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1

Geological and Geotechnical Site Investigation for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

With international efforts to limit anthropogenic carbon in the atmosphere, various CO{sub 2} sequestration methods have been studied by various facilities worldwide. Basalt rock in general has been referred to as potential host material for mineral carbonation by various authors, without much regard for compositional variations due to depositional environment, subsequent metamorphism, or hydrothermal alteration. Since mineral carbonation relies on the presence of certain magnesium, calcium, or iron silicates, it is necessary to study the texture, mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of specific basalts before implying potential for mineral carbonation. The development of a methodology for the characterization of basalts with respect to their susceptibility for mineral carbonation is proposed to be developed as part of this research. The methodology will be developed based on whole rock data, petrography and microprobe analyses for samples from the Caledonia Mine in Michigan, which is the site for a proposed small-scale demonstration project on mineral carbonation in basalt. Samples from the Keweenaw Peninsula will be used to determine general compositional trends using whole rock data and petrography. Basalts in the Keweenaw Peninsula have been subjected to zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism with concurrent native copper deposition. Alteration was likely due to the circulation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids at slightly elevated temperatures and pressures, which is the process that is attempted to be duplicated by mineral carbonation.

Metz, Paul; Bolz, Patricia

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP BLOCKS 13 AND 14, ATWATER VALLEY AREA BLOCK 151, KEATHLEY CANYON AREA GULF OF MEXICO RESULTS OF CORE SAMPLE ANALYSIS, STANDARD AND ADVANCED LABORATORY TESTING Report No. 0201-5081 CHEVRON TEXACO ENERGY TECHNOLOGY COMPANY Houston, Texas FUGRO-McCLELLAND MARINE GEOSCIENCES, INC. P. O. Box 740010, Houston, Texas 77274, Phone: 713-369-5600, Fax: 713-369-5570 GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP BLOCKS 13 AND 14, ATWATER VALLEY AREA BLOCK 151, KEATHLEY CANYON AREA GULF OF MEXICO RESULTS OF CORE SAMPLE ANALYSIS, STANDARD AND ADVANCED LABORATORY TESTING REPORT NO. 0201-5081 Client: ChevronTexaco Energy Technology Company 1500 Louisiana St. Houston, Tx 77002

3

Site hydrogeologic/geotechnical characterization report for Site B new municipal solid waste landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Site Hydrogeologic/Geotechnical Characterization Report (SHCR) presents the results of a comprehensive study conducted on a proposed solid waste landfill site, identified herein as Site B, at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report is intended to satisfy all requirements of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with regard to landfill siting requirements and ground water and environmental protection. In addition, this report provides substantial geotechnical data pertinent to the landfill design process.

Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Update of assessment of geotechnical risks, strategic petroleum reserve, Weeks Island site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a critical reassessment of the geotechnical risks of continuing oil storage at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. It reviews all previous risk abatement recommendations, subsequent mitigative actions, and new information. Of increased concern, due to the discovery of a surface levels, is the long term maintainability of the mine as an oil storage repository. Mine operational changes are supported in order to facilitate monitoring of water entry diagnostics. These changes are also intended to minimize the volume in the mine available for water entry. Specific recommendations are made to implement the mine changes.

Bauer, S.J. [ed.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Site geotechnical considerations for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels  

SciTech Connect

Eight Gulf Coast salt domes have emerged as candidate sites for possible expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels. Two existing SPR sites, Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA, are among the eight that are being considered. To achieve the billion barrel capacity, some 25 new leached caverns would be constructed, and would probably be established in two separate sites in Louisiana and Texas because of distribution requirements. Geotechnical factors involved in siting studies have centered first and foremost on cavern integrity and environmental acceptability, once logistical suitability is realized. Other factors have involved subsidence and flooding potential, loss of coastal marshlands, seismicity, brine injection well utility, and co-use by multiple operators. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Neal, J.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Whittington, D.W. (USDOE Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Magorian, T.R. (Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geotechnical aspects of investigations at Stripa on radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

Access to a granitic rock mass in an iron ore mine in Sweden has provided a unique opportunity for a series of investigations on problems involved in geologic storage of radioactive waste. Important results have been obtained that would not have emerged if these experiments had not been carried out underground at depths comparable with those envisaged for an actual repository. It was observed that as the rock mass was heated, the temperature variations over time and space could be reasonably well predicted using available theory and appropriate values of material properties. However, because the rock is fractured, predicting the thermochenical behavior is much more involved. The role of the discontinuities is a key factor and is not yet well understood. The fracture network is also the dominant factor in controlling rock mass permeability. A new method of measuring average permeability on a very large scale is reported.

Witherspoon, P.A.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Underground facility for geoenvironmental and geotechnical research at the SSC Site in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface environment is an important national resource that is utilized for construction, waste disposal and groundwater supply. Conflicting and unwise use has led to problems of groundwater contamination. Cleanup is often difficult and expensive, and perhaps not even possible in many cases. Construction projects often encounter unanticipated difficulties that increase expenses. Many of the difficulties of predicting mechanical behavior and fluid flow and transport behavior stem from problems in characterizing what cannot be seen. An underground research laboratory, such as can be developed in the nearly 14 miles of tunnel at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site, will provide a unique opportunity to advance scientific investigations of fluid flow, chemical transport, and mechanical behavior in situ in weak and fractured, porous rock on a scale relevant to civil and environmental engineering applications involving the subsurface down to a depth of 100 m. The unique element provided by underground studies at the SSC site is three-dimensional access to a range of fracture conditions in two rock types, chalk and shale. Detailed experimentation can be carried out in small sections of the SSC tunnel where different types of fractures and faults occur and where different rock types or contacts are exposed. The entire length of the tunnel can serve as an observatory for large scale mechanical and fluid flow testing. The most exciting opportunity is to mine back a volume of rock to conduct a post-experiment audit following injection of a number of reactive and conservative tracers. Flow paths and tracer distributions can be examined directly. The scientific goal is to test conceptual models and numerical predictions. In addition, mechanical and hydrological data may be of significant value in developing safe and effective methods for closing the tunnel itself.

Wang, H.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Myer, L.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hazardous waste site investigations: Towards better decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Life Sciences Symposia series is conducted under the Associate Director for Environmental, Life, and Social Sciences. This series began in 1978 and it provides a forum to discuss subjects of interest to the US Department of Energy, the scientific community, and the public. The Tenth ORNL Life Sciences Symposium focused on key aspects of measurements made at hazardous waste sites and their impact on the decision-making process. In particular, the symposium was concerned with how field measurements could be improved to provide greater quality and quantity of data at less cost and in less time. Presentations and papers presented in this publication provide a critical review of the current status in their respective areas of interest. An effort has been made to identify existing deficiencies, future directions, and needed research. Experts were brought together to present data on the state-of-the-art hazardous waste site investigations in four major areas: Individual projects are processed separately for the databases.

Gammage, R.B.; Berven, B.A. [eds.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand Citation SonicSampDrill. Geotechnical...

12

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report - Volume I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

494-VOL I/REV 1 494-VOL I/REV 1 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on D i v i s i on N ev ada E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on Pr oj ect S al m on S i t e R em edi al Inv es t i gat i on R epor t Vol u m e I R ev i s i on N o. : 1 S ept em ber 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE/NV--494-VOL I/REV 1 SALMON SITE REMEDIAL INVESTIGATION REPORT DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Revision No.: 1 September 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from -

13

In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document contains the records of cone penetrometer and dilatometer soundings for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report, Volume 3.

Fisk, B.E.; Timian, D.A.

1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

14

Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 April 2004 Investigation of Worker Vapor Exposure and Occupational Medicine Program Allegations at the Hanford Site At the direction of the Secretary of Energy, the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an investigation of selected aspects of worker safety and health systems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in February-April 2004. In February 2004, the Secretary of Energy directed OA to evaluate recent allegations of deficient safety and medical practices and to assess past practices and current operations to determine whether additional actions are needed to ensure a safe work environment at the Hanford Site.

15

ISG8-Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations (WG5) Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations (WG5) June 24 - 27, 2002 Bldg.281 Conventional Facilities Rm. (A. Seryi, T. Tauchi) Parallel Sessions: Working Groups: WG1: Parameters, Design, Instrumentation and Tuning WG2: Damping Rings and ATF WG3: RF Sources WG4:Structures WG5: Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations Agenda, ISG8 WG5 Final Version Goal: The main goal is to try to establish requirements to a linear collider site and determine a set of criteria that would allow evaluating a particular site. Trip to California representative sites: Scheduled and happened on Friday, departure 6am. This was a full day event. (Fred Asiri and Jerry Aarons were the guides). Monday, June 24, 11:00-12:00 Initial discussion Monday (joint with WG1) 13:30-17:30, Bldg.212, Cascades room

16

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

17

Geotechnical environmental aspects of geothermal power generation at Herber, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source was assessed. Here, the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California were investigated. Geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence are discussed in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. Estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds, are discussed.

Not Available

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) As greater attention is being directed toward the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities, the need for a standardized approach for implementing the necessary radiological surveys has become increasingly important. A multi-agency committee representing the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has addressed this need by producing a guidance document known as the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). Published in December 1997, MARSSIM provides detailed guidance for planning, implementing and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys to demonstrate compliance with a dose- or risk-based

19

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2001 - June 2002  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 2001, to June 30, 2002. It is divided into ten chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1 provides background information on WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which include fracture and stratigraphic mapping, borehole and core logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements. Chapter 10 lists the References and Bibliography.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 1999-June 2000  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations during operations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 1999, to June 30, 2000. It is divided into ten chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1 provides background information on the WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which includes fracture mapping, borehole logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9 provides an assessment of the hydrologic conditions near the Exhaust Shaft. Chapter 10 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements.

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 1998-June 1999  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations during operations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 1998, to June 30, 1999. It is divided into nine chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1.0 provides background information on the WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2.0 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3.0 and 4.0 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8.0 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which includes fracture mapping, borehole logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9.0 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements.

Westinghouse

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2000-June 2001  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations during operations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2001. It is divided into ten chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1 provides background information on WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which include fracture and stratigraphic mapping, borehole and core logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9 provides an assessment of the hydrologic conditions near the Exhaust Shaft. Chapter 10 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements.

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

A select bibliography with abstracts of reports related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant geotechnical studies (1972--1990)  

SciTech Connect

This select bibliography contains 941 entries. Each bibliographic entry contains the citation of a report, conference paper, or journal article containing geotechnical information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The entries cover the period from 1972, when investigation began for a WIPP Site in southeastern New Mexico, through December 1990. Each entry is followed by an abstract. If an abstract or suitable summary existed, it has been included; 316 abstracts were written for other documents. For some entries, an annotation has been provided to clarify the abstract, comment on the setting and significance of the document, or guide the reader to related reports. An index of key words/phrases is included for all entries.

Powers, D.W. [Powers (Dennis W.), Anthony, TX (United States); Martin, M.L. [International Technology, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of a 3D GIS database model for geotechnical analysis incorporating geostatistics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The application of 3D GIS and geostatistical tools in geotechnical fields enables geotechnical engineers to think spatially and make decision wisely. To support the 3D… (more)

Gao, Shan.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2002 - June 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

Kilmer, J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geological characterization report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical information is presented relevant to the WIPP site in the Delaware Basin in SE New Mexico. This volume covers regional geology, site geology, and seismology. (DLC)

Powers, D.W.; Lambert, S.J.; Shaffer, S.E.; Hill, L.R.; Weart, W.D. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Field investigation at the Faultless Site Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of groundwater monitoring at non-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear test sites raised questions about the potential for radionuclide migration from the Faultless event and how to best monitor for such migration. With its long standing interest in the Faultless area and background in Nevada hydrogeology, the Desert Research Institute conducted a field investigation in FY92 to address the following issues: The status of chimney infilling (which determines the potential for migration); the best level(s) from which to collect samples from the nearby monitoring wells, HTH-1 and HTH-2; the status of hydraulic heads in the monitoring well area following records of sustained elevated post-shot heads. The field investigation was conducted from July 27 to 31 and August 4 to 7, 1992. Temperature and electrical conductivity logging were performed in HTH-1, HTH-2, and UC-1-P-2SR. Water samples were collected from HTH-1 and HTH-2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) also collected samples during the July trip, including samples from UC-1-P-2SR. This report presents the data gathered during these field excursions and some preliminary conclusions. Full interpretation of the data in light of the issues listed above is planned for FY93.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hydrogeochemical investigation of six geothermal sites in Honduras, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We conducted detailed hydrogeochemical investigations at six geothermal sites in western Honduras: Azacualpa, El Olivar, Pavana, Platanares, Sambo Creek, and San Ignacio. None of the sites is associated with Quaternary silicic volcanism, although El Olivar lies adjacent to a small Quaternary basalt field and Pavana is part of a belt of hot spring activity parallel to and 35 km east of the Central American volcanic arc. None of the sites contains acid-sulfate waters indicative of vapor-dominated conditions. Thermal fluids are characterized by pH between 7 and 10, Cl<125 mg/l, HCO/sub 3/>Cl, SO/sub 4/greater than or equal toCl, Bless than or equal to17 mg/l, Liless than or equal to4 mg/l, and Asless than or equal to1.25 mg/l. Stable isotope analyses of the water show that recharge to the geothermal systems generally occurs from areas of higher elevation adjacent to the sites. Tritium contents of apparently undiluted thermal fluids range from 0 to 0.4 T.U., indicating residence times of fluids in the systems of more than 500 y. Various geochemical indicators show that mixing of hot and cold end-member fluids occurs in the system at Platanares and, to a lesser degree, in the systems at San Ignacio and Azacualpa. No mixing is apparent in the fluids discharging at Pavana, Sambo Creek, or El Olivar. Boiling is the dominant process responsible for subtle geochemical variations at Azacualpa and, possibly, San Ignacio. Our best estimates of subsurface reservoir temperatures are 225/sup 0/C at Platanares, 190/sup 0/C at San Ignacio, 185/sup 0/C at Azacualpa, 155/sup 0/C at Sambo Creek, 150/sup 0/C at Pavana, and 120/sup 0/C at El Olivar. The estimated power output of the three hottest sites is 45 thermal megawatts at Platanares, 14 thermal megawatts at San Ignacio, and 13 thermal megawatts at Azacualpa.

Goff, F.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Grigsby, C.O.; Janik, C.J.; Shevenell, L.A.; Paredes, J.R.; Gutierrez, J.W.; Trujillo, Jr.; Counce, D.A.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining what future CCC/USDA actions may be necessary, with the ultimate goal of achieving classification of the Sylvan Grove site at no further action status. The proposed activities are to be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA concerning environmental site characterization and remediation at former grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. That document should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

MULTI-AGENCY RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION MANUAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MULTI-AGENCY MULTI-AGENCY RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION MANUAL (MARSSIM) NUREG-1575, Rev. 1 EPA 402-R-97-016, Rev. 1 Rev. 1 AUGUST 2000 REVISION 1 DOE/EH-0624, ABSTRACT The MARSSIM provides information on planning, conducting, evaluating, and documenting building surface and surface soil final status radiological surveys for demonstrating compliance with dose or risk-based regulations or standards. The MARSSIM is a multi-agency consensus document that was developed collaboratively by four Federal agencies having authority and control over radioactive materials: Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The MARSSIM's objective is to describe a consistent approach for planning, performing, and

32

FIELD INVESTIGATION AT THE FAULTLESS SITE CENTRAL NEVADA TEST  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FIELD FIELD INVESTIGATION AT THE FAULTLESS SITE CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA DOEINV/10845--T3 DE93 005915 by JennyB. Chapman, Thdd M. Mihevc and Brad Lyles Water Resources Center Desert Research Institute DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recom- mendation, or favoring

33

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

34

Some Geotechnical Properties of Palm Biodiesel Contaminated Mining Sand and Weathered Granite Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-pollution due to accidental during transportation or leakage from storage not only brings large damage to the environments, but it also affects the geotechnical properties of soil. Hence, an extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to investigate the geotechnical properties on palm biodiesel contaminated weathered granite soil and mining sand. A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out by using a direct simple shear device on clean and contaminated soil samples. The contaminated soil samples were mixed with palm biodiesel in the amount 5%, 10 % and 15 % by dry weight. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of palm biodiesel contamination on the mining sand and weathered granite soil samples. The overall results indicated decrease of shear strength with increasing palm biodiesel contents.

Yue Ling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 266: Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1, February 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 266, Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 266 consists of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-09 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 266. Corrective Action Unit 266 is located southwest of Building 3124 which is located southwest and adjacent to Test Cell A. Test Cell A was operational during the 1960s to test nuclear rocket reactors in support of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Operations within Building 3124 from 1962 through the early 1990s resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with Test Cell A reactor testing operations, various laboratories including a high-level radioactivity environmental sample handling laboratory, and possibly the Treatability Test Facility. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include radionuclides, oil/diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. Samples will also be analyzed for radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls not considered during the DQO process. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform a radiological walkover survey. (2) Perform video and radiation surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (3) Collect samples from within the septic tank. (4) Mark approximate locations of leachfield distribution lines on the ground surface. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tank and outfall end of the diversion chamber. (6) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze soil samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/diesel-range organics), and polychlorinated biphenyls. (1) Analyze a minimum of 25 percent of the soil samples for gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, isotopic americium, and strontium-90 if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (2) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters. (3) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at Site Supervisors discretion if volatile organic compounds exceed field-screening levels. Additional sampling and analytical details are presented.

U.S. Department Of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geotechnical Environmental Aspects of Geothermal Power Generation at Heber, Imperial Valley, California. Topical report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a portion of the results from a one-year feasibility study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assess the feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source. The impact of power generation from hydrothermal resources on subsurface water flow, seismicity and subsidence are of acute interest in the determination of the environmental acceptance of geothermal energy. At the same time, the experience and data bases in these areas are very limited. The objective of the project was to assess the technical, geotechnical, environmental and economic feasibility of producing electricity from hydrothermal resources like those known to exist in the US. The objective of this part of the study was to investigate the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California. This report discusses geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. it also discusses estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds.

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Final report : Hanover environmental site investigation, 2009-2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected in two private lawn and garden wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Consequently, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations, under the direction of the KDHE, to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be associated with the former facility. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion (VI). Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at Hanover might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that may be associated with the former facility. The results of the comprehensive investigation at Hanover indicate that no unacceptable risk to human health currently exists from exposure to surface and subsurface soils by either ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact. No risk is associated with potential exposure to contaminated groundwater at Hanover. No drinking water wells are known to exist in Hanover, and the drinking water supply comes from RWD No.1 at Lanham, Kansas, located 6.5 mi north of Hanover. Limited potential risk was identified due to exposure to indoor air contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, but this risk has been mitigated, thereby removing this threat to human health. Radon is prevalent in the community, at concentrations exceeding the level at which the EPA recommends additional measures (testing and/or mitigation). The recommended testing and mitigation (if needed) are the responsibility of the homeowners. In the current condition in which no private wells are used for drinking water in the affected area, no unacceptable human health risk from carbon tetrachloride is associated with the identified impacted media at the Hanover site.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

Wickline, Alfred

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, April 2001)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 271 consists of 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) including: thirteen Septic Systems (25-04-01, 25-04-03, 25-04-04, 25-04-08, 25-04-09, 25-04-10, 25-04-11, 26-04-01, 26-04-02, 26-05-03, 26-05-04, 26-05-05, and 27-05-02), one Contaminated Water Reservoir (26-03-01), and one Radioactive Leachfield (26-05-01). The CASs addressed by CAU 271 are located at Guard Station 500, the Reactor Control Point (RCP), Bare Reactor Experiment - Nevada Tower, and Engine Test State-1 (ETS-1) facilities in Area 25; the Port Gaston and Project Pluto facilities in Area 26; and the Baker Site in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1 958 and 1973, the RCP and ETS-1 facilities supported the development and testing of nuclear reactors for space propulsion as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The Project Pluto facilities supported nuclear reactor testing for use as a ramjet propulsion system between 1961 and 1964, followed by similar use for other projects through the early 1980s. The Baker Site facilities were constructed in the 1960s to serve as the staging point where the manufactured components of nuclear devices were assembled, disassembled, and modified. The scope of the investigation strategy at these sites will involve biased and random soil sampling in leachfields using excavation (with drilling as a contingency), collection of soil samples underlying the base of proximal and distal ends of septic tanks and distal ends of distribution structures, defining the lateral and vertical extent of contamination through discrete field and possible stepout location sampling, collection system line inspection, and geotechnical/ hydrological laboratory analyses. Based on site history and existing characterization data gathered to support the Data Quality Objectives process, it is believed that the contaminants of potential concern at these CASs may include: volatile organic compounds, fecal coliform bacteria, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, strontium-90, tritium, beryllium, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and herbicides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Investigation of anatomical anomalies in Hanford Site mule deer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), common residents of the Hanford Site, are an important part of the shrub-steppe ecosystem as well as being valued for aesthetics and hunting. Because mule deer have been protected from hunting on the Site for 50 years, the herd has developed unique population characteristics, including a large number of old animals and males with either large or atypically developed antlers, in contrast to other herds in the semi-arid regions of the Northwest. Hanford Site mule deer have been studied since 1991 because of the herd`s unique nature and high degree of public interest. A special study of the mule deer herd was initiated in 1993 after observations were made of a relatively large number of male deer with atypical, velvet-covered antlers. This report specifically describes our analyses of adult male deer found on the Site with atypical antlers. The report includes estimates of population densities and composition; home ranges, habitat uses, and dietary habits; natural and human-induced causes of mortality; and the herd`s overall health and reproductive status.

Tiller, B.L.; Cadwell, L.L.; Poston, T.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex Terrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex, 50011 An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interferences of wind turbines sited over conducted in a large wind tunnel with of wind turbine models sited over a flat terrain (baseline case

Hu, Hui

44

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

46

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision No. 1 (9/2001)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This corrective action investigation plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 262 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): Underground Storage Tank (25-02-06), Septic Systems A and B (25-04-06), Septic System (25-04-07), Leachfield (25-05-03), Leachfield (25-05-05), Leachfield (25-05-06), Radioactive Leachfield (25-05-08), Leachfield (25-05-12), and Dry Well (25-51-01). Situated in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), sites addressed by CAU 262 are located at the Reactor-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Test Cell C; and Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facilities. The R-MAD, Test Cell C, and E-MAD facilities supported nuclear rocket reactor and engine testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The activities associated with the testing program were conducted between 1958 and 1973. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for the site include oil/diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and tritium. The scope of the corrective action field investigation at the CAU will include the inspection of portions of the collection systems, sampling the contents of collection system features in situ of leachfield logging materials, surface soil sampling, collection of samples of soil underlying the base of inlet and outfall ends of septic tanks and outfall ends of diversion structures and distribution boxes, collection of soil samples from biased or a combination of biased and random locations within the boundaries of the leachfields, collection of soil samples at stepout locations (where needed) to further define lateral and vertical extent of contamination, conduction of discrete field screening, and logging of soil borings and collection of geotechnical samples to assess soil characteristics. Historical information indicates that significant quantities of radioactive material were produced during the rocket engine testing program, some of which was disposed of in radioactive waste disposal systems (posted leachfields) at each of these locations. Process and sanitary effluents were generated and disposed of in other leachfields. The results of this field investigation will be used to develop and evaluate corrective action alternatives for these CASs.

NNSA /NV

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task  

SciTech Connect

This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI&SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI&SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations.

Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2004 - June 2005, Volume 2, Supporting Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of geotechnical data presented as plots for each active instrument installed in the underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) through June 30, 2005. A summary of the geotechnical analyses that were performed using the enclosed data is provided in Volume 1 of the Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2005 - June 2006, Volume 2, Supporting Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of geotechnical data presented as plots for each active instrument installed in the underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) through June 30, 2006. A summary of the geotechnical analyses that were performed using the enclosed data is provided in Volume 1 of the Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

David A. Strand

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Investigation of coal tar mobility at a former MGP site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of coal tar in the subsurface of former manufactured gas plant sites poses an environmental hazard and a potential threat to public health. Coal tar can release various chemical compounds that are transported into the groundwater. Before any efforts can be made to remove coal tar from contaminated subsurface soils, it is recommended to characterize coal tar properties and composition and to delineate the residual saturation point between mobile and immobile coal tar. This paper presents a new innovative field device, the Res-SAT field tool, and laboratory procedures that can be used to determine the saturation-capillary pressure relationship for a soil-water coal-tar system and the critical pressure for coal tar mobility.

Moo-Young, H.K.; Mo, X.H.; Waterman, R.; Coleman, A.; Saroff, S. [California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Azimuthal Density Tools, and crossover) and four (4) drill collars, the Schlumberger JAR, followed by another eight (8) drill collars. For the remaining four (4) soil sampling...

53

Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2003 - June 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains an assessment of the geotechnical status of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). During the excavation of the principal underground access and experimental areas, the status was reported quarterly. Since 1987, when the initial construction phase was completed, reports have been published annually. This report presents and analyzes data collected from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sustainable Development and Energy Geotechnology Potential Roles for Geotechnical Engineering  

SciTech Connect

The world is facing unprecedented challenges related to energy resources, global climate change, material use, and waste generation. Failure to address these challenges will inhibit the growth of the developing world and will negatively impact the standard of living and security of future generations in all nations. The solutions to these challenges will require multidisciplinary research across the social and physical sciences and engineering. Although perhaps not always recognized, geotechnical engineering expertise is critical to the solution of many energy and sustainability-related problems. Hence, geotechnical engineers and academicians have opportunity and responsibility to contribute to the solution of these worldwide problems. Research will need to be extended to non-standard issues such as thermal properties of soils; sediment and rock response to extreme conditions and at very long time scales; coupled hydro-chemo-thermo-bio-mechanical processes; positive feedback systems; the development of discontinuities; biological modification of soil properties; spatial variability; and emergent phenomena. Clearly, the challenges facing geotechnical engineering in the future will require a much broader knowledge base than our traditional educational programs provide. The geotechnical engineering curricula, from undergraduate education through continuing professional education, must address the changing needs of a profession that will increasingly be engaged in alternative/renewable energy production; energy efficiency; sustainable design, enhanced and more efficient use of natural resources, waste management, and underground utilization.

FragaszyProgram Dire, Dr. R. J. [National Science Foundation; Santamarina, Carlos [Georgia Institute of Technology; Espinoza, N. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jang, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jung, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567 is located in Areas 1, 3, 5, 20, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 567 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 567, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-1 • 03-23-25, Seaweed E Contamination Area • 05-23-07, A5b RMA • 20-23-08, Colby Mud Spill • 25-23-23, J-11 Soil RMA These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on May 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 567. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 567 releases are nuclear test operations and other NNSS operations. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary at Atmospheric Test Site T-1 exceeds the final action level (FAL) and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at Atmospheric Test Site T-1 and all other CAU 567 CASs will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based FAL. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Matthews, Patrick K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 01-25-02, Fuel Spill • 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST • 06-99-10, Tar Spills • 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Installation Restoration Program (IRP) site investigation for IRP site number 1. 101st ACS, Worcester ANGs. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

A Site Investigation (SI) was conducted at the Old Embankment/Vicinity of the old Waste Holding Area at Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site No. 1 located at the 101 st Air Control Squadron (ACS) and the 212th Engineering Installation Squadron (EIS), Massachusetts Air National Guard (MASS ANG), Worcestor, MA. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) concentrations detected did not exceed Massachusetts Soil Standards and PCBs were not detected. However, semivolatile organic compound, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons were detected above reportable concentrations. Additional background sampling and a Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study (RI/FS) were recommended to determine the nature and extent of contamination.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

Grant Evenson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the soil and sediment task. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This document is a site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist (WP/HSC) for a task of the Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI). Title 29 CFR Part 1910.120 requires that a health and safety program plan that includes site- and task-specific information be completed to ensure conformance with health- and safety-related requirements. To meet this requirement, the health and safety program plan for each WAG 2 RI&SI field task must include (1) the general health and safety program plan for all WAG 2 RI&SI field activities and (2) a WP/HSC for that particular field task. These two components, along with all applicable referenced procedures, must be kept together at the work site and distributed to field personnel as required. The general health and safety program plan is the Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169). The WP/HSCs are being issued as supplements to ORNL/ER-169.

Holt, V.L.; Burgoa, B.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the ecological assessment task, Kingfisher Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation Ecological Assessment Task, Kingfisher Study, including information that will contribute to safe completion of the project. The report includes historical background; a site map; project organization; task descriptions and hazard evaluations; controls; and monitoring, personal protective equipment, decontamination, and medical surveillance program requirements. The report also includes descriptions of site personnel and their certifications as well as suspected WAG 2 contaminants and their characteristics. The primary objective of the WAG 2 Kingfisher Study is to assess the feasibility of using kingfishers as biological monitors of contaminants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Kingfisher sample collection will be used to determine the levels of contaminants and degree of bioaccumulation within a common piscivorous bird feeding on contaminated fish from streams on the ORR.

Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fermi Site Office | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fermi Site Office Fermi Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fermi Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Fermi Site Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 7, 2013 CX-010532: Categorical Exclusion Determination Various Demolition Jobs CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office March 27, 2013 CX-010387: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Geotechnical Investigation of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Detector Site in South Dakota CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03/27/2013 Location(s): South Dakota Offices(s): Fermi Site Office February 20, 2013 CX-010388: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development Extrusion Line Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.15

63

Data Summary Report for teh Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This data summary report summarizes the investigation results to evaluate the nature and distribution of Hanford Site-related contaminants present in the Columbia River. As detailed in DOE/RL-2008-11, more than 2,000 environmental samples were collected from the Columbia River between 2008 and 2010. These samples consisted of island soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater upwelling (pore water, surface water, and sediment), and fish tissue.

Hulstrom, L.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

Wickline, Alfred

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Waste Isolation PIlot Plant Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2005 - June 2006, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports quarterly to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after early excavations of the underground facility. Since completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 2005, to June 30, 2006. It is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information on WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5 and 6 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the two main portions of the WIPP underground (the access drifts and the waste disposal area). Chapter 7 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which include fracture mapping and borehole observations. Chapter 8 summarizes the results of geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements. Chapter 9 lists references.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2004 - June 2005, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports quarterly to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after early excavations of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005. It is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information on WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the Geomechanical Monitoring Program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5 and 6 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the two main portions of the WIPP underground (the access drifts and the waste disposal area). Chapter 7 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which include fracture mapping and borehole observations. Chapter 8 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements. Chapter 9 lists the references and bibliography.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

67

Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1 Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC1342GJ79491 DOE Task Order No. ST03-205 Document N u m b e r Q0029500 S i g t ~ a t u r e Page Signature Page Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendud Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Submitted By: Arthur W. Kleinrath, Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energyat Gmnd Junction MMTS OU 111 Remedial Investigation AddendutdFocuscd Feasibilily Study January 2004 Final iii This page intentionally left blank Document Number Q0029500 Contents U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction MMTS OU III Remedial Investigation Addendum/Focused Feasibility Study

69

Site-specific investigations of aquifer thermal energy storage for space and process cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed three preliminary site-specific feasibility studies that investigated using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) to reduce space and process cooling costs. Chilled water stored in an ATES system could be used to meet all or part of the process and/or space cooling loads at the three facilities investigated. The work was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Management. The ultimate goal of DOE's Thermal Energy Storage Program is to successfully transfer ATES technology to industrial and commercial sectors. The primary objective of this study was to identify prospective sites and determine the technical and economic feasibility of implementing chill ATES technology. A secondary objective was to identify site-specific factors promoting or inhibiting the application of chill ATES technology so that other potentially attractive sites could be more easily identified and evaluated. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility of commercializing chill ATES in automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities represent a good entry market for chill ATES, if the system is cost-effective. As a result, this study was undertaken to identify and evaluate prospective chill ATES applications in the automotive industry. The balance of the report contains two main sections. Section 2.0 describes the site identification process. Site feasibility is addressed in Section 3.0. Overall study conclusions and recommendations are than presented in Section 4.0.

Brown, D R; Hattrup, M P; Watts, R L

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Work plan addendum for the remedial investigation and feasibility study of the Salmon Site  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended as an addendum to the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the Salmon Site (SS) (formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site) Lamar County, Mississippi. The original work plan - Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Tatum Dome Test Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (herein after called the Work Plan) was approved by the state of Mississippi in 1992 and was intended as the operative document for investigative activities at the Tatum Dome Test Site. Subsequent to the approval of the document a series of activities were undertaken under the auspices of the work plan. This document is organized in the same manner as the original work plan: (1) Introduction; (2) Site Background and History; (3) Initial Evaluation; (4) Data Quality Objectives; (5) RI/FS Tasks; (6) Project Schedule; (7) Project Management; and (8) Reference. This addendum will identify changes to the original work plan that are necessary because of additional information acquired at the SS. This document is not intended to replace the work plan, rather, it is intended to focus the remaining work in the context of additional site knowledge gained since the development of the original work plan. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a focused and phased site characterization as a part, of the RI/FS. The RI/FS is the methodology under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) for evaluating hazardous waste sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The SS is not listed on the NPL, but DOE has voluntarily elected to conduct the evaluation of the SS in accordance with CERCLA.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Investigations at the Sloan Site (41 SS 51) a stratified alluvial terrace site in San Saba County, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A Master's Thesis on excavations and results from Texas Tech Archaeology Field Schools 1993-1996 at the Sloan Site, a stratified alluvial terrace site with a… (more)

Butler, Joel Byron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ERDA test facilities, East Mesa Test Site. Geothermal resource investigations, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed specifications which must be complied with in the construction of the ERDA Test Facilities at the East Mesa Site for geothermal resource investigations in Imperial Valley, California are presented for use by prospective bidders for the construction contract. The principle construction work includes a 700 gpm cooling tower with its associated supports and equipment, pipelines from wells, electrical equipment, and all earthwork. (LCL)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Supplemental Investigation Plan for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is part of an effort to re-evaluate all FFACO URs against the current RBCA criteria (referred to in this document as the Industrial Sites [IS] RBCA process) as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). After reviewing all of the existing FFACO URs, the 12 URs addressed in this Supplemental Investigation Plan (SIP) could not be evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as sufficient information about the contamination at each site was not available. This document presents the plan for conducting field investigations to obtain the needed information. This SIP includes URs from Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 326, 339, 358, 452, 454, 464, and 1010, located in Areas 2, 6, 12, 19, 25, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada; and CAU 403, located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 165 miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Lynn Kidman

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site  

SciTech Connect

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from recurring. The report gives complete details on the sequence of events surrounding the accident and identifies 27 facts related to accident itself. Four technical deficiencies in the electrical systems which require further investigation were identified. The Team believes that the root cause of this accident was related to the absence of a proactive organizational entity responsible for overall health and safety on the site. Two contributing factors were identified. First, the prototype nature and associated operational difficulties of the electrical inverter resulted in large maintenance demands. Second, several of the injured employee`s co-workers noted that he occasionally failed to use appropriate personal protective equipment, but they never reported this practice to management. The direct cause of this accident was the failure of the injured employee to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., rubber gloves). Based on the review of the facts established in this investigation, five recommendations are presented to the funding agencies to reduce the possibility of future accidents at the PVUSA site.

Jacobson, L.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Garrett, J.O.; Tyler, R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories: Annual report, fiscal year 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multidisciplinary project was initiated in fiscal year 1986. It comprises 11 reports in two major interrelated tasks: The technical assistance part of the project includes reviewing the progress of the major projects in the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive waste Management (OCRWM) Program and advising the Engineering and Geotechnology Division on significant technical issues facing each project; analyzing geotechnical data, reports, tests, surveys and plans for the different projects; reviewing and commenting on major technical reports and other program documents such as Site Characterization Plans (SCP) and Study Plans; and providing scientific and technical input at technical meetings. The topical studies activity comprises studies on scientific and technical ions and issues of significance to in-situ testing, test analysis methods, and site characterization of nuclear waste geologic repositories. The subjects of study were selected based on discussions with DOE staff. One minor topic is a preliminary consideration and planning exercise for postclosure monitoring studies. The major task, with subtasks involving various geoscience disciplines, is a study of the mechanical, hydraulic, geophysical and geochemical properties of fractures in geologic rock masses.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Aquifer stability investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II of a 5-phase overall compressed air energy storage (CAES) development program was performed to characterize and explore potential CAES sites and to prepare a research and development plan. This volume for Phase II activities contains an evaluation of the suitability of seven selected sites to undergo field drilling and air injection testing; a bibliography; results of a literature search on the effects of air injection of aquifer-caprock well systems; reservoir data for the sites; cost estimates; and predicted potential risks from a CAES plant. (LCL)

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 571: Area 9 Yucca Flat Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAU 571 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 571, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 09-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site S-9F • 09-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T9-C • 09-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site S-9E • 09-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site T-9D • 09-45-01, Windrows Crater These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on March 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (now the Nevada Field Office). The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 571. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 571 CASs are from nuclear testing activities. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary exceeds the final action level (FAL) and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundaries at CAU 571 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based FAL. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Chemical contamination will be evaluated by comparing soil sample results to the FAL. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Bailey, Bernadine; Matthews, Patrick

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0 with ROTC No. 1 and ROTC No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to CAS 23-02-08. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 554 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Perform field screening. (3) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (4) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (5) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

427 427 Rev. 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Review Report: Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, PGDP, Paducah Kentucky 15 August 2007 Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Paducah KY Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Paducah KY Prepared for: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Office of Engineering and Technology Review Report - C-400 Thermal Remediation PGDP WSRC-STI-2007-00427 rev. 1 Cover Photo: Oblique view overhead photograph of the Department of Energy Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Paducah KY. The TCE source area targeted for thermal treatment is located near the center of the photograph. .

84

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste including debris deemed to be potential source material, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Pat Matthews

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report for IRP site No. 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota - Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Investigation Report for IRP Site No 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Volume I. This is the first volume of a two volume site investigation report. Two sites (Site 12 - Ramp area and Site 13 - Motor Vehicle Maintenance Facility) was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended on site 13 and quarterly sampling was recommended for site 12. South Dakota Regulators have agreed to both recommendations. Decision documents will be prepared for each site.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the appendixes for the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The following topics are covered in the appendixes: (A) David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Historical Data, (B) Fieldwork Plans for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, (C) Risk Assessment, (D) Remediation Technology Discussion, (E) Engineering Support Documentation, (F) Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements, and (G) Cost Estimate Documentation.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond • 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able • 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area • 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where the total effective dose at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, consists of seven inactive sites located in the Yucca Flat area and one inactive site in the Pahute Mesa area. The eight CAU 545 sites consist of craters used for mud disposal, surface or buried waste disposed within craters or potential crater areas, and sites where surface or buried waste was disposed. The CAU 545 sites were used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat area during the 1950s through the early 1990s, and in Area 20 in the mid-1970s. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval.

Alfred Wickline

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

Patrick Matthews

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS). Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Catania, viale A. Doria no 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

Data Quality Assessment Report for the Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the data quality assessment that was performed on the analytical data generated in connection with the 2008/2009 surface water, sediment, and soil data collection; groundwater upwelling investigation sample collection; and fish tissue sample collection.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Data Quality Assessment Report for the Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the data quality assessment that was performed on the analytical data generated in connection with the 2008/2009 surface water, sediment, and soil data collection; groundwater upwelling investigation sample collection; and fish tissue sample collection.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

David A. Strand

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area •05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able •05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton •05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area •05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), “equation of state” experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: •Conduct radiological surveys. •Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. •If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). •Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Limited site investigation of Landfills 1 and 4, Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this report was collected during limited site investigation activities conducted in the vicinity of Landfills 1 and 4 at Fort Lewis. The purpose of this work was to provide a means of detecting and evaluating the impacts of these inactive landfills on ground-water quality and adjacent lands. This effort included the design and construction of ground-water monitoring systems for compliance with applicable federal and state regulations governing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-type landfills. Ground-water samples were collected from both existing (1981 and 1984) wells and the newly installed (1988) wells. The analytical results from the water samples indicate that the ground water in and around Landfill 1 contains limited contamination. Contaminants may include volatile organic compounds and nitrate. The primary concern in the area around Landfill 1 was the determination that ground water from two wells may contain cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. Nitrate levels in the downgradient wells were greater than those in upgradient wells and exceeded drinking water standards in some of the less-representative samples. Analyses of ground-water samples from wells in and around Landfill 4 indicate several contaminants may be present. These include volatile organic compounds (principally cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene), coliform, oil and grease, and perhaps some metals (iron and magnesium). The primary concern in the area around Landfill 4 was the determination that ground water from five wells contained cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. The source of contaminants beneath either landfill cannot yet be identified. Insufficient data exist to disprove or confirm either landfill as possible contributors. 19 refs., 32 figs., 17 tabs.

Last, G.V.; Eddy, P.A.; Airhart, S.P.; Olsen, K.R.; Raymond, J.R.; Dahl, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 366 comprises the six corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1; (2) 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2; (3) 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A; (4) 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B; (5) 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C; and (6) 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 366. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 366 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated by summing the estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on historical documentation of the releases associated with the nuclear tests, it was determined that CASs 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 will be investigated as one release site. The three test areas associated with these CASs are in close proximity; the devices tested were all composed of plutonium and enriched uranium; and the ground zeroes are all posted high contamination areas (HCAs). Because the device tested at CAS 11-23-01 was composed primarily of enriched uranium and the ground zero is not a posted HCA, the CAS will be investigated as a separate release. The DQO process also resulted in an assumption that TED within the HCAs and contaminated waste dumps exceeds the FAL and requires corrective action. A field investigation will be performed to define where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other contaminants of concern are present at the site associated with other activities that took place at the site or from spills or waste discovered during the investigation. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Book review for Geotechnical and Geological Engineering Dr C.E. Augarde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book review for Geotechnical and Geological Engineering Dr C.E. Augarde 14/03/01 Modeling­49218­3 This book consists of 26 individually prepared chapters brought together by the editors into a 700­page volume. The aim of the book, expressed in its Preface, is to close the ``gap'' between current research

Augarde, Charles

103

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

DOE /NV Operations Office

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: • 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank • 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool • 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks • 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Alfred Wickline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Data for the geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the geochemical data and the methods of data collection from the former tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Data are from a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. Selected solid samples are water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The waters, extracts, and solid samples were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC1, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 560 is located in Areas 3 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 560 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 03-51-01, Leach Pit • 06-04-02, Septic Tank • 06-05-03, Leach Pit • 06-05-04, Leach Bed • 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System • 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond • 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 22, 2008, by representatives from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 560.

Grant Evenson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

Patrick Matthews

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the Colonie site, Colonie, New York  

SciTech Connect

This work plan has been prepared to document the scoping and planning process performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support remedial action activities at the Colonie site. The site is located in eastern New York State in the town of Colonie near the city of Albany. Remedial action of the Colonie site is being planned as part of DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The DOE is responsible for controlling the release of all radioactive and chemical contaminants from the site. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) must be prepared to support the decision-making process for evaluating remedial action alternatives. This work plan contains a summary of information known about the site as of January 1988, presents a conceptual site model that identifies potential routes of human exposure to site containments, identifies data gaps, and summarizes the process and proposed studies that will be used to fill the data gaps. In addition, DOE activities must be conducted in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires consideration of the environmental consequences of a proposed action as part of its decision-making process. This work also describes the approach that will be used to evaluate potential remedial action alternatives and includes a description of the organization, project controls, and task schedules that will be employed to fulfill the requirements of both CERCLA and NEPA. 48 refs., 18 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

DOE /NV

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 240, Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

DOE /NV

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

Patrick Matthews

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 34: Area 3 Contaminated Waste Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, March 2001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 34 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 34 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located within the Area 3 Compound at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the vicinity of the Mud Plant Facility in Yucca Valley. Historically, CAS 03-09-07, Mud Pit, was used for disposal of excess mud from washing drilling equipment from 1968 to 1974, at which time it began to be used for excess mud disposal (currently inactive); CAS 03-44-01, Chromium Contamination Spill, was used to store additives used in the formulation of drilling mud from the early 1960s to the mid-1990s; CAS 03-47-02, Area 3 Mud Plant Pond, was used as a freshwater storage reservoir for the mud plant as well as supplied water for a number of activities including the mixing of mud, the rinsing and cleaning of tanks, and various washdowns from the 1960s through 1990s; and CAS 03-09-06, Mud Disposal Crater, was created in 1962 by an underground nuclear detonation (i.e., Chinchilla test) and was used to mix and store mud, dispose of receiving waste from the mud plant floor drains and excess drilling mud, and clean/flush mix tanks through the mid-1990s. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to identify potentially contaminated ground soil at each of the four CASs and determine the quantity, nature, and extent of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs). The investigation will include systematic and biased surface and subsurface soil and mud sampling using hand-auguring and direct-push techniques; visual, video, and/or electromagnetic surveys of pipes; field screening for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and alpha/beta-emitting radionuclides; and laboratory analysis to characterize any investigation-derived waste for disposal both on site at NTS and at off-site locations. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that COPCs include VOCs, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s), and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal sites, or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP will be used in conjunction with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998c), hereafter referred to as the Leachfield Work Plan. Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. This CAIP contains CAU-specific information including a facility description, environmental sample collection objectives, and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 500. This CAIP addresses one of three leachfield systems associated with Test Cell A, which is located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (see Leachfield Work Plan Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 500 is comprised of the Test Cell A Septic System (CAS 25-04-05) and the associated leachfield system presented in Figure 1-1 (FFACO, 1996).

IT Las Vegas

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 1. Final remedial investigation report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1 of this report covers the Remedial Investigation conducted on Site 1, Fire Training Area at Volk Field Air National Guard Base. The remedial work is described and the testing conducted after remediation to insure all contamination has been removed. The study as conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program. Partial contents include: Meteorology; Hydrology; Soils; Water wells; Groundwater; Borings; Samplings; Chemical contamination; Migration; Decontamination.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site  

SciTech Connect

Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

A field strategy to monitor radioactivity associated with investigation derived wastes returned from deep drilling sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA) is drilling deep (>1500m) monitoring wells that penetrate both unsaturated (vadose) and saturated zones potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drill site radiological monitoring returns data on drilling effluents to make informed management decisions concerning fluid management. Because of rapid turn-around required for on-site monitoring, a representative sample will be analyzed simultaneously for {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} emitters by instrumentation deployed on-site. For the purposes of field survey, accurate and precise data is returned, in many cases, with minimal sample treatment. A 30% efficient high purity germanium detector and a discriminating liquid scintillation detector are being evaluated for {gamma} and {alpha}/{beta} monitoring respectively. Implementation of these detector systems complements a successful on-site tritium monitoring program. Residual radioactivity associated with underground nuclear tests include tritium, activation products, fission products and actinides. Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is used in {alpha}/{beta} liquid scintillation counting and is a function of the time distribution of photon emission. In particular, we hope to measure {sup 241}Am produced from {sup 241}Pu by {beta} decay. Because {sup 241}Pu is depleted in fissile bomb fuels, maximum PSD resolution will be required. The high purity germanium detector employs a multichannel analyzer to count gamma emitting radionuclides; we will designate specific window configurations to selectively monitor diagnostic fission product radionuclides (i.e., {sup 137}Cs).

Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.; Friensehner, A.V.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fire on the mesa: Archaeological investigations at the U19an borrow pit on the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1984, the Desert Research Institute conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of a proposed borrow pit area known as U19an(bp) on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office. During this reconnaissance, four National Register quality archaeological sites were discovered and recorded as lithic scatter sites 26NY4201-4204. The DRI proposed that these sites should be avoided, or investigated if avoidance was not feasible. Analysis of the surface assemblages from U19an(bp) indicates that this area was used repeatedly over the past several thousand years for domestic activities, resource processing, and hunting. Dispersed lithic reduction stations are also scattered across the area. This report presents findings relevant to several issues that have not been considered in detail in previous archaeological studies of the NTS. Notably, a detailed discussion of the lithic reduction system utilized in the production of chalcedony bifaces is presented. In addition, the role of thermal alteration in local lithic technology is considered and the evidence for thermally fractured artifacts is investigated. The data recovered from U19an(bp) indicate that fire may have played a significant role in local site formation.

Amick, D.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RCRA 10/89 closure approved 9/95 9204-3 0928-U 1966 1989 200 Gasoline Removed RIR, closure NA NA 5 oil Closed in RCRA Closure letter Site place subtitle C 1994 monitored 7560 40 Unknown Unknown 1000 9722-6 2312-U 1987 1994 550 Diesel Inert filled CR (4/95) NA Closure approval 2/95 (6/96) 9722-5 2313-U

123

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Initial investigation of soil mercury geochemistry as an aid to drill site selection in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mercury-in-soil survey was conducted at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Utah, to evaluate mercury soil geochemistry as a method of selecting exploration well sites in a hot-water geothermal system. Samples of -80 mesh soil were collected at 30.5 m intervals along traverses crossing known structures, surficial geothermal alteration, and exploration well sites, and were analyzed using a Gold Film Mercury Detector. Strong mercury anomalies occur at locations along known structures in close proximity to subsurface thermal activity; examples include areas over hot spring deposits and near a shallow producing well. In contrast, background mercury concentrations are present in nearby locations with little or no indication of subsurface thermal activity, such as areas around deep marginal producing wells and dry wells, and areas lacking hot spring deposits. These results indicate that mercury geochemical surveys can be useful for identifying and mapping structures controlling fluid flow in geothermal systems and for delineating areas overlying near-surface thermal activity. Soil mercury geochemistry thus provides information which may aid in the cost-effective selection of exploratory well sites.

Capuano, R.M.; Bamford, R.W.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Remedial Action Selection Report. Preliminary final  

SciTech Connect

This proposed remedial action plan incorporates the results of detailed investigation of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the proposed disposal site. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/waterborne materials to a permanent repository at the proposed Burro Canyon disposal cell. The proposed disposal site will be geomorphically stable. Seismic design parameters were developed for the geotechnical analyses of the proposed cell. Cell stability was analyzed to ensure long-term performance of the disposal cell in meeting design standards, including slope stability, settlement, and liquefaction potential. The proposed cell cover and erosion protection features were also analyzed and designed to protect the RRM (residual radioactive materials) against surface water and wind erosion. The location of the proposed cell precludes the need for permanent drainage or interceptor ditches. Rock to be used on the cell top-, side-, and toeslopes was sized to withstand probable maximum precipitation events.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey, in situ measurements with high-purity germanium (HPGe) and hand-held LaBr3 systems, soil sampling with a variety of tools, and laboratory gamma spectrometric analysis of those samples. A further benefit of the measurement campaign was to gain familiarity with the many logistical aspects of performing radiological field work at NNSS ahead of the PRex. Many practical lessons concerning the proper methodologies and logistics of using the surveying and sampling equipment were noted. These Lessons Learned are compiled together in Appendix A. The vehicle-based survey was successful in that it found a previously unknown hotspot (determined to be 232Th) while it demonstrated that a better method for keeping a serpentine track without staking was needed. Some of the soil sampling equipment was found to be impractical for the application, though core sampling would not be the correct way to take soil samples for a fresh vent deposit (as opposed to an old site like DILUTED WATERS). Due to the site’s age, 137Cs was the only fission radioisotope identified, though others were searched for. While not enough samples were taken and analyzed to definitively link the 137Cs to DILUTED WATERS as opposed to other NNSS activities, results were consistent with the historical DILUTED WATERS plume. MDAs were compared for soil sampling and in situ measurements.

Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

USDOE /NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

Patrick Matthews

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

CSMRI SITE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS: HISTORY, INVESTIGATION, AND CLEANUP IMPLEMENTATION REPORT AS OF 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ci/g picoCuries per gram RI/FS Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study RPD relative percent difference TCLP. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results indicate that the affected material

132

The Geotechnical Board National Research Council. [Annual] activities report, March 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the activities of the Geotechnical Board and its two national committees, the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) and the US National Committee on Tunneling Technology (USNC/TT), for the period from March 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992. The report covers a 16-month period, through June of this year, to bring the reporting period in line with the National Research Council`s (NRC) fiscal year. Subsequent reports will cover the 12-month period July 1--June 30, unless individual contracts require otherwise. A description of the Geotechnical Board and its committees within the context of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council, as well as lists of current members of the board and national committees can be found in Attachment A.

Smeallie, P.H.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the following three corrective action sites (CASs) in Area 12 of the NTS: (1) CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; (2) CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and (3) CAS 12-28-01, I-, J-, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Site 12-06-09 consists of a muckpile and debris located on the hillside in front of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels on the eastern slopes of Rainier Mesa in Area 12. The muckpile includes mining debris (muck) and debris generated during the excavation and construction of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-08-02, CWD, consists of a muckpile and debris and is located on the hillside in front of the re-entry tunnel for K-Tunnel. For the purpose of this investigation CAS 12-28-01 is defined as debris ejected by containment failures during the Des Moines and Platte Tests and the associated contamination that is not covered in the two muckpile CASs. This site consists of debris scattered south of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnel muckpiles and extends down the hillside, across the valley, and onto the adjacent hillside to the south. In addition, the site will cover the potential contamination associated with ''ventings'' along the fault, fractures, and various boreholes on the mesa top and face. One conceptual site model was developed for all three CASs to address possible contamination migration pathways associated with CAU 309. The data quality objective (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQO process addresses the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CAU. Due to the practical constraints posed by steep slopes on and around the CAU 309 muckpiles, a conservative, simplifying strategy was developed to resolve the presence and nature of contaminants. This strategy includes the use of historical data from similar sites (i.e., previously investigated NTS muckpiles) and the collection of samples from accessible areas of the muckpiles. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous investigations of similar sites, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 309 collectively include radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel range only), polychlorinated biphenyls, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' metals, volatile organic compounds, and semivolatile organic compounds.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Alfred Wickline

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

Grant Evenson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Participation in the Creede Scientific Drilling Project as on-site Principal Investigator. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Scientific questions addressed by the Creede Scientific Drilling Project were as follows (Bethke et al., 1992): (1) Did the lacustrine sedimentary sequence filling the moat of Creede caldera serve as reservoir for the moderately-saline aqueous fluids which scavenged and then transported silver and base metals to ore-depositional sites for the rich epithermal deposits of the Creede mining district (Fig. 1)?; (2) what were the chemical and isotopic compositions of these fluids prior to their entry into the Creede fracture (later vein) system; (3) how did these chemical and isotopic compositions evolve in transit to the ore-depositional site?; (4) how did the Creede caldera form and evolve?; (5) what is the present thermal regime in Creede caldera moat? {hor_ellipsis}the, paleothermal regime?; (5) what are the hydrologic transport properties of the moat sedimentary rocks?; (6) what diagenetic or hydrothermal veins disrupt the moat sedimentary sequence, and what do their paragenetic relationships, mineralogic compositions, fluid-inclusion characteristics, and stable-isotope systematics reveal about evolution of the Creede hydrothermal system? Two Creede caldera moat drill holes were completed for this project.

Hulen, J.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Participation in the Creede Scientific Drilling Project as on-site Principal Investigator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific questions addressed by the Creede Scientific Drilling Project were as follows (Bethke et al., 1992): (1) Did the lacustrine sedimentary sequence filling the moat of Creede caldera serve as reservoir for the moderately-saline aqueous fluids which scavenged and then transported silver and base metals to ore-depositional sites for the rich epithermal deposits of the Creede mining district (Fig. 1) ; (2) what were the chemical and isotopic compositions of these fluids prior to their entry into the Creede fracture (later vein) system; (3) how did these chemical and isotopic compositions evolve in transit to the ore-depositional site ; (4) how did the Creede caldera form and evolve ; (5) what is the present thermal regime in Creede caldera moat [hor ellipsis]the, paleothermal regime ; (5) what are the hydrologic transport properties of the moat sedimentary rocks ; (6) what diagenetic or hydrothermal veins disrupt the moat sedimentary sequence, and what do their paragenetic relationships, mineralogic compositions, fluid-inclusion characteristics, and stable-isotope systematics reveal about evolution of the Creede hydrothermal system Two Creede caldera moat drill holes were completed for this project.

Hulen, J.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 555: Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 555: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 555 is located in Areas 1, 3 and 6 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the five corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-59-01, Area 1 Camp Septic System; (2) CAS 03-59-03, Core Handling Building Septic System; (3) CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well; (4) CAS 06-59-01, Birdwell Septic System; and (5) CAS 06-59-02, National Cementers Septic System. An FFACO modification was approved on December 14, 2005, to include CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well, as part of the scope of CAU 555. The work scope was expanded in this document to include the investigation of CAS 06-20-05. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 555 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before the evaluation and selection of corrective action alternatives.

Pastor, Laura

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Surface Corrective Action Investigation Report for the Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Voluntary Remediation Program Voluntary Remediation Program Completion Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico Revision No.: 1 December 2005 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1077 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Phone: 865.576.8401 Fax: 865.576.5728 Email: reports@adonis.osti.gov

140

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) continued environmental investigation of the subsurface Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447. The PSA is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Project Shoal was part of the Vela Uniform Program which was conducted to improve the US' ability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The test consisted of detonating a 12-kiloton nuclear device deep underground in granitic rock to determine whether seismic waves produced by an underground nuclear test could be differentiated from seismic waves produced by a naturally occurring earthquake. The test was a joint effort conducted by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Department of Defense (DoD) in October 1963 (AEC, 1964).

DOE /NV

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 375 is located in Areas 25 and 30 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site • 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination present at the CAU 375 CASs is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). This document details an investigation plan that will provide for the gathering of sufficient information to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Corrective Action Site 25-23-22 is composed of the releases associated with nuclear rocket testing at Test Cell A (TCA). Test Cell A was used to test and develop nuclear rocket motors as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station from its construction in 1958 until 1966, when rocket testing began being conducted at Test Cell C. The rocket motors were built with an unshielded nuclear reactor that produced as much as 1,100 kilowatts (at full power) to heat liquid hydrogen to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, at which time the expanded gases were focused out a nozzle to produce thrust. The fuel rods in the reactor were not clad and were designed to release fission fragments to the atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

Patrick Matthews

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

Wemple, R.P.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geotechnical investigation of the potential use of shredded scrap tires in soil stabilization. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silt-tire and clay-tire mixtures, containing 0% to 100% shredded tire material by weight, with tire chips ranging in size from 7mm--13mm, 13mm--25mm, and 25mm--38mm, were tested for a series of engineering properties including compaction characteristics, permeability, unconfined compressive strength, friction angle, cohesion, and compression index. In addition, the leachate samples from shredded tire material, soil-tire mixtures, and a test embankment, containing 70% clay and 30% shredded tire material by weight, were analyzed for chemical composition. The results show that density and unconfined compressive strength decrease, and permeability increases, with increasing shredded tire content for both soil types and all three tire sizes used in the study. In general, the addition of shredded tire material improves the friction angle for both silt and clay by a few degrees but also increases their compression index values. The results of leachate analyses show that concentrations of trace elements from soil-tire mixtures are less than the maximum allowed contaminant levels specified in United States Environmental Protection Agency`s regulations.

Shakoor, A.; Chu, C.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because man-made radionuclides and chemical contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. The CAI will be conducted following the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The DQOs are used to identify the type, amount, and quality of data needed to define the nature and extent of contamination and identify and evaluate the most appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 552. The primary problem statement for the investigation is: ''Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 12-23-05.'' To address this problem statement, the resolution of the following two decision statements is required: (1) The Decision I statement is: ''Is a contaminant present within the CAU at a concentration that could pose an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment?'' Any site-related contaminant detected at a concentration exceeding the corresponding preliminary action level (PAL), as defined in Section A.1.4.2, will be considered a contaminant of concern (COC). A COC is defined as a site-related constituent that exceeds the screening criteria (PAL). The presence of a contaminant within each CAS is defined as the analytical detection of a COC. (2) The Decision II statement is: ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs.'' This decision will be achieved by the collection of data that are adequate to define the extent of COCs. Decision II samples are used to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination as well as the likelihood of COCs to migrate outside of the site boundaries. The migration pattern can be derived from the Decision II samples, since the analytical results of those samples will show how far the contamination has travelled in the time period since activities at the site ended. Most of the data necessary to resolve the decisions will be generated from the analysis of environmental samples collected during the CAI for CAU 552. The general purpose of the investigation is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COCs. (2) Determine the vertical and lateral extent of identified COCs. (3) Ensure sufficient data is collected to support the selection of a corrective action compliant with all NDEP, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA)'', and DOE requirements. In addition, data will be obtained to support (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 542 is located in Areas 3, 8, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 542 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-07, ''UD-3a Disposal Hole''; (2) 03-20-09, ''UD-3b Disposal Hole''; (3) 03-20-10, ''UD-3c Disposal Hole''; (4) 03-20-11, ''UD-3d Disposal Hole''; (5) 06-20-03, ''UD-6 and UD-6s Disposal Holes''; (6) 08-20-01, ''U-8d PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; (7) 09-20-03, ''U-9itsy30 PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; and (8) 20-20-02, ''U-20av PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 30, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 542. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 542 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Conduct geophysical surveys to locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Laura Pastor

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

SAIC

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Field Investigation to Determine the Extent of Sediment Recontamination at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This field investigation was undertaken to determine the present condition of sediment in Lauritzen Channel and Parr Canal approximately 2 years after completion of sediment remedial actions at the United Heckathorn Superfund site. The study was designed to supplement the post-remediation monitoring program by determining the extent and identifying potential sources of observed pesticide contamination in marine sediments near the site. Core samples collected from Lauritzen Channel and Parr Canal in July 1999 were described geologically, and samples were prepared from different sediment types, such as younger bay mud or older bay mud. Sediment samples were analyzed for grain size, organic carbon, and DDT compounds. Only minor changes have occurred in Parr Canal since remedial actions were taken in 1996-1997, but in Lauritzen Channel, DDT concentrations exceed the remedial goal of 590 ug/kg dry weight in nearly all the unconsolidated sediment (younger bay mud, sand, and disturbed older bay mud). The source of contaminated sediment could not be confirmed by this study; there was no clear correlation between high DDT concentrations and sediment remaining between the pilings, as was originally suspected. There also was no correlation between high DDT concentrations in sediment and the locations of outfalls, although some of the contamination retained by the creosote-treated wood appeared to be highest close to the known outfalls.

Kohn, Nancy P.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

Technical synthesis of prehistoric archaeological investigations on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in south Carolina span 16 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory and history.

Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 529, Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 529 consists of one Corrective Action Site (25-23-17). For the purpose of this investigation, the Corrective Action Site has been divided into nine parcels based on the separate and distinct releases. A conceptual site model was developed for each parcel to address the translocation of contaminants from each release. The results of this investigation will be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work plan identifies the objectives, tasks, and schedule for conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area of the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit addresses contamination identified in the aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, as determined in the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE/RL 1992b). The objectives of this work plan are to develop a program to investigate groundwater contaminants in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area that were designated for Limited Field Investigations (LFIs) and to implement Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) recommended in the 200 West Groundwater AAMSR. The purpose of an LFI is to evaluate high priority groundwater contaminants where existing data are insufficient to determine whether an IRM is warranted and collect sufficient data to justify and implement an IRM, if needed. A Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) will be performed as part of the LFI. The purpose of an IRM is to develop and implement activities, such as contaminant source removal and groundwater treatment, that will ameliorate some of the more severe potential risks of groundwater contaminants prior to the RI and baseline Risk Assessment (RA) to be conducted under the Final Remedy Selection (FRS) at a later date. This work plan addresses needs of a Treatability Study to support the design and implementation of an interim remedial action for the Uranium-{sup 99}{Tc}-Nitrate multi-contaminant IRM plume identified beneath U Plant.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

Chen, J.C.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Boissonnade, A.C.

1995-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located along the eastern border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes portions of Areas 5 and 11. The Frenchman Flat CAU constitutes one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. The CAIP describes the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Frenchman Flat CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The Frenchman Flat CAI will be conducted by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project which is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Project. The CAIP is a requirement of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 ) agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Based on the general definition of a CAI from Section IV.14 of the FFACO, the purpose of the CAI is ''...to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities...'' (FFACO, 1996). However, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs, ''...the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use.'', as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). According to the UGTA strategy (Appendix VI of the FFACO), the CAI of a given CAU starts with the evaluation of the existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Such is the case for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The current scope of the Frenchman Flat CAI includes the development and use of a three-dimensional (3-D), numerical, CAU-scale groundwater flow and contaminant transport model to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The CAU model will be developed and used to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The scope of this CAI does not currently include any characterization activities; however, such activities will be conducted if the CAU model results indicate that further characterization information is needed to develop a sufficiently reliable CAU model. Two areas of importance to the CAU model are the model area and the investigation area. The CAU-model area will be selected to encompass the Frenchman Flat CAU and the region located immediately downgradient where contamination may migrate. The extent of the CAU-model area is dependent on the extent of contamination and is uncertain at this point. The extent of the investigation area is not expected to increase during the CAI.

USDOE /NV

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd (Bo) Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

[Geotechnical Board activities and funding]. [Annual] activites report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Geotechnical Board, a part of the US National Research Council, which is the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, serves to advise the federal government and others on issues where geotechnology can have an impact, such as environmental remediation and infrastructure development. The board met three times during the reporting period to review current projects and to initiate activities that move the knowledge base of geotechnology forward. The board operates with two long-standing national committees, the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics and the US National Committee on Tunneling Technology. It also conducts special studies at the request of the government. A list of attachments is given.

Smeallie, P.H.

1993-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

1998 3D GIS vs Advanced visualisation -Hack & Ozmutlu -LWI Seminar 1 3D-GIS vs Advanced Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of subsurface geology, tunnel geometry) ·grid data (continuous distribution of geotechnical, engineering (boreholes, CPTs, Electrical Soundings) ·map data (electrical mapping, cross-sections, seismic lines data level: visualization of engineering geological, geotechnical site investigation data

Hack, Robert

165

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit  (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well •06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole •25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping •25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of Site Investigation/Closure Requirements and Their Applicability to Residuals from Former Manufactured Gas Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free product is defined as the concentration of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that is present in concentrations greater than the residual saturation point of the site media at a contaminated location. Identifying free product is important for the management of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites because the free product is mobile and has the potential to migrate off site. The report provides a review of the regulatory programs for six states in the mid-west and northeast with regard to closure re...

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 372 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater • 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater • 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area • 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 10, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; Desert Research Institute, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 372.

Patrick Matthews

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

170

Investigation of the Utility of United States Environmental Protection Agency's Recalculation Procedure for Deriving Site-specific Criteria for Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the utility of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA’s) Recalculation Procedure for deriving site-specific criteria for ammonia in fresh water. It represents a comprehensive evaluation of the application of the deletion process for select sites geographically distributed across the conterminous United States (U.S.).BackgroundThe Agency is currently in the process of updating its National aquatic life ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

NONE

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Numerical Methods in Offshore Geotechnics: Applications to Submarine Landslides and Anchor Plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emphasis of this dissertation is on using numerical and plasticity based methods to study two main areas of offshore geotechnics. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the undrained behavior of deeply embedded anchor plates under combined shear and torsion. Plate anchors are increasingly being used instead of typical foundation systems to anchor offshore floating platforms to sustain uplift operating forces. However extreme loading cases would create general loading conditions involving six degrees of freedom. The focus of my research was to evaluate the bearing capacity of plate anchors under two-way horizontal and torsional loading and to study the decreasing effect of torsional moment on the horizontal bearing capacity of these foundations. The study takes advantage of several approaches: Numerical simulation (two and three dimensional finite element analysis) Evaluating and modification of the available plasticity solutions Developing equations for three degree-of-freedom yield locus surfaces The same methodology is applied to evaluate the response of shallow foundations for subsea infrastructure subjected to significant eccentric horizontal loads. The second part of this study focuses on offshore geohazards. Coastal communities and the offshore industry can be impacted directly by geohazards, such as submarine slope failures, or by tsunamis generated by the failed mass movements. This study aims at evaluating the triggering mechanisms of submarine landslide under cyclic

Nouri, Hamid Reza

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); 03-05-01, Leachfield; 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); 06-05-01, Leachfield; 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and 23-05-02, Leachfield. Corrective Action Sites 06-05-01, 06-23-01, and 23-05-02 were identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) inventory (1991). The remaining sites were identified during review of various historical documents. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting a corrective action alternative for each CAS. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological and geological surveys, and sample collection. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select viable corrective actions. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details for CAU 511, whereas programmatic aspects of this project are discussed in the ''Project Management Plan'' (DOE/NV, 1994). General field and laboratory quality assurance and quality control issues are presented in the ''Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan'' (NNSA/NV, 2002). Health and safety aspects of the project are documented in the current version of the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor's Health and Safety Plan and will be supplemented with a site-specific safety basis document. Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of the following nine corrective action sites in Nevada Test Site Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). Corrective Action Sites 18-99-10 and 19-19-03 were identified after a review of the ''1992 RCRA Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Volume IV, Section L Potential Solid Waste Management Unit'' (DOE/NV, 1992). The remaining seven sites were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites''. The seven-step data quality objectives (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQOs address the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CASs. Corrective action closure alternatives (i.e., no further action, close in place, or clean closure) will be recommended for CAU 511 based on an evaluation of all the DQO required data. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select viable corrective actions. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details for CAU 511, whereas programmatic aspects of this project are discussed in the ''Project Management Plan'' (DOE/NV, 1994). General field and laboratory quality assurance and quality control issues are presented in the ''Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan'' (NNSA/NV, 2002). Health and safety aspects of the project are documented in the current version of the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor's Health and Safety Plan and will be supplemented with a site-specific safety basis document. Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of the following nine corrective action sites in Nevada Test Site Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). Corrective Action Sites 18-99-10 and 19-19-03 were identified after a review of the ''1992 RCRA Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Volume IV, Section L Potential Solid Waste Management Unit'' (DOE/NV, 1992). The remaining seven sites were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites''. The seven-step data quality objectives (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQOs address the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CASs. Corrective action closure alternatives (i.e., no further action, close in place, or clean closure) will be recommended for CAU 511 based on an evaluation of all the DQO required data. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 is located in Areas 11 and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 371 is comprised of the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 19, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 371. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 371 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Measure in situ external dose rates using thermoluminescent dosimeters or other dose measurement devices. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates. • Combine internal and external dose rates to determine whether total dose rates exceed final action levels (FALs). • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether chemical contaminants are present at concentrations exceeding FALs. • If contamination exceeds FALs, define the extent of the contamination exceeding FALs. • Investigate waste to determine whether potential source material is present. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy; and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Patrick Matthews

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, consists of 12 inactive sites located in the north and northeast section of the NTS. The 12 CAU 234 sites consist of mud pits, mud spills, mud sumps, and an open post-test cellar. The CAU 234 sites were all used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat and Rainier Mesa areas during the 1950s through the 1970s. The CASs in CAU 234 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting appropriate corrective action alternatives.

Grant Evenson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 166 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is comprised of the seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 28, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 166. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 166 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Perform field screening. (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

David Strand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 367 is located in Area 10 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) • 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site • 10-09-03, Mud Pit • 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The CASs in CAU 367 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive contaminants may be present in concentrations that exceed risk-based corrective action (RBCA) levels. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting CAAs. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 367 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the area where TED at the site exceeds FALs (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Evaluate TED to potential receptors in areas along Mercury Highway that have been impacted by a release of radionuclides from the Sedan test. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis related to the drilling mud within CAS 10-09-03, Mud Pit, and any encountered stains or waste as necessary to determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 561: Waste Disposal Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 561 is located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 5, 12, 22, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 561 is comprised of the 10 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 01-19-01, Waste Dump • 02-08-02, Waste Dump and Burn Area • 03-19-02, Debris Pile • 05-62-01, Radioactive Gravel Pile • 12-23-09, Radioactive Waste Dump • 22-19-06, Buried Waste Disposal Site • 23-21-04, Waste Disposal Trenches • 25-08-02, Waste Dump • 25-23-21, Radioactive Waste Dump • 25-25-19, Hydrocarbon Stains and Trench These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 561. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the Corrective Action Investigation for CAU 561 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform exploratory excavations. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples.

Grant Evenson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

WIPP supplementary roof support system Room 1, Panel 1: Geotechnical field data analysis report  

SciTech Connect

The design of the Room 1, Panel 1, supplementary roof support system was finalized in September 1991, and the system successfully installed in the test bin area between the bulkheads by December 1991. Simultaneously with the support system installation, existing monitoring system was upgraded to meet the needs of the installed roof support. This included extensometers, closure stations, rockbolt load cells as well as survey measurements of roof sag and floor lift. A Project Control Group (PCG) was established in order to monitor room and support system performance. Weekly meetings of the PCG were held to review all monitored data against criteria set in the initial design, and to modify these where necessary. Records of these meetings have been kept, with copies of all data summaries and action notes. These data records are maintained in the Engineering data files. After more than ten months of monitoring and reviewing experience, several modifications have been made both to the way data has been reported as well as to the load adjustment criteria. The support system has performed as expected in the design, with no signs of instability developing considering the rates of roof deformation, the rock bolt loads and the observed fracture behavior in the roof. This is particularly true of the horizon in which the rockbolt anchors are located, the most critical part of the design. The distribution of load build-up, throughout the 286 rockbolt load cells installed, in the Room 1 has been found satisfactory, and the load increases as evaluated by the PCG on a weekly basis have been within the acceptable range. The minimum life of the installed support system is estimated at 15 years based on the highest roof expansion rate experienced to date. This report provides analysis of geotechnical field data collected up to December 1992.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of a portable x-ray computed tomographic imaging system for drill-site investigation of recovered core  

SciTech Connect

A portable x-ray computed tomography (CT) system was constructed for imaging core at drill sites. Performing drill-site-based x-ray scanning and CT analysis permits rapid evaluation of core properties (such as density, lithologic structure, and macroporosity distribution) and allows for real-time decision making for additional core-handling procedures. Because of the speed with which scanning is performed, systematic imaging and electronic cataloging of all retrieved core is feasible. Innovations (such as a novel clamshell shielding arrangement integrated with system interlocks) permit safe operation of the x-ray system in a busy core handling area. The minimization of the volume encapsulated with shielding reduces the overall system weight and facilitates instrument portability. The x-ray system as originally fabricated had a 110 kV x-ray source with a fixed 300-micron focal spot size. A 15 cm image intensifier with a cesium iodide phosphor input screen was coupled to a CCD for image capture. The CT system has since been modified with a 130 kV micro-focal x-ray source. With the x-ray system's variable focal spot size, high-resolution studies (10-micron resolution) can be performed on core plugs and coarser (100-micron resolution) images can be acquired of whole drill cores. The development of an aluminum compensator has significantly improved the dynamic range and accuracy of the system. An x-ray filter has also been incorporated, permitting rapid acquisition of multi-energy scans for more quantitative analysis of sample mineralogy. The x-ray CT system has operated reliably under extreme field conditions, which have varied from shipboard to arctic.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Pruess, Jacob

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1 and 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 543 is located in Area 6 and Area 15 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Seven corrective action sites (CASs) comprise CAU 543 and are listed below: (1) 06-07-01, Decon Pad; (2) 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (3) 15-04-01, Septic Tank; (4) 15-05-01, Leachfield; (5) 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; (6) 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and (7) 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. Corrective Action Site 06-07-01, Decon Pad, is located in Area 6 and consists of the Area 6 Decontamination Facility and its components that are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the EPA Farm. The EPA Farm was a fully-functional dairy associated with animal experiments conducted at the on-site laboratory. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, video-mole surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs within CAU 543 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The seven CASs in CAU 543 primarily consist of sanitary and process waste collection, storage, and distribution systems (e.g., storage tanks, sumps, and piping). Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A gabled wooden lodge in an archaeological context: Archaeological investigations at sample unit U19adPL, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In 1991 the Quaternary Sciences Center at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted archaeological investigations at sample unit U19adPL on Pahute Mesa at the request of the Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office. This work was conducted under the Long Range Study Plan, a data recovery program designed to intensively study an 11 percent geographic sample of the cultural resources on Pahute and Rainier mesas. The focus of the research was site 26NY3393. This site consists of a gabled wooden lodge with a hearth, a rock ring, and a dim use artifacts scatter of ceramics, lithic tools, and lithic debitage. The structure is the only gabled log structure known on Pahute and Rainier mesas, and associated artifacts included shell and glass beads. Based on temporally diagnostic artifacts, the occupation of site 26NY3393 spans 8000 years. There is no evidence that the site was occupied continuously for any great length of time. It is more likely that Native Americans inhabited the area intermittently on a seasonal basis. The gabled wooden lodge is a late construction, probably dating between A.D. 1760 and 1865. This report documents and presents the results of the archaeological work at sample unit U19adPL.

DuBarton, A.; Drollinger, H.; Edwards, S.; Hemphill, M.; Hockett, B.S.; Johnson, W.G.; King, C.; Beck, C.M.; Pippin, L.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This CAIP presents a plan to investigate the nature and extent of the contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at CAU 135. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COPCs; (2) Determine the location of radiological contamination within the vault and determine the extent of COPCs in the sump area and on the floor; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-02-01. This CAIP was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) (EPA, 1994) process to clearly define the goals for collecting environmental data, to determine data uses, and to design a data collection program that will satisfy these uses. A DQO scoping meeting was held prior to preparation of this plan; a brief summary of the DQOs is presented in Section 3.4. A more detailed summary of the DQO process and results is included in Appendix A.

DOE /NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A site selection study was conducted to evaluate locations for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities. Facilities to be located include the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), and the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) facility. Objectives of the study include: (1) Confirm that the Department of Energy (DOE) selected locations for the MOX and PDCF were suitable based on selected siting criteria, (2) Recommend a site in the vicinity of F Area that is suitable for the PIP, and (3) Identify alternative suitable sites for one or more of these facilities in the event that further geotechnical characterization or other considerations result in disqualification of a currently proposed site.

Wike, L.D.

2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

195

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of contamination, as necessary. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NSO

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

New observations of infiltration through fractured alluvium in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: A preliminary field investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional tectonics coupled with the subsurface detonation of nuclear explosives has caused widespread fracturing of the alluvium of Yucca Flat. Fractures deeper than 30 meters have been observed in boreholes. Some of these fractures are large enough to capture significant amounts of runoff during storm events. Evidence of stream capture by fractures and observations of runoff flowing into open fractures give qualitative evidence of infiltration to depths greater than several meters and possibly to the saturated zone. Our field observations contradict the assumption that little infiltration occurs on Yucca Flat. The larger, hydrologically important fractures are associated with geologic faults or the regional stress field. Additional field studies are needed to investigate the impact of fractures on the transport of contaminants.

Kao, C.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Smith, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKinnis, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Mercury, NV (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada UPDATED WITH TECHNICAL CHANGE No.1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 261, the Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System, which is located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 88 kilometers (km) (55 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. As presented, CAU 261 is comprised of CASs 25-05-01 and 25-05-07, respectively known as the Leachfield and the Acid Waste Leach Pit (AWLP) (FFACO, 1996). The leachfield is an area with dimensions of approximately 23 by 17 meters (m) (75 by 55 feet [ft]) and is located south of Building 3124, which is southwest and adjacent to Test Cell A. Test Cell A was operational during the 1960s to test nuclear rocket reactors in support of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) (SNPO, 1970). Various operations within Building 3124, from 1962 through 1972, have resulted in liquid waste releases to the leachfield and the AWLP (DOE, 1988a). The surface and subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield have potentially been impacted by radioactive and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) associated with decontamination activities of equipment from Test Cell A.

DOE /NV

1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1 (Revision 0, September 2000)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate Corrective Action Alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 97, collectively known as the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU, consists of 720 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU extends over several areas of the NTS and constitutes one of several areas used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. Based on site history, the Yucca Flat underground nuclear tests were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks; whereas, the Climax Mine tests were conducted in an igneous intrusion located in northern Yucca Flat. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the regional evaluation indicate that the local Climax Mine groundwater flow system merges into the much larger Yucca Flat groundwater flow systems during the 1,000-year time period of interest. Addressing these two areas jointly and simultaneously investigating them as a combined CAU has been determined the best way to proceed with corrective action investigation (CAI) activities. The purpose and scope of the CAI includes characterization activities and model development conducted in five major sequential steps designed to be consistent with FFACO Underground Test Area Project's strategy to predict the location of the contaminant boundary, develop and implement a corrective action, and close each CAU. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs in the subsequent corrective action decision document.

Robert Andrews; Sam Marutzky

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The different uses to which geothermal heat and fluids could be applied as a direct utilization of resource or as heat utilization are explored. The following aspects are covered: geotechnical assessment, agricultural and industrial applications, socioeconomic assessment, and engineering assessment. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

NONE

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Archaeological investigations in the Elm Creek Watershed, Runnels County, Texas: sites 41RN61, 41RN64, 41RN65, 41RN72, 41RN74, 41RN76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes results of archaeological investigations and material analysis associated with six prehistoric sites in Runnels County, Texas that lie within a proposed Soil Conservation Service floodwater retarding structure and reservoir. Data recovery, based on geomorphic investigations to resolve potential for subsurface cultural deposits, resulted in retrieval of representative samples of lithic assemblages from four sites (41RN61, 41RN64, 41RN65, 41RN74). These lithic assemblages, along with lithic collections from previous testing by SMU within the project area (41RN72, 41RN76), were analyzed with an emphasis on the diversity in assemblage characteristics from quarry or primary lithic procurement sites as contrasted with sites in which further lithic reduction and utilization related to subsistence prevails, such as habitation sites. Inferences with regard to site activity and function are made based on results of lithic analysis and trends revealed in the data.

Sanders, Calvin B

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Record of Technical Change updates the technical informatioin provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532.

USDOE Nevada Operations Office

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, August 2002)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Offices's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of 12 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at Test Cell C; the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility; the X-Tunnel in Area 25; the Pluto Disassembly Facility; the Pluto Check Station; and the Port Gaston Training Facility in Area 26. These CASs include: CAS 25-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank (AST); CAS 25-02-02, Underground Storage Tank (UST); CAS 25-23-11, Contaminated Materials; CAS 25-12-01, Boiler; CAS 25-01-06, AST; CAS 25-01-07, AST; CAS 25-02-13, UST; CAS 26- 01-01, Filter Tank (Rad) and Piping; CAS 26-01-02, Filter Tank (Rad); CAS 26-99-01, Radioactively Contaminated Filters; CAS 26-02-01, UST; CAS 26-23-01, Contaminated Liquids Spreader. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 127 include radionuclides, metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Additionally, beryllium may be present at some locations. The sources of potential releases are varied, but releases of contaminated liquids may have occurred and may have migrated into and impacted soil below and surrounding storage vessels at some of the CASs. Also, at several CASs, asbestos-containing materials may be present on the aboveground structures and may be friable. Exposure pathways are limited to ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact (adsorption) of soils/sediments or liquids, or inhalation of contaminants by site workers due to disturbance of contaminated materials. Future land-use scenarios limit subsequent uses of the CASs to various nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. Field activities will consist of radiological walkover and screening surveys, and field-screening and collecting of both tank content and soil samples, and further sample testing as appropriate. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) Phase I will be to collect environmental samples for laboratory analysis to confirm the presence or absence of contaminants at concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels; and (2) Phase II will be to collect additional environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the extent of contamination identified in Phase I. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain site, September 15, 1988--September 30, 1989; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113), Number 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. This report is the first of a series of reports that will hereafter be issued at intervals of approximately 6-months during site characterization. The DOE`s plans for site characterization are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site. The SCP has been reviewed and commented on by the NRC, the State of Nevada, the affected units of local government, other interested parties, and the public. More detailed information on plans for site characterization is being presented in study plans for the various site characterization activities. This progress report presents short summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; receipt of performance-assessment results; and changes, if any, that occur in response to external comments on the site characterization programs. 80 refs.

NONE

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon wasmeters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitableThe Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant site in San Luis

Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The sedimentological and geotechnical characteristics of the lower continental slope and rise of the Mississippi Fan fold belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study is based on geological and geotechnical laboratory testing data of 70 three inch diameter piston cores. Concentration is along the Sigsbee Escarpment in a grid area between 90? and 91?W and 26.7? and 27.3?N. Water depth ranges from 1,200 meters below sea level to 2,500 meters below sea level. All data were used to characterize the seafloor processes that deposited these sediments. The Sigsbee Escarpment represents a complex topographic and geologic feature involving faults, slumps and steep slopes. Most of the study area is covered by hemipelagic Holocene sediments in 0.05 to 2.9 m thickness, greatest thickness being in bathymetric lows indicating that Holocene sediments are eroded at the bathymetric highs and transported down the slope. The underlying Pleistocene sediments are mostly laminated clays in the southwestern part of the study area, indicating no mass wasting. Hemipelagic sedimentation in quiet sea bottom environment was dominant throughout the accumulation of the unit. Several generations of slumps have occurred in the northeastern part of the Sigsbee Escarpment during the Pleistocene showing that this part of the study area is an area where active mass wasting and down slope processes dominate.

Ramazanova, Rahila

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Ambrosia Lake project archaeological investigations of three small sites associated with the southern Chacoan outlier of Kin Nizhoni, McKinley County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

During the fall of 1987, Complete Archaeological Service Associates conducted mitigative excavations at three sites (LA50363, LA50364, and LA50371) in McKinley County, New Mexico. These sites are adjacent to the Phillips/United Nuclear Inactive Uranium Mill and Tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The primary deposition at each of these sites appears to be related to a Pueblo II or Bonito Phase occupation. Temporal placement is based primarily on the cross dating of ceramics and archaeomagnetic determinations when possible. No tree-ring or radiocarbon samples are available from these sites. These Ambrosia Lake sites indicate that this area was occupied primarily by Pueblo II people who may have had close social, economic, and ceremonial ties with the people living at the nuclear community of Lower Nizhoni about 3 km south-southeast. The later component at LA50364 indicates a Pueblo III occupation by people who may have had similar ties to the people of the Kin Nizhoni nuclear community. The Ambrosia Lake sites, then, provide important information on the structure of subnuclear communities within the southern Chaco periphery.

Cullington, B.J. [ed.; Hammack, L.C.; Baugh, T.G. [Complete Archaeological Service Associates, Cortez, CO (United States)

1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

An investigation of the presence of methane and other gases at the Uzundere-Izmir solid waste disposal site, Izmir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Izmir is a large metropolitan city with a population of 3,114,860. The city consists of 27 townships, each township has a population of not less than 10,000 inhabitants. The two major solid waste disposal sites are in the townships of Uzundere and Harmandali. The amount of solid waste that is disposed at each of these sites is about 800 and 1800 t/day, respectively. In Uzundere, compost is produced from the organic fraction of urban solid wastes while the residual material is deposited at a disposal site with a remaining capacity of 700,000 m{sup 3} as of 2001. Gas monitoring and measurements were carried out at the disposal site in Uzundere. For this purpose, nine sampling wells were drilled on selected locations. Each well was furnished with perforated metal pipes suitable for gas monitoring and measurements. The following gases were monitored: O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. The most important finding was that the concentrations of CH{sub 4} in the wells ranged from 7 to 57%. Dilution of the CH{sub 4} by O{sub 2} down to the LEL levels (5-15%) is always possible and poses a continuing risk at the site. Furthermore, the levels of O{sub 2} require that access to the site be limited to only authorized personnel.

Onargan, T.; Kucuk, K.; Polat, M

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Addendum to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Addendum Revision No. 1)  

SciTech Connect

This document is submitted as an addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The addendum was prepared to propose work activities in response to comments resulting from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the draft Frenchman Flat CAU model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport completed in April 1999. The reviewers included an external panel of experts and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. As a result of the review, additional work scope, including new data-collection and modeling activities, has been identified for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The proposed work scope described in this addendum will be conducted in accordance with the revised Underground Test Area strategy contained in the December 2000 amendment to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The Frenchman Flat CAU model is a group of interdependent models designed to predict the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear tests conducted within this CAU. At the time of the DOE review, the CAU model consisted of a CAU groundwater flow and transport model comprised of two major components: a groundwater flow model and a recharge model. The CAU groundwater flow model is supported by a hydrostratigraphic model and a recharge model, whereas the CAU transport model is supported by a source-term model. As part of the modeling activities proposed in this addendum, two new major components may be added to the Frenchman Flat CAU model: a total-system model and two local groundwater flow and transport models. The reviewers identified several issues relating to insufficiency of data and inadequacy of the modeling process that should be addressed to provide additional confidence in the modeling results with respect to the potential for contaminant migration to the Lower Carbonate Aquifer. The proposed additional work scope includes new data-collection activities, development and use of local-scale models of the two underground nuclear testing areas, and potential revisions of draft CAU groundwater flow and transport models. Upon completion of this work, an evaluation will be made by DOE to ensure that all issues have been resolved.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain Site, October 1, 1991--March 31, 1992, Number 6  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18(g), the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period October 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992. This report is the sixth in a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. Also included in this report are activities such as public outreach and international programs that are not officially part of site characterization. Information on these activities is provided in order to fully integrate all aspects of the Yucca Mountain studies.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Factors Controlling the Vertical Extent of Fair-Weather Shallow Cumulus Clouds over Land: Investigation of Diurnal-Cycle Observations Collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summertime observations for 13 yr at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site are used to study fair-weather shallow cumuli (ShCu). To roughly separate forced from active ShCu, days are categorized into “thin-” or “thick-” ...

Yunyan Zhang; Stephen A. Klein

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Progress report No. 2 on the Scientific Investigation Program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain Site, October 1, 1989--March 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Pub. L. No. 97-425), as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of scientific investigation activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada for October 1, 1989, through March 31, 1990. This report is the second of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during the period of scientific investigation. The progress report presents short summaries of the status of scientific investigation activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s scientific investigation program. The progress report conveys information in a convenient summary form to be used for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be the mechanism for controlling and documenting technical or policy positions regarding changes in schedules or the technical program. Such changes are controlled through rigorous DOE change-control procedures. The progress report only describes such approval changes. 49 refs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, REVISION 0, march 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428, Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 428 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03- 05- 002- SW01 and 03- 05- 002- SW05, respectively known as Area 3 Septic Waste System 1 and Septic Waste System 5. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada , Rev. 1 (DOE/ NV, 1998c). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 428. A system of leachfields and associated collection systems was used for wastewater disposal at Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990 to replace the discrete septic waste systems. Operations within various buildings at Area 3 generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with contaminants of potential concern and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Corrective Action Unit 428 is composed of two leachfield systems in the northern portion of Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include oil/ diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. A limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from four of the septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform video surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (2) Collect samples of material in the septic tanks. (3) Conduct exploratory trenching to locate and inspect subsurface components. (4) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tanks and outfall end of distribution boxes. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes via trenching. (6) Collect surface and near- surface samples near potential locations of the Acid Sewer Outfall if Septic Waste System 5 Leachfield cannot be located. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/ diesel range organics). Limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from particular septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (10) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/ hydrologic parameters. (11) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at the discretion of the Site Supervisor if total petroleum hydrocarbons exceed field- screening levels.

DOE /NV

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Responses to comments on the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement for remedial action at the Chemical Plant area of the Weldon Spring site (November 1992)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of a chemical plant area and a noncontiguous limestone quarry; both areas are radioactively and chemically contaminated as a result of past processing and disposal activities. Explosives were produced by the US Army at the chemical plant in the 1940s, and uranium and thorium materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency in the 1950s and 1960s. During that time, various wastes were disposed of at both areas of the site. The DOE is conducting cleanup activities at the site under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The integrated remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS) documents for the chemical plant area were issued to the public in November 1992 as the draft RI/FS-EIS. (The CERCLA RI/FS is considered final when issued to the public, whereas per the NEPA process, an EIS is initially issued as a draft and is finalized after substantive public comments have been addressed.) Four documents made up the draft RI/FS-EIS, which is hereafter referred to as the RI/FS-EIS: (1) the RI (DOE 1992d), which presents general information on the site environment and the nature and extent of contamination; (2) the baseline assessment (BA) (DOE 1992a), which evaluates human health and environmental effects that might occur if no cleanup actions were taken; (3) the FS (DOE 1992b), which develops and evaluates alternatives for site cleanup; and (4) the proposed plan (PP) (DOE 1992c), which summarizes key information from the RI, BA, and FS reports and identifies DOE`s preferred alternative for remedial action. This comment response document combined with those four documents constitutes the final RI/FS-EIS for the chemical plant area.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (includes ROTC No. 1, date 01/25/1999)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 254 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 254 was used between 1963 through 1973 for the decontamination of test-car hardware and tooling used in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program. The CAS is composed of a fenced area measuring approximately 119 feet by 158 feet that includes Building 3126, an associated aboveground storage tank, a potential underground storage area, two concrete decontamination pads, a generator, two sumps, and a storage yard. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that decontamination activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) onto building surfaces, down building drains to associated leachfields, and to soils associated with two concrete decontamination pads located outside the building. Therefore, the scope of the corrective action field investigation will involve soil sampling at biased and random locations in the yard using a direct-push method, scanning and static radiological surveys, and laboratory analyses of all soil/building samples. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that solvents and degreasers may have been used in the decontamination processes; therefore, potential COCs include volatile/semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, asbestos, gamma-emitting radionuclides, plutonium, uranium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, CAU 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters; 11-22-03, Drum; 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage; 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials; 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-99-18, Storage Area; 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); and 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker). These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). The suspected contaminants and critical analyte s for CAU 214 include oil (total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics [TPH-DRO], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), pesticides (chlordane, heptachlor, 4,4-DDT), barium, cadmium, chronium, lubricants (TPH-DRO, TPH-gasoline-range organics [GRO]), and fly ash (arsenic). The land-use zones where CAU 214 CASs are located dictate that future land uses will be limited to nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Pantex Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Site Pantex Site The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear wespons in support of the NNSA stockpile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Considered Sites | Department of Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sites » Considered Sites Sites » Considered Sites Considered Sites View Considered Sites View Other Sites DOE maintains the Considered Sites Database to provide information to the public about sites that were formerly used in the nation's nuclear weapons and early atomic energy programs and that had the potential for residual radioactive contamination on site. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in March 1974 under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to identify, investigate, and take appropriate cleanup action at sites where work was performed in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and early AEC programs. Site activities included uranium ore storage and processing, uranium metal

222

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of Phase I sampling, the analytical program for Phase II investigation may be reduced. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

High-volume, high-value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines Phase 1: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the quarter a second series of samples were collected and partially characterized chemically and mineralogically. The samples were collected at the disposal site operated by Freeman United Coal Co. The second collection was necessary because of deterioration due to hydration of the original samples. A study of the hydration characteristics was completed during the quarter. Important reactions included the immediate formation of ettringite and portlandite. The hydration and transformation was found to be a slow process. A second phase of gypsum formation from ettringite deterioration was identified. The slow hydration of anhydrite with its resultant swell is a potential problem which will be addressed further. Geotechnical characterization, during the quarter included completion of the preliminary characterization, analysis of the findings, experimentation with sample preparation for the final characterization/mix design, and design of the final experimental program. The analysis of the coals collected during the core drilling and hydrologic planning were completed. Also during the quarter a meeting was held with representatives of the shotcrete industry to discuss transport systems for emplacement. The pros and cons of pneumatic and hydraulic systems were discussed and plans formulated for further investigations.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Considered Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considered Sites Considered Sites Considered Sites View Considered Sites View Other Sites DOE maintains the Considered Sites Database to provide information to the public about sites that were formerly used in the nation's nuclear weapons and early atomic energy programs and that had the potential for residual radioactive contamination on site. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in March 1974 under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to identify, investigate, and take appropriate cleanup action at sites where work was performed in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and early AEC programs. Site activities included uranium ore storage and processing, uranium metal

225

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfills used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will concentrate on geophysical surveys to confirm the presence or absence of disposed waste within a CAS and verify the boundaries of disposal areas; penetrate disposal feature covers via excavation and/or drilling; perform geodetic surveys; and be used to collect both soil and environmental samples for laboratory analyses. Phase II will deal only with those CASs where a contaminant of concern has been identified. This phase will involve the collection of additional soil and/or environmental samples for laboratory analyses. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

Seismic Hazard Characterization at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS): Status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Seismic Hazard Characterization project for the Savannah River Site (SRS-SHC) is to develop estimates of the seismic hazard for several locations within the SRS. Given the differences in the geology and geotechnical characteristics at each location, the estimates of the seismic hazard are to allow for the specific local conditions at each site. Characterization of seismic hazard is a critical factor for the design of new facilities as well as for the review and potential retrofit of existing facilities at SRS. The scope of the SRS seismic hazard characterization reported in this document is limited to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The goal of the project is to provide seismic hazard estimates based on a state-of-the-art method which is consistent with developments and findings of several ongoing studies which are deemed to bring improvements in the state of the seismic hazard analyses.

Savy, J.B.

1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS...

228

Medical Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Sites Name: Jenielle Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I started itching Aug. 1999. Diagnosed with ITP Oct.1999. I am in remission With a platelet count in...

229

Methodology for updating numerical predictions of excavation performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the usual limitations in site investigations and measurements of soil properties, simplified constitutive models are routinely used in geotechnical analyses for the design of excavation support systems. However, ...

Corral Jofré, Gonzalo Andrés

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-021.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Level Waste Disposal SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed action would conduct geotechnical investigations at two 4-6 acre candidate sites for a Remote-Handled...

231

Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home » Site Map Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas John Shalf Francesca Verdier Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Lynn Rippe Suzanne Stevenson David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Linda Vu Margie Wylie Kathy Kincade Advanced Technologies Group Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Matthew Cordery Christopher Daley Analytics Group Peter Nugent David Camp Hank Childs Harinarayan Krishnan Burlen Loring Joerg Meyer Prabhat Oliver Ruebel Daniela Ushizima Gunther Weber Yushu Yao Computational Systems Group Jay Srinivasan James Botts Scott Burrow Tina Butler Nick Cardo Tina Declerck Ilya Malinov David Paul Larry Pezzaglia Iwona Sakrejda

232

The Holocene valley fill sequence in south Louisiana: A geological and geotechnical interpretation based on results of two deep cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Louisiana Geological Survey--US Geological Survey cooperative research program concerning wetland subsidence in Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana, funded two deep research borings, each of which recovered core of the entire Holocene valley fill. These boreholes, 22 km apart in dip direction, were logged by porosity and resistivity tools and calibrated to cone penetrometer and seismic profiles immediately offsetting them. Major deltaic cycles and ravinement surfaces were recognized in each core by ROCKEVAL pyrolysis, [sup 13]C isotope signatures, shifts of increasing radiocarbon age with depth, shifts of increasing resistivity and density with depth, microfossil analysis, and the presence and type of shell material. Data collected in this project suggest the top of the Pleistocene in this onshore, fluvially-dominated section may not be the top of Substratum sands, but significantly higher in the section, as determined by the strongest positive reflection coefficient below the 10,000 year radiocarbon datum. This satisfies the criterion that this operational boundary be mappable and chronostratigraphic. Additionally, the presence of two growth faults in the northern part of the study area may have acted as sites for preferential thickening of the Holocene. Both reasons stated above profoundly influence the modeling of Holocene thickness and consolidation settlement potential, critical for understanding subsurface controls on wetland loss.

Kuecher, G.J.; Roberts, H.H.; Suhayda, J.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)); McGinnis, L.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Mr. Jack W. Anderson Chief Operating Officer Fermilab  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A~ ~ ~ 2013 A~ ~ ~ 2013 Mr. Jack W. Anderson Chief Operating Officer Fermilab P.O. Box 500 Batavia, IL 60510 Dear Mr. Anderson: SUBJECT: NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) DETERMINATION FOR' THE GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT (LBNE) DETECTOR SITE IN SOUTH DAKOTA Reference: Letter, from J. Anderson to M. Weis, dated March 21, 2013, Subject: NEPA Environmental Evaluation Notification Form (EENF) for the Geotechnical Investigation of the LBNE Detector Site in South Dakota have reviewed the EENF for the Geotechnical Investigation of the LBNE Detector Site in South Dakota. Based on the information provided in the EENF, I have approved the following categorical exclusion (CX): Protect Name Approved CX Geotechnical Investigation of the LBNE 3/27/2013 B3.1

234

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, DOE/NV--528 UPDATED WITH TECHNICAL CHANGE No.1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) addresses one of three leachfield systems associated with Test Cell A, which is located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (see Leachfield Work Plan Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 500 is comprised of the Test Cell A Septic System (CAS 25-04-05) and the associated leachfield system presented in Figure 1-1 (FFACO, 1996). The leachfield is located 60 meters (m) (200 feet [ft]) southeast of the Building 3124 gate, and approximately 45 m (150 ft) southwest of Building 3116 at Test Cell A. Test Cell A operated during the 1960s to support nuclear rocket reactor testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) (SNPO, 1970). Various operations within Buildings 3113B (Mechanical Equipment Room), 3115 (Helium Compressor Station), 3116 (Pump House), a water tank drain and overflow, a ''yard and equipment drain system'' outside of Building 3116, and a trailer have resulted in potentially hazardous effluent releases to the leachfield system (DOE, 1988a). The leachfield system components include discharge lines, manways, a septic tank, an outfall line, a diversion chamber, and a 15 by 30 m (50 by 100 ft) leachfield (see Leachfield Work Plan Figure 3-1 for explanation of terminology). In addition, engineering drawings show an outfall system that may or may not be connected to the CAU 500 leachfield. In general, effluent contributed to the leachfield was sanitary wastewater associated with floor drains, toilet and lavatory facilities in Building 3113B and floor drains in the remaining source buildings. The surface and subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system, outfall, and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) generated by support activities associated with Test Cell A reactor testing operations.

ITLV

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Site C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' u. s. A r my Corps or Engineers Kurfal.. Ilisfr ifl om« 1776 N1 . ~lI rll Sfred , lIu fflll" , New v ur k. 14207 Site C loseout Report for th e Ashland I (Includlng Seaway Arca D), Ashland 2 and Rattlesnake Creek FUS RAP Sites To nawanda . New Yor k F ina l - Octo ber 2006 Formerl y Ut ilized Sites Remedi al Actiun Program Dt:CLAlUlfiO lO OF RF ~ I'O""" A <:n o .. ('oMnLflOI'O '" 1 S-~1 1 A "n· nvnn: S Ill: C'lO'iU 'U l RtrUlIT f OR A SlIu x u l (I "ICLU I ING S t:A" ·,H A RU D j, AS H I .A ~O 2 A."n RAnU:M'AKf eRU" ~ rn~ I!d'on at A.hland 1 (Ind udonl Seaway Area DJ. Ashland 2 and kan~snak c Creek is Wi,...... 1c in acwr.hnu willi ~ Rcconl or Oecisim (ROD) . igned 00> April 20. 1998 and l'.1pbIWlOII <;If

236

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area prompted by public query; no site found in New Canaan. CT.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No AEC site...

237

The Ambrosia Lake project archaeological investigations of three small sites associated with the southern Chacoan outlier of Kin Nizhoni, McKinley County, New Mexico. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect

During the fall of 1987, Complete Archaeological Service Associates conducted mitigative excavations at three sites (LA50363, LA50364, and LA50371) in McKinley County, New Mexico. These sites are adjacent to the Phillips/United Nuclear Inactive Uranium Mill and Tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The primary deposition at each of these sites appears to be related to a Pueblo II or Bonito Phase occupation. Temporal placement is based primarily on the cross dating of ceramics and archaeomagnetic determinations when possible. No tree-ring or radiocarbon samples are available from these sites. These Ambrosia Lake sites indicate that this area was occupied primarily by Pueblo II people who may have had close social, economic, and ceremonial ties with the people living at the nuclear community of Lower Nizhoni about 3 km south-southeast. The later component at LA50364 indicates a Pueblo III occupation by people who may have had similar ties to the people of the Kin Nizhoni nuclear community. The Ambrosia Lake sites, then, provide important information on the structure of subnuclear communities within the southern Chaco periphery.

Cullington, B.J. (ed.); Hammack, L.C.; Baugh, T.G. (Complete Archaeological Service Associates, Cortez, CO (United States))

1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

SSA Old Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSA-OA) SSA-OA) View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-OA site The two huts and boardwalk The scaffold flux tower The base of the scaffold flux tower One of the canopy access towers The SRC meteorology tower The truss tower and cables from the flux tower Cabled tethersonde above the SSA Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site The tethersonde about to be launched (tethered balloon and radiosonde) Picture of the SRC meteorological tower at the SSA-OA site taken from the flux tower. Improved road into the SSA-OA site within the Prince Albert National Park. Aerial of SSA-OA tower during the winter IFC. SSA-OA flux tower about 40 meters in height, approximately 20 meters above canopy. Photograph of investigator hut and boardwalk at the SSA-OA site. Andy Black and associate within the hut at the SSA-OA site showing the various recording and data display instruments from the tower.

239

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating improvements and selected investments have already improved US refining and petrochemical energy utilization efficiency by about 20%, compared to 1972 operating efficiencies. This is equivalent to saving well over 250,000 B/D of crude; which is equal to the output of several major synthetic fuels projects! Site Energy Surveys can be an important technique for achieving the next major increment (1520%) in energy savings, even when using existing technology. These surveys encompass the total site, all associated plants, and investigate all aspects of energy requirements, heat integration configurations, steam/power cogeneration possibilities and inefficient practices. After potential energy conservation opportunities have been identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values of energy and concludes with overall improvements achieved.

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Division Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Our research program is directed toward developing and understanding metal complexes that catalyze reactions relevant to renewable energy, particularly those that reduce carbon dioxide to fuels or fuel precursors. Carbon dioxide reduction catalysts are important targets because they could enable "recycling" of hydrocarbon fuels, thus lowering their carbon footprint. Our research addresses two key challenges in this area. First, we aim to improve the lifetimes, activity, and selectivity of homogeneous catalysts by incorporating them into porous heterogeneous frameworks derived from structurally persistent organic polymers. These frameworks allow isolation of the catalytic centers, which inhibits reaction pathways that lead to catalyst decomposition, and enable the spatially controlled deployment of ancillary functional groups that bind and concentrate substrate near the active site and/or assist with its activation. Second, we are developing homogeneous dual-catalyst systems and assemblies that couple CO2 reduction catalysis to a parallel catalytic reaction that provides the reducing equivalents. We are especially interested in proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions involving activation of H2 and of organic dehydrogenation substrates, wherein the proton pathway also participates in the conversion of CO2 to CO. In both of these research thrusts we are studying catalysts that may be activated under thermal, electrochemical, or photochemical conditions.

243

Exploration for hot dry rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Hot dry rock conceptual models for exploration, HDR test site investigations, and the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation with ad hoc exploration strategies. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high, local, upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. There appear to be much more widespread possibilities for similar HDR sites in the Great Plains area. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket. There is no direct information on the presence of abnormally high temperatures in this area, but the study does show that a combination of gravity and magnetic anomaly mapping with regional geological information derived from sparse drill holes in the Phanerozoic rocks is useful on a widespread basis for focusing on local areas for detailed evaluation.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

CERCLA - Site Selector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LEHR) Fernald Preserve Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov...

247

ORNL DAAC Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map ORNL DAAC Site Map About Us About ORNL DAAC Who We Are User Working Group Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Citation Policy News Newsletters Workshops Site Map Products...

248

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

249

CERCLA - Site Selector  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov Information Quality FOIA...

250

SSA Young Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site (SSA-YA) The pole-tower at the YA site Closer look at the pole-tower at the YA site Solar panels powering the site, mounted on a folding ladder The young aspen canopy...

251

Chapter 3: Building Siting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Building Siting : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents Building Siting Laboratory site-wide issues include transportation and travel distances for building occupants, impacts on wildlife corridors and hydrology, and energy supply and distribution limitations. Decisions made during site selec- tion and planning impact the surrounding natural habitat, architectural design integration, building energy con- sumption, occupant comfort, and occupant productivity. Significant opportunities for creating greener facilities arise during the site selection and site planning stages of design. Because LANL development zones are pre- determined, identify the various factors affecting devel-

252

Indiana Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana Web Sites Other Links : Indiana Electricity Profile: Indiana Energy Profile: Indiana Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

253

Florida Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Web Sites Other Links : Florida Electricity Profile: Florida Energy Profile: Florida Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

254

MIDC: Web Site Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDC Web Site Search Enter words or phrases: Search Clear Help Also see the site directory. NREL MIDC...

255

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

256

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oliktok Point, Oliktok Point, AlaskaInstruments Oliktok Deployment AMF Home Oliktok Home Deployment Operations Baseline Instruments and Data Plots at the Archive Outreach News & Press New Sites Fact Sheet (PDF, 1.6MB) Images Contacts Fred Helsel, AMF Operations Lynne Roeder, Media Contact Hans Verlinde, Principal Investigator Instruments : Oliktok Point, Alaska [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Not Online [ Single installation ] CSAPR C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar Cloud Properties Not Online [ Single installation ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Not Online [ Single installation ] ECOR Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Surface/Subsurface Properties Not Online [ Single installation ]

257

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was established in 1999 based on an extensive probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996 by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. In subsequent years, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) staff questioned the some of the assumptions used in developing the seismic design basis, particularly the adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. Existing site-specific shear wave velocity data were considered insufficient to reliably use California earthquake response data to directly predict ground motions at the Hanford Site. To address this concern, the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed and executed a plan for acquiring site-specific soil data down to approximately 500 feet, and for reanalyzing the effects of deeper layers of sediments interbedded with basalt. New geophysical data were acquired, analyzed, and interpreted with respect to existing geologic information gathered from other Hanford-related projects in the WTP area. Existing data from deep boreholes were assembled and interpreted to produce a model of the deeper rock layers consisting of inter-layered basalts and sedimentary interbeds. These data were analyzed statistically to determine the variability of seismic velocities. The earthquake ground motion response was simulated on a large number of models resulting from a weighted logic tree approach that addressed the geologic and geophysical uncertainties. Weights in the logic tree were chosen by a working group based on the strength or weakness of the available data for each combination of logic tree parameters. Finally, interim design ground motion spectra were developed to envelope the remaining uncertainties. The results of this study demonstrate that the site-specific soil structure (Hanford and Ringold formations) beneath the WTP is thinner than was assumed in the 1996 Hanford Site-wide model. This thinness produces peaks in the response spectra (relative to those in 1996) near 2 Hz and 5 Hz. The soil geophysical properties, shear wave velocity, and nonlinear response to the earthquake ground motions are known sufficiently, and alternative interpretations consistent with this data did not have a strong influence on the results. The structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt), which are inter-layered with sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation), produces strong reductions in the earthquake ground motions that propagate through them to reach the surface. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. The Vs for the basalts, where Vp/Vs is well defined, still is limited by the quality and quantity of the Vp data. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was included in the logic trees that produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile (based on the logic tree) to produce conservative design spectra. This conservatism increased the seismic design basis by up to 40% compared to the 1999 values. Because of the sensitivity of the calculated response spectra to the velocity contrasts between the basalts and interbedded sediments, additional boreholes and direct Vs measurements through these layers are now being planned. The new measurements are expected to reduce the uncertainty in the site response that is caused by the lack of direct knowledge of the Vs contrasts within these layers. (authors)

Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

None

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Case Study on the Use of Innovative Methods for Comprehensive Site Characterization at Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study on using innovative technologies for investigating former manufactured gas plant sites.

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

262

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of specific site safety functions. C. Must have the ability to provide an overall systematic assessment of site safety performance and to characterize the major issues and...

263

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Career Site FAQs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Careers Working at ORNL Diversity Postdocs Internships and Postgrad Opportunities Fellowships Career Site FAQs Events and Conferences Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Career Site...

265

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites -...

267

Site Suitability and Hazard Assessment Guide for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear reactor projects in the U.S. have traditionally employed large light water reactors (LWR) to generate regional supplies of electricity. Although large LWRs have consistently dominated commercial nuclear markets both domestically and abroad, the concept of small modular reactors (SMRs) capable of producing between 30 MW(t) and 900 MW(t) to generating steam for electricity is not new. Nor is the idea of locating small nuclear reactors in close proximity to and in physical connection with industrial processes to provide a long-term source of thermal energy. Growing problems associated continued use of fossil fuels and enhancements in efficiency and safety because of recent advancements in reactor technology suggest that the likelihood of near-term SMR technology(s) deployment at multiple locations within the United States is growing. Many different types of SMR technology are viable for siting in the domestic commercial energy market. However, the potential application of a particular proprietary SMR design will vary according to the target heat end-use application and the site upon which it is proposed to be located. Reactor heat applications most commonly referenced in connection with the SMR market include electric power production, district heating, desalinization, and the supply of thermal energy to various processes that require high temperature over long time periods, or a combination thereof. Indeed, the modular construction, reliability and long operational life purported to be associated with some SMR concepts now being discussed may offer flexibility and benefits no other technology can offer. Effective siting is one of the many early challenges that face a proposed SMR installation project. Site-specific factors dealing with support to facility construction and operation, risks to the plant and the surrounding area, and the consequences subsequent to those risks must be fully identified, analyzed, and possibly mitigated before a license will be granted to construct and operate a nuclear facility. Examples of significant site-related concerns include area geotechnical and geological hazard properties, local climatology and meteorology, water resource availability, the vulnerability of surrounding populations and the environmental to adverse effects in the unlikely event of radionuclide release, the socioeconomic impacts of SMR plant installation and the effects it has on aesthetics, proximity to energy use customers, the topography and area infrastructure that affect plant constructability and security, and concerns related to the transport, installation, operation and decommissioning of major plant components.

Wayne Moe

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 To operate the Hanford Site (Site),...

269

Retrieval Group Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information Retrieval Tools and Systems: ... currently unavailable. Other sites with extensive information retrieval (IR) links: ...

270

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

271

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Laboratory investigation of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Laboratory investigation of steam adsorption in geothermal reservoir rocks Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic...

272

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Site Manager Kansas City Site Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City Site Office (KCSO) Workforce Diversity FY 2010 NNSA Service Center EEO and Diversity Program Office PO Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 (505) 845-5517 TTY (800)...

274

SSA Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-Fen site. A general view of the Fen The flux tower at the Fen The huts at the Fen Pink flamingos, fen hens at the SSA-Fen site. Aerial...

275

Redesigned Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redesigned Web Sites In an ongoing effort to improve services to our customers, the ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce that it has released a major revision to its Web site. The new...

276

Web Site Metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International World Wide Web Conference, pages 1123–1124,Erik Wilde. Site Metadata on the Web. In Proceedings of theUCB ISchool Report 2009-028 Web Site Metadata [4] David R.

Wilde, Erik; Roy, Anuradha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Towoomba Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Image TWM-1: General view of the Towoomba savanna grassland site, South Africa. (Photograph by Dr. R.J. Scholes, Forestek, CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa). Go to Site...

278

2012 Site Visit Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... before the first day on-site, all team members meet at their hotel to finalize ... All of the prework done above will save you much time and energy on-site ...

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

NSA-Old Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-OJP) Aerial view of the NSA-OJP site during IFC 2. The Rohn tower and investigator hut are in the approximate center of the image with the generator hut at the extreme upper...

280

ORNL Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORNL Site Ofice ORNL Site Ofice P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6269 January 28, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR GREGORY H. WOODS GENERAL COUNSEL GC-1 FROM: SUBJECT: ��MK = MOORE, MANAGER lF �NL SITE OFFICE ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY FOR 2013- OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) SITE OFFICE (OSO) This correspondence transmits the Annual NEPA Planning Summary for 2013 for OSO.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Completed Sites Listing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 24 states.

282

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

283

On-site investigations and diagnosis of hydraulic structures  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic structures (HSs) should be classified as complex engineering systems. It is difficult to imagine an absolutely reliable and safe engineering system. It is completely obvious that if such a system were possible, then economically it would not experience any competition with less reliable systems whose operation is organized in a certain way.

Vasilevskii, A.G.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Investigating the Site of Newton's Laboratory in Trinity College, Cambridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

’s ‘Das Alche- mistenlaboratorium von Oberstockstall Ein Vor- bericht zum Stand des Forschungsprojekts’. Mitteilungen der Fachgruppe der ‘Geschichte der Chemie’ 7, 1992, 11–19.] 15. Edleston J. (1850). Correspondence of Sir Isaac Newton and Professor Cotes...

Spargo, P E

285

Status report: Fernald site remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is rapidly transitioning from a Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) site to one where design and construction of the remedies dominates. Fernald is one of the first sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex to accomplish this task and real physical progress is being made in moving the five operable units through the CERCLA process. Two of the required Records of Decision (ROD) are in hand and all five operable units will have received their RODs (IROD for OU3) by the end of 1995. Pre-design investigations, design work or construction are now in progress on the operable units. The lessons learned from the work done to date include implementing innovations in the RI and FS process as well as effective use of Removal Actions to begin the actual site remediation. Also, forging close working relationships with the Federal and State Regulators, citizens action groups and the Fernald Citizens Task Force has helped move the program forward. The Fernald successes have been achieved by close coordination and cooperation among all groups working on the projects and by application of innovative technologies within the decision making process.

Craig, J.R. Jr. [USDOE Fernald Field Office, OH (United States); Saric, J.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Schneider, T. [Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH (United States); Yates, M.K. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Characterization Activities Conducted at the 183-DR Site in Support of an In Situ Gaseous Reduction Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. This document presents information associated with characterization activities conducted at the 183-DR site at Hanford, which is associated with a significant groundwater contaminant plume and was formerly a water treatment facility that utilized chromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Geotechnical and chemical data were collected during the excavation of trenches and the drilling of two vadose zone boreholes to support a possible ISGR demonstration at 183-DR. Although elevated total chromium and trace levels of hexavalent chromium were identified from one of the trenches and one of the boreholes, it appears that the boreholes missed the vadose zone contaminant source responsible for the chromium groundwater plume located downgradient of the 183-DR site. Recommendations are provided, however, for future work at 183-DR that may serve to identify the source for the groundwater plume and possibly provide an opportunity for an ISGR demonstration.

Thornton, Edward C.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion is presented under the following section headings: background and some technical characteristics of geothermal resources; geology and geohydrology, geophysics, and, conclusions regarding availability of geothermal energy for nonelectric uses; agricultural assessment of Lake County, site assessment for potential agricultural development, analysis of potential agricultural applications, special application of low cost geothermal energy to algae harvesting, development of an integrated agribusiness, geothermal complex in Lake County, analysis of individual enterprises, and, recommendations for subsequent work; demographic characteristics, economic condition and perspective of Lake County, economic impact of geothermal in Lake County, social and economic factors related to geothermal resource development, socioeconomic impact of nonelectric uses of geothermal energy, and, identification of direct heat applications of geothermal energy for Lake County based on selected interviews; cost estimate procedure, example, justification of procedure, and, typical costs and conclusions; and, recommended prefeasibility and feasibility studies related to construction of facilities for nonelectric applications of geothermal resource utilization. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hanna IV, underground coal gasification site, Wyoming, and comparison to other Wyoming UCG sites  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of 21 post-burn cores taken from the Hanna IV UCG site allows 96 m (315 ft) of overburden to be subdivided into four local stratigraphic units. The 7.6 m (25 ft) thick Hanna No. 1 coal seam is overlain by a laterally discontinuous, 3.3 m (11 ft) thick shaley mudstone (Unit A') in part of the Hanna IV site. A more widespread, 30 m (90 ft) thick well-indurated sandstone (Unit A) overlies the A' unit. Unit A is the roof rock for both of the Hanna IV cavities. Overlying Unit A is a 33 m (108 ft) thick sequence of mudstone and claystone (Unit B), and the uppermost unit at the Hanna IV site (Unit C) is a coarse-grained sandstone that ranges in thickness from 40 to 67 m (131 to 220 ft). Two elliptical cavities were formed during the two phases of the Hanna IV experiment. The larger cavity, Hanna IVa, is 45 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 18 m (59 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity; the Hanna IVb cavity is 40 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 11 m (36 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity. Geotechnical tests indicated that the Hanna IV overburden rocks were moderately strong to strong, based on the empirical classification of Broch and Franklin (1972), and a positive, linear correlation exists between rock strength and volume percent calcite cement. There is an inverse linear correlation between rock strength and porosity for the Hanna IV overburden rocks. 28 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs..

Marcouiller, B.A.; Burns, L.K.; Ethridge, F.G.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigations  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, ...

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Site Environmental Report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

DOE Site List  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Links Links Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner DOE Site List Site Geo Site Code State Operations Office1 DOE Programs Generating Streams at Site DOE Programs Managing Facilities Associated Data2 Acid/Pueblo Canyons ACPC NM Oak Ridge Waste/Media, Facilities Airport Substation CA Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Hill Communication Site CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Substation CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities AL Complex NM Albuquerque DP Facilities Alba Craft ALCL OH Oak Ridge Facilities Albany Research Center AMRC OR Oak Ridge Facilities Alcova Switchyard WY Western Area Power Administration Facilities Aliquippa Forge ALFO PA Oak Ridge Facilities

292

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES PROGRAM PROGRAM INELIGIBILITY REPORT FOR THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM INELIGIBILITY REPORT FOR THE (MARION MILL SITE, BOULDER, COLORADO CONTENTS Introduction and Summary Reason for Investigation Background for Marion Mill Site Analysis Radiological Conditions Factors Required for Inclusion % I I 2 3 5 5 FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES PROGRAM PROGRAM INELIGIBILITY REPORT FOR THE !MARION MILL SITE, BOULDER, COLORADO Introduction and Summary An investigation of a former mill site in Boulder, Colorado, known as the Marion IMill Site, Wah Chang Mill and Sweeney Mill, was completed to provide input to DOE to determine if the site qualified as a FUSRAP site. In general, the investigation concluded that while the site contains uranium and thorium bearing residue with radiation levels and concentrations of radionuclides probably in

293

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

294

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

Siting Handbook WIND ENERGY SITING HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Wind Energy Siting Handbook (the "Handbook") presents general information about regulatory and environmental issues associated with the development and siting of wind energy projects in the United States. It is intended to be a general guidance document providing technical information and tools for identifying potential issues that may arise with wind energy projects. The Handbook contains links to resources on the Internet. Those links are provided solely as aids to assist you in locating other Internet resources that may be of interest. They are not intended to state or imply that AWEA or the Contributors endorse, approve, sponsor, or are affiliated or associated with those linked sites. The Handbook is not intended as a comprehensive discussion of all wind energy project issues and should be used in conjunction with other available resources. The Handbook also is not intended as legal or environmental advice or as a best practices manual, nor should it be considered as such. Because the Handbook is only a general guidance document, independent legal counsel and/or environmental consulting services should be obtained to further explore any wind energy siting issue, matter, or project. In reviewing all or any part of the Handbook, you acknowledge and understand that the Handbook is only a general guidance document and does not constitute a best practices manual, legal or environmental advice, or a legal or other relationship with the American Wind Energy Association ("AWEA") or any of the persons or entities

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1978. Volume II. Principal investigator progress reports  

SciTech Connect

The topics covered in this report include: geologic siting considerations for the disposal of radioactive wastes into submarine geologic formations; geologic assessment of the MPG-1 regions Central North Pacific; site mapping; geotechnical aspects of subsurface seabed disposal; heat transfer, thermal and fluid physics in the deep ocean sediments; mechanical response predictive capability; sediment-seawater interaction at 300/sup 0/C, 500 bars; stability of actinides in chloride media; cannister corrosion studies; nuclide sorption and migration; development of apparatus and measurement of thermal conductivity of seabed illite and smectite at temperatures to 500/sup 0/C at simulated depths to 15,000 ft (9000 psi); in-situ heat transfer experiments; preliminary seabed disposal transport modeling studies; radionuclide migration studies; radionuclide distributions in deep ocean cores; benthic biological studies; deep sea microbial studies; activity rates of abyssal communities; Deep-towed RUM III (Sandia Seabed working platform): a third-generation remote underwater manipulator; long coring facility program; transportation; legal, political, and institutional implications of the Seabed Program for radioactive waste disposal.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

ColumbusSites.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically separate properties owned by the Battelle Memorial Institute: the King Avenue site, located in the city of Columbus, and the West Jefferson site, located approx- imately 15 miles west of Columbus. Battelle conducted extensive nuclear research at both locations for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies between 1943 and 1986. The research resulted in contamination of soil, buildings, and equipment with radioactive and mixed waste materials. Environmental cleanup of the sites began in 1986. The 6-acre King Avenue site, which was historically a part of the federal government's fuel and target fab- rication program, consisted of 9 buildings and the surrounding grounds. Nuclear research conducted at the

298

NETL: Site Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Quality Site Environmental Quality About NETL Site Environmental Quality - Certified to ISO 14001:2004 Questions about NETL's Environment, Safety and Health Management System may be directed to Michael Monahan, 304-285-4408, michael.monahan@netl.doe.gov. NETL has implemented an Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Management System, based on DOE's Integrated Safety Management System, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14000 series, and the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment (OHSAS) 18000 series. While the original scope of the ES&H Management System included the Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites, in fiscal year 2010, the Albany site was incorporated into the existing ES&H Management System. In addition, all three sites underwent ISO 14001:2004 recertification audits and Morgantown and

299

WCI | Site 300 CORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CORS : CORS Weather Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuosly Operating Reference Station (CORS) CORS logo How to access GPS satellite data The National Geodetic Survey(NGS) Home Page for the S300 CORS base station is: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/CORS/ Type S300 into "enter SiteID" To get user-friendly data: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/UFCORS/ The GPS data will be in "receiver independent exchange" (RINEX) format, version 2.10. CORS Proxy Data Availability Details: NGS Reference Position Information Site 300 CORS Reference Position RTK Transmission Frequency NGS s300 Site Log NGS s300 Site Map Links to other GPS sites Last modified: July 27, 2011 UCRL-MI-134143 | Privacy & Legal Notice Contact: wci-webteam@llnl.gov NNSA Logo DOE Logo

300

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis, site meteorological data, and monitoring summary for tlw ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 · * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see attached repmis). .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Site environmental report summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3; 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC uncertainty, the analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. Upon reviewing historical data and current site conditions, it has been determined that no further characterization is required at USW G3 (CAS 25-99-16) to select the appropriate corrective action. A cesium-137 source was encased in cement within the vadous zone during the drilling of the well (CAS 25-99-16). A corrective action of closure in place with a land-use restriction for drilling near USW G3 is appropriate. This corrective action will be documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 168. The results of the remaining field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives for the other CASs within CAU 168 in this CADD.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nairobi Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRB-1: Canopy reflectance measurement within the Nairobi grassland site, Kenya. (Prof. Jenesio Kinyamario, University of Nairobi, is using a rednear-infrared spectral ratio meter....

304

CPER Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CPR-1: Weather stationexclosure within the CPER grassland site, Colorado, USA. (Mark Lindquist, Colorado State University, is checking a wetdry deposition gauge. Photograph taken...

305

SITE LIGHTING FOUNDATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Site Lighting. This analysis is in support of design drawing BABBDF000-01717-2100-23016.

M. Gomez

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Site Lead TQP Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and...

307

1994 Site environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Site Transition Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Guidance March 2010 Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington D. C. 20585 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Technical Framework for EM...

309

Badkhyz Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BDK-1: Experiment to study the effect of UV-b solar radiation on litter decomposition at the Badkhyz grassland site, Turkmenistan. (Prof. Leonid Rodin, Komarov Botanical Institute,...

310

historic site award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Honors 'Historic Site' of NBS Physics Discovery. ... The American Physical Society (APS) has named ... revealed that in certain nuclear processes pairs ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

SRS Site Needs  

SRS Site Needs Neil R. Davis Program Manager Technology Development and Tank Closure Projects Washington Savannah River Company Aluminum/Chromium Leaching Technical ...

312

Calabozo Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLB-1: General view of the Trachypogon savanna at the Calabozo grassland site, Venezuela. (Trees include Curatella americana, Bowdichia virgilioides and Byrsonima crassifolia....

313

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Historical Photographs: Idaho Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Sites Small Image 1. Measuring intentional radiation release at the Idaho experimental dairy farm (1964). (195Kbytes) Small Image 2. Measuring intentional radiation...

315

Pantex Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Pantex Site Activity Reports 2013 Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Oversight, May 2013 Review Reports 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant,...

316

RMOTC RMOTC -Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Home About Us About Us Staff Field Info History Photo Gallery Awards & Testimonials Safety Initiatives Outreach & Community News Latest News Newsletters Press Releases...

317

2004 Environmental Site Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phenolic compounds. Tests of underground coal gasification and tests of in-situ oil shale retorting resulted in contamination at these sites. The largest cleanup activity...

318

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2003. However, seven SWMUs could not be remediated to No Further Action (NFA) status. The long- term monitoring of these inactive waste sites has been incorporated into...

320

Kursk Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Image KRS-1: Clipping above-ground biomass at the Kursk grassland site, Russia. (Dr. Kira Khodashova and student Nina N., Moscow State University, are estimating monthly...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

LM Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LM Sites LM Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Search Search Legacy Management Site Documents > Additional Information Guidance and Reports InspectionSampling Schedule...

322

Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hanford Site Video Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Video Library currently makes 30 videos related to the siteÆs history and the clean-up available for online viewing. The Video Library (also referred to as the Broadcast Archive) can be searched by keywords in the title or description. They can also be browsed in a complete list.

324

Site characterization handbook  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1 - June 30, 2008 April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities. * Shrub seedlings planted last fall had a poor survival rate. * New damage to shrubs and vole infestation is not evident. * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no abnormalities.

327

site_transition.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legacy Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet explains the process for transferring a site to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Introduction Transition Process After environmental remediation is completed at a site and there is no continuing mission, responsibility for the site and the associated records are transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management for post-closure management. Where residual hazards (e.g., disposal cells, ground water contamination) remain, active long-term surveillance and maintenance will be required to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) established transition guidance for remediated sites that will transfer to LM for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The

328

Related Data Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Data Sites Related Data Sites CDIAC has listed the following Web sites because these sites offer high-quality data sets (not available through CDIAC) from a variety of global-change themes. These links will take you outside of CDIAC, therefore, we are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. This list is not intended to be comprehensive, but we do hope you find it useful if you cannot find what you are looking for here at CDIAC. Multi-Agency Sites Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) GCDIS is a collection of distributed information systems operated by government agencies involved in global change research. GCDIS provides global change data to scientists and researchers, policy makers, educators, industry, and the public at large and includes multidisciplinary data from

329

Web Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help » Web Site Map Help » Web Site Map Web Site Map The links listed below include all pages on the site except document topic pages. Home Privacy/Security Help Web Site Map Mailing Services Remove me from the List Contact Us About Us News and Events News Archives News/Media FAQs Internet Resources Documents DUF6 EIS Historical Context What is an EIS? Why EIS is Needed Who is Responsible? EIS Process EIS Topics EIS Alternatives EIS Schedule Public Involvement Opportunities Public Comment Form For More Info DUF6 Management and Uses Management Responsibilities DUF6 Storage How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored Cylinder Leakage DUF6 Storage Safety DUF6 PEIS Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance Conversion Potential DU Uses "Business Case" for R&D on Beneficial Uses of DU Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants

330

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 1 - March 31, 2008 January 1 - March 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during January through March 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. The first semi-annual FFA meeting of 2008 was held at UDEQ in Salt Lake City, Utah, March 26 and 27, 2008. Minutes and action items resulting from that meeting will be prepared under separate cover pending review and concurrence by EPA and UDEQ. Draft minutes and action items are scheduled for submittal by May 1, 2008.

331

Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Other Sites Summary Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Chevron Panna Maria Site - 030 Clive Disposal Cell - 036 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Conoco Conquista Site - 031 Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Dawn Ford Site - 038 EFB White Mesa Site - 033 Energy Technology Engineering Center - 044 Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 Exxon Ray Point Site - 032 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory - 016 Fernald Environmental Management Project - 027 Fort St Vrain - 011 Geothermal Test Facility - 001 Hecla Durita Site - 012

332

Binding sites of quinones in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers investigated by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy: Symmetry of the carbonyl interactions and close equivalence of the Q{sub B} vibrations in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis probed by isotope labeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photoreduction of the secondary quinone acceptor Q{sub B} in reaction centers (RCs) of the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis has been investigated by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy of RCs reconstituted with several isotopically labeled ubiquinones. The labels used were {sup 18}O on both carbonyls and {sup 13}C either uniformly or selectively at the 1- or the 4-position, i.e., on either one of the two carbonyls. The Q{sub B}{sup {minus}}/Q{sub B} spectra of RCs reconstituted with the isotopically labeled and unlabeled quinones as well as the double differences calculated form these spectra exhibit distinct isotopic shifts for a numer of bands attributed to vibrations of Q{sub B} and Q{sub B}{sup {minus}}. The vibrational modes of the quinone in the Q{sub B} site are compared to those of ubiquinone in vitro, leading to band assignments for the C{double_bond}O and C{double_bond}C vibrations of the neutral Q{sub B} and for the C---O and C---C of the semiquinone. The C{double_bond}O frequency of each of the carbonyls of the unlabeled quinone is revealed at 1641 cm{sup {minus}1} for both species. This demonstrates symmetrical and weak hydrogen bonding of the two C{double_bond}O groups to the protein at the Q{sub B} site. In contrast, the C{double_bond}C vibrations are not equivalent for selective labeling at C{sub 1} or at C{sub 4}, although they both contribute to the {approximately}1611-cm{sup {minus}1} band in the Q{sub B}{sup {minus}}/Q{sub B} spectra of the two species. Compared to the vibrations of isolated ubiquinone, the C{double_bond}C mode of Q{sub B} does not involve displacement of the C{sub 4} carbon atom, while the motion of C{sub 1} is not hindered. Further analysis of the spectra suggests that the protein at the binding site imposes a specific constraint on the methoxy and/or the methyl group proximal to the C{sub 4} carbonyl. 49 refs., 5 figs.

Breton, J.; Berger, G.; Nabedryk, E. [SBE/DBCM and SMM/DBCM, CEA-Saclay (France)] [and others

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

CX-010387: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Categorical Exclusion Determination 87: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010387: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Geotechnical Investigation of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Detector Site in South Dakota CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03/27/2013 Location(s): South Dakota Offices(s): Fermi Site Office The purpose of this project is to provide geotechnical monitoring information for the proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment surface detector in Lead, South Dakota. The proposed action would consist of a geotechnical investigation comprised of drilling up to 20 boreholes with an outside diameter of 6 inches within an area of approximately 10 acres. CX-010387.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010389: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010395: Categorical Exclusion Determination

335

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility in an Underground Mine in the Keweenaw Basalts Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies is necessary in preparation for future commercial deployment. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCUS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training

336

The DOD Siting Clearinghouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The DoD Siting Clearinghouse The DoD Siting Clearinghouse Dave Belote Director, Siting Clearinghouse Office of the Secretary of Defense The Nexus of National Security & Renewable Energy * Unintended Consequences - Rapid development of renewable technologies - Rapidly changing military technology research & development * Existing Policy and Processes - Not up to date with changing technologies - Land use decision-making authorities fragmented across all levels of government 2 From Nellis to Shepherds Flat: Congressional Push for Action 3 Congressional Response - FY2011 NDAA, Section 358 * Section 358 "Study Of Effects Of New Construction Of Obstructions On Military Installations And Operations" - Integrated review process - 180-day backlog assessment

337

Princeton Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Ofice Princeton Site Ofice P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 TO: Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel JA N Z Q= LMN N= SUBJECT: PRINCETON SITE OFFICE (PSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451.1B Change 3, NEPA Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Oficer and Head of Field Organization to submit an Annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Coun. s el. We have reviewed

338

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MONTICELLO NPL SITES MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 - December 31, 2007 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems that have not been addressed. (inspection checklists attached). * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems continue to operate at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository leachate collection and removal system (LCRS) and leachate collection system (LDS) continue to operate at normal and acceptable levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Portions of repository cover were planted with rabbitbrush seedlings to repair areas

339

Site Map - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Site Map Page Content Pantex.com Mission & Strategies Mission National Security Nuclear Explosive Operations Nuclear Material Operations HE Operations Strategies Advance HE Center of Excellence Exemplify a High Reliability Organization Health & Safety Safety Training Occupational Medicine Contractor Safety Environment Environmental Projects & Operations Regulatory Compliance Waste Operations Environmental Management System Environmental Document Library Public Meetings Doing Business With Pantex Procurement How We Buy Subcontracting Opportunities Supplier Information Profile Suspect/Counterfiet Items Business Definitions Documents and Forms Accounts Payable Work for Others Our Capabilities How to do Business with the Pantex eXMC Employee Information Benefits

340

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin SiteInstruments Darwin SiteInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Darwin, Australia [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols, Radiometric Browse Data [ Single installation ] DISDROMETER Impact Disdrometer Surface Meteorology Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Single installation ] GNDRAD Ground Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation Radiometric Browse Plots

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

TWP Darwin Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin Site Darwin Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Darwin Site Location: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53' 29.75" E Altitude: 29.9 meters The third TWP climate research facility was established in April 2002 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The facility is situated adjacent to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Meteorological Office near Darwin International Airport. Darwin was chosen because it meets the scientific goal of the ARM Program, providing a unique set of climate regimes that are not seen at the other TWP facilities. Annually, Darwin

342

TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

343

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard for the Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy 1 Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program A Site Lead is an individual, normally at a senior General Schedule (GS) level or Excepted Service, who is assigned the responsibility to assess and evaluate management systems, safety and health programs, and technical activities associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Typically, a Site Lead has previously qualified as a Nuclear Safety Specialist or a Senior Technical Safety Manager. For exceptionally qualified individuals,

344

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

345

ARM - TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

346

Dzhanybek Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DZH-1: Termite mound at the Dzhanybek grassland site, Kazakhstan. (Prof. Roman Zlotin is demonstrating the internal structure of the mound, which has been cut open with a shovel....

347

EERE: Web Site Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for Federal Public Web Sites. To learn more about EERE, visit...

348

Maryland Web Site Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Website M a r y l a n d Web site Introduction The University Of Maryland 2005 Solar Decathlon Team has created a website to inform the public about solar living, establish an...

349

Moss Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moss Web Sites Name: Barbara Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I would like some on-line information about using various mosses in gardens - or pointers to other...

350

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU/LB basis. By 2004, overall progress had slowed, energy consumption increased slightly, and area results were mixed. It was time to shake things up with a new perspective. A coordinated site energy program was launched. In 2005, the first full year of the unified program, the site saved $6.9 MM from energy reduction projects. The rate of improvement is accelerating in 2006 with $3.6 MM in energy projects being implemented in the first four months.

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EERE: Web Site Policies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Web Site Policies The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for...

352

Nylsvley Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image NLS-1: Typical view of fine-leaved savanna at the Nylsvley study site, South Africa. (Dominant trees are Acacia tortilis. Photograph taken 1997 by Dr. R.J. Scholes, CSIR,...

353

Kade Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

growth at the Kade tropical forest site, Ghana. (typically, the area would now be ready for burning and planting. Photograph taken 1958 by Dr. P.H. Nye, Beckley, Oxon., UK...

354

Matador Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTD-1: Field work in progress at the Matador grassland site, Saskatchewan, Canada. (The sample plots were located between 1.0 and 2.4 km from this point, on flat topography....

355

ParaSITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paraSITE proposes the appropriation of exterior ventilation systems on existing architecture to inflate pneumatic shelters that are designed for homeless people. This project involves the production of a series of inflatable ...

Rakowitz, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monticello Monticello Agreement Name Monticello (Utah) Site: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility Agreement Pursuant to CERCLA Section 120, December 22, 1988 State Utah Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site Parties DOE; US EPA; State of Utah Department of Environmental Health Date 12/22/1988 SCOPE * Identify Interim Remedial Action (IRA) alternatives, if any, which are appropriate at the Site prior to the implementation of final remedial actions for the Site. * Evaluate all past investigative and response actions taken at the Site and documented

357

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Remediation Progress Toward Closure of Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office assess the environmental impacts that resulted from atmospheric and underground nuclear tests conducted from 1951 to 1992 on the Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range (which includes the Tonopah Test Range). The goal is to protect public health and the environment through investigations and corrective actions. The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), established in 1996 between the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense, serves as the cleanup agreement for the Environmental Restoration activities and provides the framework for identifying, prioritizing, investigating, remediating, and monitoring contaminated sites. This agreement satisfies the corrective action requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. To ensure efficiency in managing these corrective actions, the sites are grouped according to location, physical and geological characteristics, and/or contaminants. These groups, called corrective action units, are prioritized based on potential risk to workers and the public, available technology, future land use, agency and stakeholder concerns, and other criteria. Environmental Restoration activities include: Industrial Sites, Soils, and Underground Test Area. Nearly 15 years have passed since the FFACO was established, and during this time, more than 3,000 sites have been identified as requiring investigation or corrective actions. To date, approximately 1,945 sites have been investigated and closed through no further action, clean closure, or closure in place. Another 985 sites are currently being investigated or are in the remediation phase, leaving approximately 80 contaminated sites yet to be addressed.

Patrick Matthews (N-I) and Robert Boehlecke (NSO)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

NSA-Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-Fen) NSA-Fen) The Fen from the air, looking North. You can see the boardwalk, the hut, and the size of the bog. The road (Highway 391) is visible at the top. The round "crater" near the base of the boardwalk on the right is a collapsed palsa. View an aerial photo-map of the NSA-Fen site. The ground cover on the Fen itself The hut and flux tower The Fen site from the shore looking toward the hut The Fen site flux tower The boardwalk in the Fen, looking back at the shore The generator shed and the storage tent The NSA-Fen site from the air during IFC-2. Top of image is to Southeast. The NSA-Fen site in September (IFC-3) 1994 looking to the southeast. The tower is at the end of the boardwalk in right center of image with the hut near the center. The boardwalk connects to the far border at left center of the slide. Note that the tamarack (deciduous evergreen) within the fen has its fall colors.

359

SSA Mixed Canopy Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) The TE canopy tower The mixed trees Terrestrial Ecology canopy access tower at the SSA mixed coniferous/deciduous site. A picture taken looking down from the TE canopy access tower at the SSA mixed auxiliary site, showing the aspen and spruce canopies. Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help | User Services - Tel: +1 (865) 241-3952 or E-mail: uso@daac.ornl.gov

360

IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 7, 2008 IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES Plan won't impact DOE commitment to removing all stored waste from Idaho Site Idaho's Advanced Mixed Waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Department of Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTHORTHESIS TITLE SUPERVISOR(S) 2007 Weerasekara, LalindaResponse of buried natural gas pipelines subjected/J. Howie 2004 Anderson, C.Response of Buried Polyethylene Natural Gas Pipelines Subjected to Lateral Ground of Numerical Models Simulating Centrifuge Tests D. Wijewickreme 2003 Khan, A. S.Experimental Study

Laval, Bernard

362

ARM - Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSite Index govSite Index Expand | Collapse Site Index Videos Image Library About ARM About ARM (home) ARM and the Recovery Act ARM and the Recovery Act (home) ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Instruments ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) (home) ARM Education and Outreach Efforts Support IPY Research Support for International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Organization ARM Organization (home) Laboratory Partners ARM Safety Policy ARM Science Board ARM Science Board (home) Board Business Become a User Comments and Questions Contacts Contacts (home) ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts Facility Statistics Facility Statistics (home) Historical Field Campaign Statistics

363

Princeton Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Office Princeton Site Office P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 JAN 18 2012 To: Timothy G. Lynch , Acting General Counsel Subject: Princeton Site Office (PSO) 2012 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451 .1 B Change 2, NEPA Compliance Program , requires each Secretarial Officer and Head of Field Organization to submit an annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Counsel. We have reviewed your associated December 5, 2011 , memorandum and in consultation with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) staff determined that we have no Environmental Impacts Statements or Environmental Assessments either ongoing or forecast for the next 12 to 24 months. If you have any questions or need additional information

364

Former Sites Restoration. Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

@j&s* **$r* :. .+:., @j&s* **$r* :. .+:., II' .,.. I .&i. , :"': T.1 . i *&+t&&., @i i -:.+; L I. * . . .p.isit-!'..r'ir~i _, +.&.., . I. :?I,?.* .L,! j?' aa&* pi 4 L', ..b,- ., .e /w.1( ,v_.c ~A&$?>*:, ,..:.' .1 > . . . . . *. ,.. .I., .( j .~.~:,;;,.".,Certificafion ,Dockef for The ;,il' t:i~>$:+-.. ~~y:Remeciial Action. Performed "' . ::;:cxcgt the @+zb Gate Site in . ;' ! ,Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 7.99 7- 7 992 -.. Department .of Energy Former Sites Restoration. Division . ,Oak Ridge Operations .Office _. February 7 994 @ Printed on recycledhcy&ble paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ELZA GAP SITE IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE, 1991-1992 FEBRUARY 1994 I Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

365

Manhattan Project: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SITE MAP SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 1942: Difficult Choices More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943

366

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

쭺-¶ 쭺-¶ Particle Physics Education Sites ¡]¥H¤U¬°¥~¤åºô¯¸¡^ quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top Introduction: The Particle Adventure - an interactive tour of particle physics for everyone: the basics of theory and experiment. Virtual Visitor Center of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Guided Tour of Fermilab, - overviews of several aspects of Particle Physics. Also check out Particle Physics concepts. Probing Particles - a comprehensive and straight-forward introduction to particle physics. Big Bang Science - approaches particle physics starting from the theoretical origin of the universe.

367

Microsoft Word - Site Selection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection Selection One of the very first tasks of General Leslie Groves and the Manhattan Project in early 1943 was to locate and acquire sites in the United States where uranium and plutonium could be produced, as well as a site where the atomic bomb actually would be constructed. Production of uranium and plutonium required vast amounts of power. Thus, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington, were chosen because of proximity to major rivers. Oak Ridge could draw on the power of the hydroelectric plants on the Tennessee River. Hanford could use the power from the Columbia River. The cold waters of the Columbia also could be used to cool the plutonium production reactors at Hanford. A third site, with

368

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of Clouds) - AMF2 Single installation AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Data Single installation AOSMET Meteorological Measurements associated...

369

Summary Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Report Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011 ANL-12/02 (Summary) Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

370

Berkeley Lab: Educational Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Sites Educational Sites The Center for Science & Engineering Education (CSEE) Berkeley Lab's Center for Science & Engineering Education (CSEE) carries out the Department of Energy's education mission to train the next generation of scientists, as well as helping them to gain an understanding of the relationships among frontier science, technology, and society. CSEE supports science literacy in the community and nationally through a broad range of programs from elementary school to undergraduate and graduate education, including internships, mentoring, school workshops and summer research programs for teachers. Through its broad range of programs, CSEE serves as the center for Berkeley Lab's science education efforts, developing partnerships with schools, government agencies, and non-profit

371

PPPL Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on?site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non?radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non?radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories – QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the “Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011,” are documented and certified to be correct.

Virginia Finley, Robeert Sheneman and Jerry Levine

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

SSA Young Jack Pine Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-YJP site. Beginning of the "flagged path" to the tower, from the road The "new trail" to the YJP site, looking towards the site The hut and...

373

WCI | Cutting-Edge Facilities | Site 300 Experimental Test Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site 300 Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) What is Site 300? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 is an experimental test site operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. It is situated on 7,000 acres in rural foothills approximately six miles southwest of downtown Tracy and 15 miles southeast of Livermore. Site 300 was established in 1955 as a non-nuclear explosives test facility to support Livermore Laboratory's national security mission. The site gets its name from the early days of Lawrence Livermore, when the main laboratory was called Site 200 and the test facility was Site 300 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was Site 100). Today, work at Site 300

374

Indoor Sampler Siting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Sampler Siting Indoor Sampler Siting Title Indoor Sampler Siting Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Sohn, Michael D., and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms Conference Location Busan, Korea Abstract Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response is taken. U.S. Federal and local agencies are implementing programs to place air-monitoring samplers in buildings to quickly detect biological agents. We describe a probabilistic algorithm for siting samplers in order to detect accidental or intentional releases of biological material. The algorithm maximizes the probability of detecting a release from among a suite of realistic scenarios. The scenarios may differ in any unknown, for example the release size or location, weather, mode of building operation, etc. The algorithm also can optimize sampler placement in the face of modeling uncertainties, for example the airflow leakage characteristics of the building, and the detection capabilities of the samplers. In anillustrative example, we apply the algorithm to a hypothetical 24-room commercial building, finding optimal networks for a variety of assumed sampler types and performance characteristics. We also discuss extensions of this work for detecting ambient pollutants in buildings, and for understanding building-wide airflow, pollutant dispersion, and exposures

375

Site Map | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Map Site Map Print page Print page Email page Email page Home About Site Map Contact Us Search STIP For DOE Program Managers/Project Officers Contracting Officers and Contract Specialists Investigators / Authors DOE and Major Site Contractors University or R&D and Other Contracts DOE STI Program Reps STI Managers Technical Information Officers STI Releasing Officials Roles and Responsibilities OSTI DOE Element STI Managers Technical Information Officers Mandates and Guidance DOE Order 241.1B DOE Order 241.1A (Archived Version) STI-Related DOE Directives Laws, Policies, and Schedules Reference Acronyms and Initialisms Definitions STI Annnouncement Web Services Sponsoring Organizations STI Subject Categories ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus What Is STI? STI Defined Types of STI What Is NOT STI?

376

NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS). ... The URL for the NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS) is: https://www-s.nist.gov/niwsapp. ...

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

2012 BNL Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Reports Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, Environment,...

378

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease Stanford Center for Tuberculosis Research-Site Links http://molepi.stanford.edu/tblinks.html Virology on the World Wide Web http://www.idsociety.org/ file:///C|/Program%20Files/Adobe/Adobe%20Dreamweav...nks/Web%20Sites%20about%20Infectious%20Disease

de Lijser, Peter

379

Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program, the "Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application" was initially published in March 1993. It served as a roadmap and tool for applicant use in developing detailed siting plans to support an ESP application. This revision has been prepared to update the site selection process and criteria to reflect current regulatory requirements. The updated Guide also addresses the impact of significant changes in...

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

ACCP web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACCP Datasets Available ACCP - The Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP) was an investigation to determine the theoretical and empirical basis for remote sensing of nitrogen...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geotechnical site investigations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 February 2011 Livermore Site Office Safety Basis Self-Assessment This site visit report documents the collective results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) assessment of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) Livermore Site Office (LSO) safety basis processes and discusses its scope, objective, results and conclusions. Appendix A provides lists of the documents, interviews, and observations and Appendix B includes the plan for the review. The assessment was sponsored by LSO as a self-assessment and conducted jointly by HSS and LSO staff. It was completed in late 2010 and included site visits from November 29 - December

382

Investigation of 5 MOL% YSZ Electrolyte for SOFC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Investigation of 5 MOL% YSZ Electrolyte for SOFC. Author(s), Nilufer Evcimen, Ahmet Ekerim. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Nilufer Evcimen.

383

Technology Transfer: Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map About Us About Technology Transfer Contact Us Available Technologies Advanced Materials Biofuels Biotechnology and Medicine Developing World Energy Environmental Technologies Imaging and Lasers Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Nanotechnology and Microtechnology Software and Information Technology For Industry Licensing Overview Frequently Asked Questions Partnering with Berkeley Lab Licensing Interest Form Receive New Tech Alerts For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Forms Record of Invention (Word doc -- please do not use earlier PDF version of the form) Software Disclosure and Abstract (PDF, use Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader 9 and up ONLY to complete the form) Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Empolyment Export Control FAQs for Researchers

384

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SITE SITE NAME: /+%&'&&c /-i-QS~,~~-L ALTERNATE ------------ -------------------------- NAME: - -------------------___ C 1 T-f: -~~~~~L--~-----_--___,TATE: '"' y-/ OWNER ('=I B-----Z- Past: L?!lc~i&~~~~-~-~ Cut-rent: - Owner cnntacted q yes q:no; i,f yes, dats-c~~Fact,d------------- TYPE OF OPESATION ---------m-L----- @Research & Develapment & Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale a bnch scale ~~~~~~~ 0 Theoretical Studies G Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production G Disposal/Storage Manufacturing University Research Organization Government Sponsored Facility llther +r.PfTzK-- --------------------- TYPZ OF CONTRACT ~~__----__------ q Prime E SubccntractkrT u&lv.$Ch,ck>b 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information

385

NDB Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site map NDB Home Search Structures Search DNA Search RNA Advanced Search Nucleic acid tools RNA 3D motif atlas Non-redundant lists RNA base triples atlas WebFR3D R3D Align Contact NDB Mailing Address About NDB NDB Members Goal References Publications Site map Tools Software Standards Standard Reference Supplementary Information Ideal Geometries X-PLOR Parameters Valence Geometries RNA Ontology Consortium mmCIF Resources PDBML Resources Education Introduction to Nucleic Acids: DNA Definition of terms RNA Base Pair Families RNA Base-Phosphate Families Base Stacking Interactions Non Redundant list Equivalence classes RNA 3D Motifs Relative Frequency Introduction to Nucleic Acids: RNA Nucleic Acid Highlight (PDB): DNA DNA Polymerase Nucleosome Transfer RNA RNA Polymerase Self-splicing RNA

386

AshtabulaSite.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ashtabula, Ohio, Site comprises 42.5 acres of Ashtabula, Ohio, Site comprises 42.5 acres of privately owned land adjacent to the city of Ashtabula, about 55 miles east of Cleveland. From 1962 to 1988 Reactive Metals Inc. (RMI) operated a facility on the property that manufactured metallic uranium tubes and rods and experimental quantities of thorium metal for use in the Hanford, Washington; and Savannah River, Georgia, weapons program reactors. The facility operated under contract to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agency the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). RMI also extruded depleted uranium under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and extruded nonradioactive materials, primarily copper-based, for the private sector. RMI once operated a small wastewater evaporation pond near the northern boundary of the plant area for

387

Transmission Siting_071508.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordinating Interstate Electric Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate The National Council on Electricity Policy 2 DISCLAIMER: The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the authors and may not necessarily agree with the positions of the National Council on Electricity Policy, its committ ee members or the organizations they represent, the National Council funders, or those who commented on the paper during its draft ing. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate was prepared with the fi nancial assistance of a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Electricity Delivery

388

PNNL: Site index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Index Site Index # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # # 3-D Body Holographic Scanner # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Alerts - PNNL Staff Information Applied Geology and Geochemistry Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity (External website) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Division Available Technologies Awards Awards - Science and Engineering External Recognition (SEER) Program # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z B Battelle Corporate Contributions Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle Offices (addresses) Benefits (Insurance Forms, Savings Plan) Bio-Based Product Research at PNNL Biological & Environmental Research-Proteomics

389

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

graphs and more worldwide NPP datasets graphs and more worldwide NPP datasets Graphs of biomass dyanmics and climate data for grassland sites have been added to the global terrestrial Net Primary Production (NPP) reference database at the ORNL DAAC. The NPP database has been compiled by Dick Olson and Jonathan Scurlock under the auspices of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and funding from the Terrestrial Ecology Program of NASA's Office of Earth Science. Browsing through the graphs will help users to select data of interest, and to see relationships between grassland biomass changes and driving climate variables such as rainfall. Graphs are presently available for 14 of the 31 grassland sites. In addition, two more well-known worldwide datasets are available for browsing and downloading from the ORNL DAAC's NPP Web pages. The Osnabruck

390

NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:i" :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d ,,,, ;<:x,, Prepared for the 3 I. Office of Environmental Restoration I, U.S. Department of Energy i gy i. ~: ,,, "! ? ' :' : "' ,//, FINAL REPORT ".$ :,a ,,, MARCH 1995 ; m L ,, ,, ,,,. ., ,,. ' 1 jq ,Ij:,., .,~ _,I_ 1 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the

391

Site Operator Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

Warren, J.F.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Site Operator Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

Warren, J.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Site Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management December 2013 LMS/S07225 This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Site Sustainability Plan December 2013 Doc. No. S07225 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii I. Executive Summary ...............................................................................................................1 II. Performance Review and Plan Narrative ...............................................................................9 1 GHG Reduction and Comprehensive GHG Inventory ...........................................................9

394

1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL