resources is estimated to be 70,000,000 quads, equivalent to a 750,000-year supply of energy for the entire Nation at current rates of consumption. World geothermal resources (exclusive of resources under the oceans) may be as much as 20 times larger than those of the US. While industry has focused on hydrothermal resources (those containing hot water and/or steam), the long-term future of geothermal energy lies in developing technology to enable use of the full range of geothermal resources. In the foreseeable future, heat may be extracted directly from very hot rocks or from molten rocks, if suitable technology can be developed. The US Department of Energy`s Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) endorses a vision of the future in which geothermal energy will be the preferred alternative to polluting energy sources. The mission of the Program is to work in partnership with US industry to establish geothermal energy as a sustainable, environmentally sound, economically competitive contributor to the US and world energy supply. In executing its mission and achieving its long-term vision for geothermal energy, the Program has identified five strategic goals: electric power generation; direct use applications and geothermal heat pumps; international geothermal development; science and technology; and future geothermal resources. This report discusses the objectives of these five goals.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council. Fifth annual report, FY 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of significant accomplishments for the Federal program are given as follows: leasing of Federal lands; resource identification, assessment, and exploration; hydrothermal industrialization; hydrothermal technology development; geopressured resources; hot dry rock resources; geosciences research; environment, Federal use of geothermal energy, international activities, program coordination, and state government activities.

Not Available

1982-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This proposed study will involve studying the impacts associated with jobs, energy and environment (as a result of investments in geothermal industry and specific EGS technologies) through the creation of a Geothermal Economic Calculator tool (GEC). The study will cover Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. The GEC created will be capable of helping end users (public and the industry) perform region specific economic impact analyses using a web platform that will be hosted by EGI for different geothermal technologies under EGS that will be used for electric power production.

139

Property:ModernGeoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModernGeoFeatures ModernGeoFeatures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ModernGeoFeatures Property Type Page Description Describes modern surface manifestations present in vicinity of the resource area (e.g. hot springs, fumaroles, mudpots, geysers). See also Modern_Geothermal_Features This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 12 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area S cont. Soda Lake Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area Pages using the property "ModernGeoFeatures"

140

Geothermal: About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - About Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geothermal: Publications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Publications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

142

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

143

Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

144

Property:UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Estimated conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from undiscovered hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

145

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems in the western U.S. utilizing newly-discovered near-infrared spectral properties. Knowledge of the origin and mineralogic relations of ammonium minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic analysis of ammonium minerals from two mercury- and gold-bearing

146

Geothermal: a review of US geothermal activity and an assessment of the resource availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review describes US geothermal activities and assesses resource availability. The future of geothermal activity in the US is uncertain due to slashes in the geothermal program at the US Department of Energy. The question is whether private industry will continue the geothermal exploration and development program. Major cutbacks in the federal budget are in areas designed to accelerate commercial development of hydrothermal energy. Basic research is still funded, at a lower cost level. Areas of research expected to pay off in the near future include drilling technology, well stimulation, energy conversion, and end materials.

Friedlander, A.F.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Statistical Analysis of Geothermal Wells in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study represents the first attempt to characterize the U.S. geothermal-hydrothermal resource from well data. The report contains field test data on more than 500 geothermal wells and includes statistical analyses of key well parameters. Utilities can use the information in planning and engineering analysis.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Overview of geothermal energy in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal development is reviewed briefly. The resource is divided into three major categories for discussion: hydrothermal resources, hot igneous rock resources, and conduction-dominated resources. Geothermal power generation and direct applications in the U.S. are discussed. (MHR)

Schultz, R.J.; DiBello, E.G.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geothermal Energy Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earths crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

J. L. Renner

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0) 0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first seven months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

151

SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: SWIR At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique SWIR Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor MASTER, ASTER, AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding none Notes Analysis of the SWIR MASTER/ASTER data allow mapping of characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits, including carbonate, kaolinite, alunite, buddingtonite, muscovite, and hydrothermal silica. Mineral identification and the general distribution of specific minerals were verified utilizing ground spectral measurements and mineral maps produced from AVIRIS hyperspectral data.

152

Geothermal Energy Contract List: Fiscal Year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The Geothermal Energy R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. The program is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. The Geothermal Energy Contract List, Fiscal Year 1990 is a tabulation of geothermal R D contracts that were begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990). The R D activities are performed by national laboratories or industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions. The contract list is organized in accordance with the Geothermal Division R D work breakdown structure. The structure hierarchy consists of Resource Category (hydrothermal, geopressured-geothermal, hot dry rock, and magma energy), Project (hard rock penetration, reservoir technology, etc.), and Task (lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, etc.). For each contract, the contractor, the FY 1990 funding, and a brief description of the milestones planned for FY 1991 are provided.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

1988-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Geothermal materials development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development and demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of all Division of Geothermal Energy supported projects for which contracts have been executed are compiled. Each summary includes pertinent statistical data for that project and an abstract summarizing the project plans and accomplishments. The projects summarized fall into six categories: engineering research and development, resource exploration and assessment, hydrothermal technology applications, advanced technology applications, utilization experiments, and environmental control and institutional studies. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that similar to 7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow of mantle-derived helium up along the

160

Design features and equilibrium flash modeling of direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchangers for use with geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Baseline and preliminary tests of a 500 kW pilot plant were conducted during 1980. The DCHX evaporator, which combines an equilibrium-flash boiler with a countercurrent preheater, met and exceeded the performance of its predecessors, the volumetric and surface type boilers, although only its essential features had been installed. Additional tests to be conducted during 1981 are designed to improve overall tower performance and to create modular designs for a 20-foot diameter column, thereby replacing the plurality of DCHX units otherwise required for commercial-size (>50 MWe) installations. For the preheater-boiler combination, the recommended criterion of performance is the classical steam distillation efficiency, E/sub v/, defined as the ratio of the partial pressure actually exerted by the hydrocarbon to its saturation pressure at the vapor exit temperature. As presently installed, the 500 kW DCHX unit typically generates a working-fluid vapor composed of 5 mole % water and 95% isobutane at 415 psia and 254.2/sup 0/F bubble point. E/sub v/ is 87.6%. However, with the additional improvements planned, 95% should be attainable.

Rapier, P.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal Field Developments in Iceland  

SciTech Connect

The exploration and research carried out in conjunction with the exploitation of the various geothernal fields has vastly deepened our understanding of the hydrothermal systems in Inceland. They have proved to be more diverse with respect to physical state, chemical composition, hydrological properties, and geological control than previously thought. The purpose of the present paper is to review the present state of knowledge regarding the Icelandic geothermal systems, with emphasis on the production and reservoir engineering aspects.

Palmason, G.; Stefansson, V.; Thorhallsson, S.; Thorsteinsson, T.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A state-by-state review of major geothermal-development activities during 1982 is presented. It also inlcudes a summary of recent drilling and exploration efforts and the results of the 1982 leasing program. Two complementary sections feature an update of geothermal direct-use applications and a site-by-site summary of US geothermal electric-power development.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of geothermal energy in Arizona. Arizona geothermal planning/commercialization team. Quarterly topical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: geothermal prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analysis, time phased project plans, institutional analysis, hydrothermal commercialization baseline report, and the public outreach program. (MHR)

White, D.H.; Mancini, F.; Goldstone, L.A.; Malysa, L.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal geothermal Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry geothermal Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Graham7781 5 Aug 2013 - 13:18 Blog entry geothermal GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 9 Jul 2013 - 20:57 Blog entry geothermal GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 2 May 2013 - 14:06 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load)

165

Neutron imaging for geothermal energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal systems extract heat energy from the interior of the earth using a working fluid, typically water. Three components are required for a commercially viable geothermal system: heat, fluid, and permeability. Current commercial electricity production using geothermal energy occurs where the three main components exist naturally. These are called hydrothermal systems. In the US, there is an estimated 30 GW of base load electrical power potential for hydrothermal sites. Next generation geothermal systems, named Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), have an estimated potential of 4500 GW. EGSs lack in-situ fluid, permeability or both. As such, the heat exchange system must be developed or engineered within the rock. The envisioned method for producing permeability in the EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing, which is rarely practiced in the geothermal industry, and not well understood for the rocks typically present in geothermal reservoirs. High costs associated with trial and error learning in the field have led to an effort to characterize fluid flow and fracturing mechanisms in the laboratory to better understand how to design and manage EGS reservoirs. Neutron radiography has been investigated for potential use in this characterization. An environmental chamber has been developed that is suitable for reproduction of EGS pressures and temperatures and has been tested for both flow and precipitations studies with success for air/liquid interface imaging and 3D reconstruction of precipitation within the core.

Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

Mazzini, Adriano

167

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

168

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal- bearing aquifers. Geothermal Aquifer Resources Montana's many geothermal features attest to the volcanic activity that shaped much of the landscape. Geothermal springs form when ground water is heated range from 50 to 190 degrees F. Oil well drillers have encoun- tered geothermal water edging up to 240

Smerdon, Jason E.

170

Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drill hole VC-2B (total depth 1761.7 m (5780 ft); maximum temperature 295°C) was continuously cored through the Sulphur Springs hydrothermal system in the western ring-fracture zone of the 1.14 Ma Valles caldera. Among other units, the hole penetrated 760.2 m (2494.1 ft) of Paleozoic carbonate and

171

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

172

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Data Geothermal Data This dataset is a qualitative assessment of geothermal potential for the U.S. using Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and based on the levelized cost of electricity with CLASS 1 being most favorable and CLASS 5 being least favorable. This dataset does not include shallow EGS resources located near hydrothermal sites or the U.S. Geological Survey assessment of undiscovered hydrothermal resources. The source data for deep EGS includes temperature at depth from 3 to 10 kilometer (km) were provided by the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory (Blackwell & Richards, 2009) and the analyses for regions with temperatures ≥150°C were performed by NREL (2009). CLASS 999 regions have temperatures less than 150°C at a 10-km depth and were not assessed for deep EGS potential.

173

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and chemical and isotopic analyses can be undertaken. Integrated analysis of all measurements will d

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. STEP 1 Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential STEP 2 Identify Challenges to Local Development STEP 3 Evaluate Current Policy STEP 4 Consider Policy Options STEP 5 Implement Policies Increased Development Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation This document identifies and describes five steps for implementing geothermal policies that may reduce barriers and result in deployment and implementation of geothermal technologies that can be used for electricity generation, such as conventional hydrothermal, enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), geopressured, co-production, and low temperature geothermal resources. Step 1: Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential Increasing the use of geothermal

178

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update, FY 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: 1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and 2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, Joel Lawrence

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geothermal Information Dissemination and Outreach  

SciTech Connect

Project Purpose To enhance technological and topical information transfer in support of industry and government efforts to increase geothermal energy use in the United States (power production, direct use, and geothermal groundsource heat pumps). Project Work GRC 2003 Annual Meeting. The GRC convened the meeting on Oct. 12-15, 2003, at Morelia's Centro de Convenciones y ExpoCentro in Mexico under the theme, International Collaboration for Geothermal Energy in the Americas. The event was also sponsored by the Comision Federal de Electricidad. ~600 participants from more than 20 countries attended the event. The GRC convened a Development of Geothermal Projects Workshop and Geothermal Exploration Techniques Workshop. GRC Field Trips included Los Azufres and Paricutin Volcano on Oct. 11. The Geothermal Energy Association (Washington, DC) staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Annual Meeting Opening Session was convened on Oct. 13, and included the governor of Michoacan, the Mexico Assistant Secretary of Energy, CFE Geothermal Division Director, DOE Geothermal Program Manager, and private sector representatives. The 2003 Annual Meeting attracted 160 papers for oral and poster presentations. GRC 2004. Under the theme, Geothermal - The Reliable Renewable, the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting convened on Aug. 29-Sept. 1, 2004, at the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort at Indian Wells, CA. Estimated total attendance (including Trade Show personnel, guests and accompanying persons) was ~700. The event included a workshop, Geothermal Production Well Pump Installation, Operation and Maintenance. Field trips went to Coso/Mammoth and Imperial Valley/Salton Sea geothermal fields. The event Opening Session featured speakers from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the private sector. The Geothermal Energy Association staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Geothermal Education Office staged its Geothermal Energy Workshop. Several local radio and TV station interviews were conducted during the event. Technical Program included 136 technical papers. All were published in Volume 28 of the GRC Transactions. Volume 28, GRC Transactions Pblished as a high-quality, durable casebound volume, Volume 28 of the Transactions published 119 out of 136 technical papers (692 pp) presented at the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting. The papers were submitted by geothermal experts and professionals from around the world. The papers were reviewed over a 2-day period by 25 volunteer (in-kind) geothermal experts from the private sector and DOE National Laboratories. GRC staff received and cataloged the papers, and maintained interaction with authors for revisions and corrections. DOE Geothermal Technologies Newsletter The Office of Geothermal Technologies quarterly newsletter, Geothermal Technologies, is produced at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This 2-color, 4- to 16-page newsletter summarizes federal geothermal research and development projects and other DOE geothermal news. The GRC receives newsletter disk copy and color-key proof from NREL for each newsletter, then follows through with print production and distribution. Circulation is 1,000 per issue (plus 300 copies of the newsletter shipped to NREL for internal and public distribution). During the project period, the GRC printed, stitched and bound the Geothermal Technologies newsletter into the Sept/Oct 2003, Jan/Feb 2004, and May/June 2004 editions of the GRC Bulletin. Multiple copies (300) of the newsletter sans magazine were provided to NREL for internal DOE distribution. GRC Geothermal Research Library The GRC has built the largest and most comprehensive library in the world devoted to geothermal energy. The GRC Geothermal Library provides rapid accessibility to the majority of technical literature crafted over the past 30 years, and preserves hard copy and on-line databases for future use by geothermal researchers and developers. A bibliography for over half of the physical library's citations is available through keyword search on the GRC web site (www.geothe

Ted J. Clutter, Geothermal Resources Council Executive Director

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Geothermal guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The guidebook contains an overview, a description of the geothermal resource, statutes and regulations, and legislative policy concerns. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Topographic Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Topography is the shape and arrangement of physical features on a surface. In the case of geothermal...

183

The Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO2 rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165° and 200°C,

184

Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Remote sensing is a useful tool for identifying the surface expression of geothermal systems based on characteristic mineral assemblages that result from hydrothermal alteration (Kratt et al., 2004; Vaughan et al., 2005). Buffalo Valley in Pershing and Lander Counties, Nevada, is an area of high potential for geothermal energy production (Shevenell et al., 2004). Geothermal heat is expressed by several hot springs with surface temperatures of up to 79°C (Olmsted et al., 1975). The hot springs and a chain of Quaternary cinder cones appear to be

185

Geothermal Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting to Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a baseline description of the transmission issues affecting geothermal technologies. The report begins with a comprehensive overview of the grid, how it is planned, how it is used, and how it is paid for. The report then overlays onto this 'big picture' three types of geothermal technologies: conventional hydrothermal systems; emerging technologies such as enhanced engineered geothermal systems (EGS) and geopressured geothermal; and geothermal co-production with existing oil and gas wells. Each category of geothermal technology has its own set of interconnection issues, and these are examined separately for each. The report draws conclusions about each technology's market affinities as defined by factors related to transmission and distribution infrastructure. It finishes with an assessment of selected markets with known geothermal potential, identifying those that offer the best prospects for near-term commercial development and for demonstration projects.

Hurlbut, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

187

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels Geothermal Technologies...

188

Program on Technology Innovation: Modeling of Single-Well Closed-Loop Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) include one production well and one injection well to use hydrothermal resources to generate electricity. However, the high initial cost of drilling EGS wells is one of the main factors that hurt its competitiveness with other energy sources. The single-well closed-loop EGS (SWCLEGS) is a new type of geothermal power generation technology that aims to eliminate the need for natural hydrothermal resources with a relatively low drilling cost. The objective of...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Authors Philip E. Wannamaker, William M. Doerner and Derrick P. Hasterok Conference proceedings, 32th workshop on geothermal reservoir Engineering, Stanford University; Stanford University; 2007 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal

190

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

191

Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

Rush, F.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

193

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: US Geothermal Resources Review and Needs Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to lay the groundwork for an emerging process to assess U.S. geothermal resources that might be suitable for development as Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Interviews of leading geothermists indicate that doing that will be intertwined with updating assessments of U.S. higher-quality hydrothermal resources and reviewing methods for discovering ''hidden'' hydrothermal and EGS resources. The report reviews the history and status of assessment of high-temperature geothermal resources in the United States. Hydrothermal, Enhanced, and Hot Dry Rock resources are addressed. Geopressured geothermal resources are not. There are three main uses of geothermal resource assessments: (1) They inform industry and other interest parties of reasonable estimates of the amounts and likely locations of known and prospective geothermal resources. This provides a basis for private-sector decisions whether or not to enter the geothermal energy business at all, and for where to look for useful resources. (2) They inform government agencies (Federal, State, local) of the same kinds of information. This can inform strategic decisions, such as whether to continue to invest in creating and stimulating a geothermal industry--e.g., through research or financial incentives. And it informs certain agencies, e.g., Department of Interior, about what kinds of tactical operations might be required to support such activities as exploration and leasing. (3) They help the experts who are performing the assessment(s) to clarify their procedures and data, and in turn, provide the other two kinds of users with a more accurate interpretation of what the resulting estimates mean. The process of conducting this assessment brings a spotlight to bear on what has been accomplished in the domain of detecting and understanding reservoirs, in the period since the last major assessment was conducted.

Entingh, Dan; McLarty, Lynn

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

195

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

196

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

197

Property:TopoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:TopoFeatures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name TopoFeatures Property Type String Description Describes topographic features within the vicinity of the field (e.g. volcanic features, rift valleys, extensional features) that may be significant reflections of underlying geothermal resources. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 4 subproperties: G Geysers Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area S Soda Lake Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area Pages using the property "TopoFeatures" Showing 23 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Horst and Graben + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Horst and Graben +

198

Selected data for low-temperature (less than 90{sup 0}C) geothermal systems in the United States: reference data for US Geological Survey Circular 892  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supporting data are presented for the 1982 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment of the United States. Data are presented for 2072 geothermal sites which are representative of 1168 low-temperature geothermal systems identified in 26 States. The low-temperature geothermal systems consist of 978 isolated hydrothermal-convection systems, 148 delineated-area hydrothermal-convection systems, and 42 delineated-area conduction-dominated systems. The basic data and estimates of reservoir conditions are presented for each geothermal system, and energy estimates are given for the accessible resource base, resource, and beneficial heat for each isolated system.

Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Sorey, M.L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrothermal industrialization electric-power systems development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nature of hydrothermal resources, their associated temperatures, geographic locations, and developable capacity are described. The parties involved in development, required activities and phases of development, regulatory and permitting requirements, environmental considerations, and time required to complete development activities ae examined in detail. These activities are put in proper perspective by detailing development costs. A profile of the geothermal industry is presented by detailing the participants and their operating characteristics. The current development status of geothermal energy in the US is detailed. The work on market penetration is summarized briefly. Detailed development information is presented for 56 high temperature sites. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Potential impact of R and D on hydrothermal energy cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potentital impact of the DOE/Geothermal Technology Development programs on the cost of geothermal power has been estimated using the computer program IMGEO.300. Results indicate a potential 30 to 40% cost reduction for hydrothermal systems with a 40 to 50% cost reduction potential for binary systems. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate the use of IMGEO. The initial results are tentative because the R and D goals have not been finalized and the code has not been completely validated.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geothermal Energy Resource Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range, Imperial Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Energy Resource Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range, Imperial Valley, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The US Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO), has conducted geothermal exploration in the Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range (CMAGR) since the mid-1970s. At this time, the focus of the GPO had been on the area to the east of the Hot Mineral Spa KGRA, Glamis and areas within the Chocolate Mountains themselves. Using potential field geophysics, mercury surveys and geologic mapping to identify potential anomalies related to recent hydrothermal activity. After a brief hiatus starting in

202

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

Speer, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Chemistry and materials in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a geothermal fluid, from its origin as meteoric water precipitating on the earth's surface, as it flows through the soils and rocks of geological formations, to the point where it returns to the surface as a hot spring, geyser, well, etc. is traced. Water of magmatic origin is also included. The tendency of these hydrothermal fluids to form scales by precipitation of a portion of their dissolved solids is noted. A discussion is presented of types of information required for materials selection for energy systems utilizing geothermal fluids, including pH, temperature, the speciation of the particular geothermal fluid (particularly chloride, sulfide and carbon dioxide content) and various types of corrosive attack on common materials. Specific examplers of materials response to geothermal fluid are given.

Miller, R.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Geothermal Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward http://energy.gov/eere/articles/geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward" class="title-link"> Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward

205

Geothermal News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System http://energy.gov/articles/nevada-deploys-first-us-commercial-grid-connected-enhanced-geothermal-system geothermal-system" class="title-link">Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System

206

Geothermal Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to assist the physicist, chemist, engineer, and geologist engaged in discovering and developing geothermal energy resources. This first section contains a glossary of the approximately 500 most frequently occurring geological, physical, and engineering terms, chosen from the geothermal literature. Sections 2 through 8 are fact sheets that discuss such subjects as geothermal gradients, rock classification, and geological time scales. Section 9 contains conversion tables for the physical quantities of interest for energy research in general and for geothermal research in particular.

Leffel, C.S., Jr.; Eisenberg, R.A.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A High-Enthalpy Hydrothermal Resource Near A Remote Market Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications For A High-Enthalpy Hydrothermal Resource Near A Remote Market Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In summer 2009, the City of Akutan completed an exploration program to characterize the geothermal resource and assess the feasibility of geothermal development on Akutan Island. Akutan Island, Alaska is home to North America's largest seafood processing plant. The City of Akutan and the fishing industry have a combined peak demand of ~7-8 MWe which is currently supplied by diesel fuel. The exploration program included

208

Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

209

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the location of the heat source Notes Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

210

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

211

Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Petrography Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Explore for development of an EGS demonstration project Notes X-ray diffraction and thin section analyses are being conducted on samples from 5 deep wells, RRG- 1, 2, 3, 7 and 9, to determine the characteristics of the rock types and hydrothermal alteration within the geothermal system. Thin section analyses of samples from RRG-9 document the presence of strong alteration and brecciation at the contact between the Tertiary and basement

212

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

213

3D MAGNETOTELLURIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: 3D Magnetotelluric characterization of the COSO Geothermal Field Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Knowledge of the subsurface electrical resistivity/conductivity can contribute to a better understanding of complex hydrothermal systems, typified by Coso geothermal field, through mapping the geometry (bounds and controlling structures) over existing production. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion is now an emerging technology for characterizing the resistivity structures of complex geothermal systems. The method appears to hold great promise, but histories exploiting truly 3D inversion that demonstrate the advantages that can be gained by acquiring

214

Assessment of geothermal resources of the United States, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resource assessment presented is a refinement and updating of USGS Circular 726. Nonproprietary information available in June 1978 is used to assess geothermal energy in the ground and, when possible, to evaluate the fraction that might be recovered at the surface. Five categories of geothermal energy are discussed: conduction-dominated regimes, igneous-related geothermal systems, high-temperature (> 150/sup 0/C) and intermediate-temperature (90 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal convection systems, low-temperature (< 90/sup 0/C) geothermal waters, and geopressured-geothermal energy (both thermal energy and energy from dissolved methane). Assessment data are presented on three colored maps prepared in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers on these five categories.

Muffler, L.J.P. (ed.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal reservoir engineering is an important aspect f the Department of Energys Geothermal Technology Division, geothermal research and development program. Reservoir engineering-related research, a component of all geosciences activities, is of particular importance in the context of Hydrothermal Reservoir Research. Three closely related research activities (Brine Injection, Reservoir Definition, and Caldera Reservoir Investigations) are now combined under the more general heading of Reservoir Technology. Scientific investigations, as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program, also contribute greatly to the understanding of the behavior of high-temperature hydrothermal convection systems. With the creation of the Geothermal Technology Organization, where geothermal research will be cost-shard with industry, it is anticipated that a number of research topics will be brought to the point where the geothermal industry can rapidly put new technology into use. 2 tabs., 2 figs.

Mock, John E.; Blackett, Robert E.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90) 90) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

217

High-temperature hydrothermal systems in West Yunnan Province, China  

SciTech Connect

There are more than 660 thermal springs in West Yunnan Province, 30 of which are high-temperature hydrothermal systems with reservoir temperatures above 150/sup 0/C. All thermal springs in West Yunnan are under the control of tectonics, most of them distributed at anticlinoria of metamorphic rocks and granites. This paper discusses the relationship between thermal areas and tectonics, the correlation between thermal springs in West Yunnan and North Thailand, and the geothermal prospects in West Yunnan.

Laio, Z.; Tong, W.; Liu, S.; Zhao, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

220

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) Revealed By Geophysical And Geochemical Approaches- Implications For General Fluid Flow Models On Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) Revealed By Geophysical And Geochemical Approaches- Implications For General Fluid Flow Models On Volcanoes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: On March 15th 2007 a paroxysmal explosion occurred at the Stromboli volcano. This event generated a large amount of products, mostly lithic blocks, some of which impacted the ground as far as down to 200 m a.s.l., about 1.5 km far away from the active vents. Two days after the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge

222

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Categorical Exclusions Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Categorical Exclusions Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC Kyoung 14 Oct 2013 - 20:19 Blog entry Categorical Exclusions GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 9 Jul 2013 - 20:57 Blog entry Categorical Exclusions GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 2 May 2013 - 14:06 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review

223

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: EA Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry EA Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC Kyoung 14 Oct 2013 - 20:19 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

224

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: CX Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry CX Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC Kyoung 14 Oct 2013 - 20:19 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

225

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: feedback Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry feedback Geothermal Stakeholder Feedback on the GRR Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 10:01 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

226

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: EIS Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry EIS Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC Kyoung 14 Oct 2013 - 20:19 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

227

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Database Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Database Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC Kyoung 14 Oct 2013 - 20:19 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

228

Geothermal: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links News DOE Geothermal Technologies Program News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection September 30, 2008 Update: "Hot Docs" added to the Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection. A recent enhancement to the geothermal legacy site is the addition of "Hot Docs". These are documents that have been repeatedly searched for and downloaded more than any other documents in the database during the previous month and each preceding month. "Hot Docs" are highlighted for researchers and stakeholders who may find it valuable to learn what others in their field are most interested in. This enhancement could serve, for

229

Geothermal studies in northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and University of California (UCB), under the auspices of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, are conducting field studies at potential geothermal resource areas in north-central Nevada. The goal of the LBL-UCB program is to develop and evaluate techniques for the assessment of the resource potential of liquid-dominated systems. Field studies presently being conducted in northern Nevada incorporate an integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical surveys leading to heat flow measurements, and eventually to deep (1.5 to 2 km) confirmatory drill holes. Techniques evaluated include geophysical methods to measure contrasts in electrical resistivity and seismic parameters. Geochemical studies have emphasized techniques to disclose the pathways of water from its meteoric origin into and through the hydrothermal systems. Geochemical and radiometric analyses also help to provide a baseline upon which the effects of future geothermal development may be superimposed.

Wollenberg, H.A.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of

231

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Seventeen K/Ar dates were obtained on illitic clays within Valles caldera (1.13 Ma) to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on Quaternary to Precambrian intracaldera and pre-caldera rocks in a large,

232

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal water samples at Mount St. Helens collected between 1985 and 1989 and in 1994 are used to identify water types and describe their evolution through time. Two types of low temperature hydrothermal systems are associated with the 1980 eruptions and were initiated soon after emplacement of shallow magma and pyroclastic flows. The Loowit hot spring system is located in the breach zone and is associated with the magma conduit and nearby avalanche deposits, whereas the Pumice Plain (PP)

233

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 23-m.y.-old, fossil meteoric-hydrothermal system in the Lake City caldera (11 _ 14 km) has been mapped out by measuring Δ 18O values of 300 rock and mineral samples. Δ 18O varies systematically throughout the caldera, reaching values as low as -2. Great topographic relief, regional tilting, and variable degrees of erosion within the caldera all combine to give us a very complete section through the hydrothermal system, from the

234

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geothermal resources of the eastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Known and potential geothermal resources of the eastern United States are reported. The resources considered are exclusively hydrothermal, and the study was confined to the 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the Dakotas. Resource definition in these areas is based entirely on data found in the literature and in the files of a number of state geological offices. The general geology of the eastern United States is outlined. Six relatively homogeneous eastern geologic regions are discussed. (MHR)

Renner, J.L.; Vaught, T.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

High geothermal energy utilization geothermal/fossil hybrid power cycle: a preliminary investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combining geothermal and fossil fuel energy into the so-called hybrid cycle is compared with a state-of-the-art double-flash geothermal power cycle using resources which vary from 429/sup 0/K (312/sup 0/F) to 588/sup 0/K (598/sup 0/F). It is demonstrated that a hybrid plant can compete thermodynamically with the combined output from both a fossil-fired and a geothermal plant operating separately. Economic comparison of the hybrid and double-flash cycles is outlined, and results are presented that indicate the performance of marginal hydrothermal resources may be improved enough to compete with existing power cycles on a cost basis. It is also concluded that on a site-specific basis a hybrid cycle is capable of complementing double-flash cycles at large-capacity resources, and can operate in a cycling load mode at constant geothermal fluid flow rate.

Grijalva, R. L.; Sanemitsu, S. K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

Goff, S.; Goff, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

239

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

240

Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal Division Multiyear Plan FY 1992-1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This administrative report of the Department of Energy is dated December 21, 1990. It is marked ''DRAFT'' as were many of this type of report, most of which were never made ''Final''. It provides contextual elements for program planning, and covers research on Hydrothermal, Geopressured Geothermal, Hot Dry Rock, and Magma Energy systems. (DJE 2005)

None

1990-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant: Design, Construction, and Early Startup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary-cycle technology could almost double the electric energy yield from known hydrothermal resources. The 45-MWe Heber geothermal demonstration plant--now in a three-year test and demonstration program--has successfully passed through a series of feasibility studies, design stages, and field experiments that show its promise to tap these resources.

1987-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Description and operation of Haakon School geothermal-heating system  

SciTech Connect

To encourage the development of hydrothermal energy, twenty-three demonstration projects were funded. The Haakon School project is one of twelve such projects. The geothermal direct-use heating system at the Haakon School complex in Philip, South Dakota is described and information gained during approximately three heating seasons of operation is presented.

Childs, F.W.; Kirol, L.D.; Sanders, R.D.; McLatchy, M.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) has been funded by DOE since March 2002 to conduct geothermal resource exploration and assessment in the Great Basin. In that time, those efforts have led to significant advances in understanding the regional and local conditions necessary for the formation of geothermal systems. Accomplishments include the development of GPS-based crustal strain rate measurements as a geothermal exploration tool, development of new methods of detecting geothermal features with remotely sensed imagery, and the detection of

245

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1987 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare multiple theories of the structural control of the geothermal system Notes The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which range from 10 - 100s of feet in extent, separated by regions of essentially unfractured rock of similar composition. Wells in the Devil's Kitchen area have encountered fluids in excess of 4500F and flow rates of 1 million lb/hr at depths less than 4000

246

Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Surface heat flow measurements over active geothermal systems indicate strongly positive thermal anomalies. Whereas in "normal" geothermal settings, the surface heat flow is usually below 100-120 mW m- 2, in active geothermal areas heat flow values as high as several watts per meter squared can be found. Systematic interpretation of heat flow patterns sheds light on heat transfer mechanisms at depth on different lateral, depth and time scales. Borehole temperature profiles in active geothermal

247

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fairbanks Geothermal Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

248

Decision Analysis for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description The result of the proposed...

249

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Alaska geothermal bibliography  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alaska geothermal bibliography Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

250

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fourteenth workshop geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

251

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

252

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Engineered Geothermal Systems...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

253

Geothermal resources of southern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resource of southern Idaho as assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1978 is large. Most of the known hydrothermal systems in southern Idaho have calculated reservoir temperatures of less than 150 C. Water from many of these systems is valuable for direct heat applications. A majority of the known and inferred geothermal resources of southern Idaho underlie the Snake River Plain. However, major uncertainties exist concerning the geology and temperatures beneath the plain. The largest hydrothermal system in Idaho is in the Bruneau-Grang View area of the western Snake River Plain with a calculated reservoir temperature of 107 C and an energy of 4.5 x 10 to the 20th power joules. No evidence of higher temperature water associated with this system was found. Although the geology of the eastern Snake River Plain suggests that a large thermal anomaly may underlie this area of the plain, direct evidence of high temperatures was not found. Large volumes of water at temperatures between 90 and 150 C probably exist along the margins of the Snake River Plain and in local areas north and south of the plain.

Mabey, D.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Audio-Magnetotellurics Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes Audio-magnetotelluric geophysical surveys determined that the secondary low in the geothermal area, best defined by the 7.5-Hz AMT map and dc soundings, is caused by a shallow conductive zone (5--30 ohm m) interpreted to be hydrothermally altered Sierra Nevada basement rocks containing saline water of a hot water geothermal system. This zone of lowest apparent resistivities over the basement rocks lies within a closed contour of a

255

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Ranalli & Rybach...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

257

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean,...

258

Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 87Sr/86Sr values of thermal waters and hydrothermal calcites of the Long Valley caldera geothermal system are more radiogenic than those of young intracaldera volcanic rocks. Five thermal waters display 87Sr/86Sr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chemical interaction of thermal fluids with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah, has resulted in the development of characteristic trace-element dispersion patterns. Multielement analyses of surface rock samples, soil samples and drill cuttings from deep exploration wells provide a three-dimensional perspective of chemical redistribution within this structurally-controlled hot-water geothermal system. Five distinctive elemental suites of chemical enrichment are

262

Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6% of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the US public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99% of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98%. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future US energy markets. 7 figs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6% of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the US public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99% of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98%. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future US energy markets. 7 figs.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Raft River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Raft River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 DOE Involvement 4 Timeline 5 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 6 Future Plans 7 Raft River Unit II (26 MW) and Raft River Unit III (32 MW) 8 Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstration 9 Exploration History 10 Well Field Description 11 Technical Problems and Solutions 12 Geology of the Area 12.1 Regional Setting 12.2 Structure 12.3 Stratigraphy 12.3.1 Raft River Formation 12.3.2 Salt Lake Formation 12.3.3 Precambrian Rocks 13 Hydrothermal System 14 Heat Source 15 Geofluid Geochemistry 16 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 17 Exploration Activities (77) 18 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.10166667,"lon":-113.38,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Geothermal resources of the eastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The resouces considered are exclusively hydrothermal, and the study was confined to the 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the Dakotas. Resource definition in these areas is based entirely on data found in the literature and in the files of a number of state geological offices. The general geology of the eastern United States is outlined. Since the presence of geothermal resources in an area is governed by the area's geology, an attempt to define useful geothermal resources is facilitated by an understanding of the geology of the area being studied. Six relatively homogeneous eastern geologic regions are discussed. The known occurrences of geothermal energy in the eastern United States fall into four categories: warm spring systems, radioactive granite plutons beneath thick sediment covers, abnormally warm aquifers, and deep sedimentary basins with normal temperature gradients.

Renner, J.L.; Vaught, T.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: flora and fauna Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry flora and fauna Texas Legal Review Alevine 29 Jul 2013 - 14:46 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

267

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: analysis Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry analysis GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 9 Jul 2013 - 20:57 Blog entry analysis GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 2 May 2013 - 14:06 Blog entry analysis Happy New Year! Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 10:09 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers:

268

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: FWS Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry FWS Idaho Meeting #2 Kyoung 4 Sep 2012 - 21:36 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253965

269

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: BHFS Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry BHFS Texas Legal Review Alevine 29 Jul 2013 - 14:46 Blog entry BHFS Happy New Year! Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 10:09 Blog entry BHFS Legal Reviews are Underway Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 09:17 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill

270

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Colorado Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Colorado Colorado Meeting Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 10:24 Blog entry Colorado Happy New Year! Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 10:09 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load)

271

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: FY12 Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry FY12 Thank You! Kyoung 21 Mar 2013 - 08:40 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253755

272

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Fish and Wildlife Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Fish and Wildlife Idaho Meeting #2 Kyoung 4 Sep 2012 - 21:36 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

273

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Cost Recovery Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Cost Recovery GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 9 Jul 2013 - 20:57 Blog entry Cost Recovery GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Kyoung 2 May 2013 - 14:06 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers

274

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: (1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and (2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, J.L.

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessment of the State-Of-The-Art of Numerical Simulation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reservoir features of importance in the operation of enhanced geothermal systems are described first (Section 2). The report then reviews existing reservoir simulators developed for application to HDR reservoirs (Section 3), hydrothermal systems (Section 4), and nuclear waste isolation (Section 5), highlighting capabilities relevant to the evaluation and assessment of EGS. The report focuses on simulators that include some representation of flow in fractures, only mentioning other simulators, such as general-purpose programs or groundwater models (Section 6). Following these detailed descriptions, the report summarizes and comments on the simulators (Section 7), and recommends a course of action for further development (Section 8). The references are included in Section 9. Appendix A contains contractual information, including a description of the original and revised scope of work for this study. Appendix B presents comments on the draft report from DOE reviewer(s) and the replies of the authors to those comments. [DJE-2005

None

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing

278

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Obvious surface manifestations of an anomalous concentration of geothermal energy at the Coso Geothermal Area, California, include fumarolic activity, active hot springs, and associated hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic ridge near the center of an oval-shaped zone of late Cenozoic ring faulting. In an investigation of the thermal regime of the geothermal

279

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hidden geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has

280

Template:GeothermalHeader | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the page, which features a unique orange color scheme and simple menu. Parameters none Usage It should be called in the following format: GeothermalHeader Example This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

282

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

283

Hydrothermal system at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent geological and geophysical studies at Newberry Volcano have been incorporated into conceptual and numerical models of a magma-based hydrothermal system. Numerical simulations begin with emplacement of a small magma body, the presumed source of silicic eruptions at Newberry that began about 10,000 B.P., into a thermal regime representing 100,000 years of cooling of a large underlying intrusion. Simulated flow patterns and thermal histories for three sets of hypothetical permeability values are compatible with data from four geothermal drill holes on the volcano. Meteoric recharge cools the caldera-fill deposits, but thermal water moving up a central conduit representing a permeable volcanic vent produces temperatures close to those observed in drill holes within the caldera. Meteoric recharge from the caldera moves down the flanks and creates a near-isothermal zone that extends several hundred meters below the water table, producing temperature profiles similar to those observed in drill holes on the flanks. The temperatures observed in drill holes on the flanks are not influenced by the postulated Holocene magma body. The elevated temperature gradients measured in the lower portions of these holes may be related to the cumulative effect of older intrusions. The models also indicate that meteoric recharge to the deep hydrothermal system probably originates within or near the caldera. Relatively low fluid velocities at depth suggest that at least a significant fraction of the thermal fluid may be very old.

Sammel, E.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Life and hydrothermal vents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life and hydrothermal vents Life and hydrothermal vents Name: williamh Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Are there biological communities near hydrothermal vents in the ocean? Is there any life inside the hydrothermal vent? Replies: If the presence of microorganisms in hot springs and geysers are any indication, I am certain there is life inside hydrothermal vents. These heat loving organisms are termed "thermophiles" and thrive where other life dies. They are able to survive in extreme heat due to the unique way their proteins are synthesized. The May 1993 Discover has a special article on thermophiles. wizkid Life at high temperature became very interesting to molecular biologists recently. The enormously useful technique known as PCR, (polymerase chain reaction), by which very small amounts of rare DNA can be amplified to large concentrations (Jurassic Park!), depends on having a DNA polymerase (the enzyme that synthesizes complementary DNA strands during replication of chromosomes), that can work at high temperatures, or at least can survive repeated high temperature cycles. PCR depends on synthesis of DNA followed by forced separation of the daughter strands at high temperature, followed by new synthesis, to amplify DNA exponentially. At any rate, normal bacterial polymerase will not work because the high temperature cycles kill it. Enter the now infamous, patented Taq polymerase, isolated from Thermus aquaticus, a hot spring bacterium, which works after heating to up to 94 C! So knowledge of life at high temperature allowed molecular biologists to get PCR to work, with all its benefits in cloning very rare genes and amplifying small amounts of DNA for forensic work etc.

285

Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The distribution of hydrothermal circulation within active volcanoes is of importance in identifying regions of hydrothermal alteration which may in turn control explosivity, slope stability and sector collapse. Self-potential measurements, indicative of fluid circulation, were made within the crater of Mount St. Helens in 2000 and

286

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A full-waveform inversion of two-ship, wide-aperture, seismic reflection data from a ridge-crest seismic line at the southern East Pacific Rise indicates that the axial magma chamber here is about 50 m thick, is embedded within a solid roof, and has a solid floor. The 50-60-m-thick roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation,

287

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Property:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalRegion" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + Adak Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Aidlin Geothermal Facility + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Geothermal Project + Alaska Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Area + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Project + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region +

289

Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. Wells drilled along this feature have encountered production from distinct fractures in crystalline basement rocks. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which

290

NREL: Learning - Student Resources on Geothermal Direct Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Use Direct Use Photo of flowers in a greenhouse. Johnson County High School in Tennessee features a geothermally heated greenhouse, where students can learn about agriculture. The following resources will help you learn more about the direct use of geothermal energy. If you are unfamiliar with this technology, see the introduction to geothermal direct use. High School and College Level U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program: Direct Use Has more basic information Oregon Institute of Technology Geo-Heat Center Features information on research in direct use technologies, including resource maps. Geothermal Resources Council Provides information about and for the geothermal industry. Renewable Energy Policy Project Provides in-depth coverage on geothermal resources, technologies and

291

Geothermal energy technology: issues, R and D needs, and cooperative arrangements  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the National Research Council, through its Energy Engineering Board, formed the Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. The committee's study addressed major issues in geothermal energy technology, made recommendations for research and development, and considered cooperative arrangements among government, industry, and universities to facilitate RandD under current severe budget constraints. The report addresses four types of geothermal energy: hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. Hydrothermal systems are the only type that are now economically competitive commercially. Further technology development by the Department of Energy could make the uneconomical hydrothermal resources commercially attractive to the industry. The economics are more uncertain for the longer-term technologies for extracting energy from geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. For some sites, the cost of energy derived from geopressured and hot dry rock systems is projected within a commercially competitive range. The use of magma energy is too far in the future to make reasonable economic calculations.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geothermal energy technology: issues, R and D needs, and cooperative arrangements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1986, the National Research Council, through its Energy Engineering Board, formed the Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. The committee's study addressed major issues in geothermal energy technology, made recommendations for research and development, and considered cooperative arrangements among government, industry, and universities to facilitate RandD under current severe budget constraints. The report addresses four types of geothermal energy: hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. Hydrothermal systems are the only type that are now economically competitive commercially. Further technology development by the Department of Energy could make the uneconomical hydrothermal resources commercially attractive to the industry. The economics are more uncertain for the longer-term technologies for extracting energy from geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. For some sites, the cost of energy derived from geopressured and hot dry rock systems is projected within a commercially competitive range. The use of magma energy is too far in the future to make reasonable economic calculations.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine for the generation of energy from geothermal sources including a reaction water turbine of the radial outflow type and a similar turbine for supersonic expansion of steam or gases. The rotor structure may incorporate an integral separator for removing the liquid and/or solids from the steam and gas before the mixture reaches the turbines.

Sohre, J.S.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

294

Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

Not Available

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coso Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coso Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 2.1 DOE Involvement 2.2 Time Line 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Structure 9.3 Stratigraphy 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 14 Exploration Activities (132) 15 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.04701,"lon":-117.76854,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

298

Geothermal direct heat applications program summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of geothermal energy for direct heat purposes by the private sector within the US has been quite limited to date. However, there is a large potential market for thermal energy in such areas as industrial processing, agribusiness, and space/water heating of commercial and residential buildings. Technical and economic information is needed to assist in identifying prospective direct heat users and to match their energy needs to specific geothermal reservoirs. Technological uncertainties and associated economic risks can influence the user's perception of profitability to the point of limiting private investment in geothermal direct applications. To stimulate development in the direct heat area, the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, issued two Program Opportunity Notices (PON's). These solicitations are part of DOE's national geothermal energy program plan, which has as its goal the near-term commercialization by the private sector of hydrothermal resources. Encouragement is being given to the private sector by DOE cost-sharing a portion of the front-end financial risk in a limited number of demonstration projects. The twenty-two projects summarized herein are direct results of the PON solicitations.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Abstract Two-meter temperature surveys have been conducted at Salt Wells Basin and Lee-Allen Springs geothermal areas with the objective of distinguishing and

300

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Utilization of U. S. geothermal resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study is concerned with U.S. geothermal resources, their potential for commercial utilization by electric utilities between now and the year 2000, and their impact on the utility industry. USGS estimates of the resources in identified hydrothermal systems were extrapolated to the undiscovered resources marked by hot springs, and further to the blind resources between hot spring areas within the tectonic belts. The resulting estimate of the total hydrothermal resource to a depth of 10,000 ft. is about 100,000 MWe for 30 years with about one-half in undiscovered blind resources, one-fourth in undiscovered hot spring resources, and one-fourth in identified systems. Water rates and direct capital costs for geothermal power plants were evaluated as functions of resource temperature, together with costs and expected flowrates for geothermal wells. Combining these results with the temperature distribution of identified hydrothermal systems, a current supply curve for geothermal energy wa s made. This shows an estimated 20,000 MWe for 30 years potentially producible with current technology from identified resources for direct capital costs of $800/KW or less. The projected supply curve shows an estimated 30,000 to 60,000 MWe for 30 years potentially available at $800/KW or less, in 1976 dollars, taking account of estimated undiscovered resources and probable technical advances.

Reitzel, J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Geothermal Environmental Impact Assessment: Subsurface Environmental Assessment for Four Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal systems are described for Imperial Valley and The Geysers, California; Klamath Falls, Oregon; and the Rio Grande Rift Zone, New Mexico; including information on location, area, depth, temperature, fluid phase and composition, resource base and status of development. The subsurface environmental assessment evaluates potential groundwater degradation, seismicity and subsidence. A general discussion on geothermal systems, pollution potential, chemical characteristics of geothermal fluids and environmental effects of geothermal water pollutants is presented as background material. For the Imperial Valley, all publicly available water quality and location data for geothermal and nongeothermal wells in and near the East Mesa, Salton Sea, Heber, Brawley, Dunes and Glamis KGRAs have been compiled and plotted. The geothermal fluids which will be reinjected range in salinity from a few thousand to more than a quarter million ppm. Although Imperial Valley is a major agricultural center, groundwater use in and near most of these KGRAs is minimal. Extensive seismicity and subsidence monitoring networks have been established in this area of high natural seismicity and subsidence. The vapor-dominated Geysers geothermal field is the largest electricity producer in the world. Groundwater in this mountainous region flows with poor hydraulic continuity in fractured rock. Ground and surface water quality is generally good, but high boron concentrations in hot springs and geothermal effluents is of significant concern; however, spent condensate is reinjected. High microearthquake activity is noted around the geothermal reservoir and potential subsidence effects are considered minimal. In Klamath Falls, geothermal fluids up to 113 C (235 F) are used for space heating, mostly through downhole heat exchangers with only minor, relatively benign, geothermal fluid being produced at the surface. Seismicity is low and is not expected to increase. Subsidence is not recognized. Of all geothermal occurrences in the Rio Grande Rift, the Valles Caldera is currently of primary interest. injection of geothermal effluent from hydrothermal production wells should remove any hydrologic hazard due to some potentially noxious constituents. Waters circulating in the LASL Hot Dry Rock experiment are potable. Seismic effects are expected to be minimal. Subsidence effects could develop.

Sanyal, Subir; Weiss, Richard

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Indiana based on existing geologic data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general geology of Indiana is presented including the following: physiography, stratigraphy, and structural features. The following indicators of geothermal energy are discussed: heat flow and thermal gradient, geothermal occurrences, seismic activity, geochemistry, and deep sedimentary basins. (MHR)

Vaught, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL's geothermal team develops publications, including technical reports and conference papers, about geothermal resource assessments, market and policy analysis, and geothermal research and development (R&D) activities. In addition to the selected documents available below, you can find resources on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program Web site or search the NREL Publications Database. For additional geothermal documents, including those published since 1970, please visit the Office of Science and Technology Information Geothermal Legacy Collection. Policymakers' Guidebooks Five steps to effective policy. Geothermal Applications Market and Policy Analysis Program Activities R&D Activities Geothermal Applications

306

Geothermal: Promotional Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Promotional Video Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

307

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

308

Geothermal: Bibliographic Citation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Bibliographic Citation Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

309

Geothermal: Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Related Links Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

310

Geothermal: Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Home Page Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

311

Geothermal: Contact Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Contact Us Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

312

Geothermal: Hot Documents Search  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Hot Documents Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

313

Geothermal: Basic Search  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Basic Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

314

Geothermal: Educational Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Educational Zone Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

315

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Resources Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are...

316

Geothermal Resources Council's ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Resources Council's 36 th Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada, USA September 30 - October 3, 2012 Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications...

317

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal News...

318

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of

319

Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fourth exploration well within Fort Bidwell Indian Community (FBIC) lands has been successfully drilled to a total depth of 4,670 feet. Mud return temperatures and cuttings analysis are consistent with the hydrothermal model on which the well location was based. Wireline surveys have encountered an obstruction just below the casing shoe, and further evaluation of this well and resource awaits clean-out and testing activities. Author(s): Joe LaFleur, Anna Carter, Karen Moore, Ben Barker, Paul

320

Preliminary Results from Two Spectral-Geobotanical Surveys over Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preliminary Results from Two Spectral-Geobotanical Surveys over Geothermal Preliminary Results from Two Spectral-Geobotanical Surveys over Geothermal Areas- Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah and Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preliminary Results from Two Spectral-Geobotanical Surveys over Geothermal Areas- Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah and Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Geobotanical anomalies have been associated with mineralization and hydrocarbon microseepage. As both of these phenomena have been associated with hydrothermal convection systems in the Great Basin it is likely that geobotanical anomalies are present over geothermal areas. This paper present preliminary results for the ongoing Cove Fort Sulphurdale, Utah and Dixie Valley, Utah, studies. Data acquisition for these areas has included

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ground Magnetics At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ground Magnetics At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The magnetic intensity contours match general geologic patterns in varying rock types. Hydrothermally altered rocks along intersecting fault zones show up as strong magnetic lows that form a triangular-shaped area. This area is centered in an area of highest heat flow and is a site of

322

Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project Volcano EGS Demonstration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstrations Project Type / Topic 2 EGS Demonstration Project Description The project will demonstrate EGS power generation from the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area ("Newberry"). Four deep, high temperature, very low permeability, production-size wells have been completed at Newberry, including two currently owned by Davenport. The Newberry project site exemplifies unparalleled EGS potential in the United States, with a large, high-temperature, conductive thermal anomaly yielding wells with permeability orders of magnitude less than conventional hydrothermal wells.

323

The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Juneau, AK (United States)); Nye, C.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States) Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds 1031 regulations (1) Alaska (1) analysis (3) appropriations (1) BHFS (3) Categorical Exclusions (3) citation (1) citing (1) Colorado (2) Coordinating Permit Office (2) Cost Mechanisms (2) Cost Recovery (2) CX (1) D.C. (1) data (1) Database (1) developer (2) EA (1) EIS (1) endangered species (1) Fauna (1) feedback (1) Fish and Wildlife (1) Flora (1) flora and fauna (1) 1 2 3 next › last » Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12)

325

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Groups > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine Recent content Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC New Robust References! Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now Texas Legal Review GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting more Group members (12) Managers: Kyoung Recent members: AfifaAwan Dklein2012 Jweers AGill Agentile Kwitherbee Kjking Payne Dhoefner Twnrel Alevine 429 Throttled (bot load)

326

Geothermal resource assessment of the New England states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the exception of Sand Springs in Williamstown, Massachusetts, there are no identifiable hydrothermal geothermal resources in the New England region. The radioactive plutons of the White Mountains of New Hampshire do not, apparently, contain sufficient stored heat to make them a feasible target for an induced hydrothermal system such as exists at Fenton Hill near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The only potential source of low grade heat is the large volume of ground water contained within the unconsolidated sediments related to the Pleistocene glaciation of the region. During the course of the survey an unusual and unexplained thermal anomaly was discovered in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, which is described.

Brophy, G.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

328

Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Dry hot rock in the Earth's crust represents the largest and most broadly distributed reservoir of usable energy accessible to man. The engineering equipment and methods required to extract and use this energy appear to exist and are now being investigated actively at LASL. At least for deep systems in relatively impermeable rock, not close to active faults, the extraction of energy frtom dry geothermal resertvoirs should involve no significant environmental hazards. The principal environmental effects of such energy systems will be those associated with the surface facilities that use the geothermal heat; these will be visual, in land use, and in the thermal-pollution potential of low-temperature power plants. The energy extraction system itself should be clean; safe, unobtrusive, and economical. (auth)

Smith, M.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Heat Flow And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration is typically limited to high-grade hydrothermal reservoirs that are usually found in the western United States, yet large areas with subsurface temperatures above 150 deg. C at economic drilling depths can be found east of the Rocky Mountains. The object of this paper is to present new heat flow data and to evaluate the geothermal potential of Texas and adjacent areas. The new data show that, west of the Ouachita Thrust Belt, the heat flow values are lower than east of the fault zone. Basement heat flow values for the Palo Duro and Fort

331

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

332

Heat flow in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Heat flow in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat flow in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Obvious surface manifestations of an anomalous concentration of geothermal resources at the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, include fumarolic activity and associated hydrothermally altered rocks. Pleistocene volcanic rocks associated with the geothermal activity include 38 rhyolite domes occupying a north trending structural and topographic

333

Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot Springs: KGRA, China Lake, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot Springs: KGRA, China Lake, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The well, Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) was drilled at the China Lake Naval Weapons Center. Drilling was started on 2 September 1977, and the well completed on 1 December 1977 to 4845 ft. The well is an exploratory hole to determine geological and hydrothermal characteristics of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). During drilling, numerous geophysical and temperature surveys were performed to evaluate the geological characteristics of CGEH-1. LBL

334

A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We report here the first U-Th disequilibrium age for a hydrothermal mineral from an active geothermal system in New Zealand. Vein calcite recovered from a depth of 389 m in Well Thm-1 at the Tauhara geothermal field has an age of 99±44 ka BP. This age was determined using a leachate-leachate isochron technique on four silicate containing sub-samples of calcite from a single vein. Although the error on this isochron age is considerable, it is significantly younger than the earlier

335

Case studies of low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six development projects are examined that use low- (less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F)) to-moderate (90 to 150/sup 0/C (194 to 302/sup 0/F)) temperature geothermal resources. These projects were selected from 22 government cost-shared projects to illustrate the many facets of hydrothermal development. The case studies describe the history of this development, its exploratory methods, and its resource definition, as well as address legal, environmental, and institutional constraints. A critique of procedures used in the development is also provided and recommendations for similar future hydrothermal projects are suggested.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase I, Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation is based on an analysis of existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies. The principle source of data used was the oil and gas well files maintained by the NDGS. A computer library was created containing all the necessary oil and gas well data in the North Dakota Geological Survey oil and gas well files. Stratigraphic data, bottomhole-temperature data, and chemical data are presented in map form to show the geothermal gradient, temperature, and depth of potential hydrothermal aquifers and the chemical characteristics of potential hydrothermal aquifers.

Harris, K.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

338

Geothermal Today: 2005 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This DOE/EERE Geothermal Technologies Program publication highlights accomplishments and activities of the program during the last two years.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

340

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Two-phase flow in geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Two-phase flow in geothermal energy sources. Annual report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1976 Geothermal Technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

342

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine impact of brittle faulting and seismogenic deformation on permeability in geothermal reservoir Notes New mapping documents a series of late Quaternary NNE-striking normal faults in the central Coso Range that dip northwest, toward and into the main production area of the Coso geothermal field. The faults exhibit geomorphic features characteristic of Holocene activity, and locally are associated with fumaroles and hydothermal alteration. The active faults

343

Geothermal Tomorrow 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brochure describing the recent activities and future research direction of the DOE Geothermal Program.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Alaska geothermal bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.) [comps.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cody hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot springs of Colter's Hell are the surface manifestations of a much larger hydothermal system. That system has been studied to define its extent, maximum temperature, and mechanism of operation. The study area covers 2700 km/sup 2/ (1040 mi/sup 2/) in northwest Wyoming. Research and field work included locating and sampling the hot springs, geologic mapping, thermal logging of available wells, measuring thermal conductivities, analyzing over 200 oil and gas well bottom-hole temperatures, and compiling and analyzing hydrologic data. These data were used to generate a model for the hydrothermal system.

Heasler, H.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

348

Newberry Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search Davenport Newberry Holdings (previously named Northwest Geothermal Company) started to develop a 120MW geothermal project on its...

349

Geothermal Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resources Geothermal Resources August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production...

350

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from...

351

GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Subsiding Areas and Geothermal Subsidence Potential25 Project 2-Geothermal Subsidence Potential Maps . . . . .Subsidence Caused by a Geothermal Project and Subsidence Due

Lippmann, Marcello J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

354

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

355

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Because fractures and faults with sub-commercial permeability can propagate hot fluid and hydrothermal alteration throughout a geothermal reservoir, potential field geophysical methods including resistivity, gravity, heatflow and magnetics cannot distinguish between low-permeability fractures and LAF's (Large Aperature Fractures). USG will develop and test the combination of three-component,long-offset seismic surveying, permanent scatter synthetic aperture radar interferometry (PSInSAR) and structural kinematic analysis as an integrated method for locating and 3-D mapping of LAF's in shallow to intermediate depth (600-4000 feet) geothermal systems. This project is designed to test the methodology on known occurrences of LAF's and then apply the technology to expand an existing production field and find a new production field in a separate but related resource area. A full diameter production well will be drilled into each of the two lease blocks covered by the geophysical exploration program.

357

Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council fifth annual report. Final draft  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is the natural heat of the earth, and can be tapped as a clean, safe, economical alternative source of energy. Much of the geothermal energy resource is recoverable with current or near-current technology and could make a significant contribution both to increasing domestic energy supplies and to reducing the US dependence on imported oil. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural process applications. This report describes the progress for fiscal year 1980 (FY80) of the Federal Geothermal Program. It also summarizes the goals, strategy, and plans which form the basis for the FY81 and FY82 program activities and reflects the recent change in national policy affecting Federal research, development and demonstration programs. The Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC) believes that substantial progress can and will be made in the development of geothermal energy. The IGCC goals are: (1) reduce the institutional barriers so that geothermal projects can be on-line in one-half the current time; (2) make moderate temperature resources an economically competitive source of electricity; (3) remove the backlog of noncompetitive lease applications; (4) competitive lease all KGRA lands; and (5) cut the cost of hydrothermal technology by 25%.

Abel, Fred H.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Aspects of the Kalina technology applied to geothermal power production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of studies conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) concerning the applicability of the Kalina technology to geothermal (hydrothermal) power production. This report represents a correction and addition to that report. The Heat Cycle Research Program (HCRP) has as its primary goal the cost-effective production of electric power from moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. Recent work has included the study of supercritical cycles with counterflow condensation which utilize mixtures as working fluids. These advanced concepts are projected to give a 20 to 30% improvement in power produced per unit geofluid flow rate (geofluid effectiveness, w hr/lb). The original Kalina cycle is a system which is similar to the cycles being studied in the Heat Cycle Research program and it was felt that this new cycle should be studied in the geothermal context. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.

1989-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.741169444444°, -115.51666666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.741169444444,"lon":-115.51666666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

THE FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent national focus on the value of increasing our supply of indigenous, renewable energy underscores the need for reevaluating all alternatives, particularly those that are large and welldistributed nationally. This analysis will help determine how we can enlarge and diversify the portfolio of options we should be vigorously pursuing. One such option that is often ignored is geothermal energy, produced from both conventional hydrothermal and Enhanced (or engineered) Geothermal Systems (EGS). An 18-member assessment panel was assembled in September 2005 to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of EGS becoming a major supplier of primary energy for U.S. base-load generation capacity by 2050. This report documents the work of the panel at three separate levels of detail. The first is a Synopsis, which provides a brief overview of the scope, motivation, approach, major findings, and recommendations of the panel. At the second level, an Executive Summary reviews each component of the study, providing major results and findings. The third level provides full documentation in eight chapters, with each detailing the scope, approach, and results of the analysis and modeling conducted in each area.

J. L. Renner

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Whole-rock oxygen isotope compositions of cores and cuttings from Long Valley exploration wells show that the Bishop Tuff has been an important reservoir for both fossil and active geothermal systems within the caldera. The deep Clay Pit-1 and Mammoth-1 wells on the resurgent dome

362

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

364

Results of geothermal gradient core hole TCB-1, Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site, Guatemala, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical field studies conducted in 1988 and 1989 at the Tecuamburro volcano geothermal site in Guatemala indicated that there is a substantial shallow heat source beneath the area of youngest volcanism. To obtain information on subsurface temperatures and temperature gradients, stratigraphy, hydrothermal alteration, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids, a geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to 808 m low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro volcano Complex, 300 km south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, dated at 2,910 years. Gases from acid-sulfate springs near Laguna Ixpaco consistently yield maximum estimated subsurface temperatures of 250--300{degrees}C. The temperature versus depth curve from TCB-1 does not show isothermal conditions and the calculated thermal gradients from 500--800 m is 230{degrees}C/km. Bottom hole temperature is 238{degrees}C. Calculated heat flow values are nearly 9 heat flow units (HFU). The integration of results from the TCB-1 gradient core hole with results from field studies provides strong evidence that the Tecuamburro area holds great promise for containing a commercial geothermal resource.

Adams, A.I.; Chipera, S.; Counce, D.; Gardner, J.; Goff, S.; Goff, F.; Heiken, G.; Laughlin, A.W.; Musgrave, J.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Aycinena, S.; Martinelli, L. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O.; Revolorio, M.; Roldan, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion); D

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Integration of hydrothermal-energy economics: related quantitative studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison of ten models for computing the cost of hydrothermal energy is presented. This comparison involved a detailed examination of a number of technical and economic parameters of the various quantitative models with the objective of identifying the most important parameters in the context of accurate estimates of cost of hydrothermal energy. Important features of various models, such as focus of study, applications, marked sectors covered, methodology, input data requirements, and output are compared in the document. A detailed sensitivity analysis of all the important engineering and economic parameters is carried out to determine the effect of non-consideration of individual parameters.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geothermal Program Review X: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- the Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R&D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R&D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year`s conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, ``Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,`` focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R&D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: Monitoring EGS-Related Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews technologies that could be applicable to Enhanced Geothermal Systems development. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from hydrothermal to hot dry rock. We monitored recent and ongoing research, as reported in the technical literature, that would be useful in expanding current and future geothermal fields. The literature review was supplemented by input obtained through contacts with researchers throughout the United States. Technologies are emerging that have exceptional promise for finding fractures in nonhomogeneous rock, especially during and after episodes of stimulation to enhance natural permeability.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel; Carwile, Clifton

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geotechnical environmental aspects of geothermal power generation at Herber, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source was assessed. Here, the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California were investigated. Geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence are discussed in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. Estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds, are discussed.

Not Available

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

370

Geothermal Technologies Office: Electricity Generation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

371

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 6 total. G GeothermalExploration GeothermalLand Use GeothermalLeasing GeothermalPower Plant GeothermalTransmission GeothermalWell Field Retrieved from "http:...

372

Recency of Faulting and Neotechtonic Framework in the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field and Other Geothermal Fields of the Basin and Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We studied the role that earthquake faults play in redistributing stresses within in the earths crust near geothermal fields. The geographic foci of our study were the sites of geothermal plants in Dixie Valley, Beowawe, and Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada. Our initial results show that the past history of earthquakes has redistributed stresses at these 3 sites in a manner to open and maintain fluid pathways critical for geothermal development. The approach developed here during our pilot study provides an inexpensive approach to (1) better define the best locations to site geothermal wells within known geothermal fields and (2) to define the location of yet discovered geothermal fields which are not manifest at the surface by active geothermal springs. More specifically, our investigation shows that induced stress concentrations at the endpoints of normal fault ruptures appear to promote favorable conditions for hydrothermal activity in two ways. We conclude that an understanding of the spatial distribution of active faults and the past history of earthquakes on those faults be incorporated as a standard tool in geothermal exploration and in the siting of future boreholes in existing geothermal fields.

Steven Wesnousky; S. John Caskey; John W. Bell

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Abstract The Valles caldera in New Mexico hosts a high-temperature geothermal system, which is manifested in a number of hot springs discharging in and around the caldera. In order to determine the fluid pathways and the origin of chloride in this system, we measured 36Cl/Cl ratios in waters from high-temperature drill holes and from surface springs in this region. The waters fall into two general categories: recent meteoric water samples with low Cl- concentrations (< 10 mg/L) and relatively high 36Cl/Cl ratios

374

A comparison of hydrothermal reservoirs of the Western United States. Topical Report 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a portion of the results from a one-year feasibility study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to assess the feasibility of constructing a 25 to 50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluids as the energy source. It contains the results of a comparative study of sixteen hydrothermal reservoirs in the US. The reservoirs were selected for comparison on the basis of available data, development potential, and representativeness of known hydrothermal reservoirs in the US. Six reservoir and fluid criteria were considered the most important in determining the development and power conversion potential: depth and lithology, reservoir temperature, tested flow rate per well, fluid chemistry, magnitude of the reserve and reinjection potential. These criteria were evaluated for each of the selected reservoirs.

Meidav, H. Tsvi; Sanyal, Subir

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents: a new avenue for life in the Universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a quantitative assessment for the potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. The photosynthetically active radiation in this case is from geothermal origin: the infrared thermal radiation emitted by hot water, at temperatures ranging from 473 up to 673 K. We find that at these temperatures the photosynthetic potential is rather low in these ecosystems for most known species. However, species which a very high efficiency in the use of light and which could use infrared photons till 1300nm, could achieve good rates of photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents. These organisms might also thrive in deep hydrothermal vents in other planetary bodies, such as one of the more astrobiologically promising Jupiter satellites: Europa.

Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Leiva-Mora, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

Not Available

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

Lithology and hydrothermal alteration determination from well logs for the Cerro Prieto Wells, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the characteristics of geophysical well logs against the sand-shale series of the sedimentary column of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico. The study shows that the changes in mineralogy of the rocks because of hydrothermal alteration are not easily detectable on the existing logs. However, if the behavior of clay minerals alone is monitored, the onset of the hydrothermally altered zones may be estimated from the well logs. The effective concentration of clay-exchange cations, Q/sub v/, is computed using the data available from conventional well logs. Zones indicating the disappearance of low-temperature clays are considered hydrothermally altered formations with moderate to high-permeability and temperature, and suitable for completion purposes.

Ershaghi, I.; Ghaemian, S.; Abdassah, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

EPRI geothermal energy R and D 5-year program plan (1975 to 1979)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recommended EPRI Geothermal Research and Development 5-Year Program Plan has been defined to complement and provide focus for federally sponsored geothermal energy R and D efforts. The scope of the program includes: verification of hydrothermal reservoir capability and low salinity brine heat transfer characteristics at a potential demonstration site followed by design, development and construction of a low salinity hydrothermal demonstration plant in conjunction with an electric utility or utility consortium. Development of a comprehensive set of Guidelines Manuals for use by utility management and engineers spanning the full range of geothermal resource utilization from exploration through plant startup, including not only technical, but environmental, institutional and regulatory factors. A subprogram to define the potential and requirements for Geothermal Systems. A supporting research and technology subprogram oriented toward minimizing the risk associated with utilization of low and high salinity hydrothermal sources. An Advanced Research and Technology subprogram to assess the potential of geopressure resources in conjunction with the Federal government and limited R and D on advanced concepts for utilization of hydrothermal fluids. (MHR)

Spencer, D.F.

1974-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Guidebook to Geothermal Finance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Advanced Electric Submersible...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

384

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region (Redirected from Holocene Magmatic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Details...

385

Geothermal: Help  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help Help Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links Help Table of Contents Basic Search Advanced Search Sorting Term searching Author select Subject select Limit to Date searching Distributed Search Search Tips General Case sensitivity Drop-down menus Number searching Wildcard operators Phrase/adjacent term searching Boolean Search Results Results Using the check box Bibliographic citations Download or View multiple citations View and download full text Technical Requirements Basic Search Enter your search term (s) in the search box and your search will be conducted on all available indexed fields, including full text. Advanced Search Sorting Your search results will be sorted in ascending or descending order based

386

The Impact of Taxation on the Development of Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contractor report reviews past and current tax mechanisms for the development and operation of geothermal power facilities. A 50 MW binary plant is featured as the case study. The report demonstrates that tax credits with windows of availability of greater than one year are essential to allow enough time for siting and design of geothermal power systems. (DJE 2005)

Gaffen, Michael; Baker, James

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

An isotopic study of the Coso, California, geothermal area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of the Coso, California, geothermal area study of the Coso, California, geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: An isotopic study of the Coso, California, geothermal area Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta^18/O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is similar to that of the Sierra water, suggesting that the major recharge for the hydrothermal system comes from the Sierra Nevada rather than from local precipitation on the Coso Range. The delta^18/O values of

388

Gamma Log At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gamma Log At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Gamma Log At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To allow for the lateral and vertical extrapolation of core and test data and bridged the gap between surface geophysical data and core analyses. Notes Borehole gamma spectrometry can be used to identify anomalous concentration of uranium, thorium, and potassium which are probably due to transportation by hydrothermal solutions. Computer crossplotting was used as an aid to the identification of such rock types as quartzite, quartz monzonite, and

389

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Heiken &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heiken & Heiken & Goff, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Heiken & Goff, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Development of a geologically-based model of the thermal and hydrothermal potential of the Fenton Hill HDR area. References Grant Heiken, Fraser Goff (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Heiken_%26_Goff,_1983)&oldid=511328

390

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To allow for the lateral and vertical extrapolation of core and test data and bridged the gap between surface geophysical data and core analyses. Notes Temperature and flowmeter logs provide evidence that these fractures and faults are conduits that conduct hot water to the wells. One of the intermediate depth core holes penetrated a hydrothermally altered zone that includes several fractures producing hot water. This altered production

391

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: an updated picture of the Travale field is given, based on geophysical and drilling data acquired since 1978. In deriving the model, extensive use is made of the geophysical data produced in the course of the EEC test site programme (1980-1983), particularly from seismic and time domain EM methods which allowed for penetrating thick and conductive cover formations and to match deep tectonic and hydrothermal alteration trends thought to indirectly characterize the geothermal reservoir. It is

392

Geothermal Prospector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Prospector Geothermal Prospector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geothermal Prospector Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Geothermal Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/gt_prospector Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/gt_prospector Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7405574°, -105.1719904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7405574,"lon":-105.1719904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Kyoung Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC Posted by: Kyoung 14 Oct 2013 - 20:19 On Tuesday, October 2, the Geothermal Technology Office and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory held a 1/2-day NEPA workshop. The workshop was held at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, in conjunction... Tags: Categorical Exclusions, CX, Database, EA, EIS, FONSI, GEA, GRC, GRR, NEPA Jweers New Robust References! Posted by: Jweers 7 Aug 2013 - 18:23 Check out the new Reference Form. Adding... 1 comment(s) Tags: citation, citing, developer, formatting, reference, Semantic Mediawiki, wiki Graham7781

394

New Hampshire/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Hampshire Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Hampshire No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Hampshire No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Hampshire Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region White Mountains Geothermal Area Other GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Hampshire Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

395

Wisconsin/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal < Wisconsin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Wisconsin Geothermal edit General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under...

396

EIA Energy Kids - Geothermal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geothermal Basics What Is Geothermal Energy? The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within ...

397

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal pump program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

pump program Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News...

398

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal resource evaluation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

resource evaluation of the Yuma area Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search...

399

Forrest County Geothermal Energy Project Geothermal Project ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of replacing the existing air cooled chiller with geothermal water to water chillers for energy savings at the Forrest County Multi Purpose Center. The project will also replace...

400

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2011) 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Explore for development of an EGS demonstration project Notes Core was obtained from RRG-3C. The sample is a brecciated and altered siltstone from the base of the Tertiary sequence and is similar to rocks at the base of the Tertiary deposits in RRG-9. The results of thermal and quasi-static mechanical property measurements that were conducted on the core sample are presented. References Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig, S. (1 January 2011) GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(2011)&oldid=473834

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Aeromagnetic Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

77) 77) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. This survey defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system that has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km) partially due to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomoly coincides with two other geophysical anomalies: 1) a bedrock electrical resistivity low and 2) an area of relatively high near-surface temperatures. References Fox, R. C. (1 May 1978) Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a

402

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Geothermal resource requirements for an energy self-sufficient spaceport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the southwestern United States provide an opportunity for development of isolated spaceports with local energy self-sufficiency. Geothermal resources can provide both thermal energy and electrical energy for the spaceport facility infrastructure and production of hydrogen fuel for the space vehicles. In contrast to hydrothermal resources by which electric power is generated for sale to utilities, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources are more wide-spread and can be more readily developed at desired spaceport locations. This paper reviews a dynamic model used to quantify the HDR resources requirements for a generic spaceport and estimate the necessary reservoir size and heat extraction rate. The paper reviews the distribution of HDR resources in southern California and southern New Mexico, two regions where a first developmental spaceport is likely to be located. Finally, the paper discusses the design of a HDR facility for the generic spaceport and estimates the cost of the locally produced power.

Kruger, P.; Fioravanti, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Duchane, D.; Vaughan, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Are there significant hydrothermal resources in the US part of the Cascade Range?  

SciTech Connect

The Cascade Range is a geothermal dichotomy. On the one hand, it is an active volcanic arc above a subducting plate and is demonstrably an area of high heat flow. On the other hand, the distribution of hydrothermal manifestations compared to other volcanic arcs is sparse, and the hydrothermal outflow calculated from stream chemistry is low. Several large estimates of undiscovered geothermal resources in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range prepared in the 1970s and early 1980s were based fundamentally on two models of the upper crust. One model assumed that large, partly molten, intrusive bodies exist in the upper 10 km beneath major volcanic centers and serve as the thermal engines driving overlying hydrothermal systems. The other model interpreted the coincident heat-flow and gravity gradients west of the Cascade crest in central Oregon to indicate a partly molten heat source at 10 {+-} 2 km depth extending {approx}30 km west from the axis of the range. Investigations of the past ten years have called both models into question. Large long-lived high-temperature hydrothermal systems at depths <3 km in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range appear to be restricted to silicic domefields at the Lassen volcanic center, Medicine Lake volcano, Newberry volcano, and possibly the Three Sisters. Federal land-use restrictions further reduce this list to Medicine Lake and Newberry. Dominantly andesitic stratocones appear to support only small transitory hydrothermal systems related to small intrusive bodies along the volcanic conduits. The only young caldera, at Crater Lake, supports only low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems. Most of the Cascade Range comprises basaltic andesites and has little likelihood for high-level silicic intrusions and virtually no potential for resultant large high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Undiscovered hydrothermal resources of the Cascade Range of the United States are substantially lower than previous estimates. The range does have potential for intermediate-temperature hot dry rock and localized low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems.

Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Guffanti, Marianne

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Geothermal Technologies Program: Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Washington State. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Geothermal Technologies Program: Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Alaska. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geothermal Technologies Program: Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Oregon. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modeling of the fault-controlled hydrothermal ore-forming systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary precondition for the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits is a strong focusing of hydrothermal flow as fluids move from the fluid source to the site of ore deposition. The spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposits favors the concept that such fluid flow focusing is controlled, for the most part, by regional faults which provide a low resistance path for hydrothermal solutions. Results of electric analog simulations, analytical solutions, and computer simulations of the fluid flow, in a fault-controlled single-pass advective system, confirm this concept. The influence of the fluid flow focusing on the heat and mass transfer in a single-pass advective system was investigated for a simplified version of the metamorphic model for the genesis of greenstone-hosted gold deposits. The spatial distribution of ore mineralization, predicted by computer simulation, is in reasonable agreement with geological observations. Computer simulations of the fault-controlled thermoconvective system revealed a complex pattern of mixing hydrothermal solutions in the model, which also simulates the development of the modern hydrothermal systems on the ocean floor. The specific feature of the model considered, is the development under certain conditions of an intra-fault convective cell that operates essentially independently of the large scale circulation. These and other results obtained during the study indicate that modeling of natural fault-controlled hydrothermal systems is instructive for the analysis of transport processes in man-made hydrothermal systems that could develop in geologic high-level nuclear waste repositories.

Pek, A.A.; Malkovsky, V.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

411

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A reflection survey was done to analyze the brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Notes The relationships between upper crustal faults, the brittle-ductile transition zone, and underlying magmatic features imaged by multifold seismic reflection data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Coso geothermal field, which lies within an extensional step-over between dextral faults, is a young, actively developing metamorphic core complex.

412

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

413

Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To identify features related to the heat source and to seek possible evidence for an underlying magma chamber Notes 2D and 3D gravity modeling was done using gridded Bouguer gravity data covering a 45 by 45 km region over the Coso geothermal area. Isostatic and terrain corrected Bouguer gravity data for about 1300 gravity stations were obtained from the US Geological Survey. After the data were checked, the gravity values were gridded at 1 km centers for the area of interest

414

Exploration for geothermal resources in the Capital District of New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water chemistry, gas analyses, and geophysical methods including gravity and magnetic surveys, microseismic monitoring, and temperature gradient measurements were used in the Capital District area to evaluate the potential for a hydrothermal geothermal system. Water and gas chemistries provided indirect indicators, and temperature gradients provided direct indications of a geothermal system. Gravity results were supportive of gradient and chemistry data, but seismic and magnetic work have thus far provided little information on the potential system. Gradients throughout the area ranged from an average background value of about 10/sup 0/C/km to a high of roughly 44/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradient values, the most unusual water chemistries and largest carbon dioxide exhalations occur along the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, and indicate a good potential for a usable hydrothermal geothermal system at depth.

Sneeringer, M.R.; Dunn, J.R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Exploration for geothermal resources in the Capital District of New York. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water chemistry, gas analyses, and geophysical methods including gravity and magnetic surveys, microseismic monitoring, and temperature gradient measurements were used in the Capital District area to evaluate the potential for a hydrothermal geothermal system. Water and gas chemistries provided indirect indicators, and temperature gradients provided direct indications of a geothermal system. Gravity results were supportive of gradient and chemistry data, but seismic and magnetic work have thus far provided little information on the potential system. Gradients throughout the area ranged from an average background value of about 10/sup 0/C/km to a high of roughly 44/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradient values, the most unusual water chemistries and largest carbon dioxide exhalations occur along the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, and indicate a good potential for a usable hydrothermal geothermal system at depth.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geothermal: Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Search Advanced Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links You may need to turn on Javascript in your browser to use the Find Subject and Find Author features. Sort By: Relevance Publication Date System Entry Date Document Type Title Research Org Sponsoring Org OSTI Identifier Report Number DOE Contract Number Ascending Descending Enter search criteria into as few or as many fields as desired. Search In For Term(s) (Place phrase in "double quotes") All Fields: Bibliographic Data: Full Text: Creator/Author Select : Title: Subject Select : Identifier Numbers: Journal Info.: Conference Info.: Patent Info.: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.:

417

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geothermal Energy Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power production is a renewable technology with a worldwide operating capacity of more than 11,000 MW. Geothermal reservoirs have been a commercial reality in Italy, Japan, the United States, Iceland, New Zealand, and Mexico for many decades. According to the Energy Information Administration, the United States is the world leader in electricity production from geothermal resources with approximately 16,791 GWh of net production in 2012. Future geothermal power generation will depend on ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

South Dakota geothermal handbook  

SciTech Connect

The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Geothermal energy and the utility market -- the opportunities and challenges for expanding geothermal energy in a competitive supply market: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year's conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,'' focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geothermal energy and the utility market -- the opportunities and challenges for expanding geothermal energy in a competitive supply market: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year's conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,'' focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Geothermal energy in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The nature of goethermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of utilizing geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and State programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. The names, addresses, and phone numbers of various organizations actively involved in research, regulation, and the development of geothermal energy are included. (MHR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

New Mexico/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico/Geothermal Mexico/Geothermal < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Mexico Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Mexico Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Lightning Dock I Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, New Mexico Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Lightning Dock II Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, NV Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Mexico

424

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Abstract To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as a viable renewable energy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is in-vesting in the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to sup-ply cutting edge geoinformatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are dis-cussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess

425

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

426

Mono County geothermal activity  

SciTech Connect

Three geothermal projects have been proposed or are underway in Mono County, California. The Mammoth/Chance geothermal development project plans to construct a 10-MW geothermal binary power plant which will include 8 production and 3 injection wells. Pacific Lighting Energy Systems is also planning a 10-MW binary power plant consisting of 5 geothermal wells and up to 4 injection wells. A geothermal research project near Mammoth Lakes has spudded a well to provide a way to periodically measure temperature gradient, pressure, and chemistry of the thermal waters and to investigate the space-heating potential of the area in the vicinity of Mammoth Lakes. All three projects are briefly described.

Lyster, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Overview of the structure and geothermal potential of Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Evidence from a broad range of geological and geophysical investigations of Newberry Volcano in centeral Oregon suggests the presence of a small magma body beneath the summit caldera. Drilling has encountered temperatures indicative of a hydrothermal system above the hypothesized magma body. On the basis of hydrothermal mineralogy the temperature of the hydrothermal system is at or near its maximum value, indicating that the hydrothermal system is young. Basaltic underplating is postulated to replenish the magma body. The results of interdisciplinary studies at Newberry Volcano document that young, silicic volcanism in the Cascade Range can have geothermal potential. These results should be applied with caution to the rest of the Cascade Range because of the strong influence of Basin and Range extensional tectonics on Newberry Volcano's style of volcanism.

Fitterman, D.V.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Overview of Geothermal Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Energy Geothermal Energy Development Kermit Witherbee Geothermal Geologist/Analyst DOE Office of Indian Energy Webcast: Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Geothermal Geology and Resources Environmental Impacts Geothermal Technology - Energy Conversion Geothermal Leasing and Development 2 PRESENTATION OUTLINE GEOTHERMAL GEOLOGY AND RESOURCES 3 Geology - Plate Tectonics 4 Plate Tectonic Processes Schematic Cross-Section "Extensional" Systems- "Rifting" Basin and Range Rio Grand Rift Imperial Valley East Africa Rift Valley "Magmatic" Systems Cascade Range 6 Geothermal Resources(USGS Fact Sheet 2008-3062) 7 State Systems

430

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

432

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

433

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

434

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

435

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

436

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

437

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

438

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

439

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

440

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geothermal features hydrothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

442

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

443

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

444

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

445

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

446

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

447

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

448

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

449

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

450

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

451

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

452

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

453

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

454

Reference book on geothermal direct use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the direct uses of geothermal energy in the United States. Topics discussed include: low-temperature geothermal energy resources; energy reserves; geothermal heat pumps; geothermal energy for residential buildings; and geothermal energy for industrial usage.

Lienau, P.J.; Lund, J.W.; Rafferty, K.; Culver, G.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Geothermal-energy files in computer storage: sites, cities, and industries  

SciTech Connect

The site, city, and industrial files are described. The data presented are from the hydrothermal site file con