Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Geosynthetic clay liners subjected to differential settlement  

SciTech Connect

Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs), which consist of a thin layer of bentonite attached to one or more geosynthetic materials, are receiving increased use as low-permeability barrier layers in waste-containment systems. Tests were performed in tanks to measure the hydraulic conductivity of GCLs that were subjected to differential settlement. In most cases the GCLs maintained a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s or less when subjected to tensile strains of 1{minus}> 10%, depending on the material and test conditions. Overlapped GCL panels maintained their hydraulic integrity despite in-plane slippage of up to 25--100 mm. In general, the ability of GCLs to withstand differential settlement appears to be greater than that of compacted clay liners, but less than that of geomembranes. GCLs are a promising barrier material for situations in which differential settlement is expected, for example, in landfill final covers.

LaGatta, M.D. [Golder Associates, Mt. Laurel, NJ (United States); Boardman, B.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Cooley, B.H. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydraulic conductivity of desiccated geosynthetic clay liners  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale tests were performed to determine the effect of a cycle of wetting and drying on the hydraulic conductivity of several geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). The GCLs were covered with 0.6 m of pea gravel and permeated with water. After steady seepage had developed, the water was drained away, and the GCL was desiccated by circulating heated air through the overlying gravel. The drying caused severe cracking in the bentonite component of the GCLs. The GCLs were again permeated with water. As the cracked bentonite hydrated and swelled, the hydraulic conductivity slowly decreased from an initially high value. The long-term, steady value of hydraulic conductivity after the wetting and drying cycle was found to be essentially the same as the value for the undesiccated GCL. It is concluded that GCLs possess the ability to self-heal after a cycle of wetting and drying, which is important for applications in which there may be alternate wetting and drying of a hydraulic barrier (e.g. within a landfill final cover).

Boardman, B.T. [CH2M Hill, Oakland, CA (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hydraulic Conductivity of Geosynthetic Clay Liners to Coal Combustion Product Leachates: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic conductivity tests are being conducted on geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) using solutions representing leachates observed in disposal facilities for coal combustion products (CCPs). Five different GCL products that are commercially available within the United States are being tested: two containing conventional sodium bentonite (NaB), two containing polymer-modified bentonite (PMB), and one with a bentonite polymer composite (BPC). Testing to date has been conducted by direct permeation ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

Rate of flow of leachate through clay soil liners  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the research was to measure the time of travel (TOT) of inorganic solutes through laboratory columns of compacted clay, to determine the physical and geochemical parameters that controlled solute transport through the soil columns, and to compare measured and predicted TOT's. Two clay soils were used: kaolinite (a low-plasticity, commercially-produced clay) and Lufkin clay (a highly plastic, naturally-occurring clay soil). Anionic tracers were chloride and bromide; potassium and zinc were the cationic tracers. Diffusion cells were designed, constructed, and used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient of the tracers in the two soils. Diffusion coefficients for anions were typically 0.000002 to 0.000007 sq cm/s; somewhat lower values were determined for cations. Column tests showed that the effective porosity ratio (defined as effective divided by total porosity) increased with increasing hydraulic gradient in kaolinite from a low of about 0.25 at a gradient of 1 to a high of 1 at a gradient of 20. With Lufkin clay, the effective porosity ratio was between 0.02 and 0.16. Breakthrough times were controlled much more by the low effective porosities than by molecular diffusion. The computer program SOILINER predicted times of travel that were larger than actual TOT's by a factor of up to 52. The failure to account for effective porosity ratios less than 1 was the cause for the poor predictions from SOILINER.

Daniel, D.E.; Shackelford, C.D.; Liao, W.P.; Liljestrand, H.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Interaction of Uranium Mill Tailings Leachate with Soils and Clay Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates leachate-soil interactions that will take place at the Morton Ranch for certain disposal alternatives. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the following: 1) physical and chemical characteristics of geologic materials from the Morton Ranch. 2) physical and chemical characteristics of acid leach tailings and tallings solution, 3) leaching tests with selected tailings materials and leach solutions to evaluate the leachability of contaminants with time under specific disposal alternatives, 4) adsorption studies measuring the sorption characteristics of heavy metals and radionuclides on the geologic materials at Morton Ranch, 5) clay liner stability tests to evaluate effects of acid leachate on clay mineralogy and clay permeability.

Gee, G. W.; Campbell, A. C.; Sherwood, D. R.; Strickert, R. G.; Phillips, S. J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Clay  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clay Clay Nature Bulletin No. 435-A November 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CLAY When Nebuchadnezzar was king of Babylon in the 6th century B.C., messages were sent and records kept by writing on little pillow-shaped tablets of soft wet clay. They were baked in the sun. Those clay tablets are still found by the thousands in ruins of ancient cities excavated in that dry climate. The Babylonians also sun-dried bricks of clay and straw for building, as the Israelites did during their captivity in Egypt. This process spread to Spain and Mexico and our American Southwest. Called "adobe", in regions with little rainfall it has the advantages of being cheap, fireproof, cool in summer and warm in winter.

7

Slow liner fusion  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

Shaffer, M.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Interaction between reinforcing geosynthetics and soil-tire chip mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of tire chips and soil-tire chip mixtures relevant to geosynthetic-reinforced earthworks. Tests were conducted to evaluate shear strength and pull-out capacity with a woven geotextile and two geogrids. Soil-tire chip mixtures made with clean sand and sandy silt were tested. These properties were then used to assess the potential advantages of using soil-tire chip backfills for geosynthetic-reinforced retaining walls and embankments. The test results show that the geosynthetic pull-out force in tire chip and soil-tire chip backfills increases with displacement--i.e., no peak pull-out force is generally obtained, at least for displacements {le}100 mm. Pull-out interaction coefficients for the chip backfills are typically greater than 1, whereas for soil-tire chip backfills are typically greater than 1, whereas for soil-tire chip backfills they typically range between 0.2 and 0.7, even though the pull-out capacity for soil-tire chip backfills is generally similar to or greater than the pull-out capacity in a soil backfill. The higher strength, lower unit weight and good backfill-geosynthetic interaction obtained with soil-tire chip backfills can result in walls requiring less geosynthetic reinforcement than walls backfilled with soil. In addition, embankments can potentially be constructed with steeper slopes and a smaller volume of material when soil-tire chip fill is used, while providing greater resistance against lateral sliding and foundation settlement.

Tatlisoz, N. [International United Consultants, Inc., Istanbul (Turkey); Edil, T.B.; Benson, C.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of compaction grade at Proctor energy. This compaction was executed using a Bosch pneumatic hammer model GSH 11E as targets for a laser measurement device (Figure 6b). These wires were connected at two different points ­ 10000 manufactured by EMIC Ltda., Brazil; a load cell; and a pneumatic grip, to which the geosynthetic

Zornberg, Jorge G.

10

Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium amy accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRe computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities.

Jeppson, D.W.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Elastomer liners for geothermal tubulars Y267 EPDM Liner Program:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The elastomer, Y267 EPDM, has been identified as a hydrothermally stable material which can operate at temperatures in excess of 320/sup 0/C. The goal of the Y267 Liner Program was to demonstrate the feasibility of using this material as a liner for mild steel tubulars to prevent or mitigate corrosion. If successful, the usage of EPDM lined pipe by the geothermal community may have a significant impact on operating costs and serve as a viable alternative to the use of alloyed tubulars. Tooling procedures were developed under this program to mold a 0.64 cm (0.25'') thick Y267 EPDM liner into a tubular test section 61 cm (2') in length and 19.1 cm (7.5'') in diameter (ID). A successful effort was made to identify a potential coupling agent to be used to bond the elastomer to the steel tubular wall. This agent was found to withstand the processing conditions associated with curing the elastomer at 288/sup 0/C and to retain a significant level of adhesive strength following hydrothermal testing in a synthetic brine at 260/sup 0/C for a period of 166 hours. Bonding tests were conducted on specimens of mild carbon steel and several alloys including Hastelloy C-276. An objective of the program was to field test the lined section of pipe mentioned above at a geothermal facility in the Imperial Valley. Though a test was conducted, problems encountered during the lining operation precluded an encouraging outcome. The results of the field demonstration were inconclusive. 6 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs

Hirasuna, A.R.; Davis, D.L.; Flickinger, J.E.; Stephens, C.A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fabrication of a Kevlar liner assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several liner assemblies were fabricated with Kevlar 49 and epoxy using various wet layup and prepreg processes. A production process, using prepreg material, was developed for fabricating the liner and a wet layup molding process was used to fabricate the Kevlar hat-shaped tunnels. Fabrication of the tunnels using Kevlar prepreg with an autoclave curving process was evaluated.

Schloman, A.H.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium may accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRE computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities. 1 ref., 10 figs.

Jeppson, D.W.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Natural clay-shredded tire mixtures as landfill barrier materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A natural overconsolidated fissured clay, Keuper Marl, was mixed with shredded tire, 1--4 and 4--8 mm angular size particles, in weight percentages between 6 and 15%, and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, stress-strain behavior, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, free swell behavior and swelling pressure. The results showed that the compacted dry density reduced solely due to the lighter weight of the tire and the unconfined compressive strength of the mixture was as low 40% of the strength of the clay alone. In stress-strain behavior the clay-tire mixtures produced a prolonged strain range at failure of roughly double that observed for the clay alone. The permeability to paraffin was reduced by more than 50 times compared to that of water. The leachability results showed different leached levels of copper and nickel from the NRA and TCLP leaching tests which will need to be assessed in relation to appropriate standards. Paraffin caused considerable swelling of the clay-tire mixtures compared to the clay alone and caused the development of swelling pressures of up to 600 kPa. Combinations of the various test results will need to be assessed in relation to the design requirement of the specific landfill liner being designed.

Al-Tabbaa, A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering; Aravinthan, T. [Babtie Group, Croydon (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Liner target interaction experiments on Pegasus II  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics program uses capacitively driven low voltage, inductive-storage pulse power to implode cylindrical targets for hydrodynamics experiments. Once a precision driver liner was characterized an experimental series characterizing the aluminum target dynamics was performed. The target was developed for shock-induced quasi-particle ejecta experiments including holography. The concept for the Liner shock experiment is that the driver liner is used to impact the target liner which then accelerates toward a collimator with a slit in it. A shock wave is set up in the target liner and as the shock emerges from the back side of the target liner, ejecta are generated. By taking a laser hologram the particle distribution of the ejecta are hoped to be determined. The goal for the second experimental series was to characterize the target dynamics and not to measure and generate the ejecta. Only the results from the third shot, Pegasus II-26 fired April 26th, 1994, from the series is discussed in detail. The second experimental series successfully characterized the target dynamics necessary to move forward towards the planned quasi-ejecta experiments.

Hockaday, M.P.; Chrien, R.E.; Bartsch, R. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Influence of atomic processes on the implosion of plasma liners  

SciTech Connect

The influence of atomic physics processes on the implosion of plasma liners for magneto-inertial nuclear fusion has been investigated numerically by using the method of front tracking in spherically symmetric geometry and equation of state models accounting for dissociation and ionization. Simulation studies of the self-collapse of argon liners to be used in the Los Alamos Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) program have been performed as well as studies of implosion of deuterium and argon liners on plasma targets. Results show that atomic processes in converging liners reduce the temperature of liners and increase the Mach number that results in the increase of the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain. For deuterium and argon liners imploding on plasma targets, dissociation and ionization increased the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain by the factor of 1.5 (deuterium) and 2 (argon) correspondingly. Similarly, ionization during the self-collapse of argon liners leads to approximately doubling of the Mach number and the stagnation pressure. The influence of the longitudinal density spread of the liner has also been investigated. The self-collapse stagnation pressure decreased by the factor of 8.7 when the initial position of the liner was shifted from the merging radius (33 cm) to the PLX chamber edge (137.2 cm). Simulations with and without the heat conduction demonstrated that the heat conduction has negligible effect on the self-collapse pressure of argon liners.

Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang Lina [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Samulyak, Roman [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Computational Science Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reservoir compaction loads on casings and liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure drawdown due to production from a reservoir causes compaction of the reservoir formation which induces axial and radial loads on the wellbore. Reservoir compaction loads increase during the production life of a well, and are greater for deviated wells. Presented here are casing and liner loads at initial and final pressure drawdowns for a particular reservoir and at well deviation angles of 0 to 45 degrees.

Wooley, G.R.; Prachner, W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Modified clay sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

Fogler, H. Scott (Ann Arbor, MI); Srinivasan, Keeran R. (Livonia, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

LIQUID BUTANE FILLED LOAD FOR A LINER DRIVEN PEGASUS EXPERIMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen rich, low density liquid, contained within the internal volume of a cylindrical liner, was requested of the Polymers and Coatings Group (MST-7) of the Los Alamos Materials Science Division for one of the last liner driven experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus facility. The experiment was a continuation of the Raleigh-Taylor hydrodynamics series of experiments and associated liners that have been described previously [1,2].

M.A. SALAZAR; W. ANDERSON; ET AL

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Liquid butane filled load for a liner driven Pegasus experiment.  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen rich, low density liquid, contained within the internal volume of a cylindrical liner, was requested of the Polymers and Coatings Group (MST-7) of the Los Alamos Materials Science Division for one of the last liner driven experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus facility. The experiment (Fig.1) was a continuation of the Raleigh-Taylor hydrodynamics series of experiments and associated liners that have been described previously.

Salazar, M. A. (Mike A.); Armijo, E. V. (Elfino V.); Anderson, W. E. (Wallace E.); Atchison, W. L. (Walter L.); Bartos, J. J. (Jacob J.); Garcia, F. (Fermin); Randolph, B. (Blaine); Sheppard, M. G. (Maurice G.); Stokes, J. L. (John L.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Liner hanger assembly with setting tool  

SciTech Connect

A setting tool and liner hanger for setting a liner in a well bore traversing earth formations is described including: a tubular outer hanger member adapted for coupling to a depending liner, the outer hanger member having circumferentially disposed elongated slip openings, elongated slip members disposed in the slip openings for movement of the slip members from a first retracted position within the outer hanger member to an extended position in engagement with the wall of a well casing, a setting tool having a tubular inner member adapted for coupling to a drill string; hydraulic slip setting means for response to hydraulic pressure for producing a slip setting force and mechanical slip setting means for producing a slip setting force, the hydraulic slip setting means and the mechanical slip setting means being carried by the tubular inner member; coupling means for releasably coupling the tubular inner member to the outer hanger member. The slip setting means include an upper dog member and a lower dog member which are respectively connected to the hydraulic slip setting means and to the mechanical slip setting means wherein the dog members are movable longitudinally relative to the tubular member in response to a slip setting force for moving the slip members from the first retracted position to the extended position. The hydraulic slip setting means and the mechanical slip setting means for moving the upper and lower dog members respectively include selectively operable actuator means for selectively moving one of the dog members longitudinally relative to the tubular inner member and the outer hanger member.

Dockins, R.R. Jr.; Lindsey, H.E. Jr.

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Centralizers help reduce stuck casing, liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential sticking is one of the most common and costly problems in the drilling industry today. Most major operators have extensive company-wide programs to educate drilling teams on stuck pipe symptoms, prevention and remedies. The search for better engineering solutions to overcome stuck pipe is leading many drillers to use centralizers, not only to achieve good cementation, but also to run pipe easier. While a centralizer's moving and running forces tend to be somewhat suspicious for some, the drag force reductions they provide when running casing or liners are documented.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool GmbH, Langenhagen (Germany))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nondestructive evaluation of environmental barrier coatings in CFCC combustor liners.  

SciTech Connect

Advanced combustor liners fabricated of SiC/SiC continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) and covered with environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been successfully tested in Solar Turbines Inc. field engines. The primary goal for the CFCC/EBC liners is to reach a 30,000-h lifetime. Because the EBCs, when applied on the hot surfaces of liners, protect the underlying CFCC from oxidation damage, their performance is critical in achieving the lifetime goal. To determine CFCC/EBC liner condition and assess operating damage, the liners were subjected to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) during various processing stages, as well as before and after the engine test. The NDE techniques included pulsed infrared thermal imaging, air-coupled ultrasonic scanning, and X-ray computerized tomography. It was found that EBC damage and spallation depend on the condition of the CFCC material. The NDE results and correlations with destructive examination are discussed.

Sun, J. G.; Benz, J.; Ellingson, W. A.; Kimmel, J. B.; Price, J. R.; Energy Technology; Solar Turbines, Inc

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

High energy imploding liner experiment HEL-1: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect

Magnetically driven imploding liner systems can be used as a source of shock energy for materials equation of state studies, implosion driven magnetized plasma fusion experiments, and other similar applications. The imploding liner is a cylinder of conducting material through which a current is passed in the longitudinal direction. Interaction of the current with its own magnetic field causes the liner to implode. Sources of electrical energy for imploding liner systems are capacitor banks or explosive pulse power systems seeded by capacitor banks. In August, 1996, a high energy liner experiment (HEL-1) was conducted at the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia. A 5 tier 1 meter diameter explosive disk generator provided electrical energy to drive a 48 cm outside diameter, 4 mm thick, aluminum alloy liner having a mass of about 11kg onto an 11 cm diameter diagnostic package. The purpose of the experiment was to measure performance of the explosive pulse power generator and the heavy imploding liner. Electrical performance diagnostics included inductive (B-dot) probes, Faraday Rotation current measurement, Rogowski total current measurement, and voltage probes. Flux loss and conductor motion diagnostics included current-joint voltage measurements and motion sensing contact pins. Optical and electrical impact pins, inductive (B-dot) probes, manganin pressure probes, and continuously recording resistance probes in the Central Measuring Unit (CMU) and Piezo and manganin pressure probes, optical beam breakers, and inductive probes located in the glide planes were used as liner symmetry and velocity diagnostics. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that a peak current of more than 100 MA was attained and the liner velocity was between 6.7 km/sec and 7.5 km/sec. Liner kinetic energy was between 22 MJ and 35 MJ. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Clark, D.A.; Anderson, B.G.; Ekdahl, C.A. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

2005-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

2005-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Liners for ion transport membrane systems  

SciTech Connect

Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Miller, Christopher Francis (Macungie, PA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Liner Drilling Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liner Drilling Date: Liner Drilling Date: 4-5-10 DOE Code: 71092 Cont ractor Code: 8067-766 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview Nothing out of the ordinary for drilling an existing location 1. What are the environmental impacts? NE SW Sec 21 , T39N, R78W (45-3-X-21 well) 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately a week 4 . What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, Drilling Rig etc.)? Will Drill out of 9 5/8 caslng with liner drillng assembly. After drilling approximately 750 to 1000 ft, will test liner hanging assembly set and retrieve multiple times. The table b elow is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialis t and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey a

33

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nondestructive Evaluation: NDE for Tanks and Containment Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns of the government, regulators, and public about nuclear safety and groundwater contamination have compelled nuclear power plant operators to take active measures to ensure that tanks and containment liners are structurally sound and leak free. For tanks, verifying adequate structural integrity is required to safely and reliably store and transport radioactive materials, whereas for containment liners, structural integrity verification is required to enclose the primary ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

How to select an effective waste pit liner  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that the use of earthen pits is widespread in the oil and gas industry. These pits are used to contain produced water as well as waste fluids and solids from drilling activities. The pits contain a myriad of metals, salts, minerals and organic compounds. Sometimes, a pit liner may be needed to ensure the integrity of the earthen pit. The pit liner should act as an impervious barrier between the contained fluids and soil or ground water outside the pit. It is imperative to construct the pit and liner to prevent leakage of pit contents and consequent potential contamination of the surrounding environment. In the United States, the construction of oilfield pits and the need for pit liners is typically governed by state oil and gas regulatory requirements. Standards for the construction and composition of pit liners vary considerably from state to state. Thus, when choosing a pit liner or constructing an oilfield waste pit, it is important to determine the legal requirements applicable in the state where the pit is located.

Hinds, A.A.; Legget, L.H.; Liao, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wellbore instability mechanisms in clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigates the stability of wellbores drilled in Ko-consolidated clays using non-linear finite element method (FEM) and effective stress soil models to characterize the behavior of clay and unconsolidated ...

Akl, Sherif Adel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Five synthetic rubber pond liners protect against leakage and weather  

SciTech Connect

More than 137 million cu ft of pipeline quality gas is produced daily at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project in Beulah, ND. The facility is the only commercial plant in the US which produces gaseous and liquid fuels from low-grade coal. The plant needs to recycle and reuse 100% of the organic process wastewater, requiring a complicated treatment system of cooling towers, evaporators, a liquid waste incinerator and other units, each of which has its own surge pond. In total, the plant has five surge ponds which hold near 80 million gallons. To prevent the seepage of wastewater from the surge ponds into the ground water, a liner material was needed that would fulfill several design criteria. The liner had to be resistant to degradation caused by a very wide range of temperatures and it had to have a low coefficient of expansion. Resistance to both organic and inorganic chemical substances was another key requirement. Finally, the liner material needed to be easy to seam during field installation. An elastomeric membrane liner using the synthetic rubber and reinforcing polyester scrim best met the plant's requirements. One of the primary reasons for selecting synthetic rubber was its low coefficient of expansion. Extreme seasonal weather conditions, with temperatures ranging from below zero in the winter to over 100/sup 0/F in the summer, are common in North Dakota. And because the level of wastewater in the ponds constantly varies, a liner is frequently exposed to the elements. Overall, the synthetic rubber pond liners have performed through extreme weather conditions and have proven to be a cost-effective solution to wastewater storage at the gasification project.

Weinreich, G.; Hofsess, R.; Toy, D.A.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A simulation approach to the evaluation of operational costs and performance in liner shipping operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation model of the operation of a liner shipping network that considers multiple service routes and schedules. The objective is to evaluate the operational costs and performance associated with liner shipping, as well as the ...

Aldo A. McLean; William E. Biles

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Compatibility of Admix and Synthetic Liner Materials With Clean Coal Technology By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When designing effective liner systems for clean coal technology by-products, utilities need information on the liner materials most suitable for each type of waste by-product. This study has developed data on twenty admix and synthetic liner types for seven different by-product combinations.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

FFTF in-containment cell liner design and installation experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design features and liner construction techniques are discussed. Cell leak-rate tests and the methods used to locate and repair leaks are described. A brief analysis of the overall experience at FFTF is provided, with recommendations for future plant designs.

Umek, A.M.; Swenson, L.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Precision high energy liner implosion experiments PHELIX [1  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the hardware design of a small megajoule sized transformer coupled pulse power system utilized to drive hydrodynamic liner experiments with a nominal current capability of 10 megAmperes. The resulting liner velocities and characteristics provide properties of physics interest. The capacitor banks utilize the ''Atlas'' plastic cased 60 kV, 60 kJ capacitors [2] and railgaps [3]. The air insulated marx'S are configured to dive a multi-filar toroidal transformer. The 4:1 multi-filar toroidal transformer is mechanically part of a circular disc line and this feature results in an attractive inductance budget. Because of the compact size, re-usable transformer, and resulting low maintenance cost, shot rates can be high compared to other ''large'' machines or explosively driven hydrodynamic methods. The PHELIX modeling, construction status, and test results will also be provided.

Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy  

SciTech Connect

A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

Mentesana, Charles (Leawood, KS)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nondestructive Evaluation: Inspection Methods for Tanks and Containment Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns from the public, politicians, and regulators about nuclear safety and groundwater contamination have forced nuclear power plant operators to take proactive measures to ensure that tanks and containment liners are structurally sound and leak-free. This must be done in order to provide the anticipated integrity to contain the primary coolant system components in containment and store and transport radioactive material in tanks in a safe and reliable manner. This report addresses ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

Magnetized Target Fusion With Centimeter-Size Liner  

SciTech Connect

The author concentrates on the version of magnetized target fusion (MTF) that involves 3D implosions of a wall-confined plasma with the density in the compressed state {approx} 10{sup 21}-10{sup 22} cm{sup -3}. Possible plasma configurations suitable for this approach are identified. The main physics issues are outlined (equilibrium, stability, transport, plasma-liner interaction, etc). Specific parameters of the experiment reaching the plasma Q{approx}1 are presented (Q is the ratio of the fusion yield to the energy delivered to the plasma). It is emphasized that there exists a synergy between the physics and technology of MTF and dense Z-pinches (DZP). Specific areas include the particle and heat transport in a high-beta plasma, plasma-liner interaction, liner stability, stand-off problem for the power source, reaching a rep-rate regime in the energy-producing reactor, etc. Possible use of existing pulsed-power facilities for addressing these issues is discussed.

Ryutov, D

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fabrication of Machined and Shrink Fitted Impactor; Composite Liners for the Los Alamos HEDP Program  

SciTech Connect

Composite liners have been fabricated for the Los Alamos liner driven HEDP experiments using impactors formed by physical vapor deposition (PVD), electroplating, machining and shrink fitting. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been proposed for some ATLAS liner applications. This paper describes the processes used to fabricate machined and shrink fitted impactors which have been used for copper impactors in 1100 aluminum liners and 6061 T-6 aluminum impactors in 1100 aluminum liners. The most successful processes have been largely empirically developed and rely upon a combination of shrink fitted and light press fitting. The processes used to date will be described along with some considerations for future composite liners requirements in the HEDP Program.

Randolph, B.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Microsoft PowerPoint - LinerARRA2010YearlyReview23Feb2011.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Accounting University of Houston Presenter: Dr. Chris Liner, Dept. of Earth & Atm. Sciences Presenter: r. Chris iner, ept. of arth & Atm. Sciences February 24-26, 2011...

47

Development of improved performance refractory liner materials for slagging gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Refractory liners for slagging gasifiers used in power generation, chemical production, or as a possible future source of hydrogen for a hydrogen based economy, suffer from a short service life. These liner materials are made of high Cr2O3 and lower levels of Al2O3 and/or ZrO2. As a working face lining in the gasifier, refractories are exposed to molten slags at elevated temperature that originate from ash in the carbon feedstock, including coal and/or petroleum coke. The molten slag causes refractory failure by corrosion dissolution and by spalling. The Albany Research Center is working to improve the performance of Cr2O3 refractories and to develop refractories without Cr2O3 or with Cr2O3 content under 30 wt pct. Research on high Cr2O3 materials has resulted in an improved refractory with phosphate additions that is undergoing field testing. Results to date of field trials, along with research direction on refractories with no or low Cr2O3, will be discussed.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Powell, Cynthia; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fluid Resistance Analysis of Sand Control Slotted Liner with Compound Cavity Based on Fluent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slotted liners have been used for many years to provide sand control in many oil industry applications. They are commonly applied in reservoirs that produce high-viscosity oil from horizontal wells with unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. However, ... Keywords: slotted liner, newly-designed slot, Fluid resistance

Hang Li; Yonghong Liu; Jianmin Ma; Xinfang Wei

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Liner velocity, current, and symmetry measurements on the 32 MEGAMP flux compression generator experiment ALT-1  

SciTech Connect

A flux compression generator pulse power system, designed, built, and fielded by a Russian team at the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), was used to successfully drive an aluminum liner to velocities greater than 12 km/sec. The experiment objective was to demonstrate performance of a precision liner implosion at an Atlas current of 30 MA or greater. Diagnostics to measure liner performance were an essential part of the experiment. An experimental team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided a suite of diagnostics to measure liner performance. Three diagnostics were fielded: (1) A velocity interferometer (VISAR) to continuously measure the liner innersurface velocity throughout the entire range of travel, (2) Two Faraday rotation devices to measure liner current during the implosion, and, (3) Sixteen fiber optic impact pins to record liner impact time and provide axial and azimuthal symmetry information. All diagnostics performed very well. Major results are maximum current: 32.3 MA, velocity at impact: greater than 12 km/sec, symmetry: the impact pins indicated that the liner was smooth, solid, and axially symmetric upon arrival at the diagnostic package. The LANL team fabricated, installed, and recorded the three diagnostics presented here. All necessary equipment was brought to the site in Russia. The VNIIEF team fielded other diagnostics to measure machine performance. Results of machine diagnostics are reported in other presentations.

Anderson, B. G. (Brodie G.); Rodriguez, G. (George); Stokes, J. L. (John L.); Tabaka, L. J. (Leonard J.); Clark, D. A. (David A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hallosite Clay Nanotubes as Green Nanocontainers for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Coatings and Surface Treatments for Corrosion Protection. Presentation Title, Hallosite Clay Nanotubes as Green Nanocontainers for...

51

Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay  

SciTech Connect

Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

Ita, S.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy transfer through a multi-layer liner for shaped charges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the determination of parameters for selecting materials for use as liners in shaped charges to transfer the greatest amount of energy to the explosive jet. Multi-layer liners constructed of metal in shaped charges for oil well perforators or other applications are selected in accordance with the invention to maximize the penetrating effect of the explosive jet by reference to four parameters: (1) Adjusting the explosive charge to liner mass ratio to achieve a balance between the amount of explosive used in a shaped charge and the areal density of the liner material; (2) Adjusting the ductility of each layer of a multi-layer liner to enhance the formation of a longer energy jet; (3) Buffering the intermediate layers of a multi-layer liner by varying the properties of each layer, e.g., composition, thickness, ductility, acoustic impedance and areal density, to protect the final inside layer of high density material from shattering upon impact of the explosive force and, instead, flow smoothly into a jet; and (4) Adjusting the impedance of the layers in a liner to enhance the transmission and reduce the reflection of explosive energy across the interface between layers.

Skolnick, Saul (Albuquerque, NM); Goodman, Albert (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Development of a combustor liner composed of ceramic matrix composite (CMC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Research Institute of Advanced Materials Gas-Generator (AMG), which is a joint effort by the Japan Key Technology Center and 14 firms in Japan, has, since fiscal year 1992, been conducting technological studies on an innovative gas generator that will use 20% less fuel, weight 50% less, and emit 70% less NO{sub x} than the conventional gas generator through the use of advanced materials. Within this project, there is an R and D program for applying ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners to the combustor, which is a major component of the gas generator. In the course of R and D, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced SiC composite (SiC{sup F}/SiC) was selected as the most suitable CMD for the combustor liner because of its thermal stability and formability. An evaluation of the applicability of the SiC{sup F}/SiC composite to the combustor liner on the basis of an evaluation of its mechanical properties and stress analysis of a SiC{sup F}/SiC combustor liner was carried out, and trial SiC{sup F}/SiC combustor liners, the largest of which was 500-mm in diameter, were fabricated by the filament winding and PIP (polymer impregnation and pyrolysis) method. Using a SiC{sup F}/SiC liner built to the actual dimensions, a noncooling combustion test was carried out and even when the gas temperature was raised to 1873K at outlet of the liner, no damage was observed after the test. Through their studies, the authors have confirmed the applicability of the selected SiC{sup F}/SiC composite as a combustor liner. In this paper, the authors describe the present state of the R and D of a CMC combustor liner.

Nishio, K.; Igashira, K.I.; Take, K. [Research Inst. of Advanced Material Gas-Generator, Tokyo (Japan); Suemitsu, T. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Limited, Hyogo (Japan)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method and apparatus for monitoring the integrity of a geomembrane liner using time domain reflectometry  

SciTech Connect

Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

Morrison, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method and Apparatus for Monitoring the Integrity of a Geomembrane Liner using time Domain Reflectometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

Morris, John L.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

56

Dynamic Responses in Polymer-Clay Gels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... INTRODUCTION ... Under similar conditions a comparable pure clay solution or a pure ... P.; Nicolai, T.; Tassin, JF Journal of Colloid and Interface ...

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Stone, Clay, and Glass Industries, 1994. The cement and lime manufacturing industries emit almost half of ...

58

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

59

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

60

Nuclear containment steel liner corrosion workshop : final summary and recommendation report.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the proceedings of an expert panel workshop conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of corrosion for the steel liner in nuclear containment buildings. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored this work which was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. A workshop was conducted at the NRC Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland on September 2 and 3, 2010. Due to the safety function performed by the liner, the expert panel was assembled in order to address the full range of issues that may contribute to liner corrosion. This report is focused on corrosion that initiates from the outer surface of the liner, the surface that is in contact with the concrete containment building wall. Liner corrosion initiating on the outer diameter (OD) surface has been identified at several nuclear power plants, always associated with foreign material left embedded in the concrete. The potential contributing factors to liner corrosion were broken into five areas for discussion during the workshop. Those include nuclear power plant design and operation, corrosion of steel in contact with concrete, concrete aging and degradation, concrete/steel non-destructive examination (NDE), and concrete repair and corrosion mitigation. This report also includes the expert panel member's recommendations for future research.

Erler, Bryan A. (Erler Engineering Ltd., Chicago, IL); Weyers, Richard E. (Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA); Sagues, Alberto (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL); Petti, Jason P.; Berke, Neal Steven (Tourney Consulting Group, LLC, Kalamazoo, MI); Naus, Dan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility...

62

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Solar Thermal Loans | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Solar Thermal Loans Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Solar Thermal Loans Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool...

63

Resin Liner Recovery and Over-Packing at Ontario Power Generation's Western Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

Spent resins generated from Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s and Bruce Power's Candu reactor operations are stored at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. The older resins are contained in 3 m{sup 3} epoxy-coated cylindrical carbon steel containers known as resin liners. The liners are stored in a stacked configuration within cylindrical in-ground containers. Previous studies indicated evidence of unacceptable liner wall corrosion and the potential for eventual leakage of resin from the liners. Based on this, OPG elected to re-package the majority of the resin liners into stainless steel over-packs. A contract for this work was awarded to a project team consisting of Duratek of Canada, Kinectrics, Inc. and E.S. Fox. This paper provides an overall summary of project activities focusing on the effectiveness of the equipment utilized and the soundness of the developed programs, plans and procedures. Specific information is provided on key aspects of the project and the overall achievement of project goals. (authors)

Pearson, S.D. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, SC (Colombia); Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Design report on the SSCL prototype 80 K Synchrotron Radiation Liner System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the effort to develop a viable design for an SSC prototype 80 K Synchrotron Radiation Liner System. This liner is designed to be tested in the Superconducting Super Collider Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) facility. The liner is one method under consideration to minimize the presence of photodesorbed gases in the particle beam line vacuum environment. Secondly, the liner is aimed at improving the Collider cryogenic thermal efficiency which would allow a potential luminosity upgrade. The SSC Collider is the first proton superconducting accelerator designed to operate at an energy of 20 TeV (each beam) and a beam current of 72 mA. The Collider will produce a synchrotron power of 0.14 W/m and a total of 18 kW into 4.2 K for the two rings. This radiated power may trigger a serious impact of photodesorbed gases on the operational availability of the Collider. The interaction between beam particle and photodesorbed gases may greatly reduce the beam lifetime and the scattered beam power may lead to quenching of the superconducting magnets. Collider availability may be unacceptable if this concern is not properly addressed. The liner is one method under consideration to minimize the presence of photodesorbed gases in the particle beam line vacuum. Secondly, the liner is aimed improving the Collider`s cryogenic thermal efficiency which would allow a potential luminosity upgrade. The ultimate goal is to require no more than one machine warm up per year for vacuum maintenance during operation of the SSC Collider.

Shu, Q.S.; Barts, T.; Chou, W. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Experimental Study of Wellbore Instability in Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an extensive program of laboratory model wellbore tests that have been performed to study wellbore instability in saturated clays. The tests were conducted on resedimented Boston blue ...

Abdulhadi, Naeem O.

66

AN EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL LINER MATERIALS FOR ELIMINATING FCCI IN IRRADIATED METALLIC NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are being looked at as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Program for transmuting longlive transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products. In order to optimize the performance of these fuels, the concept of using liners to eliminate the fuel/cladding chemical interactions that can occur during irradiation of a fuel element has been investigated. The potential liner materials Zr and V have been tested using solid-solid diffusion couples, consisting of liner materials butted against fuel alloys and against cladding materials. The couples were annealed at the relatively high temperature of 700C. This temperature would be the absolute maximum temperature present at the fuel/cladding interface for a fuel element in-reactor. Analysis was performed using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive and wavelengthdispersive spectrometers (SEM/EDS/WDS) to evaluate any developed diffusion structures. At 700C, minimal interaction was observed between the metallic fuels and either Zr or V. Similarly, limited interaction was observed between the Zr and V and the cladding materials. The best performing liner material appeared to be the V, based on amounts of interaction.

D. D. Keiser; J. I. Cole

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New MexicoThe Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

Randall T. Cygan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

69

Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

Gregar, Kathleen C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Winans, Randall E. (Downers Grove, IL); Botto, Robert E. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modeling of liner finish effects on oil control ring lubrication in internal combustion engines based on deterministic method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Twin-land oil control ring is widely used in the automotive diesel engines, and is gaining more and more applications in the modern designs of gasoline engines. Its interaction with the cylinder liner surface accounts for ...

Chen, Haijie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nondestructive characterization of ceramic composites used as combustor liners in advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods, which can provide full-field information about components prior to and during use, are critical to the reliable application of continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites in high-firing-temperature (>1,350 C) gas turbines. [For combustor liners, although they are nonmechanical load-bearing components, both thermal characteristics and mechanical integrity are vitally important.] NDC methods being developed to provide necessary information include x-ray computed tomography (mainly for through-wall density and delamination detection), infrared-based thermal diffusivity imaging, and single-wall through-transmission x-ray imaging (mainly for fiber content and alignment detection). Correlation of the data obtained from NDC methods with subscale combustor liner tests have shown positive results at thermal cycling temperatures from 700 C to 1,177 C.

Ellingson, W.A.; Rothermel, S.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Simpson, J.F. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Device and method for imploding a microsphere with a fast liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner to drive the fast liner to implode a microsphere.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Advanced Electromagnetic Inspection Methods for Fuel Pool and Transfer Canal Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liner leakage is prevalent in spent fuel pools (SPFs) and transfer canals, with some plants experiencing leakage since early in plant life. Leakage concerns are more critical in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) fleet due to the undesirable consequences that can be encountered with the release of boron. These can include, but are not limited to, (1) degradation of the reinforced concrete and rebar that form the pool structure and (2) uncontrolled release of radioactive nuclides that have the potential ...

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tribological evaluation of piston skirt/cylinder liner contact interfaces under boundary lubrication conditions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The friction and wear between the piston and cylinder liner significantly affects the performance of internal combustion engines. In this paper, segments from a commercial piston/cylinder system were tribologically tested using reciprocating motion. The tribological contact consisted of aluminium alloy piston segments, either uncoated, coated with a graphite/resin coating, or an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : H) coating, in contact with gray cast iron liner segments. Tests were conducted in commercial synthetic motor oils and base stocks at temperatures up to 120 C with a 2 cm stroke length at reciprocating speeds up to 0.15 m s{sup -1}. The friction dependence of these piston skirt and cylinder liner materials was studied as a function of load, sliding speed and temperature. Specifically, an increase in the sliding speed led to a decrease in the friction coefficient below approximately 70 C, while above this temperature, an increase in sliding speed led to an increase in the friction coefficient. The presence of a coating played an important role. It was found that the graphite/resin coating wore quickly, preventing the formation of a beneficial tribochemical film, while the a-C : H coating exhibited a low friction coefficient and provided significant improvement over the uncoated samples. The effect of additives in the oils was also studied. The tribological behaviour of the interface was explained based on viscosity effects and subsequent changes in the lubrication regime, formation of chemical and tribochemical films.

Demas, N. G.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc Place Florida Utility Id 3757 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Rate Schedule - FL (Large) Lighting Rate Schedule - FL (Small) Lighting Rate Schedule - GS Commercial Rate Schedule - GS - 1 Commercial Rate Schedule - GSD Commercial Rate Schedule - HLF Industrial Rate Schedule - INT (Primary Metering Voltage) Industrial Rate Schedule - INT (Secondary Metering Voltage) Industrial Rate Schedule - INT (Transmission Metering Voltage) Industrial

79

Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V., E-mail: siva@civil.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Baig, M. Arif Ali, E-mail: reach2arif@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Characterization of melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composite combustor liners using meso- and micro-NDE techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melt-infiltrated ceramic matrix composite SiC/SiC material systems are under development for use in combustor liners for low-emission advanced gas turbines. Uncertainty in repeatability of processing methods for these large components (33--76 cm diameter), and hence possible reduced reliability for the end user. This requires that appropriate test methods, at both meso- and micro-scale, be used to ensure that the liners are acceptable for use. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, if demonstrated to reliably detect changes caused by processing, would be of significant benefit to both manufacturer and end user. This paper describes the NDE methods and their applications in detecting a process upset in a melt-infiltrated 33 cm combustor liner and how high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to verify the NDE data.

Ellingson, W. A.; Sun, J. G.; More, K. L.; Hines, R.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Characterization of Heavy Clay Ceramic Mixed with Red Mud Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Characterization of Heavy Clay Ceramic Mixed with Red Mud Waste. Author(s), Carlos Maurcio Fontes Vieira, Michelle Pereira Babisk,...

82

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

83

Recent Results from USANS Measurements of Clays and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of cement pastes, clays and ANSTO-produced SYNROC have been performed on the new ultra-high resolution instruments at ORNL, NIST and ILL ...

84

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial...

85

Plasma Liner with an Intermediate Heavy Shell and Thermal Pressure Drive  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the challenging problems of Magnetized Target Fusion is development of the ways of transporting energy to the target situated at a large-enough distance from the energy source: the distance should be such as to prevent damage to the permanent parts of the source. Several schemes have been considered in the past, including the use of particle beams coupled with the inverse diode, mechanical projectiles in combination with magneto-compressional generators, and the plasma liner. In this paper, a possible modification of the original concept of the plasma liner (Y.C.F. Thio, C.E. Knapp, R.C. Kirkpatrick, R.E. Siemon, P.J. Turchi. J. Fusion Energy, 20, 1, 2001) is described. The modification consists in creating a thin, higher density shell made of a high-Z plasma and accelerating it onto an MTF target by a thermal pressure of a hydrogen plasma with the temperature {approx}10 eV. We discuss constraints on the parameters of this system and evaluate convergence ratio that can be expected.

Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development of polymer concrete liners and coatings for use in geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a research and field testing program conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy to develop polymer concrete (PC) liners and coatings for use in geothermal applications are presented. Whenever possible, carbon steel is used in geothermal facilities for components such as piping, well casings, and containment vessels. However carbon steel is subject to severe corrosion when exposed to some geothermal fluids and brines, leading to the use, in some cases, of very expensive high alloy steels. Results of laboratory tests done in simulated geothermal environments (pH 2 hydrochloric acid steam at 200{degree}C) have shown that PC materials can be used as liners and coatings to protect carbon steel surfaces from corrosion. In situ field testing of 8-in. (203-mm) inside diameter (ID) by 12-in. (305-mm) long spool sections and 12in. ID (305-mm) wellhead tee sections in operational geothermal facilities is currently being done to verify the laboratory test data. Economic studies have shown that the capital cost of the vessels and piping in a typical geothermal facility can be significantly reduced through the use of protective PC linings and coatings. As a result PC lined components are currently being used commercially at two geothermal sites.

Webster, R.P.; Reams, W.; Kukacka, L.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion  

SciTech Connect

The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration of megagauss magnetic field compression by a small array of full scale macrons. In addition the physics of the compression of an FRC to fusion conditions will be undertaken with a smaller scale MFL. The timescale for testing will be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of other facilities at MSNW where the target FRC will be created and translated inside the MFL just prior to implosion of the MFL. Experimental success would establish the concept at the â??proof of principleâ? level and the following phase III effort would focus on the full development of the concept into a fusion gain device. Successful operation would lead to several benefits in various fields. It would have application to high energy density physics, as well as nuclear waste transmutation and alternate fission fuel cycles. The smaller scale device could find immediate application as an intense source of neutrons for diagnostic imaging and non-invasive object interrogation.

Slough, John

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a jurassic opalinum shale, switzerland. Clays and Clay96 1 INTRODUCTION Clay/shale has been considered asand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

Liu, H.H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Illuminating clay: a 3-D tangible interface for landscape analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel system for the real-time computational analysis of landscape models. Users of the system - called Illuminating Clay - alter the topography of a clay landscape model while the changing geometry is captured in real-time by ... Keywords: 3D laser scanner, DEM, GIS, landscape design, physical models, tangible user interface

Ben Piper; Carlo Ratti; Hiroshi Ishii

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan´, Budapest, Hungary 2012 Abstract Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan-012-1876-x #12;In Pakistan geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common especially amongst the women

Short, Daniel

91

Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioners: $50 Geothermal Heat Pump: $750/ton new installation; $150/ton for replacement Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $150/ton plus $.01 rate reduction (above 200 kWh) Water Heaters: Discounted price Provider Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative offers a variety of rebates to residential and commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient equipment. Newly installed ground source heat pumps are eligible for a $750 per ton

92

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $600 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.01 per BTU output Provider Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per system, or $600. Eligible solar water heaters can be either passive or active systems. The proposed solar system must meet Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) specifications and be installed by a contractor certified to install solar water heating

93

Quantifying the impact of inland transport times on container fleet sizing in liner shipping services with uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Container fleet sizing is a key issue in liner shipping industry. Although container shipping is an intermodal transport system, inland container movements are often beyond the control of shipping lines. It is vital to understand how the inland transport ... Keywords: Container fleet sizing, Empty container repositioning, Genetic algorithms, Golden section, Intermodal, Simulated annealing, Stochastic

Jing-Xin Dong; Dong-Ping Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

LITERATURE REVIEW ON THE SORPTION OF PLUTONIUM, URANIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AMERICIUM AND TECHNETIUM TO CORROSION PRODUCTS ON WASTE TANK LINERS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the risk associated with closing liquid waste tanks. The PA estimates the risk associated with a number of scenarios, making various assumptions. Throughout all of these scenarios, it is assumed that the carbon-steel tank liners holding the liquid waste do not sorb the radionuclides. Tank liners have been shown to form corrosion products, such as Fe-oxyhydroxides (Wiersma and Subramanian 2002). Many corrosion products, including Fe-oxyhydroxides, at the high pH values of tank effluent, take on a very strong negative charge. Given that many radionuclides may have net positive charges, either as free ions or complexed species, it is expected that many radionuclides will sorb to corrosion products associated with tank liners. The objective of this report was to conduct a literature review to investigate whether Pu, U, Np, Am and Tc would sorb to corrosion products on tank liners after they were filled with reducing grout (cementitious material containing slag to promote reducing conditions). The approach was to evaluate radionuclides sorption literature with iron oxyhydroxide phases, such as hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.5H{sub 2}O). The primary interest was the sorption behavior under tank closure conditions where the tanks will be filled with reducing cementitious materials. Because there were no laboratory studies conducted using site specific experimental conditions, (e.g., high pH and HLW tank aqueous and solid phase chemical conditions), it was necessary to extend the literature review to lower pH studies and noncementitious conditions. Consequently, this report relied on existing lower pH trends, existing geochemical modeling, and experimental spectroscopic evidence conducted at lower pH levels. The scope did not include evaluating the appropriateness of K{sub d} values for the Fe-oxyhydroxides, but instead to evaluate whether it is a conservative assumption to exclude this sorption process of radionuclides onto tank liner corrosion products in the PA model. This may identify another source for PA conservatism since the modeling did not consider any sorption by the tank liner.

Li, D.; Kaplan, D.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation March 16, 2007 - 10:55am Addthis Visits National Nuclear Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia TBILISI, Georgia - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today visited the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia, and praised Georgia for issuing a license this week to open the facility to consolidate radioactive sources. Deputy Secretary Sell also met with Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili and other senior government and business leaders to address the importance of diversifying energy sources, increasing the use of energy efficient technologies, and further efforts to

96

The mechanical behavior of heavily overconsolidated resedimented Boston Blue Clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geotechnical engineers encounter some of the most challenging problems in heavily overconsolidated soils. Clays under this condition originated in nature or man-made construction. This thesis investigates the mechanical ...

Vargas Bustamante, Albalyra Geraldine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

An analytical and numerical model to determine stresses in a Rock Melt Drill produced glass liner for potential use on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A numerical and analytical model was constructed to determine the resultant stress state imposed on a Rock Melt Drill produced liner. The purpose of this study was to determine if the liner produced would possess the strength required to prevent a failure in the borehole wall. Derivation of energy, mass and momentum conservation equations was performed to aid in the identification of applicable loads acting on the melted material that will form the liner. A finite difference model was coded to produce a temperature profile in the liner thickness. An analytical stress model, using the results of the derived equations and the numerical thermal model, was constructed to determine the magnitude of the stresses the liner is subjected to after operation of the Rock Melt Drill. By using values from the Rock Melt Drill design and formation material properties taken from the literature, from experiment and through calculations, a baseline resultant stress was able to be determined for the liner. Utilizing the thermal and stress model, a parametric analysis of the stresses and temperature profile was conducted over a range of Rock Melt Drill operational parameters and formation material property parameters. This parametric analysis was conducted to determine trends between the above parameters and the resultant temperature and stress profiles. It was determined that the liner would have enough strength to prevent failure by collapse up to the required depths of 5 km, under ideal conditions. Additional loads applied to the liner in the form of an increase pressure gradient or formation fluid load may be enough to cause collapse of the liner. Also, the resultant tensile stress in the liner at shallow depths is great enough to cause crack propagation near the surface. It is a conclusion of this study that the Rock Melt Drill may be a potentially viable drilling system for use on Mars, in terms of preventing borehole collapse. Further study is necessary to determine the state of the liner in more realistic conditions, such as including pressurized fluids in the models, and additional work is needed to optimize the Rock Melt Drill system.

McConnell, Joshua B

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lifecycle Verification of Polymeric Storage Tank Liners - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Barton Smith (Primary Contact) and Lawrence M. Anovitz Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 574-2196 Email: smithdb@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Start Date: June 2008 Projected End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Continue temperature cycling and permeation * measurements on tank liner polymers, and use permeation data to assess ability of tank liners to retain a steady-state hydrogen discharge rate that does not exceed 110% of the 75 normal cubic centimeters per minute (Ncc)/min permeation requirement of SAE International

100

Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility. Interim final report, 7 November 1986-31 October 1989  

SciTech Connect

Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

Gage, M.L.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or {beta} angle of the inner liner.

Murphy, M.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Capacitor Bank 'CHANDI' for Plasma Target Production for Liner Plasma Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A capacitor bank is fabricated to drive (JXB) Plasma gun to generate hot plasma (target) for liner plasma investigation. The bank will also be used for driving other pintch experiments. The bank consists of 8 capacitors connected in parallel, each having capacitance of 178 {mu}F giving a total of 1424uF. The bank is charged at 15 kV using a 28 kV power supply charging the capacitors in 65 seconds utilizing full wave charging technique. The total energy of the bank is 160kJ at 15kV. A modeling of power supply was done so that all the components involved are utilized to their operating limit safely. Moreover to give fault protection to the capacitor bank we have implemented the neutral control technique in the power supply. The capacitor bank is discharged to the inductive load through an ignitron switch of very high coulomb rating and capable of withstanding high voltages at its electrodes. The cables used for connecting capacitor bank with ignitron switch are used in parallel to give them collective capability of bearing capacitor discharge currents. These cables are capable of holding high DC voltages (40kV), which appear at the time of charging of the bank. The bank is tested and is operational.

Shukla, R.; Sharma, S.K.; Debnath, K.; Shyam, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat Village, Gandhinagar Gujarat 382428 (India)

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Energy Efficiency Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Ceiling Insulation: $600 Spray Foam Insulation: $600 Heat Pump: $500 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Insulation: $0.11 per square foot Spray Foam Insulation: $0.28 per square foot Window Film: $0.44 per square foot Heat Pump Water Heater: $175 Heat Recovery Unit: $200 Heat Pump: $50 to $500 Provider Clay Electric Co-op Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential

104

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Conservation Loans | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Loans Conservation Loans Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Conservation Loans < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5,000 ($7,500 for metal roofs) Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 - $7,500 Provider Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 North Florida counties, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs. It offers loans to help customers

105

Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Place Missouri Utility Id 15138 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DF - Dual Fuel Heating Residential GP - Schedule of Green Power Rate Adder MC3 - Medium Commercial Service Commercial R - Rural and Residential Service Residential R-ETS - Residential ETS Service Residential SL - 100 watt HPS Ornamental Fixture Lighting SL - 100 watt HPS Ornamental Fixture w/Pole Lighting

106

The Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors on the Stability and Transport of Clay Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clays which exist in formations in the vicinity of injection and disposal wells is a worldwide problem in the petroleum industry. Clays can be categorized as two major groups: swelling clays, which include smectite group clays, and dispersing clays, which include the kaolinite groups of clays. Therefore, two basic damage mechanisms of clay minerals are swelling and dispersion. Both mechanisms cause pore plugging, and thus aggravate hydrocarbon ease of flow. In this thesis, the effect of temperature, injected water chemical composition, pH, and flowrate of the injected fluid were tested experimentally. Clay mineralogy, chemistry, and composition of the exchangeable cations were also examined. The existing theoretical models of evaluation of forces between clay particles and the rock matrix were used to quantify the interactions. Coreflood experiments were conducted to determine the effect of parameters such as variation of temperature, flowrate, pH, presence of various salts in working solution and their concentration. The results obtained from experimental and theoretical work show that clay minerals in sandstone formation are subject to fines migration and can cause a detrimental impact on the reservoir permeability. Every aforementioned factor has its influence on clays behavior and therefore, a degree of fines migration. The work accomplished summarizes and concludes what parameters sensitize clays migration. Moreover, recommendations for formation damage due to fines migration are given. The scope of work presented can be useful for petroleum engineers as well as geologists and clay mineralogists.

Musharova, Darya

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Model of a 80 K liner vacuum system for the 4.2 K cold bore of the SSCL 20 TeV proton collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss a model for an 80 K liner system for the beam tube vacuum of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The liner is a coaxial perforated tube fitting inside the {approximately}4.2 K bore tube of the SSC magnet cryostats. A liner of this type is useful for pumping the gas desorbed by synchrotron radiation out of the view of the radiation and for decoupling the beam current from the 4.2 K refrigeration plant capacity. Addition of cryosorber on the bore tube (e.g., charcoal) greatly increases the H{sub 2} sorption capacity compared to the bare metal surface, thus lengthening the time between beam tube warmups. The model equations are useful for estimating the performance of the beam tube vacuum and for defining the experimental information necessary to make a prediction. Some analysis is also presented for 4.2 K and 20 K liners and a simple 4.2 K beam tube without a liner.

Turner, W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method  

SciTech Connect

A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

Taylor, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Boyer, Norman W. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale: sedimentary rock which contains quartz, carbonates and clay minerals #12;clay minerals in shales quartz

Magee, Joseph W.

111

Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Everly School Dist Wind Farm Everly School Dist Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm Facility Clay Central/Everly School Dist Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Clay Central/Everly School District Energy Purchaser Clay Central/Everly School District Location IA Coordinates 43.1392°, -95.2644° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1392,"lon":-95.2644,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

ClayVision: the (elastic) image of the city  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe ClayVision, a new quasi-immersive urban navigation system that rethinks the design conventions of existing Augmented Reality (AR) applications, by aggressively incorporating knowledge from non-Computer Science fields - namely ... Keywords: augmented reality, computer vision, information design, urban navigation, urban planning

Yuichiro Takeuchi; Ken Perlin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gas Dynamics in the LINER Galaxy NGC 5005: Episodic Fueling of a Nuclear Disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high-resolution CO(1-0) observations in the central 6 kpc of the LINER galaxy NGC 5005 with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory millimeter array. Molecular gas is distributed in three components - a ring at a radius of about 3 kpc, a strong central condensation, and a stream to the northwest of the nucleus but inside the 3 kpc ring. The central condensation is a disk of about 1 kpc radius with a molecular gas mass of 2 x 10^9 M_sun. The stream between the 3 kpc ring and the nuclear disk lies on a straight dust lane seen in the optical. If this material moves in the plane of the galaxy, it has a velocity offset by up to ~ 150 km/s from galactic rotation. We suggest that an optically inconspicuous stellar bar lying within the 3 kpc ring can explain the observed gas dynamics. This bar is expected to connect the nuclear disk and the ring along the position angle of the northwest stream. A position-velocity cut in this direction reveals features which match the characteristic motions of gas in a barred potential. Our model indicates that gas in the northwest stream is on an x_1 orbit at the bar's leading edge; it is falling into the nucleus with a large noncircular velocity, and will eventually contribute about 2 x 10^8 M_sun to the nuclear disk. If most of this material merges with the disk on its first passage of pericenter, the gas accretion rate during the collision will be 50 M_sun/yr. We associate the nuclear disk with an inner 2:1 Lindblad resonance, and the 3 kpc ring with an inner 4:1 Lindblad resonance. The high rate of bar-driven inflow and the irregular appearance of the northwest stream suggest that a major fueling event is in progress in NGC 5005. Such episodic (rather than continuous) gas supply can regulate the triggering of starburst and accretion activity in galactic nuclei. (abridged)

Kazushi Sakamoto; Andrew J. Baker; Nick Z. Scoville

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.

Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.; Shelley, B.; Gorman, M.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

City of Clay Center, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clay Center Clay Center Place Kansas Utility Id 3710 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Rural Commercial Commercial- Urban Commercial Industrial- Rural Industrial Industrial- Urban Industrial Residential- Rural Residential Residential- Urban Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.1120/kWh Industrial: $0.0876/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

116

Diffusion of inorganic chemical wastes in compacted clay  

SciTech Connect

The factors that were investigated included the water content/dry unit weight, the method of compaction, the mineralogy of the soil, and the concentration of the ions. The effective diffusion coefficients (D{asterisk}) of three anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}}) and three cations (K{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) in a simulated waste leachate were measured. Two clay soils (kaolinite and Lufkin clay) and a sand were used in the study. The clay samples were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize hydraulic gradients due to negative pore pressures. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution. The D{asterisk} values for tests using high-concentration (0.04 N) leachate generally fell in the narrow range of about 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s, and were relatively insensitive to compaction water content/dry unit weight and to compaction method. The variability in the results from the tests with low-concentration (0.013 N) leachate precluded any definite conclusions from these tests. The values of D{asterisk} measured in this study were compared to values from previous studies, and the D{asterisk} values from this study were found to be slightly conservative (i.e., high). However, the results of the tests may be affected by several chemical and physical factors, and care should be taken to ensure that the soils used in the tests are representative of those used in the application of the test results. Recommendations are made for estimating D{asterisk} values for use in the design of compacted clay barriers for the containment of inorganic chemical wastes.

Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with simulated double-shell slurry feed at 90/degree/C: Hanford Grout Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with a low-level radioactive waste slurry called double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). The evaluation was necessary as part of the permitting process authorized by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL-94-580. Materials that were examined included five flexible membrane liners (Hytrel/reg sign/ polyester, polyurethane, 8130 XR5/reg sign/, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The liner and pipe samples were immersed for 120 days in the synthetic DSSE at 90/degree/C, the maximum expected temperature in the waste disposal scenario. Physical properties of the liner and pipe samples were measured before immersion and every 30 days after immersion, in accordance with EPA Method 9090. In addition, some of the materials were exposed to four different radiation doses after 30 days of immersion. Physical properties of these materials were measured immediately after exposure and after an additional 90 days of immersion to determine each material's response to radiation, and whether radiation exposure affected the chemical compatibility of the material. 20 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs.

Farnsworth, R.K.; Hymas, C.R.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Sell to Depart Clay Sell to Depart Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart January 14, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement: "It is with regret that I announce the resignation of Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell. Clay has served with distinction as the Deputy Secretary of Energy for nearly three years and has played a key role in the Administration's efforts to enact landmark energy legislation in 2005 and 2007." "As the Department's Chief Operating Officer, Clay has led and implemented many of the successful Departmental improvements of the last three years, including improving the performance and capability of our nuclear weapons and intelligence organizations, streamlining the management and focus of

119

Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy March 21, 2005 - 10:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Jeffrey Clay Sell was sworn in today as Deputy Secretary of Energy at a small ceremony held at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington, DC. Mr. Sell was sworn in by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman after being unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate on Thursday, March 17, 2005. "Clay brings a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience to the department, which will be critical as we seek to ensure an affordable, reliable energy supply for America's future," Secretary Bodman said. "As Deputy Secretary, Clay will play a critical role in the management of our nuclear stockpile and the effort to continue America's leadership in

120

Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes.

Weaver, C.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

OIL WELL REMEDIATION IN CLAY AND WAYNE COUNTIES, IL  

SciTech Connect

This is the second progress and final technical report of the remediation of abandoned wells in Clay and Wayne Counties in Illinois. The wells will be identified as the Routt No.3 and No.4 and the Bates Hosselton 1 and 2. Both sites have met all legal, financial and environmental requirements to drill and/or pump oil on both leases. We have also obtained all available information about both leases. All steps were taken to improve access roads, dig the necessary pits, and build the necessary firewalls. This progress and final technical report will address the remediation efforts as well as our results and conclusions.

Peter L. Dakuras; Larry Stieber; Dick Young

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

123

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Clayshale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level...

124

Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

Rollins, Andrew M.

125

Interactions of uranium with bacteria and kaolinite clay Toshihiko Ohnukia,*, Takahiro Yoshidaa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of uranium with bacteria and kaolinite clay Toshihiko Ohnukia,*, Takahiro Yoshidaa of uranium (VI) by a bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, suspended in a slurry of kaolinite clay, to elucidate, removed approximately 80% of the associated uranium. However, in the presence of B. subtilis the amount

Kasama, Takeshi

126

A KECK/LRIS SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF A LINER GALAXY SDSS J091628.05+420818.7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using spatially resolved spectra obtained with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at the Keck I telescope, we investigate the nature of ionizing sources and kinematic properties of emission-line gas in a LINER galaxy SDSS J091628.05+420818.7, which is a nearby (z = 0.0241) and bright (M{sub r} = -20.2) early-type galaxy. After subtracting stellar absorption features using a combination of simple stellar population models, we measure the flux, line-of-sight velocity, and velocity dispersion of four emission lines, i.e., H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}5007, and [N II] {lambda}6584, to study radial change of emission-line fluxes and velocities. Compared to the point-spread function of the observation, the emission-line region is slightly extended but comparable to the seeing size. The central concentration of emission-line gas suggests that ionization is triggered by a nuclear source, excluding old stellar population as ionizing sources. We find that emission-line gas is counter-rotating with respect to stellar component and that the [O III] {lambda}5007 line is blueshifted compared to other emission lines, possibly due to an outflow.

Bae, Hyun-Jin; Yoon, Suk-Jin [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Jong-Hak [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yagi, Masafumi [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Water structure and vibrational properties in fibrous clays.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of water confined in porous materials influences macroscopic phenomena such as solute and water mobility, ion exchange, and adsorption. While the properties of bulk water are generally understood, that of nanoconfined water remains an active area of research. We used molecular simulation and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to investigate the effect of local structure on the vibrational behavior of nanoconfined water. We focus specifically on the nanosized pores found in the 2:1 phyllosilicate clay minerals palygorskite and sepiolite. These are charge neutral, Mg-rich trioctahedral clays with idealized formulas Mg{sub 5}Si{sub 8}O{sub 20} (OH){sub 2} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O and Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 12}O{sub 30} (OH){sub 2} {center_dot} 12H{sub 2}O for palygorskite and sepiolite, respectively. The regular pattern of inverted phyllosilicate layers results in narrow channels with effective van der Waals dimensions of 3.61 {angstrom} x 8.59 {angstrom} (palygorskite) and 4.67 {angstrom} x 12.29 {angstrom} (sepiolite). These clay minerals represent a unique opportunity to study water adsorbed at 'inner edge' sites of uncoordinated Mg{sup 2+}. INS spectra taken at 90 K reveal a large shift in the water librational edge between palygorskite (358 cm{sup -1}) and sepiolite (536 cm{sup -1}), indicating less restricted water motion in the smaller-pore palygorskite. The librational edge of the reference sample (ice I{sub h}) is similar to sepiolite, which confirms the unique water behavior in palygorskite. We used both classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations and more rigorous density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the hydrogen bonding environment and vibrational behavior of structural water, defined as those water molecules coordinated to Mg{sup 2+} along the pore walls. These waters remain coordinated throughout the 1-ns timescale of the CMD simulations, and the resulting vibrational spectra indicate a similar shift in the water librational edges seen in the INS spectra. The DFT-optimized structures indicate differences in hydrogen bonding between palygorskite and sepiolite, which could explain the librational shift. Corner-sharing silicate tetrahedra in palygorskite are tilted with respect to the crystallographic a-axis due to the induced strain of layer inversion. As a result, only two short (1.9 {angstrom}) hydrogen bonds form between each water and the framework. In contrast, the relatively unstrained sepiolite structure, each water forms three hydrogen bonds with the framework, and at greater distances (2.0 {angstrom} - 2.5 {angstrom}).

Ockwig, Nathan W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Sandstone Acidizing Using Chelating Agents and their Interaction with Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandstone acidizing has been carried out with mud acid which combines hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid at various ratios. The application of mud acid in sandstone formations has presented quite a large number of difficulties like corrosion, precipitation of reaction products, matrix deconsolidation, decomposition of clays by HCl, and fast spending of the acids. There has been a recent trend to use chelating agents for stimulation in place of mud acid which are used in oil industry widely for iron control operations. In this study, two chelates, L-glutamic-N, N-diacetic acid (GLDA) and hydroxyethylethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) have been studied as an alternative to mud acid for acidizing. In order to analyze their performance in the application of acidizing, coreflood tests were performed on Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. Another disadvantage of mud acid has been the fast spending at clay mineral surfaces leading to depletion of acid strength, migration of fines, and formation of colloidal silica gel residue. Hence, compatibility of chelates with clay minerals was investigated through the static solubility tests. GLDA and HEDTA were analyzed for their permeability enhancement properties in Berea and Bandera cores. In the coreflood experiments conducted, it was found out that chelating agents can successfully stimulate sandstone formations. The final permeability of the Berea and Bandera cores were enhanced significantly. GLDA performed better than HEDTA in all applications. The substitution of seawater in place of deionized water for mixing purposes also led to an increased conductivity of the core implying GLDA is compatible with seawater. In the static solubility tests, chelates were mixed with HF acid at various concentrations. GLDA fluids kept more amounts of minerals in the solution when compared with HEDTA fluids. Sodium-based chelates when mixed with HF acid showed inhibited performance due to the formation of sodium fluorosilicates precipitates which are insoluble damage creating compounds. The application of ammonium-based chelate with HF acid was able to bring a large amount of aluminosilciates into the solution. The study recommends the use of ammonium-based GLDA in acidizing operations involving HF acid and sodium-based GLDA in the absence of the acid.

George, Noble Thekkemelathethil 1987-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the excavation damaged zone, and (3) development of a THM model for the Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the

130

Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel ...

Butscher, Christoph

131

Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

House, Robert Donald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The effects of sample disturbance on preconsolidation pressure for normally consolidated and overconsolidated clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sample disturbance has always been a particularly challenging topic in Geotechnical Engineering exercise. The effect and importance of disturbance on stress-strain history and undrained shear strength of soft clays are ...

Kontopoulos, Nikolaos S. (Nikolaos Stefanos)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation,...

135

Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described in this report relates to a combined system of an apparatus and a method of increasing the rates of oxidation of gases and hazardous vapors by methanotrophic and other bacteria. The gases of interest are methane and trichlorethylene and other hazardous vapors. In a preferred embodiment, the oxidation rate of methane is improved by the addition of clays, e.g., kaolin, sometimes called ``China clay.``

Apel, W.A.; Dugan, P.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Petrographic correlations and mathematical analysis of log signatures for clay identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of correlation of log signature with information on distribution of the types and volumes of clays in the sandstone pore spaces determined from detailed CT-scan, XRD, SEM and thin section analyses of core samples from three sandstone reservoirs. The log signatures are then analyzed to determine if suitable mathematical/statistical parameter(s) could be calculated from the logs for identification of types and volumes of clays in sandstone reservoirs.

Sharma, B.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

Keyes, B.L.P.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

COMPUTER MODELING OF GEOLOGY IN THE SPARTA AND MONTPELIER QUADRANGLES OF CLAY AND CHICKASAW COUNTIES, MISSISSIPPI: A TANTALIZING NEAR MISS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project attempted to combine digital data sets to define and map geologic features in the Sparta and Montpelier quadrangles of Chickasaw and Clay counties (more)

Defibaugh y Chavez, Jason

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low pressure storage of methane on interlayered clays for potential vehicular applications. [Comparison with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Inexpensive, high surface area sorbents were prepared by treating naturally occurring hectorite and bentonite clays with aluminum chlorohydroxide, zirconium chlorohydroxide, or silica-sol solutions. Data were obtained comparing these interlayered clays with activated carbons and zeolites as sorbents for the low pressure storage of methane onboard natural gas powered vehicles. Methane sorption at pressures up to 7 MPa (1000 psig) resembled a Langmuir-type curve with a saturation sorption equal to about six micromoles of methane per square meter of surface area. Even at low pressures, methane sorption capacity was largely determined by surface area. At 2.2 MPa (300 psig), the best interlayered clay sorbed less than one-third the methane sorbed by an equal volume of Witco grade 9JXC activated carbon. Both the activated carbons and interlayered clays exhibited excellent release-on-demand capability. Driving ranges were calculated for a 2500-lb automobile equipped with three, 35-liter fuel tanks filled with sorbent and pressurized to 3.6 MPa (500 psig) with methane. Enough methane was stored with the best interlayered clay to travel 41 km (25 mi). With 9JXC carbon, one could travel 82 km (51 mi). The same vehicle equipped with high pressure (2400 psig) fuel tanks having the same volume but containing no sorbent would have a 190 km (118 mi) range.

Innes, R.A.; Lutinski, F.E.; Occelli, M.L.; Kennedy, J.V.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Seventeen K/Ar dates were obtained on illitic clays within Valles caldera (1.13 Ma) to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on Quaternary to Precambrian intracaldera and pre-caldera rocks in a large,

142

Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2 Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2 Shale and clay-rich rock formations have been considered as potential host rocks for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a repository in this type of rocks. The validity of the two-part Hooke's model (TPHM), a new constitutive relationship, and associated formulations regarding rock hydraulic/mechanical properties is demonstrated by the consistency between observations from a mine-by test at the Mont Terri site

143

Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License Application Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License Application September 25, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis "Today marks the most significant and tangible step to date, towards the construction of the first new nuclear power plant in the United States in over 30 years. DOE is confident that with NRG's reactor design selection and cooperation with their partners, General Electric and Toshiba, this project will likely result in the first of many new reactors being constructed and operated in the U.S. This reactor would join an American nuclear industry that is safe, secure and has a strong record to prove it. We look forward to the continued cooperation with industrial partners and

144

Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

Pitman, Michael C. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; Van Duin, Adri C. T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

Pitman, Michael C. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; Van Duin, Adri C. T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Formation of Replicating Saponite from a Gel in the Presence of Oxalate: Implications for the Formation of Clay Minerals in Carbonaceous Chondrites and the Origin of Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous ...

Schumann, Dirk

147

Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments  

SciTech Connect

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

Caporuscio, Florie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cheshire, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Dennis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarney, Mary Kate [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lithium Hectorite Clay as the Ionic Conductor in LiCoO2 Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Hectorite Clay as the Ionic Conductor in LiCoO2 Cathodes Michael W. Riley,* Peter S. Fedkiw Carolina 27695-7905, USA Cathodes based on LiCoO2 that contain various lithium-conducting species lithium hectorite, lithium Laponite, and lithium- exchanged Nafion are studied in conjunction with lithium metal

Khan, Saad A.

149

1 DEMONSTRATION OF NUCLEAR FUSION IN AN ORDINARY CLAY FLOWER POT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work demonstrates a sustainable nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen using a clay flower port as a reactor vessel. Our novel approach uses a charge mirror that reduces the electromagnetic repulsion between nuclei enough to allow fusion initiation at room temperature. The device can also be used as a secure error-free transgalactic communications pipe with zero latency and near infinite bandwidth. I.

Albert Einstein; Er Bell; Richard Feynman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 ? 10?22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

Herbert, Bruce

151

Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

material properties, the load transfer mechanism at the interface, and the shape of the load-strain curve during pullout (Gupta, 2009). In general, these analytical models are used to predict the load profile from frontal linear variable differential transducer (LVDT) is the only displacement value used

Zornberg, Jorge G.

152

GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Finally, the fish ladder at Little Goose Dam uses pumped river water rather than a gravity flow. Of all GOOSE DAM ON UPSTREAM MOVEMENTS OF ADULT CHINOOK SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA A major environmental effects of hydroelectric dams (Figure 1) on the upstream movements of adult salmonids. Results indicated

Zornberg, Jorge G.

153

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Gas Migration In The Opalinus Clay As A Function Of The Gas Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be backfilled in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. After healing and re-saturation of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and saturation of the backfill, the waste containers and the metallic components will corrode resulting in a generation of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon dioxide will be released as a result of oxidation and thermal decomposition of the organic components in the waste and in the clay. If the disposal boreholes and chambers are sealed gas-tight, high gas pressure may be produced leading to the potential generation of fractures in the host rock which could influence the integrity of the repository. Therefore it is essential that the gases migrate through the technical barriers (backfill) or into the surrounding host rock at lower pressure and without any irreversible damage of the repository. In order to estimate the consequences of the gas generation the knowledge of the gas paths in the host rock and the knowledge of the parameters which influence the gas migration in the host rock are important. During an ongoing project at the underground research laboratory Mt. Terri in Switzerland the gas migration in the undisturbed over-consolidated Opalinus Clay is investigated. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Goa, India Cyclic Lateral Response of Model Pile Groups in Clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: This paper presents the results of two-way cyclic lateral load tests conducted in the laboratory on the model pile groups embedded in soft clay. The purpose of this research work is to investigate the effects of spacing, number of cycles of loading and cyclic load level on the pile group behaviour in clay. A pneumatic system is used to simulate cyclic loading typical of wave loading. Similitude laws are adhered to in selecting the material and size of the model piles. Piles are instrumented so that bending moments developed along the piles can be calculated. The results emphasized highly nonlinear nature of load-deflection behaviour. Group interaction effect under cyclic lateral loading is predominant for groups with spacing to diameter ratio less than 7. It is found that the cyclic load levels exceeding 0.5 times of static ultimate capacity, produce large deflections of the pile group due to gaps developed at the pile-soil interface, remoulding of clay and subsequent reduction in the stiffness. The bending moments in the piles are increased with the number of cycles and the location of maximum bending moment shifted downwards along the length of the pile. Numerical analysis using software ? GROUP is also carried out for closely spaced pile groups subjected to static lateral loads and the results are compared with the experimental ones. 1

S. S. Ch; A. Boominathan; G. R. Dodagoudar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Review of Sub-Scale Test Methods to Evaluate the Friction and Wear of Ring and Liner Materials for Spark- and Compression Ignition Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review was conducted of past laboratory-scale test methods and to assess their validity for ranking materials and lubricants for use as piston and liner materials in compression-ignition (CI) and spark-ignition (SI) engines. Most of the previous work was aimed at simulating SI engine environments. This report begins with a discussion of the numerous factors that can affect the validity of an approach to simulating engine conditions in a laboratory. These include not only mechanical, chemical and thermal factors, but also human factors as regards how the vehicle is operated and maintained. The next section provides an annotated review of open literature publications that address the issues of laboratory simulation of engine components. A comparison of these studies indicates a lack of sufficient standardization in procedures to enable a systematic comparison of one publication to another. There were just a few studies that compared several laboratory test methods to engine test results, and these indicated that some test methods correlate, at least qualitatively, better than others. The last section provides a series of recommendations for improving the accuracy and validity of laboratory-scale simulations of engine behavior. It became clear that much of the engine wear damage occurs during start-up when the engine is cold, and this calls into the question the usefulness of test methods that attempt to simulate steady-state running conditions. It is recommended that a new standard test method, perhaps developed with the help of the ASTM wear and erosion committee, be developed. It would use cold start-up conditions in the presence of degraded oil, or simulated degraded oil.

Blau, P.J.

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Clay-sewage sludge co-pyrolysis. A TG-MS and Py-GC study on potential advantages afforded by the presence of clay in the pyrolysis of wastewater sewage sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater sewage sludge was co-pyrolyzed with a well characterized clay sample, in order to evaluate possible advantages in the thermal disposal process of solid waste. Characterization of the co-pyrolysis process was carried out both by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometric (TG-MS) analysis, and by reactor tests, using a lab-scale batch reactor equipped with a gas chromatograph for analysis of the evolved gas phase (Py-GC). Due to the presence of clay, two main effects were observed in the instrumental characterization of the process. Firstly, the clay surface catalyzed the pyrolysis reaction of the sludge, and secondly, the release of water from the clay, at temperatures of approx. 450-500 deg. C, enhanced gasification of part of carbon residue of the organic component of sludge following pyrolysis. Moreover, the solid residue remaining after pyrolysis process, composed of the inorganic component of sludge blended with clay, is characterized by good features for possible disposal by vitrification, yielding a vitreous matrix that immobilizes the hazardous heavy metals present in the sludge.

Ischia, Marco, E-mail: marco.ischia@ing.unitn.it [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento (Italy); Maschio, Roberto Dal [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento (Italy); Grigiante, Maurizio [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento (Italy); Baratieri, Marco [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Universita 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Preferred Orientations and Anisotropy in Shales: Callovo-Oxfordian Shale (France) and Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks is receiving increasing attention. Seismic anisotropy is essential in the prospecting for petroleum deposits. Anisotropy of diffusion has become relevant for environmental contaminants, including nuclear waste. In both cases, the orientation of component minerals is a critical ingredient and, largely because of small grain size and poor crystallinity, the orientation distribution of clay minerals has been difficult to quantify. A method is demonstrated that relies on hard synchrotron X-rays to obtain diffraction images of shales and applies the crystallographic Rietveld method to deconvolute the images and extract quantitative information about phase fractions and preferred orientation that can then be used to model macroscopic physical properties. The method is applied to shales from European studies which investigate the suitability of shales as potential nuclear waste repositories (Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory near Bure, France, and Benken borehole and Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland). A Callovo-Oxfordian shale from Meuse/Haute-Marne shows a relatively weak alignment of clay minerals and a random distribution for calcite. Opalinus shales from Benken and Mont Terri show strong alignment of illite-smectite, kaolinite, chlorite, and calcite. This intrinsic contribution to anisotropy is consistent with macroscopic physical properties where anisotropy is caused both by the orientation distribution of crystallites and high-aspect-ratio pores. Polycrystal elastic properties are obtained by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution and polyphase properties by averaging over all phases. From elastic properties we obtain anisotropies for p waves ranging from 7 to 22%.

Wenk, H.-R.; Voltolini, M.; Mazurek, M.; Van Loon, L.R.; Vinsot, A. (PSI); (UCB); (Bern); (LSMHM)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Experimental Test of the validity of "Isotropic" Approximation for the Mechanical Behaviour of Clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental data from axially symmetric compression test at constant mean pressure p on kaolinite clay are used to study the validity of an "isotropic" modelling as a function of the overconsolidation ratio (OCR).The isotropic assumption is found to be quite good for 24. For very large OCR (OCR >10), anisotropic response is observed at few percents of axial deformation. Relation with anisotropic distribution of local forces is made. Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

P. Evesque; M. Hattab

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Toxicity of lead to soil respiration: mediation by clay minerals, humic acids, and compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Pb has no known biological function, elevated levels of Pb in soils and in other natural environments may adversely affect the indigenous biota, including the microbiota. Elevated levels of Pb in soil may also adversely affect microbemediated ecologic processes. There is, however, relatively little information on the mediating influence of the physicochemical factors of the recipient environment on the toxicity of Pb to microbe-mediated ecologic processes. This present study evaluated the influence of the clay minerals, kaolinite and montmorillonite, particulate humic acids, and compost on the degradation of glucose in soil.

Debosz, K.; Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

CO2 Adsorption to Sub-Single Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may react with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of 0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At low pressure increasing CO2 adsorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak or no temperature dependence. Supercritical fluids, sorption phenomena, carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, caprock integrity

Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Hauss, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Schaef, Herbert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

CO2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ??0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.

Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk; Hauss, Thomas; Schaef, Herbert T.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Krukowski, Elizabeth; Stack, Andrew G.; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ultimate capacity of suction caisson in normally and lightly overconsolidated clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum exploration and production in recent years have moved into increasingly deeper water off the continental shelf. Some of these facilities are anchored in water depths in excess of 1000 meters. Exploration and production in deep water present new technological challenges where traditional fixed platforms have given way to floating structures. Today suction caissons are the most commonly used anchorage system for permanent offshore oil production facility. The objective of this study is to numerically predict the ultimate capacity of suction caissons in normally consolidated and lightly overconsolidated clays. Representative soil profile from the Gulf of Mexico and the North Sea are taken and analyzed for suction caissons with length over diameter ratios of 2, 4, 6 & 8. Normalized failure load interaction diagrams are generated for each of the cases. The location of optimum attachment point is also reported for each of the cases. General purpose finite element computer program ABAQUS is used for the numerical prediction. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models using hybrid elements. A simplified elastic perfectly plastic model with von-Mises yield criterion is used for the study. The saturated clay is treated as an incompressible material. Results of the study compares well with existing simplified method for estimating load capacity of suction caisson anchors.

Sharma, Partha Pratim

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions  

SciTech Connect

Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, ?. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived ? values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had ?~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had ?=0.001. SD (?=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (?=0.007) and ATD (?=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of fresh mineral dust which leads to the addition of more than ~3% soluble material is expected to significantly enhance hygroscopicity and CCN activity.

Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRESIDENT'S MANAGEMENT COUNCIL FROM: Clay Johnson Deputy Director for Management SUBJECT: Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (Pub. L. No. 109-282) Implementation This memorandum establishes an interagency task force to ensure effective implementation of the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (the Act). I have asked OMB Associate Director for Management Robert Shea to lead the task force. The first meeting of the task force will take place on Thursday, November 16, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. in Room 248 of the Old Executive Office Building. Please appoint a senior level official from your agency that can contribute to the development of the website required by the Act as well as

169

Durability of LDPE nanocomposites with clay, silica, and zinc oxide: part I: mechanical properties of the nanocomposite materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three types of LDPE-based nanocomposites with montmorillonite clay, silica, and zinc oxide were prepared by melt blending the nanofiller with the resin. As a prelude to studying their durability, the extent of reinforcement of the LDPE matrix by the ...

Halim Hamid Redhwi, Mohammad Nahid Siddiqui, Anthony L. Andrady, Syed Hussain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

Y. Mheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work aims at recycling of the solid wastes of clay brick industry (WCB) in the manufacture of blended cement. The various characteristics of collected samples of the waste were determined. WCB was ground to different surface areas. Different mixes were designed from the WCB and ordinary Portland cement (OPC). After adding the required amount of water for each mix, the pastes were moulded in 5x5x5cm3 mould. The initial and final setting time were measured. The moulded specimens were cured at room temperature for 24hr, then demoulded and cured at water for the required testing time. The compressive strength for the hardened specimens was measured. The kinetic of the reaction was followed by determining free lime and chemically combined water contents. The obtained results were compared with OPC and different types of blended cement already existing in the market. The results clearly illustrate the suitability of WCB for the production of series of different types of blended cement (green products) having great impact on the energy saving moreover decreasing carbon dioxide content released during cement industry .

Amin, A. M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Liquid-impregnated clay solid sorbents for CO2 removal from postcombustion gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel liquid-impregnated clay sorbent #1;R. V. Siriwardane, U.S. Patent No. 6,908,497 B1 #2;2003#3;#4; was developed for carbon dioxide #1;CO2#2; removal in the temperature range of ambient to 60C for both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactor applications. The sorbent is regenerable at 80100C. A 20-cycle test conducted in an atmospheric reactor with simulated flue gas with moisture demonstrated that the sorbent retains its CO2 sorption capacity with CO2 removal efficiency of about 99% during the cyclic tests. The sorbents suitable for fluidized-bed reactor operations showed required delta CO2 capacity requirements for sorption of CO2 at 40C and regeneration at 100C. The parameters such as rate of sorption, heat of sorption, minimum fluidization velocities, and attrition resistance data that are necessary for the design of a reactor suitable for capture and regeneration were also determined for the sorbent. A 20-cycle test conducted in the presence of flue-gas pollutant sulfur dioxideSO2 #2;20 parts per million#3;indicated that the sorbent performance was not affected by the presence of SO2.

Siriwardane, R.; Robinson, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is leading an effort to find novel approaches to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources. The Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to encourage development of processes that

177

QUANTITATIVE X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION ANALYSES OF CLAYS USING AN ORIENTING INTERNAL STANDARD AND PRESSED DISKS OF BULK SHALE SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstraet--Quantitative analysis of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction requires oriented clays in order to increase detection limits of the analyses. This is achieved commonly either by smear or sedimentation techniques; however, these techniques can lead to poor analytical precision when used with an internal standard because they often produce non-homogeneous internal standard-clay mineral mixtures. Compaction of bulk shale material at 8000 psi in an hydraulic press produces preferred orientations comparable to that produced by smear or sedimentation. When used with a suitable platy internal standard which provides an estimate of clay mineral preferred orientation, excellent analytical precision is achieved routinely. Several lines of experimental evidence indicate that 1-5 /tm MoS2 is an ideal orienting internal standard for use with compaction mounts.

R. D. Cody; G. L. Thompson

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major concern in the development of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths such as those caused by thermally-induced stress cracking. Past analyses of HDR and HFR reservoirs have tended to focus primarily on the coupling between hydrology (flow), heat transfer, and rock mechanics. Recent studies suggest that rock-fluid interactions and associated mineral dissolution and precipitation effects could have a major impact on the long-term performance of HFR reservoirs. The present paper uses recent European studies as a starting point to explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in HFR systems. We examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance by maintaining or even enhancing injectivity. Chemical manipulations considered here include pH modification and dilution with fresh water. We performed coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua), using the non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate that modifying the injection water chemistry can enhance mineral dissolution and reduce clay swelling. Chemical interactions between rocks and fluids will change a HFR reservoir over time, with some changes favorable and others not. A detailed, quantitative understanding of processes and mechanisms can suggest chemical methods for reservoir management, which may be employed to improve the performance of the geothermal system.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse  

SciTech Connect

Our goal in this study is to utilize novel anionic clay sorbents for treating and reclaiming/reusing power-plant effluents, in particular, boiler blow-down waters containing heavy metals, such as As and Se. Developing and using novel materials for such application is dictated by the challenge posed by reclaiming and recycling these too-clean-to-clean effluent streams, generated during electricity production, whose contaminant levels are in the ppm/ppb (or even less) trace levels. During the study model blow-down streams have been treated in batch experiments. Adsorption isotherms as a function of pH/temperature have been established for both As and Se. Adsorption rates have also measured as a function of concentration, temperature, pH, and space time. For both the equilibrium and rate measurements, we have studied the As/Se interaction, and competition from background anions. A homogeneous surface diffusion model is used to describe the experimental kinetic data. The estimated diffusivity values are shown to depend on the particle size. On the other hand, a model taking into account the polycrystalline nature of these adsorbent particles, and the presence of an intercrystallite porous region predicts correctly that the surface diffusivity is particle size independent. A mathematical model to describe flow experiments in packed-beds has also been developed during phase I of this project. The goal is to validate this model with flow experiments in packed-beds during the phase II of this project, to determine the adsorption capacity under flow conditions, and to compare it with the capacity estimated from the adsorption isotherms determined from the batch studies.

Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stabilization traps toxic contaminants (usually both chemically and physically) in a matrix so that they do not leach into the environment. Typical contaminants are metals (mostly transition metals) that exhibit the characteristic of toxicity. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. In many instances, materials that can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP-the federal leach test) or the Soluble Threshold Leachate Concentration (STLC-the California leach test) must have high concentrations of lime or other caustic material because of the low pH of the leaching media. Both leaching media, California`s and EPA`s, have a pH of 5.0. California uses citric acid and sodium citrate while EPA uses acetic acid and sodium acetate. These media can form ligands that provide excellent metal leaching. Because of the aggressive nature of the leaching medium, stabilized wastes in many cases will not pass the leaching tests. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation, are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens). The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements.

Bowers, J.S.; Anson, J.R.; Painter, S.M.; Maitino, R.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Hazardous Waste Management Div.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sorption and desorption characteristics of a packed bed of clay-CaCl{sub 2} desiccant particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccants can be used in conjunction with solar energy to provide a viable alternative to traditional air conditioning techniques. A desiccant consisting of clay and calcium chloride was developed and tested using multiple sorption and desorption cycles. During sorption, inlet air temperatures from 23 to 36 C with corresponding relative humidities of 42-66% were tested. Additionally, superficial air velocities from 0.17 to 0.85 m/s were tested. During desorption, inlet air temperatures from 50 to 57 C and superficial air velocities of approximately 0.30 and 0.60 m/s were tested. A regression equation was determined for the mass of water sorbed by the clay-CaCl2 desiccant with a R{sup 2} value of 0.917. The desorption data was regressed to an exponential function and significant k-values were determined. An equation for pressure drop through the desiccant was determined and compared to existing models. The desiccant was found to perform well during the repeated test cycles though small masses of desiccant were lost due to surface disintegration of the desiccant spheres. (author)

Tretiak, C.S.; Abdallah, N. Ben [Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 1000, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE/EA-1083; Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 April 1997 Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR A NEW SILT/CLAY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND USE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing its current silt/clay source and opening as many as three new sources with volumes sufficient to support potential Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) projects through 2005. The current source, Spreading Area B

184

3.1 $?$m H$_{2}$O Ice Absorption in LINER-Type Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies with Cool Far-Infrared Colors: the Centrally-Concentrated Nature of Their Deeply Buried Energy Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-based 2.8--4.1 $\\mu$m slit spectra of the nuclei of seven ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) that are classified optically as LINERs and have cool far-infrared colors are presented. All the nuclei show 3.3 $\\mu$m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, with equivalent widths that are systematically lower than those in starburst galaxies. Strong 3.1 $\\mu$m H$_{2}$O ice absorption, with optical depth greater than 0.6, is also detected in five nuclei, and 3.4 $\\mu$m carbonaceous dust absorption is detected clearly in one of the five nuclei. It is quantitatively demonstrated that the large optical depths of the H$_{2}$O ice absorption in the five sources, and the 3.4 $\\mu$m absorption in one source, are incompatible with a geometry in which the energy sources are spatially mixed with dust and molecular gas, as is expected for a typical starburst, but instead require that a large amount of nuclear dust (including ice-covered grains) and molecular gas be distributed in a screen in front of the 3--4 $\\mu$m continuum-emitting sources. This geometrical requirement can naturally be met if the energy sources are more centrally concentrated than the nuclear dust and molecular gas. The low equivalent widths of the PAH emission compared to starbursts and the central concentration of the nuclear energy sources in these five ULIRGs are best explained by the presence of energetically important active galactic nuclei deeply buried in dust and molecular gas.

Masatoshi Imanishi; Philip R. Maloney

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fine-grained clay fraction (,0.2 {mu}m): An interesting tool to approach the present thermal and permeability state in active geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated by X-ray diffraction the very fine grained secondary minerals (< 0.2 {micro}m) developed in geothermal systems, in relation with their present thermal and permeability state. Because the smallest particles are the most reactive part of a rock, they are the youngest mineral phases of the geothermal fields. This study has been performed on two active geothermal fields: Milos field, Greece (130 < T < 320 C) and Chipilapa field, Salvador (90 < T < 215 C). In the Milos field, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fraction observed in the reservoir strongly differs from the overlying altered metamorphic schists in the presence of abundant quantities of saponite and talc/saponite interstratified minerals at unusually high temperature. These phases are considered to be kinetically control-led ''metastable'' minerals which rapidly evolve towards actinolite and talc for present temperatures higher than 300 C. Their occurrence is a good indicator of discharge in highly permeable zones. In the geothermal field of Chipilapa, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fractions fairly agrees with the temperatures presently measured in the wells, whereas several discrepancies may be pointed out from the compositions of coarser clay fractions (< 5 {micro}m) which contain minerals inherited from higher temperature stages. Permeable zones may be evidenced from an increase of expandable components in the interstratified minerals and a decrease of the coherent domain of the unexpandable clay particles (chlorite).

Patrier, P.; Papapanagiotou, P.; Beaufort, D.; Traineau, H.; Bril, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays Laura A. Wendling,* James B) on rhizosphere soil as compared with bulk soil. This study The strongest association between Cs and the soil

Flury, Markus

187

Molecular dynamics simulation of complex molecules at interfaces: dendritic surfactants in clay and amyloid peptides near lipid bilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique to complex molecules at interfaces. Partitioning of dendritic surfactants into clay gallery and Ab protein behavior near hydrated lipids are chosen for the purpose. Using a full atomistic model of dendritic surfactants, the confinement force profiles featuring oscillatory fashion at moderate layer separation of 10 to 25 were observed. Integration of the confinement forces led to free energy profiles, which, in turn, were used to determine the final morphology of the nanocomposite. From the free energy profiles, smaller and linear surfactants (G1 and G2L) are expected to intercalate into the clay comfortably, while larger surfactants (G2 and G3) are expected to form frustrated intercalated structures due to the location and depth of the free energy minima. This would agree with the previous observations. As primary steps to understand the Ab protein behavior under biological conditions, simulations of bulk water and hydrated lipids were performed and the results were compared with the literature. Hydrated lipids were simulated using a full atomistic model of lipids (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) and water with a cvff force-field and it was found that structural properties such as the molecular head group area and membrane thickness were accurately produced with MD simulation. Systems of the protein Ab(1-42) in bulk water were simulated and some secondary structural change, with loss of part of the a-helical structure, occurred during the 1 ns of simulation time at 323K. The fragment Ab(31-42) with b-sheet conformation was also simulated in bulk water, and the extended b-sheet structure became a bent structure. Simulations of Ab(1- 42) or Ab(31-42) near lipid bilayers have been performed to investigate the structural property changes under biological conditions. The different nature of structural change was observed from the simulations of the protein or fragment in water and near lipid bilayers due to the different solvent environment. The protein has close contacts with the membrane surface. It was impossible to observe the conformational change to b-sheet and protein entrance into the lipid bilayer within 1 ns simulations.

Han, Kunwoo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Organic liner for thermoset composite tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Previously, scientists have followed two approaches in the development of cryotanks that were impervious to deterioration caused by the contained material and environmental factors. One is a metal lined tank with the metal usually in the form of a foil. The other is an organically coated tank where the coating is a film. Both the foil and the film are theoretically impermeable; however, the bond to the substrate and the integrity of the final surface have proven to be unsatisfactory in both applications. This invention relates to a coating for sealing surfaces having complex geometry, particularly to a coating of epoxy layers that forms a surface impermeable in harsh cryogenic and chemically corrosive environments. 8 tabs.

Garvey, R.E.

1989-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Technical Information Service, NTIS, Springfield, VA (1982). Fisher Controls, Control Valve Handbook, 2nd Ed., Fisher Controls Company, Marshalltown, IA (1977)....

192

The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mechanical tests of PVC and HDPE geomembranes that were exposed to weathering (solar radiation, humidity of puncture and tear tests showed some increases with aging. Some decreases were verified in the deformation, they can degrade when in contact with sunlight. Sharma & Lewis (1994) report that geomembranes exposed

Zornberg, Jorge G.

193

Zornberg, Jorge G. et al."Geosynthetics" The Handbook of Groundwater Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advisory Board on Toxics in Water for the Electric Power Research Institute, and several boards and panels and durability forecasting of civil infrastructure. Dr. Sagüés is a member of NACE International (formerly operations, repository layout and design alternatives, construction planning, thermal load ing

Zornberg, Jorge G.

194

Geosynthetics in pavements: North American contributions Zornberg, J.G. & Gupta, R.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the component of interest. Another benefit of adapting the ETS to the Web is the ability to connect the ETS, usually due to pneumatics problems. A program is now in place to provide semi- annual preventive

Zornberg, Jorge G.

195

Evaluation of past and future alterations in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, based on the clay mineralogy of drill cores USW G-1, G-2, and G-3  

SciTech Connect

The tuffs at Yucca Mountain in south-central Nevada are being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to determine their suitability for a high-level radioactive waste repository. For predictive purposes, it is important to understand the alteration history of Yucca Mountain and to know how the minerals in Yucca Mountain tuffs respond to changing conditions such as elevated temperatures. The clay mineralogy of these tuffs has been examined using x-ray powder diffraction, and approximation temperatures of alteration have been determined using available clay mineral data and fluid inclusion analyses. Also, several illites from drill holes USW G-1 and G-2 have been dated using K/Ar techniques, yielding ages of about 11 Myr. The clay mineral in Yucca Mountain tuffs are predominantly interstratified illite/smectites, with minor amounts of chloride, kaolinite, and interstratified chlorite/smectite at depth in USW G-1 and G-2. The reactions observed for these illite/smectites are similar to those observed in pelitic rocks. With depths, the illite/smectites transform from random interstratifications (R = 0) through ordered intermediates (R = 1) to illite in USW G-2 and to Kalkberg (R {ge} 3) interstratifications in USW G-1. The illite/smectites in USW G-3 have not significantly transformed. It appears that the illites in deeper rock results from hydrothermal and diagenetic reactions of earlier-formed smectites. These data demonstrate that the rocks at depth in the northern end of Yucca Mountain were significantly altered about 11 Myr ago. Both clay mineralogy and fluid inclusions suggest that the rocks at depth in USW G-2 have been subjected to postdepositional temperatures of at least 275{degree}C, those in USW G-1 have reached 200{degree}C, and USW G-3 rocks probably have not exceeded 100{degree}C. 64 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Bish, D.L.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

{sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix  

SciTech Connect

Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

Hartzell, C.J. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1994-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

A test program to determine the structural properties of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry walls at the DOE Oak Ridge plants  

SciTech Connect

A recent Department of Energy (DOE) General Design Criteria'' has emphasized the importance of determining the adequacy and safety of both new and existing facilities to natural phenomenon hazards. Many of the buildings at the DOE Oak Ridge facilities are constructed with unreinforced masonry hollow clay tile infill walls -- in some cases these walls comprise a substantial part of the lateral force resistance for a building. In order to perform a realistic assessment of the strength of the buildings to seismic events it is important to accurately predict the behavior of these walls. Very little information is currently available on hollow clay tile masonry, its structural properties and behavior. As the in-situ condition of these walls throughout the plants is suspect due to their age and exposure to numerous chemicals, a test program was initiated at the Oak Ridge plants to obtain material properties for use in the natural phenomena hazards analysis. This paper presents the preliminary results of that testing program. The following tests on clay-tile walls, units, and panels were performed: (1) in-situ mortar bed shear strength, (2) compression strength, (3) splitting tensile strength, and (4) diagonal tension (shear) strength of panels which had been removed from existing walls. The testing program is ongoing, is being expanded, and will include not only in-plane tests, but out-of-plane bending testing as well. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

W. Clay Davis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dr. Davis' research focuses on coupling gas and liquid chromatography to ICP-MS using high accuracy analytical methods such as speciated ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Application of Brazilian kaolinite clay as adsorbent to removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution: Kinetic and thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions  

SciTech Connect

The compound N{sup 1}-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopic, X-ray diffraction, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The kinetic parameters analyzed by the Lagergren and Elovich models gave a good fit for a pseudo-second order reaction with k{sub 2} values 16.0 and 25.1 mmol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} ranges for natural and modified kaolinite clays, respectively. The energetic effects caused by metal ion adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. - Graphical abstract: This investigation reports the use of original and modified kaolinites as alternative absorbents. The compound N-[3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route.

Guerra, Denis L., E-mail: denis@cpd.ufmt.b [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba 78060 900, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba 78060 900, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Airoldi, Claudio [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Coal resources of the Southwestern District, Kentucky: Bell, Clay, Clinton, Estill, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Madison, McCreary, Owsley, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Wayne, and Whitley counties  

SciTech Connect

The Southwestern District contains an estimated 7.43 billion short tons of original coal resources. Remaining coal resources total an estimated 6.85 billion short tons as of January 1, 1981. The coal resources are tabulated by standard U. S. Geological Survey resource classes for 25 of the coal beds that occur in the district. Clay County contains an estimated 1.54 billion tons, or 21 percent of the district total, followed by Knox, which contains 1.38 billion tons, or 19 percent of the district total. Bell County contains an estimated 1.03 billion tons, or 14 percent, and Whitley County contains 975 million tons, or 13 percent of the district total. Remaining coal resources in the other 11 counties range from 70 thousand tons in Madison County to nearly 574 million tons in Owsley County.

Brant, R.A.; Smith, G.E.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ADVANCES ON THE USE OF GEOSYNTHETICS IN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS Jorge G. Zornberg, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change little. Water diverted from Bendora Dam (the middle dam) is supplied to Canberra via a gravity examines the ecological effects of serial impoundments (three dams) on a rocky upland stream and Sons, New York] and the Australian Rivers Assessment System (AUSRIVAS) to predict pre-dam biota. First

Zornberg, Jorge G.

202

Geosynthetics -7 ICG -Delmas, Gourc & Girard (eds) 2002 Swets & Zeitlinger, Lisse ISBN 90 5809 523 1 1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Technology (NIST) proposed a Smart Grid architecture * Manuscript received June 15, 2012; revised August 15 architecture [1]. 3. Vulnerabilities Smart grid network introduces enhancements and improved capabilitiesInternational Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities

Zornberg, Jorge G.

203

Sb(III) and Sb(V) Sorption onto Al-Rich Phases: Hydrous Al Oxide and the Clay Minerals Kaolinite KGa-1b and Oxidized and Reduced Nontronite NAu-1  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the immobilization of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by Al-rich phases - hydrous Al oxide (HAO), kaolinite (KGa-1b), and oxidized and reduced nontronite (NAu-1) - using batch experiments to determine the uptake capacity and the kinetics of adsorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy to characterize the molecular environment of adsorbed Sb. Both Sb(III) and Sb(V) are adsorbed in an inner-sphere mode on the surfaces of the studied substrates. The observed adsorption geometry is mostly bidentate corner-sharing, with some monodentate complexes. The kinetics of adsorption is relatively slow (on the order of days), and equilibrium adsorption isotherms are best fit using the Freundlich model. The oxidation state of the structural Fe within nontronite affects the adsorption capacity: if the clay is reduced, the adsorption capacity of Sb(III) is slightly decreased, while Sb(V) uptake is increased significantly. This may be a result of the presence of dissolved Fe(II) in the reduced nontronite suspensions or associated with the structural rearrangements in nontronite due to reduction. These research findings indicate that Sb can be effectively immobilized by Al-rich phases. The increase in Sb(V) uptake in response to reducing structural Fe in clay can be important in natural settings since Fe-rich clays commonly go through oxidation-reduction cycles in response to changing redox conditions.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based and pillared interlayer clay-based catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated. The experiments used a number of gas compositions to simulate different combustion gases. A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to determine the concentrations of the product species. The major products were nitric oxide (NO), ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The aim was to delineate the effect of various parameters including reaction temperature, oxygen concentration, NH3-to-NO ratio, space velocity, heating area, catalyst arrangement, and vanadium coating on the removal of nitric oxide. The investigation showed that the change of the parameters significantly affected the removals of NO and NH3 species, the residual NH3 concentration (or NH3 slip), the temperature of the maximum NO reduction, and the temperature of complete NH3 conversion. The reaction temperature was increased from the ambient temperature (25C) to 450 C. For both catalysts, high NO and NH3 removals were obtained in the presence of a small amount of oxygen, but no significant influence was observed from 0.1 to 3.0% O2. An increase in NH3-to-NO ratio increased NO reduction but decreased NH3 conversions. For V2O5-WO3/TiO2, the decrease of space velocity increased NO and NH3 removals and broadened the active temperature window (based on NO > 88% and NH3 > 87%) about 50C. An increase in heating area decreased the reaction temperature of the maximum NO reduction from 350 to 300C, and caused the active reaction temperature window (between 250 and 400C) to shift toward 50C lower reaction temperatures (between 200 and 350C). The change of catalyst arrangements resulted slight improvement for NO and NH3 removals, therefore, the change might contribute to more gas removals. The catalyst with extra vanadium coating showed higher NO reductions and NH3 conversions than the catalyst without the extra vanadium coating.

Oh, Hyuk Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a five research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Peabody Energy studied three experimental cast blasts conducted at the North Antelope Rochelle mine site on July 24,28 and 31 2005. The initial purpose of this research project was to determine the influence that blast initiation sequence have on: NOx production; Face Displacement; Highwall damage; Explosive performance; Vibration emissions; Displacement; Surface swell; and Cast benefit. Two new discoveries on velocity of detonation (VoD) and pressure of detonation (PoD) were made as a result of this research project. Furthermore, a relationship between surface swell velocity and face velocity was also noted. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Madsen, A.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nondestructive Evaluation: NDE for Fuel Pool and Transfer Canal Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addresses results of studies conducted with the long-range ultrasonic guided wave technique using magnetostrictive (MsS) sensors, rotational scanner with eddy current (EC) probes, alternating current field measurement (ACFM), and infrared thermography (IRT). Additionally, through collaborative work with EPRIs Critical Power division, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) were identified for delivering nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools into spent fuel pools where extreme high ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Open-Access Journal for the Basic Principles of Diffusion Theory, Experiment and Application Application of Low Field and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy to Study the Liquid/Liquid Interface in Porous Space of Clay Minerals and Shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In petroleum research understanding displacement, redistribution, and adsorption of oil and water plays an important role. To study complex multi-component systems such as liquid/liquid/mineral interactions in the porous space of clays and shales we applied low field (2 15 MHz) and high resolution (300 MHz) NMR spectroscopy. The detailed NMR analysis shows that the results from low field NMR measurements are in good correlation with the solid-state data. Consequently the process of liquid/liquid displacement can be characterised by considering the relaxation times, signal amplitudes and chemical shifts together.

Artem Borysenko; Ben Clennell; Iko Burgar; David Dewhurst; Rossen Sedev; John Ralston

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Light-stable-isotope studies of spring and thermal waters from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort/Sulphurdale Thermal areas and of clay minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen have been determined for spring waters and thermal fluids from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal areas, for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration of the acid-sulfate type in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area, and for spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area of central Utah. The water analyses in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area confirm the origin of the thermal fluids from meteoric water in the Mineral Range. The water analyses in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal area restrict recharge areas for this system to the upper elevations of the Pavant and/or Tushar Ranges. The low /sup 18/O shift observed in these thermal fluids (+0.7 permil) implies either high water/rock ratios or incomplete isotope exchange or both, and further suggests minimal interaction between the thermal fluid and marble country rock in the system. Hydrogen and oxygen-isotope data for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration zones in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal system suggest that the fluids responsible for the shallow acid-sulfate alteration were in part derived from condensed steam produced by boiling of the deep reservoir fluid. The isotope evidence supports the chemical model proposed by Parry et al. (1980) for origin of the acid-sulfate alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs. The isotope analyses of spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area indicate only a general correlation of isotope composition, salinity and chemical temperatures.

Bowman, J.R.; Rohrs, D.T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Attenuation of dilute aromatic hydrocarbon transport by a block copolymer in a compacted vertisol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste landfills in the United States are built with a composite bottom liner consisting of a flexible membrane liner of high-density polyethylene overlying a compacted soil liner. Hydrocarbons have been shown to pass through the flexible membrane liner by diffusion. Flexible membrane liners often have flaws allowing direct contact between the leachate and the compacted soil liner. The transmission of hydrocarbons to the compacted soil liner presents a threat to groundwater supplies. The study was performed to determine if the modification of a compacted soil liner with a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer could successfully sequester benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and meet the United States Environmental Protection Agency's saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement of 1x10?? cm sec?. Compacted Ships clay modified with 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10% weight of a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer was tested for saturated hydraulic conductivity using 10.2 cm fixed wall permeameters. The compacted Ships clay met the United States Environmental Protection Agency's mandated saturated hydraulic conductivity of 10?? cm sec? at polymer contents of 3% (wt) polymer or less. The presence of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons had no effect on the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The ability of the polymer to attenuate the transport of dilute aromatic hydrocarbons was tested by permeating the compacted soil/polymer treatments with a 0.01N CaSO4 solution contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Leachate from permeameters packed with soil containing more than 1% (wt) polymer had BTEX concentrations below the drinking water standard for 3 or more pore volumes. The findings of this research were applied to a hypothetical compacted soil liner constructed with Ships clay modified to include 3% (wt) polymer and having a saturated hydraulic conductivity of 4.23 x 10?? cm sec?. It was assumed that the soil liner was in direct contact with landfill leachate. The hypothetical liner would protect the groundwater from contamination above the maximum contamination limit for drinking water by benzene for 350 years, toluene for 140 years, and ethylbenzene for 260 years.

Akin, James Browning

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Polycarbonate-Clay Nanocomposite (Sumsung Project)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEI Corporation NEI Corporation 1 Nanophase Electrode Materials for Fast Rate Li-based Energy Storage Devices Dr. Amit Singhal, Chief Scientist NEI Corporation, Somerset, NJ N. Pereira, F. Badway and G. Amatucci Energy Storage Research Group, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ NEI Corporation Presentation at: DOE Peer Review Meeting NEI Corporation 2 Program Overview * Goals - Develop low cost & non-toxic nanostructured anodes with fast rate capability for Li-based energy storage devices - Fabricate prototype asymmetric cells with fast rate capabilities and long cycle life * Phase II Start date: July 2003 * Accomplished So Far - Synthesized nanostructured WO 2 powders and performed detailed electrochemical and structural characterization - Synthesized and characterized nanostructured W

213

Clay Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data File for 2010 - File1a1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

214

ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF CLAYS Arpita Pal Bathija  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer and related fluid-thermal-energy sciences; with emphases on physical transfer and viscoelastic fluid flows, after working for some time in industry. "Kostic's unique synergy LECTURE Uniqueness and Universality of Heat Transfer: Challenges and Opportunities for Improving Heat

215

Polypropylene Nanocomposites Reinforced with Organophilic Clay ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit ... Method for Removal of Mercury from Oil Field Brine with Calcium Carbonate...

216

Polycarbonate-Clay Nanocomposite (Sumsung Project)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Fabricated and characterized prototype ( 2" X 2") asymmetric hybrid cells utilizing nano - WO 2 and macro- WO 2 anodes * Future Milestone - Improve 1 st cycle efficiency of...

217

? Disposal concepts (enclosed): crystalline, clay/shale,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

salt, deep borehole (Re: January, 2012 briefing) ? Thermal analysis for mined, enclosed concepts ? Finite element analysis for generic salt repository (waste package size up to 32-PWR) ? Open disposal concept development: shale unbackfilled, sedimentary backfilled, and hard-rock unsaturated (waste package sizes up to 32-PWR) ? Thermal analysis for mined, open concepts ? Cost estimation for 5 disposal concepts ? Summary and conclusions

Ernest Hardin (snl; Jim Blink; Harris Greenberg (llnl; Joe Carter (srnl; Rob Howard (ornl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Flame retardant mechanism of polyamide 6clay ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a nitrogen atmos- phere over a temperature range which is close to the ... sample was observed giving it the appearance of a highly viscous mound. ...

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

Characterization of Refractories, Clays, Concrete, Interfaces, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 18, 2010 ... Gasification is a process that converts a carbon feedstock into synthesis gas (CO +H2). Slagging gasifiers operate at high temperature and...

220

Material characterization of the clay bonded silicon carbide candle filters and ash formations in the W-APF system after 500 hours of hot gas filtration at AEP. Appendix to Advanced Particle Filter: Technical progress report No. 11, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

(1) After 500 hours of operation in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion gas environment, the fibrous outer membrane along the clay bonded silicon carbide Schumacher Dia Schumalith candles remained intact. The fibrous outer membrane did not permit penetration of fines through the filter wall. (2) An approximate 10-15% loss of material strength occurred within the intact candle clay bonded silicon carbide matrix after 500 hours of exposure to the PFBC gas environment. A relatively uniform strength change resulted within the intact candles throughout the vessel (i.e., top to bottom plenums), as well as within the various cluster ring positions (i.e., outer versus inner ring candle filters). A somewhat higher loss of material strength, i.e., 25% was detected in fractured candle segments removed from the W-APF ash hopper. (3) Sulfur which is present in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion gas system induced phase changes along the surface of the binder which coats the silicon carbide grains in the Schumacher Dia Schumalith candle filter matrix.

Alvin, M.A.

1993-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack.

Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Absorbents for Mineral Oil Spill Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual mineral oil on the ground surface following electrical equipment spills is often removed using a surface application of an absorbent material. Traditional absorbent products include clays, sawdust-like products, silica-based products, and various organic industry byproduct materials. After the material has had time to absorb the mineral oil on the ground surface, it is removed and normally sent to a landfill with a liner and leachate collection system designed to Subtitle D standards for municip...

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison between HDPE/Clay and HDPE/Piassava Fiber/Clay ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nickel Recovery from Sukinda Chromite Overburden Using Shewanella Putrefaciens Optimization of Process Parameters on the Siffusion Bonding of a...

224

Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique and Guided Wave Examination of Containment Liners and Shells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At a nuclear power plant, the containment building is of primary importance for safe operation. The primary containment and other safety-related structures at a nuclear plant site must be capable of maintaining their design features for the operating life of the plant. Demonstrating the satisfactory condition of the containment building and other safety-related structures is required for long-term operation of the plant.Lucius Pitkin, Inc., has performed a project for the Electric Power ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

An evaluation of web site services in liner shipping in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research steps include questionnaire design and research methods are ... of the questionnaire, personal interviews with shipping practitioners, and a.

226

Development of a liner-less composite CNG cylinder and improved mechanical properties of cylinder materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xv, 91 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis MECH 2008 Iqbal Composite high pressure vessels are required in many (more)

Iqbal, Kosar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of a helmet liner for protection against blast induced trauma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traumatic brain injuries caused by shock waves have attracted increased medical and scientific attention due to the large percentage of combat troops that have sustained such injuries in recent conflict theatres. To this ...

Christou, George Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

State-of-the-Practice Liners and Caps for Coal Combustion Product Management Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 40% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) generated in the United States are beneficially reused in applications such as concrete products, road construction, and wallboard, with the remaining volume managed in landfills and ponds. Most new management units since 1994 have been lined landfills; pending federal regulations are expected to accelerate that trend.The objective of this report is to provide environmental managers with an overview of the state of the practice for ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Modular development mat reinforcing and liners containment/annulus building. Final report supplement. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of developing a modular system approach for the construction of containment mats has been established. The investigative results obtained from a plant used for the modular study has determined that (1) modularization results in a 10-week reduction in the construction schedule critical path over that for the conventional approach, and (2) modularization is cost effective and could result in a savings of approximately $10,700,000. Accordingly, it is recommended that the modular system approach be adopted as standard practice for the construction of containment mats.

Wainrib, J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Study of an advanced helmet liner concept to reduce TBI : experiments & simulation using sandwich structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large percentage of combat troops suffered Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) in recent wars in the Middle East. The majority of TBIs were caused by exposure to blast waves. Use of ...

Goel, Rahul, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fluid-filled helmet liner concept for protection against blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to changes in modem warfare threats, as well as advances in body armor, soldier survivability in combat has increased, but blast-induced Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has become a prevalent injury in the battlefield. ...

Yost, Allison L. (Allison Lynne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

ST0202 Statistikk for samfunnsvitere Kapittel 13: Liner regresjon og korrelasjon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TA-55 PF-4 2012 LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities National Security At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), virtually all plutonium operations occur within the Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55 (TA-55). TA-55 is the nation's most modern plutonium science and manufacturing facility

Langseth, Helge

233

Design of a composite combat helmet liner for prevention of blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air blast-induced traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) represent a significant percentage of military personnel injuries observed in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Prevalence of blast-induced ...

Vechart, Andrew (Andrew Peter)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Buckling of a cracked cylindrical shell reinforced with an elastic liner.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Shell structures have been widely used in engineering applications such as pipelines, aerospace and marine structures, and cooling towers. Occurring suddenly and generally inadvertently due (more)

Kim, Yoontae

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Executive Summary The Report of the World Commission on Dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in drainage applications. Also, dams often have vertical or near-vertical facing, so gravity has a differentGEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams

Kammen, Daniel M.

237

MMaannhhaattttaann CCoolllleeggee CCeenntteerr ffoorr GGeeootteecchhnnoollooggyy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Project - Cellular Geosynthetics 2001: Geofoam Lightweight Fills and Beyond Research Report No/Center for Geotechnology Manhattan College School of Engineering Center for Geotechnology Bronx, New York, U.S.A. November 2001 #12;Manhattan College School of Engineering Center for Geotechnology Cellular Geosynthetics 2001

Horvath, John S.

238

Clay County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6447931°, -85.0025539° 6447931°, -85.0025539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.6447931,"lon":-85.0025539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Clay County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

176186°, -94.479976° 176186°, -94.479976° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3176186,"lon":-94.479976,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

Clay County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.8486236° 5.8486236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.279527,"lon":-85.8486236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Clay County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8.556531° 8.556531° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7279431,"lon":-88.556531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.7787021° 1.7787021° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.9943564,"lon":-81.7787021,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

Clay County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

44°, -90.3748354° 44°, -90.3748354° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.3492244,"lon":-90.3748354,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Clay County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

38°, -95.1432068° 38°, -95.1432068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1368038,"lon":-95.1432068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

Clay Center, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

33831°, -83.3618725° 33831°, -83.3618725° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5633831,"lon":-83.3618725,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Clay County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.7199136° .7199136° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.1738044,"lon":-83.7199136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Clay County Electric Coop Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas Arkansas Utility Id 3712 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Agriculture Service-Off Peak Commercial Commercial Service Commercial Commercial Service- Optional Commercial General Service Residential Industrial Service Industrial Industrial Service Optional Industrial Irrigation-Off Peak Commercial Irrigation-Radio Controlled Commercial Irrigation-Regular Service Commercial Security Light: 150 Watt High Pressure Sodium Lighting Security Light: 175 Watt Metal Halide Lighting

248

Clay County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Carolina: Energy Resources North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0964003°, -83.7199136° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0964003,"lon":-83.7199136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Clay County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indiana: Energy Resources Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.368622°, -87.1422895° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.368622,"lon":-87.1422895,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Clay County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

98.0465185° 98.0465185° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5975479,"lon":-98.0465185,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Clay County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

344°, -97.0068393° 344°, -97.0068393° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8829344,"lon":-97.0068393,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

Clay County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -88.8263006° °, -88.8263006° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6567838,"lon":-88.8263006,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

Clay County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6.4257589° 6.4257589° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.878186,"lon":-96.4257589,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.56121° 5.56121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.5701766,"lon":-85.56121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Clay County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7°, -81.1196075° 7°, -81.1196075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.4417717,"lon":-81.1196075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Clay County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7900416°, -98.2212979° 7900416°, -98.2212979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7900416,"lon":-98.2212979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

Exchange of Cs Ion in Clay Minerals by Microwave Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Difference between Life and Death of Bacterium against Microwave Power under ... Sintering and Plastic Deformation of Ceramics under Pulsed Electric Current.

258

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Building Insulation, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Heat Recovery Unit, Spray Foam Insulation, Window Film Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy...

259

Long-term behaviour of twin tunnels in London clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state settlement RT, RTi Tunnel radius, and initial value S Settlement s Deviatoric stress tensor xxxi CONTENTS s Deviatoric stress tensor stated relative to rotated yield surface axis Sintc , S int cmid Additional Scmax(ss) due to twin-tunnel interaction...

Laver, Richard George

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Deep ocean clay crusts: behaviour and biological origin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 B.5 Detail of brass connection to actuator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 B.6 Detail of upper half of ball. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 B.7 Detail of lower half of ball...

Kuo, Matthew Yih-Han

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Professional Regulation's Construction Industry Licensing Board. System must be FSEC certified http:www.dsireusa.orgincentivesincentive.cfm?IncentiveCodeFL54F...

262

Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionic transport in porous shales, J. Geophys. Res. 109 , p.During the Early Compaction of Shales, from Fluid Flow andand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

Liu, Hui-Hai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effect of sample disturbance in opalinus clay shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sample disturbance problem for different geomaterials is reviewed in this thesis. A general discussion on the disturbance sources and complexities of the disturbance problem is followed by detailed reviews on disturbance ...

Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plates with spacer strips down the edges of the plates, then sealing the edges and bottom to form. Fig 1.4. Diagram of vertical slab gel assembly ("sandwich"). The sides and bottom must be sealed for a record of the separation. Radioactively labelled samples separated on a slab gel are commonly detected

Chorover, Jon

265

Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooperation and Non-Proliferation March 16, 2007 - 10:55am Addthis Visits National Nuclear Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia TBILISI, Georgia - U.S. Deputy Secretary of...

266

Promising Fire Retardant Results When Clay Nanofiller Has ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the NIST/UMD experiments, the material of interest was a polymera type of polystyrene, used in packaging, insulation, plastic cutlery and many ...

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

Mapping clay content variation using electromagnetic induction techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective management of the soil resource requires basic information about the spatial distribution of various attributes. A method widely used for providing spatial information is a combination of sampling strategies and geostatistics. However, geostatistical ... Keywords: EM34, EM38, Electromagnetic induction, Fuzzy k-means and extragrades classification, Spatial response surface sampling

J. Triantafilis; S. M. Lesch

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom Clay after ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom ...

269

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Ceiling Insulation: 600 Spray Foam Insulation: 600 Heat Pump: 500 Program Information Florida...

270

Clay County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7.179026° 7.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.34792,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Date Stamped/Typed Centered  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-C 2-C NEPA ID No.: PXP-10-0004 Deactivation & Decommissioning of the North Compost Tent Application of DOE NEPA Procedure: Categorical Exclusion B1.23, Applicable to Facility Operations (10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B), applies to the proposed activity. Rationale: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), proposes to demolish Environmental Restoration's (ER) North Compost Tent, which was damaged by a storm in 2003 and has not been fully operational since then. It is considered unsalvageable by the Facility & Systems Design Department. Demolition will consist of: Removal of clay soil (approximately 1 foot deep) and two liners (polyvinylchloride and

272

Characterization of the corrosion behavior of the carbon steel liner in Hanford Site single-shell tanks  

SciTech Connect

Six safety initiatives have been identified for accelerating the resolution of waste tank safety issues and closure of unreviewed safety questions. Safety Initiative 5 is to reduce safety and environmental risk from tank leaks. Item d of Safety Initiative 5 is to complete corrosion studies of single-shell tanks to determine failure mechanisms and corrosion control options to minimize further degradation by June 1994. This report has been prepared to fulfill Safety Initiative 5, Item d. The corrosion mechanisms that apply to Hanford Site single-shell tanks are stress corrosion cracking, pitting/crevice corrosion, uniform corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The corrosion data relevant to the single-shell tanks dates back three decades, when results were obtained from in-situ corrosion coupons in a few single-shell tanks. Since that time there have been intertank transfers, evaporation, and chemical alterations of the waste. These activities have changed the character and the present composition of the waste is not well characterized. All conclusions and recommendations are made in the absence of relevant laboratory experimental data and tank inspection data. The report attempts to identify the failure mechanisms by a literature survey of carbon steel data in environments similar to the single-shell tank wastes, and by a review of the work performed at the Savannah River Site where similar wastes are stored in similar carbon steel tanks. Based on these surveys, and in the absence of data specific to Hanford single-shell tanks, it may be concluded that the single-shell tanks identified as leakers failed primarily by stress corrosion cracking due to the presence of high nitrate/low hydroxide wastes and residual stresses. In addition, some failures may be attributed to pitting under crevices in low hydroxide locations.

Anantatmula, R.P.; Schwenk, E.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Danielson, M.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of NZP ceramic based {open_quotes}cast-in-place{close_quotes} diesel engine port liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BSX (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6-2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24}) and CSX (Ca{sub l-x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) type NZP ceramics were fabricated and characterized for: (i) thermal properties viz., thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, thermal stability and thermal shock resistance; (ii) mechanical properties viz., flexure strength and elastic modulus; and (iii) microstructures. Results of these tests and analysis indicated that the BS-25 (x=0.25 in BSX) and CS-50 (x=0.50 in CSX) ceramics had the most desirable properties for casting metal with ceramic in place. Finite element analysis (FEA) of metal casting (with ceramic in place) was conducted to analyze thermomechanical stresses generated and determine material property requirements. Actual metal casting trials were also conducted to verify the results of finite element analysis. In initial trials, the ceramic cracked because of the large thermal expansion mismatch (hoop) stresses (predicted by FEA also). A process for introduction of a compliant layer between the metal and ceramic to alleviate such destructive stresses was developed. The compliant layer was successful in preventing cracking of either the ceramic or the metal. In addition to these achievements, pressure slip casting and gel-casting processes for fabrication of NZP components; and acoustic emission and ultrasonics-based NDE techniques for detection of microcracks and internal flaws, respectively, were successfully developed.

Nagaswaran, R.; Limaye, S.Y.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite: Implications for the disposal of shale oil production wastes  

SciTech Connect

Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. Solid and liquid waste materials that arise from the production of shale oil contain a vast array of organic compounds. Common among these compounds are the aromatic amines. in order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict organic compound mobility, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca[sup 2+] - and K[sup +]-saturated Wyoming bentonite was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH, ionic strength, and dominate electrolyte cation and anion. organic adsorption on Ca[sup 2+] - and K[sup +]-saturated montmorillonite is pH dependent. For any given organic compound, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. organic compound adsorption is inhibited in the presence of sulfate and is greater in the Ca[sup 2+] systems than in the K[sup +] systems at any given ionic strength. High salt content and K[sup +] collapse the bentonite layers and limit access to and compete for adsorption sites. The K[sup +] ion is also more difficult to displace than Ca[sup 2+] from interlayer positions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic data show that the aniline compounds are adsorbed on bentonite through the hydrogen bonding of an amine hydrogen to a surface silica oxygen. Sulfate reduces amine adsorption by removing positively charged anilinium species from solution to form negatively charge sulfate complexes. Although adsorption of the substituted amines on bentonite is observed, aniline and toluidine adsorption is minimal in saline systems and not detected in alkaline systems. Thus, in shale oil process waste disposal sites, the mobility of the anilines through bentonite liners will not be mitigated by sorption processes, as spent oil shale leachates are both highly alkaline and saline.

Essington, M.E.; Bowen, J.M.; Wills, R.A.; Hart, B.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite: Implications for the disposal of shale oil production wastes  

SciTech Connect

Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. Solid and liquid waste materials that arise from the production of shale oil contain a vast array of organic compounds. Common among these compounds are the aromatic amines. in order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict organic compound mobility, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca{sup 2+} - and K{sup +}-saturated Wyoming bentonite was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH, ionic strength, and dominate electrolyte cation and anion. organic adsorption on Ca{sup 2+} - and K{sup +}-saturated montmorillonite is pH dependent. For any given organic compound, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. organic compound adsorption is inhibited in the presence of sulfate and is greater in the Ca{sup 2+} systems than in the K{sup +} systems at any given ionic strength. High salt content and K{sup +} collapse the bentonite layers and limit access to and compete for adsorption sites. The K{sup +} ion is also more difficult to displace than Ca{sup 2+} from interlayer positions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic data show that the aniline compounds are adsorbed on bentonite through the hydrogen bonding of an amine hydrogen to a surface silica oxygen. Sulfate reduces amine adsorption by removing positively charged anilinium species from solution to form negatively charge sulfate complexes. Although adsorption of the substituted amines on bentonite is observed, aniline and toluidine adsorption is minimal in saline systems and not detected in alkaline systems. Thus, in shale oil process waste disposal sites, the mobility of the anilines through bentonite liners will not be mitigated by sorption processes, as spent oil shale leachates are both highly alkaline and saline.

Essington, M.E.; Bowen, J.M.; Wills, R.A.; Hart, B.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

aquitard distribution in a northern reach of the miami ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

interest. Clay, Yellow Clay. Blue Clay, Sand with Clay. Gravel with Clay, Hardpan . Till, Silt. LOW 1. Fine Sand, Quicksand, Heaving. Sand, Black Sand, Red Sand.

278

March 25, 2011 Some Florida lakes failing the new numeric nutrient criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pond Citrus Fort Cooper Citrus Hampton Citrus North Citrus Park Citrus River Lake Manor Citrus Rousseau Clay Crystal Clay Doctors Clay Hall Clay Johnson Clay Little Crystal Clay Little Johnson Clay Margie

Watson, Craig A.

279

Probabilistic aerothermal design of gas turbine combustors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a probability-based framework for assessing the impact of manufacturing variability on combustor liner durability. Simplified models are used to link combustor liner life, liner temperature variability, ...

Bradshaw, Sean D. (Sean Darien), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels - Energy Innovation ...  

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CX-001232: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32: Categorical Exclusion Determination 32: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001232: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Reactor Area-609 Compressed Air System Drain Line Modification and Valve Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy Due to periods of insufficient water flow to the sewer ponds, the clay liners in the ponds can dry out and crack. This proposed action is to add an additional drain line, which will allow clean well water that has been used to cool compressors to then be drained into the sewer system ponds during low flow periods in order to maintain a higher, more consistent water level. There are no chemicals added to the water. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001232.pdf More Documents & Publications

282

DATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 SECTION A. Project Title: TRA-609 Compressed Air System Drain Line Modification and Valve Replacement SECTION B. Project Description: Due to periods of insufficient water flow to the sewer ponds, the clay liners in the ponds can dry out and crack. This proposed action is to add an additional drain line, which will allow clean well water that has been used to cool compressors to then be drained into the sewer system ponds during low flow periods in order to maintain a higher, more consistent water level. There are no chemicals added to the water. This project will replace the 1.5" compressor oil cooling water solenoid valves with ball valves on M-6, M-7 and M-8; replace the 2" compressor oil and air cooling system flow control valves on M-6, M-8 and M-9; install a new check valve in the compressed air system auxiliary compressor line; install a drain line

283

DATE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 SECTION A. Project Title: TRA-609 Compressed Air System Drain Line Modification and Valve Replacement SECTION B. Project Description: Due to periods of insufficient water flow to the sewer ponds, the clay liners in the ponds can dry out and crack. This proposed action is to add an additional drain line, which will allow clean well water that has been used to cool compressors to then be drained into the sewer system ponds during low flow periods in order to maintain a higher, more consistent water level. There are no chemicals added to the water. This project will replace the 1.5" compressor oil cooling water solenoid valves with ball valves on M-6, M-7 and M-8; replace the 2" compressor oil and air cooling system flow control valves on M-6, M-8 and M-9; install a new check valve in the compressed air system auxiliary compressor line; install a drain line

284

Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective  

SciTech Connect

A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

Young, Suzanne E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Coupled thermohydromechanical analysis of a heater test in unsaturated clay and fractured rock at Kamaishi Mine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injection and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements inlevel measured with hydraulic fracturing (reproduced from

Rutqvist, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Characterization and control of formation damage during waterflooding of a high-clay-content reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Permeability damage was suspected as a factor contributing to postcompletion production declines observed during waterflooding of a friable to unconsolidated sandstone. A loss in water injectivity also indicated that near-wellbore damage may have been occurring. This paper summarizes the laboratory studies undertaken to evaluate and understand permeability damage in this formation. The experimental program consisted of primarily coreflooding experiments to evaluate the influence of injection fluid composition, temperature, mineralogy, and flow velocity on permeability damage. The significance of damage during brine injection was observed to be a strong function of mineralogy and injection rate. Permeability losses of greater than or equal to60% were observed in cores from some sand intervals, while little or no damage was apparent in cores from a second zone in identical wells. In the sands that were susceptible to brine damage, a critical velocity below which permeability damage did not occur was repeatedly established. The occurrence of a critical velocity, along with other observations, indicated that the primary damage mechanism was fines migration. Damage could be controlled by maintaining velocities below the critical value or reducing the pH of the injected brine.

Leone, J.A.; Scott, E.M. (Arco Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Dugan, Patrick R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be close to the produced reservoir water without surfaceinjection. Mixing the produced geothermal water with large

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ground source heat storage and thermo-physical response of soft clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground source heat storage can condition buildings with reduced consumption of fossil fuels, an important issue in modem building design. However, seasonal heat storage can cause soil temperature fluctuations and possibly ...

Saxe, Shoshanna Dawn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Study and Application of the Taphole Clay with High Strength and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic Research of Direct Pyrolysis Performance of MgCl2 in Molten State for New Process of ... Strengthening Sintering of Refractory Iron Ore with Biomass Fuel.

293

Measuring clay property variation and effects on ceramic pot filter performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pure Home Water (PHW) is a non-profit organization in Ghana whose mission is to provide safe drinking water to Ghana's Northern Region - the poorest part of the country. Originally a distributor of ceramic pot filters ...

Hester, Joshua (Joshua C.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A high field solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experimental study for clay and shale swelling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of the shale resources faces many problems related to their complex structure and challenging conditions. Drilling and fracturing operations suffer from the swelling (more)

Alzahrani, Mohammed S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

On the (Dis)similarity of Transactional Memory Workloads Clay Hughes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization techniques will help TM architects select a small, diverse, set of TM workloads for their design to their similarities outside of the traditional lock/barrier model. This is a pitfall for computer architects. If too that architects can use to choose which programs to run based on the transactional feature that needs

Roy, Subrata

296

Ground movements due to excavation in clay: physical and analytical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-22 CHAPTER 7 CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 7.1 Introduction 7-1 7.2 Achievements 7-2 7.2.1 Development of a novel technique for deep excavation in centrifuge 7-2 7.2.2 Observations from small scale centrifuge model tests...

Lam, Sze Yue

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Development of a Green Clay-fiber Composite for Fire Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latter consisted of short recycling paper cellulosic fibers and long kapok ( Ceiba Pentadra). The composite composition had been optimized regarding the ...

298

Coupled thermohydromechanical analysis of a heater test in unsaturated clay and fractured rock at Kamaishi Mine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instrumentation. Power reactor and nuclear fiel developmentexperiment area. Power reactor and nuclear fbel developmentHydraulic tests. Power reactor and nuclear fiel development

Rutqvist, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A finite element analysis of the pullout capacity of suction caissons in clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suction caissons are increasingly becoming the foundation of choice for offshore structures in deep water. They are used extensively in Tension Leg Platforms and provide the most efficient foundations for many offshore ...

Sgardeli, Christina G. (Georgia-Chrysouli C.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Clay-mineral suites, sources, and inferred dispersal routes: Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pb following 3 weeks storage in sealed containers to allow radioactive equilibration. 137 Cs on a slide in Hoyer's solution for identification under the micro- scope. This is considered the best way heat- ing a magnetic stirrer was used to speed up the de- flocculation of the organic material, after

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Estimating Undrained Strength of Clays from Direct Shear Testing at Fast Displacement Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Germaine, J.T. (1996), Rate-dependent undrained shearTesting at Fast Displacement Rates Andrew D. Bro 1 , M.variable shear displacement rates on specimens composed of

Bro, Andrew D; Stewart, Jonathan P; Pradel, Daniel E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

"Application of an anisotropic constitutive model for structured clay to seismic slope stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ASCE / MAY 2011 Downloaded 10Redistribution subject to ASCE license or copyright.AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ASCE / MAY 2011 / 503

Taiebat, Mahdi; Kaynia, Amir; Dafalias, Yannis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cyclic softening of low plasticity clay and its effect on seismic foundation performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ASCE / NOVEMBER 2008No. 11, November 1, 2008. ASCE, ISSN 1090-0241/2008/11-GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ASCE / NOVEMBER 2008 / 1595

Chu, Daniel B; Stewart, Jonathan P; Boulanger, R W; Lin, P. S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Analytical, centrifuge and numerical modelling of underwater vacuum consolidation of soft clay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xxix, 305 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CIVL 2007 LeeN Vacuum preloading is a ground improvement technique in which effective (more)

Lee, Nang Lap

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Jurassic and Cretaceous clays of the northern and central North Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercialized techniques fail. For instance, technology for recovering oil from shales in western Colorado

Haszeldine, Stuart

306

Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energys River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OWN OAKFORD TWENTY-MILE CR EEK CARMICH AELS GOULD KAN ZIGG H ILL CADIZ LEOPOLD MT DAVIS BEARSVILLE AU GU STA FAYETT E C ITY FINK CR EEK HEADSVILLE CAMERON-GARNER TERRA ALTA...

308

Novel Clay-based Coating May Point the Way to New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... foam, which is used in furniture cushions, carpet padding, children's car seats, and ... layers in pairs that are held together by basic electrical attraction ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mineralogy of the playa clays at the Pantex plant, Amarillo, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Southem High Plains of Texas contains approximately 20,000 small ephemeral lake basins called playas. Recentiy, these playas have received considerable attention due to the (more)

Mars, Kenneth R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

Measurement and Modeling of Solute Diffusion Coefficients in Unsaturated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mullins and Sommers [1986] sandy clay loam soil. Figure 1-the predicted lines for the sandy clay loam and clay soilsanalysis of RMSE. Sand Sandy clay loam Clay RMSE 0.0030

Chou, Hsin-Yi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

UV degradation of hdpe and pvc geomembranes in laboratory exposure So Paulo State University (UNESP) -Ilha Solteira (Brazil)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University (UNESP) - Ilha Solteira (Brazil) Bueno, B.S. University of State of São Paulo (USP) at São Carlos (Brazil) Zornberg, J.G. University of Texas (UT) at Austin (USA) Keywords: UV degradation, weathering International Conference on Geosynthetics, Brazil, 2010 821 3 #12;were used like a guide: ASTM D638 (Standard

Zornberg, Jorge G.

313

MMaannhhaattttaann CCoolllleeggee CCeenntteerr ffoorr GGeeootteecchhnnoollooggyy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Project - Concepts for Cellular Geosynthetics Standards with an Example for EPS-Block Geofoam Engineering Director/Center for Geotechnology Manhattan College School of Engineering Center for Geotechnology Bronx, New York, U.S.A. October 2001 #12;Manhattan College School of Engineering Center

Horvath, John S.

314

Applied Clay Science, 1 (1985) 89--101 89 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam --Printed in The Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, to rationalize chemical reaction rates, a knowledge of the kinetics is required. Kinetic studies provide valuable to theoretical and experimental difficulties, it is often arduous to apply pure chemical kinetics to even time. Also, in order to measure the kinetics of a chemical reaction properly, the technique must

Sparks, Donald L.

315

Comparison of bucket-wheel spoil and phosphogypsum/clay blend as substrates for Nonriverine Wet Hardwood Forest restoration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Phosphate mining in Beaufort county, NC impacts a rare plant community type, Nonriverine Wet Hardwood Forest (NRWHF). Reclamation of land after mining utilizes three byproducts (more)

Andrews, Ross Lester

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Normalized mechanical properties of resedimented Gulf of Mexico clay from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition Leg 308  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition Leg 308, many Whole Core Samples were recovered from the Ursa Basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Post-cruise geotechnical testing found these samples to be highly disturbed ...

Mazzei, David P. C. (David Peter Clark)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

BGRR FS FINAL - 07-16-04.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary liner system Remove from the two ducts and compact on-site Contaminated metal debris (8.2) Primary liner system debris (880) Exhaust filters (24) Land disposal Land...

318

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Florida Residential Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric...

319

Nitrogen fertiliser management of sugarcane crops for meeting global environmental challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mulgrave Mossman Mossman Soil texture (0-0.6 m) sandy clayloam sandy clayloam sandy loam to sandy light clay light clay sandy clay

Thorburn, Peter J; Webster, Tony J; Biggs, Jody S; Biggs, Ian M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Perforating devices for use in wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The perforating device for use in completing a well includes a case, an explosive charge contained in the case, and a generally bowl-shaped liner. The liner is positioned adjacent the explosive charge and has non-uniforrn thickness along its length. The liner further includes a protruding portion near its tip. In another configuration, the liner includes a hole near its tip to expose a portion of the explosive charge.

Jacoby, Jerome J. (Grass Valley, CA); Brooks, James E. (Manvel, TX); Aseltine, Clifford L. (late of Houston, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

Processing and Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties ... Plasma sprayed Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) coating is most commonly used in cylindrical liners,...

323

Tribological Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites ... Abstract Scope, Plasma sprayed Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) coating is most commonly used in cylindrical liners,...

324

Exhibitor: SAINT GOBAIN INDUSTRIAL CERAMICS NORTON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SAINT GOBAIN INDUSTRIAL CERAMICS NORTON PRIMARY METALS ... Norton refractory products for the copper industry include shaft furnace liners, bricks,...

325

Effect of Ni Addition and Heat Treatment with Inert Gas Argon on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title ... The liner shrinkage , real and apparent density measurement experiment for all sintering samples.

326

CALUTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A calutron improved in liner and capacity is offered. The liner is a hollow insulated structure at high negative potential with respect to the vessel. The liner has delimiting vanes to prevent ions from one beam scattering into the receiver from another beam. The double beam-double receiver feature is thus made possible, increasing the capacity of the calutron. (T.R.H.)

Brobeck, W.M.; Lofgren, E.J.; Thornton, R.L.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Jointly sponsored research program quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the Koppelman ``Series C`` Power River Basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Crow{trademark} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; ``B`` series pilot plant tests; and in-situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Jointly sponsored research program. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Objectives, accomplishments, procedures, and results are briefly described for each of the following 18 research projects: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; Coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; The impact of leachate from Clean Coal Technology waste on the stability of clay liners; Investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; Optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC Coke Process; Chemical sensor and field screening technology development; Demonstration of the Koppelman Series C Process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; Remote chemical sensor development; Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; Solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; CROW{trademark} field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; ``B`` series pilot plant tests; In situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; NMR analysis of Mowry Formation shale from different sedimentary basins; and Acid-mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee Area.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear waste package fabricated from concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1983, the Department of Energy must design, site, build and operate permanent geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy has recently selected three sites, one being the Hanford Site in the state of Washington. At this particular site, the repository will be located in basalt at a depth of approximately 3000 feet deep. The main concern of this site, is contamination of the groundwater by release of radionuclides from the waste package. The waste package basically has three components: the containment barrier (metal or concrete container, in this study concrete will be considered), the waste form, and other materials (such as packing material, emplacement hole liners, etc.). The containment barriers are the primary waste container structural materials and are intended to provide containment of the nuclear waste up to a thousand years after emplacement. After the containment barriers are breached by groundwater, the packing material (expanding sodium bentonite clay) is expected to provide the primary control of release of radionuclide into the immediate repository environment. The loading conditions on the concrete container (from emplacement to approximately 1000 years), will be twofold; (1) internal heat of the high-level waste which could be up to 400/sup 0/C; (2) external hydrostatic pressure up to 1300 psi after the seepage of groundwater has occurred in the emplacement tunnel. A suggested container is a hollow plain concrete cylinder with both ends capped. 7 refs.

Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Coolside waste management research. Quarterly technical report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of 3 monthly progress reports. The first represents a summary of results from mineralogical studies of the field lysimeter samples. This part of the project is an ongoing task to understand the long term mineralogical reactions that occur in the lysimeters as a function of static loading (compaction) and moisture content. The data is congruent with results obtained from geotechnical characterization of pre-aged and non-aged Coolside samples with and without surcharge. The investigations are expected to aid in the understanding of the processes that control permeability and leaching potential of the materials and to produce sufficient information on the physical and chemical nature of Coolside waste to design and construct physically stable and environmentally safe landfills. The capacity of various FGD wastes to absorb CO{sub 2} has been recently investigated with the results summarized in the second monthly. The potential usage is for the removal of CO{sub 2} from multi-component gas streams, in particular, natural-gas streams. The third comprises results from ongoing geotechnical testing. The results are concurrent with mineralogical findings that suggest that ettringite, gypsum and calcium-alumino-silicate hydrate phases proceed to form within the aging materials. In specimens with higher degrees of static loading, minerals are forced to grow within available pore space and fractures, which causes less swell. This report also summarizes results from a study of the effects of Coolside leachate on natural clay liners.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Predictive geochemical modeling of interactions between uranium-mill-tailings solutions and sediments in a flow-through system: model formulations and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equilibrium thermodynamic conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. Initial calculations of ion speciation and mineral solubility and our understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the modeled system were used to select solid phases for inclusion in the conceptual model. The modeling predictions were compared to the analytically determined column effluent concentrations. Hypotheses were formed, based on modeling predictions and laboratory evaluations, as to the probable mechanisms controlling the migration of selected contaminants. An assemblage of minerals and other solid phases could be used to predict the concentrations of several of the macro constituents (e.g., Ca, SO/sub 4/, Al, Fe, and Mn) but could not be used to predict trace element concentrations. These modeling conclusions are applicable to situations where uranium mill tailings solutions of low pH and high total dissolved solids encounter either clay liners or natural geologic materials that contain inherent acid neutralizing capacities. 116 references, 22 figures, 6 tables.

Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Jointly sponsored research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is a progress report on work performed by Western Research Institute for the U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center in the period October- December 1993. Tasks addressed include: development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; the impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the koppelman {open_quotes}series c{close_quotes} process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Crow{trademark} field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} series pilot plant tests; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program.

Deans, H.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Providing solutions to energy and environmental problems. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries are presented for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; Coal gasification, power generation and product market study; Impact of leachate from Clean Coal Technology waste on the stability of clay liners; Investigation of coprocessing heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; Optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; Chemical sensor and field screening technology development; Demonstration of the Koppelman Series C process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; Remote chemical sensor development; Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; Solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Contained recovery of oily wastes field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; B Series pilot plant tests; In-situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils; Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; Solid state NMR analysis of Mowry Formation shale from different sedimentary basins; Acid mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee Area; PERF dispersion modeling project, Phase 2; Field testing of the TaBoRR Process using the asphalt and dry bottoms configurations; and Validation of a new soil VOC sampler.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12:18 pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for three new plants, announced that country would undertake a "measured" exit from nuclear power, and even for in the latest nuclear power plant technology. Keeping a nuclear plant safe means keeping it cool in any to the new designs." Truly safe, secure nuclear power requires plants that simply cannot melt down

Danon, Yaron

335

Cyclic threshold strains in clays versus sands and the change of secant shear modulus and pore water pressure at small cyclic strains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Geotech. Engrg. , ASCE, 114(5). Andersen, K. H. , Kleven,J. Geotech. Engrg. , ASCE, 114(5). Arulanandan, K. andGeoenvironmental Engineering, ASCE Journal of Geotechnical

Mortezaie, Ahmad Reza -

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Compressive strength of masonry (f{sub m}{prime}) for the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant, Hollow Clay Tile Walls  

SciTech Connect

Prism tests have been performed on the HCT walls. The three groups of data were treated as separate data points and averaged. The recommended effective compressive strengths for HCT walls are 735 psi for single wythe 6- and 8-in. walls, and 495 psi for the double wythe 13-in. walls.

Fricke, K.E.; Flanagan, R.D.

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Combustor for a low-emissions gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Many government entities regulated emission from gas turbine engines including CO. CO production is generally reduced when CO reacts with excess oxygen at elevated temperatures to form CO2. Many manufactures use film cooling of a combustor liner adjacent to a combustion zone to increase durability of the combustion liner. Film cooling quenches reactions of CO with excess oxygen to form CO2. Cooling the combustor liner on a cold side (backside) away from the combustion zone reduces quenching. Furthermore, placing a plurality of concavities on the cold side enhances the cooling of the combustor liner. Concavities result in very little pressure reduction such that air used to cool the combustor liner may also be used in the combustion zone. An expandable combustor housing maintains a predetermined distance between the combustor housing and combustor liner.

Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA); Greenwood, Stuart A. (San Diego, CA); Dutta, Partha (San Diego, CA); Moon, Hee-Koo (San Diego, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS April 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis The liner installer heat-welds a sand anchor closed. The sand anchors are installed under the liner and across the length of the slit trench to keep the liner in place and minimize the effects of wind lift. The liner installer heat-welds a sand anchor closed. The sand anchors are installed under the liner and across the length of the slit trench to keep the liner in place and minimize the effects of wind lift. A view of the Slit Trenches 1-4 operational cover in E Area. A view of the Slit Trenches 1-4 operational cover in E Area. The liner installer heat-welds a sand anchor closed. The sand anchors are installed under the liner and across the length of the slit trench to keep the liner in place and minimize the effects of wind lift.

339

Measures for Progress: A History of the National Bureau of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the propulsion of battleships and ocean liners, the new turbine proved a ... where, were still lighted by gas lamps, and except in the city homes of ...

340

Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

They review several hundred compressed gas cylinders, personal protective equipment, safety harnesses, lifts and liners. Cranes, forklifts, and portable eyewash stations are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EM SSAB ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

quantitatively. Develop strategies to limit use of nuclear densometer for compaction testing. * Revisit conservative assumptions made for liner systems to account directly for...

342

Resistance to Hydrogen Embrittlement and Behavior of Hydrogen in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the fuel cell vehicles, high-pressure hydrogen gas is stored in a container consisting of aluminum liner and surrounding fiber-reinforced plastic layer.

343

Quiet unlined HVAC ductwork: Using active silencing to obtain NC?35 in buildings without fibrous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fan noise in HVAC ducts has traditionally been attenuated with fibrous internal duct liner or with passive silencers constructed with porous fill material. Now

Steve Wise; Lawrence J. Gelin; Kirk G. Burlage; Susan H. Dineen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Damage analysis of composite pressure vessels using acoustic emission monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composite pressure vessels (CPVs) fabricated using a metal or plastic liner under a composite structural skin are commonly used for natural gas storage on road (more)

Chou, H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

THERMAL NEUTRON MODERNIZATION PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tube liner and shutter that will operate inside the biological shield, and will ... permanent face plate has been designed so that the shielding along the ...

346

Design Parameters for CVD Shrapnel Tiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the ceramic tiles will be to cover the inside wall of a spherical firing vessel and thus protect the inner liner from shrapnel.

Hollaway, J R

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Mechanical Behavior - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: Mechanical Behavior ... such as leading edges and combustor liners, are subjected to simultaneous thermal and...

348

Nanotechnology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from the mundane, such as superabsorbent diaper liners, to the ... Spray-on Coating Combines Carbon Nanotubes with Ceramic Release Date: 04/17 ...

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Simulation of shaped charge collapse using smoothed particle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collapse of the liner was mathematically modeled in this work, using the ... Experimental study on deformation and fracture of Al2O3 ceramic under dynamic ...

350

Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic matrix composite combustor components.  

SciTech Connect

Combustor liners fabricated from a SiC/SiC composite were nondestructively interrogated before and after combustion rig testing. The combustor liners were inspected by X-ray, ultrasonic and thermographic techniques. In addition, mechanical test results were obtained from witness coupons, representing the as-manufactured liners, and from coupons machined from the components after combustion exposure. Thermography indications were found to correlate with reduced material properties obtained after rig testing. Microstructural examination of the SiC/SiC liners revealed the thermography indications to be delaminations and damaged fiber tows.

Sun, J. G.; Verrilli, M. J.; Stephan, R.; Barnett, T. R.; Ojard, G.

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Accelerating High-Performance Materials Design: An Integrated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure/Property Relations in Proton Conducting Ceramics of the Form ... The Impact of Mixed Carbon Feedstock on High Cr2O3 Refractory Liners Used in...

352

Mitigation of Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI) in Fast ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work summarizes efforts to evaluate barrier coating and liner materials to ... Hot Isostatically Pressed Sodalite- and Apatite-Based Ceramic Candidates for...

353

2000 TMS Annual Meeting Exhibitor: CONSOLIDATED CERAMIC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consolidated Ceramics Logo For 42 years, Consolidated Ceramic Products has been of service to the ... Pre-cast liners for degassing and filtration systems.

354

Biopolymers and Surface Modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Our results show ceramic-polymer and ceramic-metal hybrid materials ... stability of current polyethylene liner-based load-bearing implants.

355

Bringing Down the House: Science an Explosive Topic on Discovery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2009 ... A key component of the shaped charge is a V-shaped liner made of a ... and Interfacial Phenomena Between Metals and Ceramic/Refractory...

356

Oxidation/Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... International Symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Oxidation/ ... on combustor liners of a Solar Turbines' industrial gas turbine engine,...

357

CONSOLIDATED CERAMIC PRODUCTS, INC. - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impellers, shafts, rotors, nozzles, baffles and pre-cast liners for degassing and filtration systems. Consolidated Ceramic's team of sales, marketing and technical ...

358

NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and .... used in cylindrical liners, pistons, rings and combustion chamber for...

359

Environmental Barrier Coatings for CMC - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, International Symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites ... which was later applied on combustor liners of a Solar Turbines' industrial gas turbine...

360

Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites ... and recession in water vapor rich hot- section applications such as combustor liners, vanes, shrouds, and blades.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CMC Applications - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 17, 2011 ... New structural insulation materials which support ablation-resistant flowpath liner materials for pintle and motor applications using Powdermet's...

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 81...

363

Development of a Conventional Fine Grain Casting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, all the liners cracked or spalled due to low thermal ... Failure analysis indicated that nonmetallic inclusions were the source of .... and neutron radiation

364

ORNL Robot Takes Pollutant Samples and Assesses Structural ...  

walls. There, a remotely operated, ... is positioned and activated to take multiple samples of pollutants from the concrete and/or brick liners of the stacks.

365

Evaluation of Alloy 625 Steel Bimetallic Pipe for Petroleum Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

of CPA liner collapse from hydrogen produced by corrosion on the ID and/or .... tubes. In these cases, atomic hydrogen produced on the ..... of Electrolytic.

366

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Major markets for ABS products...Market category Applications ABS grades Major appliances Refrigerator door and food liners; crisper pans;

367

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liner is subject to two main types of wear, slag corrosion and structural spalling. Gasifier users have identified refractory service life as the most important limitation to...

368

Development of a New Alloy for SOFC Interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Impact of Mixed Carbon Feedstock on High Cr2O3 Refractory Liners Used in Commercial Gasifiers Thermo-mechanical Reliability of Proton Exchange...

369

Alloying and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011... aimed at replacing Type 316Ti in elevated-temperature applications such as automotive flexible connectors and residential chimney liners.

370

Development and Characterization of ATI 216Cb Alloy, a Mo ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... flexible connectors and residential chimney liners. This presentation will review the development of ATI 216Cb alloy and present results of mechanical testing,...

371

8lores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contaminated portions of the liner using a remotely operated robot known as a BROKK manipulator. This project was a major radiological challenge, and demonstrated the use of...

372

Flow Rate Dependence of Soil Hydraulic Characteristics D. Wildenschild,* J. W. Hopmans, J. Simunek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

four 2.5inch by 6 inch brass liners, was used to collect the sample. The sampler was connected to a 5

Wildenschild, Dorthe

373

Development of fly ash-based slope protection materials for waste disposal ponds. Topical report, Task 7.7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research project was conducted to develop a cost-effective slope protection material for a 100-acre scrubber sludge disposal pond located at the Sherco power plant. The technical objective of the project was to formulate and evaluate the performance of a slope protection material produced using self-cementing coal combustion by-products. The material was to have sufficient durability and erosion resistance to protect the underlying bottom ash fill and clay liner from wave erosion for at least 5 years when it was placed on the interior side slopes of the pond. The two coal combustion by-products that were considered for use in the slope protection material were 1) a spray dryer waste and 2) a subbituminous coal fly ash. The spray dryer waste was approximately a 50:50 mixture of subbituminous coal fly ash and reacted, lime-based scrubber sorbent. The subbituminous coal fly ash was produced from a cyclone-fired boiler. Both by-products displayed self-cementing behavior when mixed with water. The results of the field tests indicated that a slope protection slab prepared from Sherco spray dryer waste placed with a 20% moisture content showed almost no deterioration after 20 months in the field. A slab prepared from a mixture of 25% Riverside fly ash and 75% bottom ash with a moisture content of 18% showed a slight loss of material from the surface of the slab, but no substantial deterioration after 20 months in the field. Two other materials containing Riverside fly ash that were prepared with higher moisture contents showed somewhat more deterioration after 20 months, although none of the field test slabs appeared to have failed in that time period.

Moretti, C.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2 Shale and clay-rich rock formations have been considered as potential host rocks for...

375

Magnetized targets for fast z-pinch implosions: a spectrum of possibilities  

SciTech Connect

In this brief communication, we discuss various plasma configurations that can be adiabatically compressed by an imploding liner and produce fusion-grade plasma near the liner turn around point. Our prime interest will be discussion of the ways of forming initial plasma configurations and discussion of the ways of imploding them in a 3D fashion.

Ryutov, D D

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM FOR CALUTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is invented for heating or cooling the electrostatic liner conventionally disposed in a calutron tank. The apparatus is additionally arranged to mount the liner in its intended position in a readily detachable manner so as to facilitate disassembly of the calutron.

Starr, A.M.

1960-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ultrasonic search wheel probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

Mikesell, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1  

SciTech Connect

Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An interpretation of potential scale dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, calcium bentonite, shale, clay, silica sand, and crushed granite. Natural Barriers Natural barriers

Zhou, Quanlin

382

Method of lining a vertical mine shaft with concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus includes a cylindrical retainer form spaced inwardly of the wall of the shaft by the desired thickness of the liner to be poured and having overlapping edges which seal against concrete flow but permit the form to be contracted to a smaller circumference after the liner has hardened and is self-supporting. A curb ring extends downwardly and outwardly toward the shaft wall from the bottom of the retainer form to define the bottom surface of each poured liner section. An inflatable toroid forms a seal between the curb ring and the shaft wall. A form support gripper ring having gripper shoes laterally extendable under hydraulic power to engage the shaft wall supports the retainer form, curb ring and liner until the newly poured liner section becomes self-supporting. Adjusting hydraulic cylinders permit the curb ring and retainer form to be properly aligned relative to the form support gripper ring. After a liner section is self-supporting, an advancing system advances the retainer form, curb ring and form support gripper ring toward a shaft boring machine above which the liner is being formed. The advancing system also provides correct horizontal alignment of the form support gripper ring.

Eklund, James D. (Mattawa, WA); Halter, Joseph M. (Richland, WA); Rasmussen, Donald E. (Spokane, WA); Sullivan, Robert G. (Richland, WA); Moffat, Robert B. (Federal Way, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proposed generation and compression of a target plasma for MTF  

SciTech Connect

Magnetized target fusion (MTF), in which a magnetothermally insulated plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions, represents an approach to controlled fusion which avoids difficulties of both traditional inertial confinement and magnetic confinement approaches. The authors are proposing to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetized target fusion by: (1) creating a suitable magnetized target plasma, (2) performing preliminary liner compression experiments using existing pulsed power facilities and demonstrated liner performance. Once the target plasma and the means for its generation have been optimized, the authors plan to conduct preliminary liner compression experiments aimed at demonstrating the near-adiabatic compression of the target plasma desired for MTF. Relevant liner compression experiments have been performed at Los Alamos in the Scyllac Fast Liner Program and, more recently, in the Pegasus facility and the Procyon explosive pulsed power program. In a series of liner experiments they plan to map out the dependence of temperature and neutron production as functions of the initial plasma conditions and the liner compression achieved. With the above research program, they intend to demonstrate most of the key principles involved in magnetized target fusion, and develop the experimental and theoretical tools needed to design and execute fully integrated MTF ignition experiments.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Thurston, R.S.; Chrien, R.E. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials and Processes Materials and Processes for Severe Service Environments Opportunity Technology/Capability Overview Industry Significance Benefits to Partner Development Status Contact Refractory liner materials have been identified as a barrier in gasification and other process technologies. Industry desires improved material performance to decrease repair frequency and time. This has been accomplished in gasification and steel industries by developing new or improved performance refractory liner materials or through better process control. Refractory Development: * Improved Cr 2 O 3 refractory liner containing phosphates developed for slagging gasifiers * Slag/refractory interactions in gasification systems with mixed carbon feedstock studied to control slag properties and refractory performance

385

Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heat exchanger for a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

A heat exchanger is described for a Stirling engine comprising: a domed cylinder having a domed portion and a cylindrical portion. The domed cylinder serves as a high-temperature cylinder and a regenerator housing of the Stirling engine; a cylindrical inner liner which is coaxially disposed inside the domed cylinder and which divides the inside of the domed cylinder into an expansion space inside of the inner liner and a regenerator space between the outer surface of the inner liner and the inner surface of the cylindrical portion of the domed cylinder.

Fujiwara, M.; Nomaguchi, T.; Kazumoto, Y.; Tsuchino, K.; Kawajiri, K.; Hisamori, Y.

1987-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

Bulman, David Edward (Cincinnati, OH); Darkins, Jr., Toby George (Loveland, OH); Stumpf, James Anthony (Columbus, IN); Schroder, Mark S. (Greenville, SC); Lipinski, John Joseph (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

388

Free-fall core sampler  

SciTech Connect

The described free-fall corer apparatus consists of an expendable, elongated casing having an annular-shaped ballast member secured to it. A cylindrical housing surmounts this ballast member and accommodates a float which is tied to the core liner. During descent of the apparatus, the float is latched to the ballast element, but when the apparatus strikes bottom, a pilot weight suspended from the float latching means moves upward and allows the float to freely ascend within the ocean. This ascent unlatches the core liner from the expendable casing and the liner is thereafter raised to the surface. (13 claims)

Raymond, S.O.; Sachs, P.L.

1968-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

An analysis of the production and manufacture of the modified clay pot at the Oriang Women's Pottery Group, the Amilo-Rangwe Pottery Group, and the Kinda E Teko Pottery Group in Nyanza Province, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the growing demands for safe water supplies and the absence of a central infrastructure capable of meeting those demands, CARE-Kenya has implemented a safe water storage program at the household level. Central ...

Pihulic, Michael P. (Michael Phillip), 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

WIPP - Open RFPs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be issued Contact Fabrication of CPP Commodities - POCs and CCOs 9-Oct-13 Janet.Miehls@wipp.ws DOT Open Head Steel Drums with Liners 9-Oct-13 Janet.Miehls@wipp.ws Drum Vent...

391

Free form hemispherical shaped charge  

SciTech Connect

A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

Haselman, Jr., Leonard C. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Epitaxial CoSi2 on MOS devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An Si.sub.x N.sub.y or SiO.sub.x N.sub.y liner is formed on a MOS device. Cobalt is then deposited and reacts to form an epitaxial CoSi.sub.2 layer underneath the liner. The CoSi.sub.2 layer may be formed through a solid phase epitaxy or reactive deposition epitaxy salicide process. In addition to high quality epitaxial CoSi.sub.2 layers, the liner formed during the invention can protect device portions during etching processes used to form device contacts. The liner can act as an etch stop layer to prevent excessive removal of the shallow trench isolation, and protect against excessive loss of the CoSi.sub.2 layer.

Lim, Chong Wee (Urbana, IL); Shin, Chan Soo (Daejeon, KR); Petrov, Ivan Georgiev (Champaign, IL); Greene, Joseph E. (Champaign, IL)

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

RussiaLANLV3-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and unstable liner experiments compared with 2D MHD calculations. Modifi ed for the Web Modified for the Web experiments" conducted in FY02, the results of the first two...

394

Numerical Simulations of a Case of Explosive Marine Cyclogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extratropical cyclone which damaged the liner Queen Elizabeth II in September 1978 is a well-documented example of explosive marine cyclogenesis in which the 24 h surface central pressure fall was 60 mb commencing 1200 GMT 9 September. ...

Richard A. Anthes; Ying-Hwa Kuo; John R. Gyakum

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Andrew Weisberg DOE-Annual-030520-1 Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Improvement [Projected in FY01] Thermoplastic Matrices Blow- Molded Liners e.g. light bulbs, resistors, truck.e. semiconductors, tires, light bulbs, biotech...] · Method relies on samples from batch built under identical

396

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

covered with a 305-mm-thick soil protective layer. Leachate drains from the cells by gravity through double-wall HDPE pipes that penetrate the liner system. These pipes are...

397

Pinch Related Research At Institute For Plasma Research, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several pinch related experiment their drivers and related diagnostics are being developed in our laboratory. The first set of experiments is to investigate various aspects of magnetized target fusion (MTF/MAGO). To drive the liner

Anurag Shyam; Pulsed Power Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Microsoft Word - NT42951PrelimDesCkean.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleeve positions the Liner in the box tool joint. Sleeve material is currently type 360 Brass. Insulation: The Insulation is the most critical component of the IDP design. The...

399

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

483-6D Surge Basin Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina Lay up of 483-6D Back Wash Filter Surge Basin, remove sludge, fabric liner. Breach dike and direct storm water...

400

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... condenser, with cooling pro- vided by a 3.5 KW helium gas refrigerator. ... between the casing and liners is filled with mineral oil, which is a ... 7. Outlook ...

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ASHRAE sound and vibration technical committee position statement on the use of fiberglass in HVAC systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiberglass duct liner continues to be the most cost?effective solutions to noise control in most HVAC air duct systems. There has been a recent increase in the number of institutional

Russell A. Cooper

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Passing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

prayer for them in every stitch," she says. -Pat Remick Knitting instructions for a wool cap liner: Use knitting worsted weight yarn. Synthetic yarn is more easily washed but...

403

Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

been operating over 8 years, the longevity of the pond liner-and the remediation infrastructure as a whole-may soon warrant evaluation andor necessary upgrades. * To mitigate...

404

Hawaii Geothermal Project. Progress report on the drilling program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: well conditions; perforating and cementing; temperature-depth plot; slotted liner, well head and auxiliary equipment; well testing and analysis program; well monitoring during standby; environmental assessment; time schedule; and budgets. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Free form hemispherical shaped charge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is a spherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved shape charge for oil well perforation.

Haselman, L.C. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water-storage-tube systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar collection/storage/distribution systems were surveyed, designed, fabricated, and mechanically and thermally tested. The types studied were clear and opaque fiberglass tubes, metal tubes with plastic liners, and thermosyphoning tubes. (MHR)

Hemker, P.

1981-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

CX-006729: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Liner DrillingCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.7, B5.12Date: 04/27/2010Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

408

CX-007514: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Record of Categorical Exclusion for Big Hill Anhydrite Pond Liner Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

409

Coatings for Wear and Corrosion II: Electrochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... result in formation of a matt-finish ceramic film on the substrate. This film has shown great wear and corrosion resistance which makes it desirable for liner less ...

410

Graphene Reinforced Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UHMWPE is the clinically used acetabular cup liner material for last few ... Effect of P2O5 on sintering behavior of Na2O-CaOAl2O3-SiO2 glass ceramic system.

411

Wear Resistant Coatings for Engine Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... result in formation of a matt-finish ceramic film on the substrate. This film has shown great wear and corrosion resistance which makes it desirable for liner less ...

412

CX-001003: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

West Hackberry Tank (WHT)-1 and WHT-10 Liner Removal/RelineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/01/2010Location(s): West Hackberry, LouisianaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

413

Effects of piston design and lubricant selection on reciprocating engine friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction between the piston and the liner in a reciprocating engine is of much interest because it affects reliability, noise, and efficiency. This study evaluated various changes to the piston skirt with the specific ...

Moughon, Luke (Luke Frank)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - E-Z Rider II BRT Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Freightliner - M2 106 Hybrid Nova Bus - LFS Artic HEV Nova Bus - LFS HEV Nova Bus - LFX Cummins -...

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner HDX CNG Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 90 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

416

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lift fixture for 55-gallon drums, greatly increasing the efficiency of remote drum handling in the hotcell. TWPC also developed an in-drum liner to be used in the hot cell...

417

(COPVs) Materials Aging Issues - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three aspects of COPV aging were considered; the age life of the Kevlar overwrap, the fatigue life of the titanium liner and the stress rupture life of the combined...

418

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retention Basin Cover & Liner System Removal From Service Retention Basin Cover & Liner System Removal From Service Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The purpose of the proposed activity is to remove the KAC retention basin (cover & liner systems) from service in order to eliminate unnecessary maintenance & operational costs. The scope of the PA includes cutting holes in the basin cover/liner to facilitate rain water drainage and placing in safe energy state by isolating electrial power to the basin. Entry to the basin will be controlled. B1.28 - Placing a facility in an environmentally safe condition Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2012.02.07 18:02:22 -05'00'

419

Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

Beck, Theodore R. (Seattle, WA); Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA)

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Application of natural analogues in the Yucca Mountain project - overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contractor) 2000. Yucca Mountain Site Description. TDR-CRW-in silicic tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Clays and ClayHazard Analysis for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. BA0000000-01717-

Simmons, Ardyth M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Research on the Process of Alkaline Pressure Oxidation for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders for ... Comparison between HDPE/Clay and HDPE/Piassava Fiber/Clay Treated by ... Effects of Rare Earth Pr on the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Pb-based Alloys.

422

Reduced Building-Vat-Size-Design for Process Parameter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To minimize total powder usage of costly powders as well as processing time and ... Comparison between HDPE/Clay and HDPE/Piassava Fiber/Clay Treated by ... Pr on the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Pb-based Alloys.

423

Deep vadose zone hydrology demonstrates fate of nitrate in eastern San Joaquin Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the experimental site. Sandy loam is the most fre quentare: SL1 recent Hanford sandy loam C clay, very thinVar2 various textures, sandy loam to clay loam S medium

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Civilian Unemployment Rate Industrial Production Total Industrial Production Manufacturing Food Paper Chemicals Petroleum Stone, Clay, Glass Primary ...

425

Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and

Zheng, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production process starts with the transport of limestone and other materials containing oxides, normally clay or shale,

Haya, Barbara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Journal of Hazardous Materials B125 (2005) 237243 Solidification and stabilization of cadmium ions in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H of the leachant drops around 7. Jordan reserves large amounts of natural resources, such as clay, oil shale

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

428

A simple methodology for observing fracture process of nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple methodology for observing mechanical properties of nanocomposite Part 1: interfacial properties in an Epoxy Clay Nanocomposites. ...

429

Process for the preparation of organoclays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing organoclays from smectites for use as rheological control agents and in the preparation of nanocomposites. Typically, the clay is dispersed in water, and a substantially monomolecular layer of a water soluble polymer is applied to the surfaces of the clay. A surfactant is also applied to the clay to modify the surface hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance of the clay, and the organoclay is separated out for subsequent use.

Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NIST - Physical and Chemical Properties Division - Technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Clay is the key inorganic substance in applications ranging from pollution prevention and remediation, enhanced oil recovery, the treatment of ...

431

Overview of the April 9th North Central Texas Wildfire Outbreak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the outbreak area showed that grasses were cured in Clay, Montague, Archer, Wichita and Shackelford Counties

432

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... quantify MWCNTs. Three types of typical clay minerals were chosen as the solid phase: kaolinite, smectite, and shale. Results ...

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Environmental and Materials Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...waste repositories in the world are clay and granite (Table 1). The containers are intended to be located

434

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Conservation Loans Florida Residential Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling...

435

REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston assembly in an engine. The model appears to produce the correct behavior, but we cannot quantify its strengths or weaknesses until our crank-angle-resolved measurements have been completed. Finally, we proposed and implemented a model for the effects of liner rotation on piston assembly friction. Here, we propose that the rotating liner design is analogous to the shaft-bushing mechanism. Therefore, we used the side-slip rolling friction model to simulate the effects of liner rotation. This model appears to be promising, but final analysis of its strengths and/or weaknesses must await our crank-angle-resolved measurements.

Ron Matthews

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering; Bernal, A. [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

Vp/Vs ESTIMATION FROM MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC DATA FOR IMPROVED CHARACTERIZATION OF A TIGHT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the fluid flowing though the sand matrix a13 tortuosity for the sand flowing though the clay matrix a31 tortuosity for the clay flowing though the sand matrix B friction matrix b11 friction coefficient between the sand matrix and the fluid b13 friction coefficient between the sand and the clay matrices b33 friction

439

Eastman Community musiC sChool Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­Saturday, 3­4:30 p.m. Clay Jenkins, Dariusz Terefenko, Julie Beauregard, instructors Each afternoon during--Clay Jenkins · Modern Harmonic Substitutions-- Dariusz Terefenko · Global Connections to Jazz--Julie Beauregard Terefenko · Improvisations in World Musics-- Julie Beauregard · Working Toward Depth of Groove--Clay Jenkins

Portman, Douglas

440

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modular assembly for supporting, straining, and directing flow to a core in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core support arrangement for supporting, straining, and providing fluid flow to the core and periphery of a nuclear reactor during normal operation. A plurality of removable inlet modular units are contained within permanent liners in the lower supporting plate of the reactor vessel lower internals. During normal operation (1) each inlet modular unit directs main coolant flow to a plurality of core assemblies, the latter being removably supported in receptacles in the upper portion of the modular unit and (2) each inlet modular unit may direct bypass flow to a low pressure annular region of the reactor vessel. Each inlet modular unit may include special fluid seals interposed between mating surfaces of the inlet modular units and the core assemblies and between the inlet modular units and the liners, to minimize leakage and achieve an hydraulic balance. Utilizing the hydraulic balance, the modular units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the modular unit receptacles by their own respective weight. Included as part of the permanent liners below the horizontal support plate are generally hexagonal axial debris barriers. The axial debris barriers collectively form a bottom boundary of a secondary high pressure plenum, the upper boundary of which is the bottom surface of the horizontal support plate. Peripheral liners include radial debris barriers which collectively form a barrier against debris entry radially. During normal operation primary coolant inlet openings in the liner, below the axial debris barriers, pass a large amount of coolant into the inlet modular units, and secondary coolant inlet openings in the portion of the liners within the secondary plenum pass a small amount of coolant into the inlet modular units. The secondary coolant inlet openings also provide alternative coolant inlet flow paths in the unlikely event of blockage of the primary inlet openings. The primary inlet openings have characteristics which limit the entry of debris and minimize the potential for debris entering the primary inlets blocking the secondary inlets from inside the modular unit.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Antonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

PHELIX: design of transformer-driven linear implosion system  

SciTech Connect

Experiments involving electromagnetically-imploded, solid-density liners can be achieved at reduced cost and energy if we start with a scale-size based on diagnostic resolution, rather than on the largest capacitor bank or generator we could bring to bear. For minimum resolution of 100 microns or less, many useful experiments could be performed with initial liner diameters that are factors of two to three smaller than used on high-energy systems, such as Atlas, thereby reducing energy requirements to sub-megajoule levels. Reduction in scale-size, however, also decreases the inductance change associated with liner motion relative to other inductances in the circuit. To improve coupling efficiency to liner kinetic energy, we invoke a current step-up transformer. Scaling relations have been developed for reducing the size and energy of such systems and compared with detailed numerical simulations. We discuss these calculations and describe the engineering embodiment of the resulting design for a system called PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment).

Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, Walter L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Chris L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Anotonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Penn Valley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

Haselkorn, M.H. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

Haselkorn, M.H. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Liners and the Use of Slag Management to Refractory Liners and the Use of Slag Management to Improve the On-Line Performance of Slagging Gasifiers Technology Gasification offers a clean, efficient, and flexible way to convert carbon based materials into power or chemicals. The high Cr 2 O 3 refractory materials used to protect the steel reaction vessel where the gasification reactions occur are exposed to high temperature slags and gases. The refractory liner is subject to two main types of wear, slag corrosion and structural spalling. Gasifier users have identified refractory service life as the most important limitation to on-line availability. To meet gasifier user needs, NETL developed a phosphate containing Cr 2 O 3 refractory that has demonstrated a significant decrease in slag penetration/refractory spalling

452

Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

04.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. 04.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. DOE Tank Safety Workshop Hydrogen Tank Safety Testing 1 POWERTECH - Hydrogen & CNG Services  Certification testing of individual high pressure components  Design Verification, Performance, End-of-Life testing of complete fuel systems  Design, construction, and operation of Hydrogen Fill Stations  Safety Studies  Standards Development 2 PRESENTATION  Discuss CNG Field Performance Data  Discuss Safety Testing of Type 4 Tanks  Current work to support Codes & Standards Development 3 Storage Tank Technologies 4 basic types of tank designs  Type 1 - all metal  Type 2 - metal liner with hoop wrapped composite  Type 3 - metal liner with fully wrapped composite  Type 4 - Plastic liner with

453

CX-007968: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

68: Categorical Exclusion Determination 68: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007968: Categorical Exclusion Determination Retention Basin Cover & Liner System Removal From Service CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 02/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The purpose of the proposed activity is to remove the KAC retention basin (cover & liner systems) from service in order to eliminate unnecessary maintenance & operational costs. The scope of the proposed activity includes cutting holes in the basin cover/liner to facilitate rain water drainage and placing in safe energy state by isolating electrical power to the basin. Entry to the basin will be controlled. CX-007968.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008668: Categorical Exclusion Determination

454

CFD modeling of a gas turbine combustor from compressor exit to turbine inlet  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbine combustor CFD modeling has become an important combustor design tool in the past few years, but CFD models are generally limited to the flow field inside the combustor liner at the diffuser/combustor annulus region. Although strongly coupled in reality, the two regions have rarely been coupled in CFD modeling. A CFD calculation for a full model combustor from compressor diffuser exit to turbine inlet is described. The coupled model accomplishes the following two main objectives: (1) implicit description of flow splits and flow conditions for openings into the combustor liner, and (2) prediction of liner wall temperatures. Conjugate heat transfer with nonluminous gas radiation (appropriate for lean, low emission combustors) is utilized to predict wall temperatures compared to the conventional approach of predicting only near wall gas temperatures. Remaining difficult issues such as generating the grid, modeling swirler vane passages, and modeling effusion cooling are also discussed.

Crocker, D.S.; Nickolaus, D.; Smith, C.E. [CFD Research Corp., Huntsville, AL (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Irradiation subassembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

1973-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace  

SciTech Connect

A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Independence, OR); Addison, Gerald W. (St. Stephen, SC)

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

457

Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

O' Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W. (AJT Enterprises, Inc.)

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

458

APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Analysis of the causes of failure in high chrome oxide refractory materials from slagging gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

High Cr2O3 refractory materials are used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers. Gasifiers are reaction chambers that convert water, oxygen, and a carbon feedstock into CO, H2, and methane at temperatures as high as 1575oC and pressures up to 1000 psi. Ash in the carbon feedstock liquefies, erodes and corrodes the gasifiers refractory liner, contributing to liner failure within a few months to two years. The failure of a refractory liner decreases a gasifiers on-line availability and causes costly system downtime and repairs. Many factors contribute to refractory lining failure, including slag penetration and corrosion, thermal cycling, gasifier environment, and mechanical loads. The results of refractory post-mortem failure analysis and how observations relate to gasifier service life will be discussed.

Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.; Thomas, H.; Krabbe, R.A.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An analysis of the causes of failure in high chrome oxide refractory materials from slagging gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

High Cr2O3 refractory materials are used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers. Gasifiers are reaction chambers that convert water, oxygen, and a carbon feedstock into CO, H2, and methane at temperatures as high as 1575DGC and pressures up to 1000 psi. Ash in the carbon feedstock liquefies, erodes and corrodes the gasifier's refractory liner, contributing to liner failure within a few months to two years. The failure of a refractory liner decreases a gasifier's on-line availability and causes costly system downtime and repairs. Many factors contribute to refractory lining failure, including slag penetration and corrosion, thermal cycling, gasifier environment, and mechanical loads. The results of refractory post-mortem failure analysis and how observations relate to gasifier service life will be discussed.

Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geosynthetic clay liner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Apparatus and method for sealing perforated well casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perforations and other openings in well casings, liners and other conduits may be substantially blocked or sealed to prevent fluid flow between the casing or liner interior and an earth formation by placing a radially expansible sleeve adjacent the perforations or openings and urging the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing or inner wall using an explosive charge. An apparatus including a radially contracted sleeve formed by a coiled plate member or a tubular member having flutes defined by external and internal folds, may be deployed into a well casing or liner through a production or injection tubing string and on the end of a flexible cable or coilable tubing. An explosive charge disposed on the apparatus and within the sleeve may be detonated to urge the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing inner wall. 17 figs.

Blount, C.G.; Benham, R.A.; Brock, J.L.; Emerson, J.A.; Ferguson, K.R.; Scheve, D.F.; Schmidt, J.H.; Schuler, K.W.; Stanton, P.L.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

462

Apparatus and method for sealing perforated well casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perforations and other openings in well casings, liners and other conduits may be substantially blocked or sealed to prevent fluid flow between the casing or liner interior and an earth formation by placing a radially expansible sleeve adjacent the perforations or openings and urging the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing or inner wall using an explosive charge. An apparatus including a radially contracted sleeve formed by a coiled plate member or a tubular member having flutes defined by external and internal folds, may be deployed into a well casing or liner through a production or injection tubing string and on the end of a flexible cable or coilable tubing. An explosive charge disposed on the apparatus and within the sleeve may be detonated to urge the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing inner wall.

Blount, Curtis G. (Wasilla, AK); Benham, Robert A. (Albuquerque, NM); Brock, Jerry L. (Los Lunas, NM); Emerson, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ferguson, Keith R. (Anchorage, AK); Scheve, Donald F. (Anchorage, AK); Schmidt, Joseph H. (Anchorage, AK); Schuler, Karl W. (Albuquerque, NM); Stanton, Philip L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder A China Paper on Type 4 Cylinder, translated and presented by J. P. Hsu, PhD, Smart Chemistry Reason for Defect Analysis of CNG Composite Cylinder * Safety Issue - Four explosion accidents of auto used CNG composite material cylinders resulting huge personnel and vehicles loss. * Low Compliance Rate - Inspect 12119 Auto used CNG composite cylinders and only 3868 are qualified with compliance rate of 32%. Plastic CNG Composite Cylinder Process Fitting Internal Plastic Liner External Composite Layer Metal Fitting HDPE Cylinder Liner * HDPE has a high density, great stiffness, good anti-permeability and high melting point, but poor environmental stress cracking Resistance (ESCR). * The defects of cylinder liner quality can be

464

Sealion Database: Tracking and Characterization of Legacy Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility Liner-by-Liner Characterization Project was initiated to support waste management planning and disposition activities at the Materials and Fuels Complex located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The project scope consisted of a detailed examination of available historical records to consolidate information and eliminate discrepancies between sources. This information was captured in a new comprehensive searchable online database dubbed Sealion (Searchable Liner Online). For each storage liner and associated waste container, Sealion tracks the physical configuration, radiological data (e.g., source term, transuranic content, fissile content, and direct gamma radiation reading), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characterization data, contents descriptions, and a variety of other waste management data. Historical hard-copy records were scanned and are stored in the database for easy access. In addition to storing the consolidated data in a library for easy retrieval or linking, Sealion serves as a tool in the development of batching plans for retrieving, transporting, processing, and, ultimately, dispositioning the waste. An integral search function allows the user to query for a variety of parameters in order to plan custom batches and account for facility or regulatory limitations (e.g., U.S. Department of Transportation limits, hazard category determinations, and fissile gram equivalent limitations). Liners can be combined or batched together and the combined results displayed in real-time graphs and tables showing the cumulative characteristics. The basic database architecture has proven to be adaptable to a variety of other similar applications. Sealion is capable of tracking segmented inventories (i.e., the liners can be replaced with storage drums, racks in a warehouse, or grids overlaid on a landfill). Additionally, the batching functions allow for the ability to combine inventory sub-locations into real-time graphs that summarize the characteristics of the contents for ease in comparison of characteristics to established thresholds or decision-making modeling needed to support waste-management operations.

Michel Hall; Brady Orchard; Brett Welty; James Rivera; Paul Walker; Reese Gannon

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Recommended Sections  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

450 450 Page 1 Session 14: Confinement, Pulsed Power, Emerging Technologies Optimizing Kinetic Energy of Magnetically Driven Solid Liners for use as Drivers of HEDP Experiments Walter L. Atchison and Anthony G. Sgro Los Alamos National Laboratory Summary: This paper will show that it is possible to use 1D MHD simulations to select a starting radius and total mass combination for a cylindrical liner driven by a specific power source that will maximize the kinetic energy (KE) delivered to a target. Exploring this approach clarified the role specific time scales play in determining that optimum.

466

Development of modifications for Coflexip flexible drilling pipe for high-temperature and -pressure geothermal service. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coflexip (France) flexible drilling pipe can provide economies in drilling geothermal wells. However, the current liner materials cannot take the high temperatures (approx.250C) and pressures (approx.69 MPa). Development was undertaken to replace the liner with higher temperature materials and, thus increase the temperature capability of the flexible pipe. DuPont Teflon PFA 350, L'Garde EPDM Y267 and L'Garde AFLAS 291 were considered but they all require backing by a closely woven stainless steel fabric to prevent extrusion. A graphite-reinforced EPDM elastomer was developed which has the potential of meeting the pressure-temperature requirements without the metal fabric reinforcement.

Friese, G.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ALT-3 target design and simulations  

SciTech Connect

ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities and pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disck Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive> 60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. 1-D and 2-D simulations of the aluminum target are presented with information on the free surface velocity profile, the state of the target, and the shock velocity in the target. 2-D simulations are presented showing the different targets available as well as a scenario with a perturbed liner impacter.

Peterson, Jeffrey H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

468

Mitigation of Nuclear Fuel Pool Leaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The used or spent fuel from nuclear reactors is stored in spent fuel pools, which require canals for fuel transfer activities. These pools--3540 feet or more in depth--are lined with stainless steel ranging in thickness from ~.19 in~.38 in (~4.8 mm~9.5 mm). The liners are anchored to the walls and slab via welds that can leak or crack. lectricit de France (EDF) has developed tools to check suspect areas of the liner seam welds for cracking or leakage. This report ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

469

Solar energy system  

SciTech Connect

A solar energy system is described for selectively absorbing or reflecting radiant energy entering through a window of a structure, the system comprising a window drape having a decorative side and a back side, and a removable liner adjacent the backside of the window drape. At least one side of the liner or window drape backside is a radiant energy reflecting surface and another of said sides is a radiant energy absorbing surface. Thus, depending upon the season of the year, the system may be arranged to selectively provide the appropriate surface to optimize or minimize the radiant energy maintained within the structure.

Mole, R.A.

1977-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

Method of making a sodium sulfur battery  

SciTech Connect

A method of making a portion of a sodium sulfur battery is disclosed. The battery portion made is a portion of the container which defines the volume for the cathodic reactant materials which are sulfur and sodium polysulfide materials. The container portion is defined by an outer metal casing with a graphite liner contained therein, the graphite liner having a coating on its internal diameter for sealing off the porosity thereof. The steel outer container and graphite pipe are united by a method which insures that at the operating temperature of the battery, relatively low electrical resistance exists between the two materials because they are in intimate contact with one another.

Elkins, Perry E. (Santa Ana, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Gelcasting of aluminum titanate. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to assess the applicability of the gelcasting process for forming automotive exhaust port liner green bodies using Golden Technologies` proprietary aluminum titanate powder composition. A gelcasting process, specifically tailored to Golden Technologies` powder, was developed and used successfully to form green bodies for property evaluation. Using appropriate milling and firing conditions, it was found that the gelcast material had properties which compared favorably with Golden Technologies` baseline material. Tubular gelcast samples simulating exhaust port liners were prepared and shipped to Golden Technologies for final process evaluation.

Nunn, S.D.; Stephan, J.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

474

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the following analytical reports: hydraulic conductivity and Atterberg limits of porcelain clay; laser particle size analyses of Oklahoma sand, Custer feldspar, porcelain clay and Ajax sand; X-ray diffraction analyses of Custer feldspar and porcelain clay; density and viscosity of canola oil; residual oil saturation analyses of Oklahoma sand samples with canola oil; and residual oil saturation analyses of Oklahoma sand samples with Soltrol.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Carbons for lithium batteries prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing an anode material using sepiolite clay having channel-like interstices in its lattice structure. Carbonaceous material is deposited in the channel-like interstices of the sepiolite clay and then the sepiolite clay is removed leaving the carbonaceous material. The carbonaceous material is formed into an anode. The anode is combined with suitable cathode and electrolyte materials to form a battery of the lithium-ion type.

Sandi, Giselle (Wheaton, IL); Winans, Randall E. (Downers Grove, IL); Gregar, K. Carrado (Naperville, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Natural Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

producers of oil, coal, limestone, clay, silica sand, and that unique mineral -- fluorspar - - we recommend our bulletins about them, "Teaching Mineral Conservation"...