National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for geosynthetic clay liner

  1. Unsaturated geotechnics applied to geoenvironmental engineering problems involving geosynthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    such as geotextiles and geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) with particular focus on capillary barriers, liner performance with contrasting hydraulic conductivity (e.g. a fine-grained soil and a nonwoven geotextile). Potential desiccation

  2. JACQ: "4316_c037" --2006/10/12 --13:17 --page 1 --#1 Geosynthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    -10 Geotextiles · Geomembranes · Geogrids · Geosynthetic Clay Liners · Geocomposite Sheet Drains · Geocomposite is the use of geotextile filters in trench (i.e., French) drains. Base and cover liner systems for modern­2001 (in million m2) 1995 1996 1998 2001 Geotextiles 346.2 356.2 419.7 477.4 Geomembranes 62.4 64.4 74.6 86

  3. EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION IN GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of stress concentration or nonuniform stresses, such as a rock or roughness in the subgrade, a leachate sump leachate attenuation capacity (Daniel GSP 142 Waste Containment and Remediation #12;2 1991), (5) shorter

  4. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  5. GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams geomembrane and composite liners under conditions representative of dams. There has been previous work done

  6. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    high-density polyethylene leachate collection and removalthe following requirements: leachate collection and removalLCRS) limiting the head of leachate on the liner system to

  7. TRACER TRANSPORT THROUGH A FIELD-SCALE COMPACTED CLAY LINER OVER A 12 YEAR PERIOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " or "punctures" in the GM can form from GM deployment, construction of the leachate collection and recovery the transport of leachate from the composite system. As a result, transport through the composite liner system

  8. Model to aid the design of composite landfill liners 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Kifayathulla

    1993-01-01

    containment facilities. A numerical simulation model with a user-friendly interface was developed to study the transport of hazardous chemicals through a composite liner system consisting of a combination of flexible membrane liners, compacted clay liners...

  9. LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas for a range of conditions representative of dams, including representative hydraulic heads and soil hydraulic liner as a redundant lining system for earth dams. Introduction Embankment dams are susceptible

  10. Leakage through Liners under High Hydraulic Heads C.T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams and other hydraulic of geomembrane and composite liners for hydraulic systems such as dams involves heads several hundreds largerLeakage through Liners under High Hydraulic Heads C.T. Weber1 and J.G. Zornberg2 1 Civil

  11. REGEO `2007 -1 -New Concepts in Geosynthetic-Reinforced Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    geosynthetic inclusions such as geogrids and geotextiles. The acceptance of geosynthetics in reinforced soil are nonwoven geotextiles, woven geotextiles, geogrids, and geocells. Reinforced soil vertical walls generally retaining structures. A reduced scale geotextile-reinforced slope model built using dry sand as backfill

  12. Geosynthetics 2007 Conference 1 Effect of Wet-Dry Cycles on Capillary Break Formation in Geosynthetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Geosynthetic drainage layers consisting of a geonet sandwiched between two nonwoven geotextiles are often used size, nonwoven geotextiles will retain an amount of water equal to their porosity until reaching that movement of water through an unsaturated soil into a nonwoven geotextile is influenced by the capillary

  13. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  14. Analysis of Factors Affecting Strain Distribution in Geosynthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    and may play a critical role in design problems. A battery of tensile tests was conducted on 12 different. Digital images of the geosynthetic specimens were captured during testing, and the analyses of time-lapsed images were performed using two optical flow techniques to define strain distributions within specimens

  15. 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetics play an important role in geotechnical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    .2 A Creative Approach using Geosynthetics: Geotextile Filters Geotextiles can be used as filters in critical designers towards the use of new filter materials such as geotextiles, the design base and experience, which confirmed the suitability of using geotextiles as filters in large earth dams (Giroud 2010

  16. Advances in Geosynthetics Materials and Applications for Soil Reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    geotextiles (particularly woven geotextiles), geogrids and geocells. Geotextiles (Figure 1a, Bathurst 2007 geomattresses. soil confinement (a) Geotextiles (b) Geogrids (c) Geocells Figure 1: Geosynthetics commonly used layer typically incorporated between a top and bottom geotextile layer or bonded to a geomembrane

  17. Ingenuity in Geotechnical Design using Geosynthetics Jorge G. Zornberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Approach using Geosynthetics: Geotextile Filters Geotextiles can be used as filters in critical projects filter materials such as geotextiles, the design base and experience in their use continues to grow geotextiles as filters in large earth dams (Giroud 2010). The recent re-evaluation led to four criteria

  18. Microsoft Word - LL-WM08 Paper 8351.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tests on Geosynthetic Clay Liners Subjected to Differential Settlement," MS Thesis, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (1992). 25. W.J. WAUGH, G.M. SMITH, D.BERGMAN-TABBERT, and...

  19. Microsoft Word - LL-White Paper Prac_Improve_Perform.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tests on geosynthetic clay liners subjected to differential settlement. MS Thesis, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX. Lapham, S.C., J.B. Millard, and J.M. Samet, 1989. "Health...

  20. ADVANCES ON THE USE OF GEOSYNTHETICS IN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS Jorge G. Zornberg, Ph.D., P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    since 1959 (Contrada Sabetta dam). The use of geosynthetics in hydraulic systems has the potential and on the performance of geosynthetic barriers under high hydraulic heads. UPDATE ON THE USE OF GEOSYNTHETICS IN DAMS-induced degradation in new dams, and as the main hydraulic barrier in cases where low-hydraulic conductivity soils

  1. Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system T. D. Stark containment, Strength, Stability, Shearbox test, Failure, Final cover system, Landfill REFERENCE: Stark, T. D. & Newman, E. J. (20 I0). Design of a landfill final cover systcm. Geosynthetics [ntemational17, No.3, 124

  2. TENSILE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF GEOSYNTHETICS USING CONFINED-ACCELERATED TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    TENSILE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF GEOSYNTHETICS USING CONFINED-ACCELERATED TESTS COMPORTEMENT EN tensile and creep standard tests are performed with in-isolation specimens, they may not reproduce the possibly significant effect of soil-geosynthetic interaction. A new creep testing machine was recently

  3. Evaluation of alternative leachate liner materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Daniel Franklin

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate alternative landfill liner materials that could be utilized in conjunction with current liners in order to improve the liner's performance by preventing the release of hazardous chemicals into the subsurface...

  4. Micromechanical Analysis of Geosynthetic-Soil Interaction Under Cyclic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhandari, Anil

    2010-05-28

    OF PAPER 85 3.7 CALIBRATION OF GEOTEXTILE AND GEOGRID 87 CHAPTER FOUR 91 4 TRAPDOOR EXPERIMENT AND DEM SIMULATION 91 4.1 EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TEST PROCEDURE 91 4.2 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS 94 4.2.1 Unreinforced embankments 94 4.2.2 Reinforced embankments... CHAPTER SIX 160 6 BEHAVIOR OF GEOSYNTHETIC-REINFORCED BASES 160 6.1 GEOTEXTILE-REINFORCED BASE 160 6.1.1 Numerical sample preparation 162 6.1.2 Moving wheel load 164 6.1.3 Contact forces due to moving wheel load 165 6.1.4 Rut depths due to moving...

  5. Computational fluid dynamics improves liner cementing operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, N.A.; Archer, G.L. ); Seymour, D.A. )

    1994-09-26

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), an analytical tool for studying fluid mechanics, helped plan the successful cementing of a critical liner in a North Sea extended reach well. The results from CFD analysis increased the confidence in the primary cementing of the liner. CFD modeling was used to quantify the effects of increasing the displacement rate and of rotating the liner on the mud flow distribution in the annulus around the liner.

  6. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  7. Hydraulic Interaction between Geosynthetic Drainage Layers and Unsaturated Low Plasticity Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    and relatively large pore size of nonwoven geotextiles compared with that of most soils, water will drain from a geotextile more readily than from a soil for a similar suction. In fact, the geotextile will drain drainage layers, as the hydraulic conductivity of a geotextile predicted from the shape of its water

  8. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  9. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Andrew H. (Knoxville, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace.

  10. An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-03-01

    Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000’s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

  11. Geosynthetics in Landfills Prepared by M. Bouazza and J. Zornberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    ; · geotextiles, which can be used for filtration purpose or as cushion to protect the geomembrane from puncture system, located between the primary and secondary liners, is a geotextile/geonet composite. The leachate with a network of perforated geopipes. A geotextile protection layer beneath the gravel provides a cushion

  12. The naked nuclei of LINERs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmaverde, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We analyze HST spectra and Chandra observations of a sample of 21 LINERs, at least 18 of which genuine AGN. We find a correlation between the X-rays and emission lines luminosities, extending over three orders of magnitude and with a dispersion of 0.36 dex; no differences emerge between LINERs with and without broad lines, or between radio-loud and radio-quiet sources. The presence of such a strong correlation is remarkable considering that for half of the sample the X-ray luminosity can not be corrected for local absorption. This connection is readily understood since the X-ray light is associated with the same source producing the ionizing photons at the origin of the line emission. This implies that we have a direct view of the LINERs nuclei in the X-rays: the circumnuclear, high column density structure (the torus) is absent in these sources. Such a conclusion is also supported by mid-infrared data. We suggest that this is due to the general paucity of gas and dust in their nuclear regions that causes als...

  13. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico, wind, rain) after 6, 12, 18, 30, and 84 months under specific exposure conditions. Geomembranes of two radiation, humidity, wind, and rain) after 6, 12, 18, 30, and 84 months (0,5, 1, 1.5, 2.5, and 7 years). 2

  14. International GSI-Asia Geosynthetics Conference Taichung, Taiwan, Nov. 16~18, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    by the inclusion of nonwoven geotextiles under the fine-grained soil component of the cover. 1. INTRODUCTION), or a porous geosynthetic (e.g. a nonwoven geotextile). This phenomenon was initially observed in geotechnical geomaterials with relatively large pores (e.g. gravel, geotextiles) decreases faster than that of fine

  15. Geosynthetics International, 2004, 11, No. 1 Liquid flow equations for drainage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    overlain by a sand protective layer (Figure 1). It should be noted that only the upper geotextile of the drainage geocomposite is shown in Figure 1. In many cases, there is a geotextile heat-bonded to the lower face of the geosynthetic drainage medium for stability purposes. This geotextile is not shown in Figure

  16. New equipment to conduct confined-accelerated creep tests on geosynthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    on geosynthetics. The results of creep tests conducted using both a nonwoven and a woven geotextiles are presented-soil conditions. On the other hand, the creep behavior of only the nonwoven geotextile was found to be sensitive to soil confinement. Soil confinement was found to have an insignificant effect on the woven geotextile

  17. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico Moisture Migration in Geogrid Reinforced Expansive Subgrades R. Gupta, University of Texas at Austin, Texas for moisture infiltration and increased ease of base course particle migration, both of which accelerate

  18. Geosynthetics International, 2003, 10, No. 2 Air channel testing of thermally bonded PVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and recommend that destructive testing of PVC geomembranes be reduced and possibly discontinued length used in destructive tests. KEYWORDS: Geosynthetics, Peel strength, PVC geomembrane, Quality to long curing times. This can delay peel and shear testing of seams up to 24 h and also delay non

  19. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  20. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  1. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  2. Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model under Working Stress and Large Soil Strain Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model with a centrifuge test are used to investigate the mobilization of backfill stress and strain within a geosynthetic a centrifuge GRS slope model. Numerical results indicate that soil stress mobilization can be described

  3. Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on geotechnical and stability analyses for the design of landfills and remedial closures. It is the mostLandfill Instability and Its Implications for Operation, Construction, and Design By: W. Douglas landfill waste slide, a 300,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving a geosynthetic clay liner, and a 100

  4. Design of the ZTH vacuum liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, P.P.; Dike, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of the ZTH vacuum liner design is covered by this report. ZTH will be the first experiment to be installed in the CPRF (Confinement Physics Research Facility) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and is scheduled to be operational at the rated current of 4 MA in 1992. The vacuum vessel has a 2.4 m major radius and a 40 cm minor radius. Operating parameters which drive the vacuum vessel mechanical design include a 300 C bakeout temperature, an armour support system capable of withstanding 25 kV, a high toroidal resistance, 1250 kPa magnetic loading, a 10 minute cycle time, and high positional accuracy with respect to the conducting shell. The vacuum vessel design features which satisfy the operating parameters are defined. The liner is constructed of Inconel 625 and has a geometry which alternates sections of thin walled bellows with rigid ribs. These composite sections span between pairs of the 16 diagnostic stations to complete the torus. The thin bellows sections maximize the liner toroidal resistance and the ribs provide support and positional accuracy for the armour in relation to the conducting shell. Heat transfer from the vessel is controlled by a blanket wrap of ceramic fiber insulation and the heat flux is dissipated to a water cooling jacket in the conducting shell.

  5. LIQUID BUTANE FILLED LOAD FOR A LINER DRIVEN PEGASUS EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. SALAZAR; W. ANDERSON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A hydrogen rich, low density liquid, contained within the internal volume of a cylindrical liner, was requested of the Polymers and Coatings Group (MST-7) of the Los Alamos Materials Science Division for one of the last liner driven experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus facility. The experiment was a continuation of the Raleigh-Taylor hydrodynamics series of experiments and associated liners that have been described previously [1,2].

  6. Liquid butane filled load for a liner driven Pegasus experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, M. A.; Armijo, E. V.; Anderson, W. E.; Atchison, W. L.; Bartos, J. J.; Garcia, F.; Randolph, B.; Sheppard, M. G.; Stokes, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen rich, low density liquid, contained within the internal volume of a cylindrical liner, was requested of the Polymers and Coatings Group (MST-7) of the Los Alamos Materials Science Division for one of the last liner driven experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus facility. The experiment (Fig.1) was a continuation of the Raleigh-Taylor hydrodynamics series of experiments and associated liners that have been described previously.

  7. Construction, monitoring, and performance of two soil liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Hensel, B.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype and large-scale soil liner were constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for saturated hydraulic conductivity. In situ ponded infiltration rates into the prototype liner were measured and water containing fluorescein and rhodamine WT dyers was allowed to infiltrate in the prototype liner. Although the liner met the USEPA conductivity requirement, the dye flow paths indicated a need for better bonding between lifts and a reduction in soil clod sizes. These observations suggested that if soil liners are to perform according to design specifications, soil processing prior to construction and rigid construction QA/QC are necessary. The large-scale liner (7.3 c 14.6 {times} 0.9 m) consisted of six 15-cm compacted lifts. Full-scale equipment was used for compaction, and construction practices were modified on the basis of experience gained from the prototype liner study. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirements established by the USEPA. Questions regarding methodologies to collect in situ infiltration data have arisen from the research. Differences have been noted in infiltration fluxes, as measured by different types of infiltrometers. Perturbations in measurements of infiltration rates and soil tensions have been correlated with barometric pressure fluctuations and/or temperature changes in the liner.

  8. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Figure 2.15. As the water content and compressibility of theWater Contents Final water contents and dry unit weights areangularity), compaction water content, and magnitude of

  9. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    R. S. (2011). “Geomembrane damage due to static and cyclic66 Figure 4.10. GM damage results after shearing for Testsshear displacement on shear strength and GM damage for test

  10. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    behavior using NW-NP geotextile protection layer (Narejo etPuncture behavior using geotextile-based GCL protectionmass per unit area of geotextile protective layer at various

  11. Wellbore instability mechanisms in clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Sherif Adel

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the stability of wellbores drilled in Ko-consolidated clays using non-linear finite element method (FEM) and effective stress soil models to characterize the behavior of clay and unconsolidated ...

  12. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Miller, Christopher Francis (Macungie, PA)

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  13. Re-Use of Clean Coal Technology By-Products in the Construction of Low Permeability Liners. Final report, 10/1/96 – 3/31/00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, William E.; Butalia, Tarunjit S.; Whitlach, Jr., E. Earl; Mitsch, William

    2000-12-31

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from October 1, 1996 to March 31, 2000 to investigate the use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners. The objective of the research program was to establish field-verified time-dependent relationships for the performance of liners constructed from stabilized FGD by-products generated in Ohio. The project objective was accomplished with a coordinated program of testing and analyzing small scale laboratory specimens under controlled conditions, medium-scale wetland mesocosms, and a full-scale pond facility. Although the specific uses directly addressed by this report include liners for surface impoundments, the results presented in this study are also useful in other applications including design of daily cover and liners for landfills, seepage cutoff walls and trenches and for nutrient retention and pollution mitigation wetlands. The small scale laboratory tests, medium scale mesocosm wetland experiments, and construction and monitoring of a full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds, and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. Actual permeability coefficients in the range of 10-7 cm/sec (3 x 10-9 ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by properly compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio’s non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. Constructed FGD-lined wetlands offer the opportunity for increased phosphorous retention giving rise to the potential use of these materials as a liners for wastewater treatment wetlands. While plant growth was observed to be less vigorous for FGD lined wetland mesocosms compared to the control, the above and below ground biomass were not significantly different. Cost estimates for FGD liners compared favorably with clay liners for varying haul distances.

  14. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  15. Multiscale modeling of clay-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebrahimi, Davoud

    2014-01-01

    The engineering properties of soils are highly affected by clay content and clay-water interactions. However, existing macro-scale continuum models have no length scale to describe the evolution of the clay microstructure ...

  16. Metal liner-driven quasi-isentropic compression of deuterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Bland, Simon N.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2013-09-15

    Properties of degenerate hydrogen and deuterium (D) at pressures of the order of terapascals are of key interest to Planetary Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In order to recreate these conditions in the laboratory, we present a scheme, where a metal liner drives a cylindrically convergent quasi-isentropic compression in a D fill. We first determined an external pressure history for driving a self-similar implosion of a D shell from a fictitious flow simulation [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Nucl. Fusion 47, 1147 (2007)]. Then, it is shown that this D implosion can be recreated inside a beryllium liner by shaping the current pulse. For a peak current of 10.8 MA cold and nearly isochoric D is assembled at around 12 500 kg/m{sup 3}. Finally, our two-dimensional Gorgon simulations show the robustness of the implosion method to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability when using a sufficiently thick liner.

  17. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  18. Numerical models of pressure pulse generation by imploding metal liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphries, S. Jr. [Acceleration Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Acceleration Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Ekdahl, C.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The authors describe numerical calculations of pressure pulse generation using imploding liners. Liners are metal cylinders that are magnetically compressed by an intense axial current flow from a high-power pulse generator. The simulations cover the acceleration of the liner, collision with an internal diagnostic target, followed by compression and shock wave heating of the target. With the projected current waveform of the Atlas capacitor bank (in development at Los Alamos National Laboratory), initial results suggest that it may be possible to achieve pressures exceeding 3,000 Gpa (30 Mbar) in a 4 mm diameter sample over an interval of 100--200 ns. The simulations were carried out with Crunch, a new one-dimensional hydrodynamics package for advanced personal computers. The program uses finite-element techniques to solve the coupled problems of hydrodynamics and magnetic diffusion. Crunch fully supports loading and interpolating Sesame equation-of-state tables. The program exhibits excellent stability, even for collisions between material shells and shock convergence on axis. In contrast to previous work, the present studies follow the full process through solid target collision and compression. The work supports the High-Energy Density Physics Program of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a component of the US Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship Program. The purpose of this program is maintenance of the nuclear weapons stockpile through improved computational ability and above-ground experiments. Imploding liners driven by conventional capacitor banks constitute a portion of the program to study matter at high pressure.

  19. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

  20. A comparison of portable and permanent landfill liner leak detection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, S.B.; White, C.C.; Barker, R.D.

    1999-07-01

    Monitoring of the integrity of electrically non-conductive geomembrane liners installed at waste sites using electrical geophysical techniques has been carried out for a number of years using above-liner leak location surveys and, more recently, below-liner monitoring systems. The authors compare the theoretical response of both types of survey to a hole in a liner and then compare with measurements made in the field. The theoretical leak response indicates that above-liner surveys are sensitive to leaks over a greater area, though both responses result in comparable leak detectability. However, field data suggest that in practice, measurements made on a sparse grid below the liner have the greater sensitivity to certain leaks. This may be due to the differing leak geometries and background conditions present above and below the liner. The results indicate that a sparse below-liner monitoring grid, with its long-term monitoring capabilities, combined with above-liner surveys to pinpoint leaks accurately offer a successful approach to ensuring liner integrity throughout the lifetime of a lined waste site.

  1. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mentesana, Charles (Leawood, KS)

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  2. Precision high energy liner implosion experiments PHELIX [1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware design of a small megajoule sized transformer coupled pulse power system utilized to drive hydrodynamic liner experiments with a nominal current capability of 10 megAmperes. The resulting liner velocities and characteristics provide properties of physics interest. The capacitor banks utilize the ''Atlas'' plastic cased 60 kV, 60 kJ capacitors [2] and railgaps [3]. The air insulated marx'S are configured to dive a multi-filar toroidal transformer. The 4:1 multi-filar toroidal transformer is mechanically part of a circular disc line and this feature results in an attractive inductance budget. Because of the compact size, re-usable transformer, and resulting low maintenance cost, shot rates can be high compared to other ''large'' machines or explosively driven hydrodynamic methods. The PHELIX modeling, construction status, and test results will also be provided.

  3. Reliability-based condition assessment of steel containment and liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingwood, B.; Bhattacharya, B.; Zheng, R.

    1996-11-01

    Steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environments that may cause their strength and stiffness to decrease during the plant service life. Among the factors recognized as having the potential to cause structural deterioration are uniform, pitting or crevice corrosion; fatigue, including crack initiation and propagation to fracture; elevated temperature; and irradiation. The evaluation of steel containments and liners for continued service must provide assurance that they are able to withstand future extreme loads during the service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. Rational methodologies to provide such assurances can be developed using modern structural reliability analysis principles that take uncertainties in loading, strength, and degradation resulting from environmental factors into account. The research described in this report is in support of the Steel Containments and Liners Program being conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The research demonstrates the feasibility of using reliability analysis as a tool for performing condition assessments and service life predictions of steel containments and liners. Mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors are identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis are summarized. The analysis of steel containment fragility is described, and simple illustrations of the impact on reliability of structural degradation are provided. The role of nondestructive evaluation in time-dependent reliability analysis, both in terms of defect detection and sizing, is examined. A Markov model provides a tool for accounting for time-dependent changes in damage condition of a structural component or system. 151 refs.

  4. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Ubiquitous clay minerals can play an important role in assessing...

  5. Fabrication of Machined and Shrink Fitted Impactor; Composite Liners for the Los Alamos HEDP Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, B.

    1999-10-19

    Composite liners have been fabricated for the Los Alamos liner driven HEDP experiments using impactors formed by physical vapor deposition (PVD), electroplating, machining and shrink fitting. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been proposed for some ATLAS liner applications. This paper describes the processes used to fabricate machined and shrink fitted impactors which have been used for copper impactors in 1100 aluminum liners and 6061 T-6 aluminum impactors in 1100 aluminum liners. The most successful processes have been largely empirically developed and rely upon a combination of shrink fitted and light press fitting. The processes used to date will be described along with some considerations for future composite liners requirements in the HEDP Program.

  6. Gas-puff liner implosion in the configuration with helical current return rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2013-02-15

    Results of experiments with double-shell gas-puff liners carried out on a high-current MIG generator (2 MA, 80 ns) are presented. To stabilize the process of liner implosion and increase the efficiency of energy transfer from the generator to the liner plasma, a current return in the form of a multifilar helix was used. The effect of the configuration of the current return on the parameters of the generated pulses of argon and neon K-shell radiation (with photon energies of 3-5 and 0.9-1.5 keV, respectively) and the neutron yield from a deuterium liner were studied.

  7. COUPLED MECHANICAL AND HYDRAULIC MODELING OF GEOSYNTHETIC-REINFORCED COLUMN-SUPPORTED EMBANKMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jie

    2007-12-14

    -30 60-300 Stone column 100-500 3-10 45-120 GEC 300-600 3-10 80-150 Geopier 225-650 3-10 60-90 VCC 200-600 3-10 45-60 CSV 30-60 3-10 12-18 AU-Geo 75-150 2-15 15 Note: CFA— continuous flight augered; DMM— deep mixing method; GEC—geotextile encased... and marine clay Timber piles with concrete caps Geotextile H=1.5, s=1.5m, d=0.83m, P c =30.6% N/A Broms and Wong 1985 Railway Very soft alluvium and peat Concrete pile Geotextile H=3-5m, s=2.75m, d=1.4m, P c =20%, N=1 No discernible...

  8. Liner/target/CMU cassette design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griego, Jeffrey Randall

    2011-01-07

    As part of an ongoing collaboration in pulsed power technology and condensed matter shock physics with RFNCNNIIEF, the initial design for the target and central measuring unit (CMU) for a high-pressure, high-precision ({approx}1 %), Hugoniot, equation of state (EOS) experiment is shown. VNIIEF would design and construct the disk explosive magnetic generator (DEMG) with peak currents {approx}100 MA, and cylindrical liner system with peak velocity {approx}10-20 km/s. LANL would design and construct the target and velocimetry diagnostic system. The initial mechanical design features a 2 cm diameter target system and a 1 cm diameter CMU with 32 lines of sight for PDV.

  9. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Acoustic Behavior of a Multi-perforated Liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldredge, Jeff

    Numerical Investigation of the Acoustic Behavior of a Multi-perforated Liner Jeff D. Eldredge, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA The acoustic response of a turbulent flow through an aperture in a multi-perforated, turbine, and the downstream-traveling sound created by the fan. In particular, multi-perforated liners

  11. Tank 241-AY-102 Secondary Liner Corrosion Evaluation - 14191

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of 241-AY-102 (AY-102) was leaking. A number of evaluations were performed after discovery of the leak which identified corrosion from storage of waste at the high waste temperatures as one of the major contributing factors in the failure of the tank. The propensity for corrosion of the waste on the annulus floor will be investigated to determine if it is corrosive and must be promptly removed or if it is benign and may remain in the annulus. The chemical composition of waste, the temperature and the character of the steel are important factors in assessing the propensity for corrosion. Unfortunately, the temperatures of the wastes in contact with the secondary steel liner are not known; they are estimated to range from 45 deg C to 60 deg C. It is also notable that most corrosion tests have been carried out with un-welded, stress-relieved steels, but the secondary liner in tank AY-102 was not stress-relieved. In addition, the cold weather fabrication and welding led to many problems, which required repeated softening of the metal to flatten secondary bottom during its construction. This flame treatment may have altered the microstructure of the steel.

  12. FIREBALL: Fusion Ignition Rocket Engine with Ballistic Ablative Lithium Liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Lee, Michael H. [Propulsion Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center XD22, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fimognari, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Thermo-nuclear fusion may be the key to a high Isp, high specific power propulsion system. In a fusion system energy is liberated within, and imparted directly to, the propellant. In principle, this can overcome the performance limitations inherent in systems that require thermal power transfer across a material boundary, and/or multiple power conversion stages (NTR, NEP). A thermo-nuclear propulsion system, which attempts to overcome some of the problems inherent in the Orion concept, is described. A dense FRC plasmoid is accelerated to high velocity (in excess of 500 km/s) and is compressed into a detached liner (pulse unit). The kinetic energy of the FRC is converted into thermal and magnetic-field energy, igniting a fusion burn in the magnetically confined plasma. The fusion reaction serves as an ignition source for the liner, which is made out of detonable materials. The energy liberated in this process is converted to thrust by a pusher-plate, as in the classic Orion concept. However with this concept, the vehicle does not carry a magazine of autonomous pulse-units. By accelerating a second, heavier FRC, which acts as a piston, right behind the first one, the velocity required to initiate the fusion burn is greatly reduced.

  13. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L. (comp.)

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  14. Geotextiles, one among the different geosynthetic products, can be used for a number of functions or applications in pavement design. Specifically, woven or nonwoven geotextiles have been used in pavements to fulfill the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Geotextiles, one among the different geosynthetic products, can be used for a number of functions or applications in pavement design. Specifically, woven or nonwoven geotextiles have been used in pavements propagation. Indeed, geotextiles often perform more than one function simultaneously depending on the type

  15. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  16. Formation of imploding plasma liners for fundamental HEDP studies and MIF Standoff Driver Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hatcher, Richard; Stanic, Milos

    2013-08-17

    The disciplines of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are characterized by hypervelocity implosions and strong shocks. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is focused on reaching HEDP and/or ICF relevant regimes in excess of 1 Mbar peak pressure by the merging and implosion of discrete plasma jets, as a potentially efficient path towards these extreme conditions in a laboratory. In this work we have presented the first 3D simulations of plasma liner, formation, and implosion by the merging of discrete plasma jets in which ionization, thermal conduction, and radiation are all included in the physics model. The study was conducted by utilizing a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) and was a part of the plasma liner experiment (PLX). The salient physics processes of liner formation and implosion are studied, namely vacuum propagation of plasma jets, merging of the jets (liner forming), implosion (liner collapsing), stagnation (peak pressure), and expansion (rarefaction wave disassembling the target). Radiative transport was found to significantly reduce the temperature of the liner during implosion, thus reducing the thermal leaving more pronounced gradients in the plasma liner during the implosion compared with ideal hydrodynamic simulations. These pronounced gradients lead to a greater sensitivity of initial jet geometry and symmetry on peak pressures obtained. Accounting for ionization and transport, many cases gave higher peak pressures than the ideal hydrodynamic simulations. Scaling laws were developed accordingly, creating a non-dimensional parameter space in which performance of an imploding plasma jet liner can be estimated. It is shown that HEDP regimes could be reached with ~ 5 MJ of liner energy, which would translate to roughly 10 to 20 MJ of stored (capacitor) energy. This is a potentially significant improvement over the currently available means via ICF of achieving HEDP and nuclear fusion relevant parameters.

  17. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

  18. Energy transfer through a multi-layer liner for shaped charges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skolnick, Saul (Albuquerque, NM); Goodman, Albert (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to the determination of parameters for selecting materials for use as liners in shaped charges to transfer the greatest amount of energy to the explosive jet. Multi-layer liners constructed of metal in shaped charges for oil well perforators or other applications are selected in accordance with the invention to maximize the penetrating effect of the explosive jet by reference to four parameters: (1) Adjusting the explosive charge to liner mass ratio to achieve a balance between the amount of explosive used in a shaped charge and the areal density of the liner material; (2) Adjusting the ductility of each layer of a multi-layer liner to enhance the formation of a longer energy jet; (3) Buffering the intermediate layers of a multi-layer liner by varying the properties of each layer, e.g., composition, thickness, ductility, acoustic impedance and areal density, to protect the final inside layer of high density material from shattering upon impact of the explosive force and, instead, flow smoothly into a jet; and (4) Adjusting the impedance of the layers in a liner to enhance the transmission and reduce the reflection of explosive energy across the interface between layers.

  19. 187GEOSYNTHETICS INTERNATIONAL S 1997, VOL. 4, NO. 2 Technical Note by J.G. Zornberg and J.P. Giroud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    of conven- tional landfill cover and liner systems), but also for challenging projects in which an exposed geomembrane without any protective layer is contemplated for final closure of a waste containment system

  20. Competitive sorption of pyrene and pyridine to natural clay minerals and reference clay standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lai Man

    2001-01-01

    understood. This study followed a mechanistic approach to confirm suspected specific mineral-PAH interactions. The focus was on the sorption of pyrene to three clay sorbents, a soil clay fraction and two reference clay standards, in the presence of a...

  1. Method and apparatus for monitoring the integrity of a geomembrane liner using time domain reflectometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-04-24

    Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

  2. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Brockington, Samuel; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Mike; Wu, Linchun; Elton, Ray

    2014-11-11

    Plasma jets with high density and velocity have a number of important applications in fusion energy and elsewhere, including plasma refueling, disruption mitigation in tokamaks, magnetized target fusion, injection of momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, plasma thrusters, and high energy density plasmas (HEDP). In Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), for example, an imploding material liner is used to compress a magnetized plasma to fusion conditions and to confine the resulting burning plasma inertially to obtain the necessary energy gain. The imploding shell may be solid, liquid, gaseous, or a combination of these states. The presence of the magnetic field in the target plasma suppresses thermal transport to the plasma shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target to fusion conditions. This allows the required imploding momentum flux to be generated electromagnetically using off-the-shelf pulsed power technology. Practical schemes for standoff delivery of the imploding momentum flux are required and are open topics for research. One approach for accomplishing this, called plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF), uses a spherical array of pulsed plasma guns to create a spherically imploding shell of very high velocity, high momentum flux plasma. This approach requires development of plasma jet accelerators capable of achieving velocities of 50-200 km/s with very precise timing and density profiles, and with high total mass and density. Low-Z plasma jets would require the higher velocities, whereas very dense high-Z plasma shells could achieve the goal at velocities of only 50-100 km/s. In this report, we describe our work to develop the pulsed plasma gun technology needed for an experimental scientific exploration of the PJMIF concept, and also for the other applications mentioned earlier. The initial goal of a few hundred of hydrogen at 200 km/s was eventually replaced with accelerating 8000 ?g of argon or xenon to 50 km/s for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initial work used existing computational and analytical tools to develop and refine a specific plasma gun concept having a novel tapered coaxial electromagnetic accelerator contour with an array of symmetric ablative plasma injectors. The profile is designed to suppress the main barrier to success in coaxial guns, namely the blow-by instability in which the arc slips past and outruns the bulk of the plasma mass. Efforts to begin developing a set of annular non-ablative plasma injectors for the coaxial gun, in order to accelerate pure gases, resulted in development of linear parallel-plate MiniRailguns that turned out to work well as plasma guns in their own right and we subsequently chose them for an initial plasma liner experiment on the PLX facility at LANL. This choice was mainly driven by cost and schedule for that particular experiment, while longer term goals still projected use of coaxial guns for reactor-relevant applications for reasons of better symmetry, lower impurities, more compact plasma jet formation, and higher gun efficiency. Our efforts have focused mainly on 1) developing various plasma injection systems for both coax and linear railguns and ensuring they work reliably with the accelerator section, 2) developing a suite of plasma and gun diagnostics, 3) performing computational modeling to design and refine the plasma guns, 4) establishing a research facility dedicated to plasma gun development, and finally, 5) developing plasma guns and associated pulse power systems capable of achieving these goals and installing and testing the first two gun sets on the PLX facility at LANL. During the second funding cycle for this program, HyperV joined in a collaborative effort with LANL, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, and the University of New Mexico to perform a plasma liner experiment (PLX) to investigate the physics and technology of forming spherically imploding plasma liners. HyperV’s tasks focused on developing the plasma guns and associated pulse power syst

  3. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-15

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a 'plasma liner' that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., 'Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers', Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M=liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as {rho}{approx}1/r{sup 2}, for any constant adiabatic index {gamma}=d ln p/d ln {rho}. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A{approx}C{sup 2}, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C=r{sub m}/R, where r{sub m}(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A=compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity {approx}100 km/s and {gamma}=5/3, need to be hypersonic M{approx}60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A{approx}10{sup 4} necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T<2 eV, n>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A=1.6x10{sup 4} can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M{approx_equal}12.7({gamma}-0.3){sup 4.86}, valid in the range (10liners assembled by current and anticipated plasma jets is <4%. A new similarity model for fusion {alpha}-particle heating of the collapsed liner indicates that 'spark' ignition of the DT liner fuel does not appear to be possible for magnetized fusion targets with typical threshold values of areal density {rho}R<0.02 g cm{sup -2}.

  4. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ClaY and Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the clays are mainly underclays associated with coal. domestic production data for clays were developed-based products in Canada and the United S

  5. Nuclear containment steel liner corrosion workshop : final summary and recommendation report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erler, Bryan A. (Erler Engineering Ltd., Chicago, IL); Weyers, Richard E. (Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA); Sagues, Alberto (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL); Petti, Jason P.; Berke, Neal Steven (Tourney Consulting Group, LLC, Kalamazoo, MI); Naus, Dan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the proceedings of an expert panel workshop conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of corrosion for the steel liner in nuclear containment buildings. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored this work which was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. A workshop was conducted at the NRC Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland on September 2 and 3, 2010. Due to the safety function performed by the liner, the expert panel was assembled in order to address the full range of issues that may contribute to liner corrosion. This report is focused on corrosion that initiates from the outer surface of the liner, the surface that is in contact with the concrete containment building wall. Liner corrosion initiating on the outer diameter (OD) surface has been identified at several nuclear power plants, always associated with foreign material left embedded in the concrete. The potential contributing factors to liner corrosion were broken into five areas for discussion during the workshop. Those include nuclear power plant design and operation, corrosion of steel in contact with concrete, concrete aging and degradation, concrete/steel non-destructive examination (NDE), and concrete repair and corrosion mitigation. This report also includes the expert panel member's recommendations for future research.

  6. TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS By: J. A. Kuhn1 and J. G. Zornberg for use in highly plastic clay. The clay used for experimentation was taken locally from the Eagle Ford Ford Clay is determined. INTRODUCTION The progression of wetting and drying fronts in highly plastic

  7. Preparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The influence of blending method, compatibil- izers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation. RHDPE/clay hybrids containing completely exfoliated clay were obtained using a two-step blending method), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP) are the three largest components

  8. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  9. Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

    1993-10-15

    This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

  10. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  11. The Large Scale Structure of LINERs and Seyferts and Implications for their Central Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anca Constantin; Michael S. Vogeley

    2006-12-15

    We discuss here the spatial clustering of Seyferts and LINERs and consequences for their central engines. We show that Seyferts are less clustered than LINERs, and that this difference is not driven by the morphology-density relation, but it is related to the difference in clustering as a function of level of activity in these systems and the amount of fuel available for accretion. LINERs, which are the most clustered among AGN, show the lowest luminosities and obscuration levels, and relatively low gas densities, suggesting that these objects harbor black holes that are relatively massive yet weakly active or inefficient in their accretion, probably due to the insufficiency of their fuel supply. Seyferts, which are weakly clustered, are very luminous, show generally high gas densities and large quantities of obscuring material, suggesting that in these systems the black holes are less massive but abundantly fueled and therefore accrete quickly and probably efficiently enough to clearly dominate the ionization.

  12. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  13. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  14. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, Kathleen C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Winans, Randall E. (Downers Grove, IL); Botto, Robert E. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  15. Fracture mechanics analysis of NGV fuel cylinders. Part 2. Metal cylinder liners. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.P.; Hudak, S.J.

    1994-03-01

    Metal-lined composite wrapped cylinders for compressed natural gas (CNG) storage onboard natural gas vehicles (NGV`s) offer the advantage of reduced weight over conventional all-metal cylinders. These cylinders, however, can fail as a result of fatigue crack growth in the metal liners, or by degradation and failure of the composite wrap. This report summarizes a fracture mechanics based assessment of fatigue crack growth of the metal liners. The analysis was performed on a full-wrapped aluminum lined cylinder and a hoop-wrapped steel cylinder.

  16. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ?10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (?10{sup ?10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (?10{sup 28}m{sup ?3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  17. Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc More Documents & Publications...

  18. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As amore »result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.« less

  19. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay Electric

  20. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Low Permeation Liner for H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . "Conformable" Composite Tanks #12;Polymer Liners are Proposed for Composite H2 Tanks Examples: Nylon 6, XLPE "Conformable" Composite Tanks #12;INEEL's Active Electrochemical Diffusion Barrier Approach Electron-conductive polymer electrodes & proton-conductive electrolyte E = -G/nF = RT/nF {ln[ PH2 (ref) /PH2 (sub

  1. Study of LINER sources with broad H(alpha) emission. Spectral energy distribution and multiwavelength correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younes, G; Sabra, B; Reeves, J N; Grosso, N

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We attempt to infer the accretion mechanism and radiative processes giving rise to the SEDs of a well-defined optically-selected sample of LINERs showing a definite detection of broad Halpha emission (LINER 1s). We construct SEDs for six LINER~1s with simultaneous UV and X-ray fluxes, and we looked for multiwavelength, radio to X-ray and UV to X-ray, correlations. At a given X-ray luminosity, the average SED of the six LINER 1s in our sample: (1) resembles the SED of radio-loud quasars in the radio band, ~-2.7, (2) exhibits a weak UV bump, ~-1.17+-0.02 with a dispersion sigma=0.01, and (3) displays a X-ray spectrum similar to radio-quiet quasars. The bolometric luminosities inferred from the SEDs are extremely faint, at least two orders of magnitude lower than AGN. The X-ray bolometric correction, kappa_(2-10 keV), of our sample is lower than in the case of AGN, with a mean value of 16. We find a strong anticorrelation between the radio loudness parameter, R_X, and the Eddington ratio for our sampl...

  2. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Modified Atmosphere Packaging Box Liners on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    that the use of MAP box liners is recommended to improve market life of `Friar' plums up to 45 days cold with different permeabilities to oxygen and carbon dioxide to pro- long the shelf life of fruit and vegeta- bles and Shelf Life of `Friar' Plums Celia M. Canti´n1 , Carlos H. Crisosto2,4 , and Kevin R. Day3 ADDITIONAL

  3. Characterization of Gulf of Mexico Clay Using Automated Triaxial Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murali, Madhuri

    2012-02-14

    . This thesis presents the results of SHANSEP triaxial testing performed on undisturbed samples of Gulf of Mexico clay. Background information is given about the clay, the sampling program and the laboratory testing program. The GEOTAC Truepath automated stress...

  4. The Swelling of Clays Within Portland Brownstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    the stone comes into contact with water. Water enters between the clay layers and surrounds the positive and buckling Ex.: rain #12;Example of Damage: Victoria Mansion in Portland, Maine oh my #12;2. Equipment: How 2. Water is poured on top, causes differential swelling 3. Sample warps due to the stress from

  5. Application of a Novel Clay Stabilizer to Mitigate Formation Damage due to Clay Swelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Timothy

    2014-12-09

    and drilling engineers’ responsibilities. This research focuses on the application of a cationic inorganic Al/Zr-based polymer clay stabilizer to prevent swelling of smectite particles in a sandstone matrix. Previous work has focused on mitigating fines...

  6. The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of Ni Surface Precipitates R O B E R 19717 The formation of transition-metal surface precipitates may occur during sorption to clay minerals formation are poorly understood. We monitored changes in the reversibility of Ni sorbed to a clay mineral

  7. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash-water suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Ph by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH-6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Ph occurred as anionic Ph hydroxide. Anionic Ph was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Ph would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Ph when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  9. Modeling of liner finish effects on oil control ring lubrication in internal combustion engines based on deterministic method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Haijie

    2008-01-01

    Twin-land oil control ring is widely used in the automotive diesel engines, and is gaining more and more applications in the modern designs of gasoline engines. Its interaction with the cylinder liner surface accounts for ...

  10. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  11. An investigation of the effect of a propellant liner in the launch tube of a hypervelocity accelerator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schappaugh, Ronald Dean

    1967-01-01

    from a five foot one-eighth inch diameter launch tube. 20 CHAPTER IV EXPERINENTAL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT Accelerator To test the effect of a propellant liner, a powder gun accelerator was designed in such a manner to permit coating...'. "" 1 . h 22 entering the tube. 1t was thought that the propellant liner would more readily ignite, if the projectile had an initial velocity when it entered the coated tube. The system was designed so that the pistol could be triggered...

  12. Optimization of the parameters of plasma liners with zero-dimensional models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-11-15

    The efficiency of conversion of the energy stored in the capacitor bank of a high-current pulse generator into the kinetic energy of an imploding plasma liner is analyzed. The analysis is performed by using a model consisting of LC circuit equations and equations of motion of a cylindrical shell. It is shown that efficient energy conversion can be attained only with a low-inductance generator. The mode of an 'ideal' load is considered where the load current at the final stage of implosion is close to zero. The advantages of this mode are, first, high efficiency of energy conversion (80%) and, second, improved stability of the shell implosion. In addition, for inertial confinement fusion realized by the scheme of a Z pinch dynamic hohlraum, not one but several fusion targets can be placed in the cavity on the pinch axis due to the large length of the liner.

  13. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. This observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  14. Effects of the deviation characteristics of nuclear waste emplacement boreholes on borehole liner stresses; Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report investigates the effects of borehole deviation on the useability of lined boreholes for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository in Nevada. Items that lead to constraints on borehole deviation include excessive stresses that could cause liner failure and possible binding of a waste container inside the liner during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. Liner stress models are developed for two general borehole configurations, one for boreholes drilled with a steerable bit and one for boreholes drilled with a non-steerable bit. Procedures are developed for calculating liner stresses that arise both during insertion of the liner into a borehole and during the thermal expansion process that follows waste emplacement. The effects of borehole curvature on the ability of the waste container to pass freely inside the liner without binding are also examined. Based on the results, specifications on borehole deviation allowances are developed for specific vertical and horizontal borehole configurations of current interest. 11 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Device and method for imploding a microsphere with a fast liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner to drive the fast liner to implode a microsphere.

  16. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  17. Fitting LINER nuclei within the AGN family: A matter of obscuration?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez-Martin, O; Márquez, I; Guainazzi, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the nuclear obscuration of galaxies hosting LINERs based on their X-ray and optical emission. They show column densities (N_H) at soft energies (0.5-2 keV) mostly related to the diffuse emission around the AGN, showing a correlation with the optical extinction. N_H at hard energies (2-10 keV) seem to be much higher than what would be expected from the optical extinction. They might be associated to the inner regions of the AGN, buried at optical wavelengths. The main result of this paper is that around 50% of our LINER sample shows signatures of Compton-thickness (CT) according to the most common tracers: the X-ray spectral index, F(2-10 keV)/F([OIII]) ratio and EW(FeKa). However, the EWs of CT LINERs are significantly lower than in CT Sy, suggesting that the 2-10 keV emission is dominated by electron scattering of the otherwise invisible AGN, or by emission from shocked gas associated to star formation rather than by reflection from the inner wall of the torus. However, no clear relati...

  18. X-ray spectral variability of LINERs selected from the Palomar sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-García, L; Masegosa, J; Márquez, I

    2014-01-01

    Variability is a general property of active galactic nuclei (AGN). At X-rays, the way in which these changes occur is not yet clear. In the particular case of low ionisation nuclear emission line region (LINER) nuclei, variations on months/years timescales have been found for some objects, but the main driver of these changes is still an open question. The main purpose of this work is to investigate the X-ray variability in LINERs, including the main driver of such variations, and to search for eventual differences between type 1 and 2 objects. We use the 18 LINERs in the Palomar sample with data retrieved from Chandra and/or XMM-Newton archives corresponding to observations gathered at different epochs. All the spectra for the same object are simultaneously fitted in order to study long term variations. The nature of the variability patterns are studied allowing different parameters to vary during the spectral fit. Whenever possible, short term variations from the analysis of the light curves and UV variabil...

  19. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    arc. Three directional wells were drilled in 2001 to optimize the productivity of the geothermal field up to 15 MWe and to investigate the vertical distribution of clay...

  20. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets...

  1. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of...

  2. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide...

  3. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

  4. The need to design and construct roadways on highly plastic clays is common in central and eastern Texas, where expansive clays are prevalent. Roadways constructed on highly plastic clay subgrades may be damaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    The need to design and construct roadways on highly plastic clays is common in central and eastern Texas, where expansive clays are prevalent. Roadways constructed on highly plastic clay subgrades may the infiltration of water into highly plastic clays under an increased gravity field in a centrifuge. Project

  5. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    of a jurassic opalinum shale, switzerland. Clays and Clay96   1 INTRODUCTION Clay/shale has been considered asand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

  6. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM and Zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of methylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Methylcyclohexane was reacted with these catalysts under a variety of conditions. Pillared clays gave higher gas yields and higher hydrocracking but lower hydroisomerization activity than nonpillared clay. The majority of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffinic). These catalysts effectively use hydrogen as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. The effect of various operating conditions, i.e., reaction temperature, contact time, H{sub 2} pressure, and catalyst, on the product distribution will be described.

  7. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  8. The Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors on the Stability and Transport of Clay Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musharova, Darya

    2012-07-16

    clays, which include the kaolinite groups of clays. Therefore, two basic damage mechanisms of clay minerals are swelling and dispersion. Both mechanisms cause pore plugging, and thus aggravate hydrocarbon ease of flow. In this thesis, the effect...

  9. Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V.; Baig, M. Arif Ali

    2011-02-15

    Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

  10. Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW Department of Agronomy, Purdue University. Agric. Exp. Stn., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. SUMMARY The swelling of clay-water systems and the thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water in these systems are discussed. The swelling

  11. Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    ´, Budapest, Hungary 2012 Abstract Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan-012-1876-x #12;In Pakistan geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common especially amongst the women

  12. Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic Investigation B E N J A M I N C . B O, Arizona 85721-0038 Cesium adsorption on the clay minerals vermiculite and montmorilloniteisdescribedasafunctionofsurfacecoverage using extended X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Cesium (Cs) possessed

  13. Testing of Expansive Clays in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Testing of Expansive Clays in a Centrifuge Permeameter M. D. Plaisted & J. G. Zornberg with the objective of characterizing the swelling of highly plastic clays using a centrifuge permeameter. The new. This study, conducted using a comparatively simple, non- instrumented centrifuge device complements ongo- ing

  14. An analytical and numerical model to determine stresses in a Rock Melt Drill produced glass liner for potential use on Mars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Joshua B

    2000-01-01

    A numerical and analytical model was constructed to determine the resultant stress state imposed on a Rock Melt Drill produced liner. The purpose of this study was to determine if the liner produced would possess the strength required to prevent a...

  15. Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slough, John

    2011-12-10

    The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration of megagauss magnetic field compression by a small array of full scale macrons. In addition the physics of the compression of an FRC to fusion conditions will be undertaken with a smaller scale MFL. The timescale for testing will be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of other facilities at MSNW where the target FRC will be created and translated inside the MFL just prior to implosion of the MFL. Experimental success would establish the concept at the �proof of principle� level and the following phase III effort would focus on the full development of the concept into a fusion gain device. Successful operation would lead to several benefits in various fields. It would have application to high energy density physics, as well as nuclear waste transmutation and alternate fission fuel cycles. The smaller scale device could find immediate application as an intense source of neutrons for diagnostic imaging and non-invasive object interrogation.

  16. Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.

    1969-01-01

    potassium Fixation and Supply By Soils With Misd Clay Minerals I KUS A&M UNIVERSITY Tcrv Agricultural Experiment Station r i 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas Summary to the plants while Cameron clay supplied onl!. Studies were made... of plants for any one crop period. The plants were n , with distilled water throughout the experiment. ' Ther I Previous work by Hipp and Thomas (3) pointed out the importance of clay type in the assessment of K avail- ability in certain soils of Texas...

  17. Construction, Startup and Operation of a New LLRW Disposal Facility in Andrews County, Texas - 12151

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Vliet, James A. [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Andrews County, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-01

    During this last year, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) completed construction and achieved start of operations of a new low level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility in Andrews County Texas. Disposal operations are underway for commercial LLRW, and start up evolutions are in progress for disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) LLRW. The overall approach to construction and start up are presented as well as some of the more significant challenges and how they were addressed to achieve initial operations of the first new commercial low level radioactive waste disposal facility in more than 30 years. The WCS disposal facility consists of two LLRW disposal cells, one for Texas Compact waste, and a separate disposal cell for DOE waste. Both disposal cells have very robust and unique designs. The cells themselves are constructed entirely in very low permeability red bed clay. The cell liners include a 0.91 meter thick clay liner meeting unprecedented permeability limits, 0.3 meter thick reinforced concrete barriers, as well as the standard geo-synthetic liners. Actions taken to meet performance criteria and install these liners will be discussed. Consistent with this highly protective landfill design, WCS chose to install a zero discharge site water management system. The considerations behind the design and construction of this system will be presented. Other activities essential to successful start of LLRW disposal operations included process and procedure development and refinement, staffing and staff development, and training. Mock ups were built and used for important evolutions and functions. Consistent with the extensive regulation of LLRW operations, engagement with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) was continuous and highly interactive. This included daily activity conference calls, weekly coordination calls and numerous topical conference calls and meetings. TCEQ staff and consultants frequently observed specific construction evolutions, such as geological feature mapping of designated excavation faces, disposal cell clay liner installation, disposal cell concrete barrier construction, etc. (author)

  18. Sandstone Acidizing Using Chelating Agents and their Interaction with Clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Noble Thekkemelathethil 1987-

    2013-01-09

    in the application of acidizing, coreflood tests were performed on Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. Another disadvantage of mud acid has been the fast spending at clay mineral surfaces leading to depletion of acid strength, migration of fines, and formation...

  19. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  20. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  1. Analysis of consolidation around driven piles in overconsolidated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niarchos, Dimitrios G

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of this thesis is to assess the capabilities of an already established analytical framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of piles driven in highly overconsolidated clays (OCR24). ...

  2. The mechanical behavior of heavily overconsolidated resedimented Boston Blue Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Bustamante, Albalyra Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Geotechnical engineers encounter some of the most challenging problems in heavily overconsolidated soils. Clays under this condition originated in nature or man-made construction. This thesis investigates the mechanical ...

  3. Unsaturated properties for non-Darcian water flow in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Physical chemistry of clay-water interaction, Advance inporous media. Advances in Water Resources 2, 351-362. Zou,Newtonian fluids Figure 2. A water element in a capillary

  4. Intercalation of Trichloroethene by Sediment-Associated Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthieu, Donald E.; Brusseau, Mark; Johnson, G. R.; Artiola, J. L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Curry, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the potential for intercalation of trichloroethene (TCE) by clay minerals associated with aquifer sediments. Sediment samples were collected from a field site inTucson, AZ. Two widely used Montmorillonite specimen clays were employed as controls. X-ray diffraction, conducted with a controlled-environment chamber, was used to characterize smectite interlayer dspacing for three treatments (bulk air-dry sample, sample mixed with synthetic groundwater, sample mixed with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater). The results show that the d-spacing measured for the samples treated with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater are larger (*26%) than those of the untreated samples for all field samples as well as the specimen clays. These results indicate that TCE was intercalated by the clay minerals, which may have contributed to the extensive elution tailing observed in prior miscible-displacement experiments conducted with this sediment.

  5. Nondestructive laboratory measurement of geotechnical and geoacoustic properties through intact core-liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayen, R.E.; Edwards, B.D.; Lee, H.J.

    1999-07-01

    High-resolution automated measurement of the geotechnical and geoacoustic properties of soil at the US geological Survey (USGS) is performed with a state-of-the-art multi-sensor whole-core logging device. The device takes measurements, directly through intact sample-tube wall, of p-wave acoustic velocity, of soil wet bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. This paper summarizes the authors methodology for determining soil-sound speed and wet-bulk density for material encased in an unsplit liner. The authors methodology for nondestructive measurement allows for rapid, accurate, and high-resolution (1 cm-spaced) mapping of the mass physical properties of soil prior to sample extrusion.

  6. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  7. LITERATURE REVIEW ON THE SORPTION OF PLUTONIUM, URANIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AMERICIUM AND TECHNETIUM TO CORROSION PRODUCTS ON WASTE TANK LINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-02-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the risk associated with closing liquid waste tanks. The PA estimates the risk associated with a number of scenarios, making various assumptions. Throughout all of these scenarios, it is assumed that the carbon-steel tank liners holding the liquid waste do not sorb the radionuclides. Tank liners have been shown to form corrosion products, such as Fe-oxyhydroxides (Wiersma and Subramanian 2002). Many corrosion products, including Fe-oxyhydroxides, at the high pH values of tank effluent, take on a very strong negative charge. Given that many radionuclides may have net positive charges, either as free ions or complexed species, it is expected that many radionuclides will sorb to corrosion products associated with tank liners. The objective of this report was to conduct a literature review to investigate whether Pu, U, Np, Am and Tc would sorb to corrosion products on tank liners after they were filled with reducing grout (cementitious material containing slag to promote reducing conditions). The approach was to evaluate radionuclides sorption literature with iron oxyhydroxide phases, such as hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.5H{sub 2}O). The primary interest was the sorption behavior under tank closure conditions where the tanks will be filled with reducing cementitious materials. Because there were no laboratory studies conducted using site specific experimental conditions, (e.g., high pH and HLW tank aqueous and solid phase chemical conditions), it was necessary to extend the literature review to lower pH studies and noncementitious conditions. Consequently, this report relied on existing lower pH trends, existing geochemical modeling, and experimental spectroscopic evidence conducted at lower pH levels. The scope did not include evaluating the appropriateness of K{sub d} values for the Fe-oxyhydroxides, but instead to evaluate whether it is a conservative assumption to exclude this sorption process of radionuclides onto tank liner corrosion products in the PA model. This may identify another source for PA conservatism since the modeling did not consider any sorption by the tank liner.

  8. Modified helix-like instability structure on imploding z-pinch liners that are pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awe, T. J., E-mail: tjawe@sandia.gov; Jennings, C. A.; McBride, R. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Owen, A. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; Jones, M. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Stygar, W. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Tomlinson, K. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)] [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratories Z Facility have, for the first time, studied the implosion dynamics of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) style liners that were pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic field. As reported [T. J. Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] when premagnetized with a 7 or 10?T axial field, these liners developed 3D-helix-like hydrodynamic instabilities; such instabilities starkly contrast with the azimuthally correlated magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities that have been consistently observed in many earlier non-premagnetized experiments. The helical structure persisted throughout the implosion, even though the azimuthal drive field greatly exceeded the expected axial field at the liner's outer wall for all but the earliest stages of the experiment. Whether this modified instability structure has practical importance for magneto-inertial fusion concepts depends primarily on whether the modified instability structure is more stable than standard azimuthally correlated MRT instabilities. In this manuscript, we discuss the evolution of the helix-like instability observed on premagnetized liners. While a first principles explanation of this observation remains elusive, recent 3D simulations suggest that if a small amplitude helical perturbation can be seeded on the liner's outer surface, no further influence from the axial field is required for the instability to grow.

  9. Midbarrel hydrocracking process employing rare earth pillared clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gortsema, F.P.; McCauley, J.R.; Miller, J.G. Rabo, J.A.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbons boiling above about 700{degrees} F. to midbarrel fuel products boiling between about 300{degrees} F. and about 700{degrees} F. which includes contacting the hydrocarbons with hydrogen under effective hydrocracking conditions in the presence of a catalyst composition consisting of at least one hydrogenation component and at least one cracking component. The improvement comprises utilizing as the cracking component an expanded clay including pillars comprising at least one pillaring metal, at least one rare earth element and oxygen located between the sheets of at least one clay mineral or synthetic analogue thereof.

  10. Diagenesis of clay minerals from early Eocene shales of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whynot, John David

    1983-01-01

    expandable layers with depth that is reflected in the K 0 content and cation exchange capac- 2 ity (CEC) of the mixed-layer clay rich fine clay (& 0. 2 )jm) fraction. Samples high in expandable layers have a low K 0 content and high CEC. Samples low... in expandable layers have a high K 0 content and low CEC, which reflect the potassium being fixed in the interlayer positions of expandable layers. Potassium for this reaction may come from the K-feldspar rich silt (2 ? . 63 um) fraction. Some samples show...

  11. Lateral load test of a drilled shaft in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasch, Vernon R

    1977-01-01

    LATERAL LOAD TEST OF A DRILLED SHAFT IN CLAY A Thesis by VERNON RAY KASCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering LATERAL LOAD TEST OF A DRILLED SHAFT IN CLAY A Thesis by VERNON RAY KASCH Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle - Ch irman of Committee Charles H. Samson, Jr. Head of Department Wayne . Dunlap - Ne er Christop er C...

  12. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay

  13. Multiscale micromechanical modeling of the thermal/mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Nuo, 1977-

    2006-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced thermal/mechanical properties at low weight fractions (We) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly ...

  14. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  15. On the relationship between water-flux and hydraulic gradient for unsaturated and saturated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Threshold gradient for water flow in clay systems. Soil.Darcy’s law for the flow of water in soils. Soil Science 93:1970. Saturated flow of water through clay loam subsoil

  16. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    illitization in burial diagenesis environments. Geochimicausually part of the diagenesis process of clay formation (is usually part of the diagenesis process of clay formation.

  17. Chinese character decoding: a semantic bias? Clay Williams Thomas Bever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bever, Thomas G.

    Chinese character decoding: a semantic bias? Clay Williams · Thomas Bever Published online: 6 April on Chinese character decoding were examined. Our results suggest that semantic and phonetic radicals are each response times. These results are interpreted to indicate that while educated native Chinese speakers have

  18. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples Pierre DELAGE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples Pierre DELAGE 1 , Trung-Tinh LE 1 , Anh-Minh TANG located at Mol (Belgium) called Boom clay, in the context of research into deep nuclear waste disposal. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples were investigated through the characterisation

  19. HST Observations and Photoionization Modeling of the LINER Galaxy NGC 1052

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Gabel; F. C. Bruhweiler; D. M. Crenshaw; S. B. Kraemer; C. L. Miskey

    2000-01-19

    We present a study of available Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectroscopic and imaging observations of the low ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) galaxy NGC 1052. The WFPC2 imagery clearly differentiates extended nebular Halpha emission from that of the compact core. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) observations provide a full set of optical and UV data (1200-6800 Angstroms). These spectral data sample the innermost region (0."86 x 0."86 ~ 82pc x 82pc) and exclude the extended Halpha emission seen in the WFPC2 image. The derived emission line fluxes allow a detailed analysis of the physical conditions within the nucleus. The measured flux ratio for Halpha/Hbeta, F{Halpha}/F{Hbeta}=4.53, indicates substantial intrinsic reddening, E(B-V)=0.42, for the nuclear nebular emission. This is the first finding of a large extinction of the nuclear emission line fluxes in NGC 1052. If the central ionizing continuum is assumed to be attenuated by a comparable amount, then the emission line fluxes can be reproduced well by a simple photoionization model using a central power law continuum source with a spectral index of alpha = -1.2 as deduced from the observed flux distribution. A multi-density, dusty gas gives the best fit to the observed emission line spectrum. Our calculations show that the small contribution from a highly ionized gas observed in NGC 1052 can also be reproduced solely by photoionization modeling. The high gas covering factor determined from our model is consistent with the assumption that our line of sight to the central engine is obscured.

  20. X-ray emission line gas in the LINER galaxy M81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Page; A. A. Breeveld; R. Soria; K. Wu; G. Branduardi-Raymont; K. O. Mason; R. L. C. Starling; S. Zane

    2003-01-02

    We present the soft X-ray spectrum of the LINER galaxy M81 derived from a long observation with the XMM RGS. The spectrum is dominated by continuum emission from the active nucleus, but also contains emission lines from Fe L, and H-like and He-like N, O, and Ne. The emission lines are significantly broader than the RGS point-source spectral resolution; in the cross dispersion direction the emission lines are detected adjacent to, as well as coincident with, the active nucleus. This implies that they originate in a region of a few arc-minutes spatial extent (1 arc-minute ~ 1 kpc in M81). The flux ratios of the OVII triplet suggest that collisional processes are responsible for the line emission. A good fit to the whole RGS spectrum is obtained using a model consisting of an absorbed power law from the active nucleus and a 3 temperature optically thin thermal plasma. Two of the thermal plasma components have temperatures of 0.18+-0.04 keV and 0.64+-0.04 keV, characteristic of the hot interstellar medium produced by supernovae; the combined luminosity of the plasma at these two temperatures accounts for all the unresolved bulge X-ray emission seen in the Chandra observation by Tennant et al. (2001). The third component has a higher temperature (~1.7 keV), and we argue that this, along with some of the 0.64 keV emission, comes from X-ray binaries in the bulge of M81.

  1. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  2. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Boyer, Norman W. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  3. Clay County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Clay County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,

  5. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  6. Study of instability formation and EUV emission in thin liners driven with a compact 250?kA, 150?ns linear transformer driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, J. C., E-mail: jcval@ucsd.edu; Collins, G. W.; Mariscal, D.; Beg, F. N. [Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Wyndham, E. S. [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Ave. Vicuña Mackena 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)] [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Ave. Vicuña Mackena 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-03-15

    A compact linear transformer driver, capable of producing 250?kA in 150?ns, was used to study instability formation on the surface of thin liners. In the experiments, two different materials, Cu and Ni, were used to study the effect of the liner's resistivity on formation and evolution of the instabilities. The dimensions of the liners used were 7?mm height, 1?mm radius, and 3??m thickness. Laser probing and time resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging were implemented to diagnose instability formation and growth. Time-integrated EUV spectroscopy was used to study plasma temperature and density. A constant expansion rate for the liners was observed, with similar values for both materials. Noticeable differences were found between the Cu and Ni instability growth rates. The most significant perturbation in Cu rapidly grows and saturates reaching a limiting wavelength of the order of the liner radius, while the most significant wavelength in Ni increases slowly before saturating, also at a wavelength close to the liner radius. Evidence suggests that the instability observed is the well-known m?=?0 MHD instability. However, upon comparing the instability evolution of Cu and Ni, the importance of the resistivity on the seeding mechanism becomes evident. A comparison of end-on and side-on EUV emission possible indicates the formation of precursor plasma, where it has been estimated using EUV spectroscopy that the precursor plasma temperature is approximately 40?eV with ion density of order 10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}, for both materials.

  7. Note: Effect of hot liner in producing {sup 40,48}Ca beam from RIKEN 18-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozeki, K. Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2015-01-15

    In order to produce a high-intensity and stable {sup 48}Ca beam from the RIKEN 18-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, we have begun testing the production of a calcium beam using a micro-oven. To minimize the consumption rate of the material ({sup 48}Ca), we introduced the “hot liner” method and investigated the effect of the liner on the material consumption rate. The micro-oven was first used to produce the {sup 48}Ca beam for experiments in the RIKEN radioisotope beam factory, and a stable beam could be supplied for a long time with low consumption rate.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.; Shelley, B.; Gorman, M.

    2010-04-13

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.

  9. Ideal hydrodynamic scaling relations for a stagnated imploding spherical plasma liner formed by an array of merging plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassibry, J. T.; Stanic, M.; Hsu, S. C.

    2013-03-15

    This work presents scaling relations for the peak thermal pressure and stagnation time (over which peak pressure is sustained) for an imploding spherical plasma liner formed by an array of merging plasma jets. Results were derived from three-dimensional (3D) ideal hydrodynamic simulation results obtained using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code SPHC. The 3D results were compared to equivalent one-dimensional (1D) simulation results. It is found that peak thermal pressure scales linearly with the number of jets and initial jet density and Mach number, quadratically with initial jet radius and velocity, and inversely with the initial jet length and the square of the chamber wall radius. The stagnation time scales approximately as the initial jet length divided by the initial jet velocity. Differences between the 3D and 1D results are attributed to the inclusion of thermal transport, ionization, and perfect symmetry in the 1D simulations. A subset of the results reported here formed the initial design basis for the Plasma Liner Experiment [S. C. Hsu et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 123514 (2012)].

  10. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  11. Study of LINER sources with broad H(alpha) emission. X-ray properties and comparision to luminous AGN and X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Younes; Sabra, B; Reeves, J N

    2011-01-01

    [Abridged]We study the X-ray properties of LINER sources with definite detection of a broad H(alpha) emission line in their optical spectra, LINER 1s from Ho et al. sample. These objects preferentially harbor a low luminosity active nucleus at the center and show small or no intrinsic absorption (<10^(22) cm^(-1)). We analyzed all available X-ray archived XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of 13 LINER 1s satisfying the above criterion in a systematic homogeneous way. We looked for any correlations between the X-ray properties and the intrinsic parameters of our sample of LINER 1s. An absorbed power-law gave a good fit to the spectra of 9 out of the 13 sources. A thermal component and an absorbed power-law were required in the remaining 4 sources. We found a photon index between 1.3\\pm0.2 for the hardest source and 2.4^(+0.2)_(-0.3) for the softest one with a mean value of 1.9\\pm0.2 and a dispersion sigma=0.3. The thermal component had a mean temperature kT~0.6 keV. Significant short (hours to days) time-s...

  12. The compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with simulated double-shell slurry feed at 90/degree/C: Hanford Grout Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Hymas, C.R.

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with a low-level radioactive waste slurry called double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). The evaluation was necessary as part of the permitting process authorized by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL-94-580. Materials that were examined included five flexible membrane liners (Hytrel/reg sign/ polyester, polyurethane, 8130 XR5/reg sign/, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The liner and pipe samples were immersed for 120 days in the synthetic DSSE at 90/degree/C, the maximum expected temperature in the waste disposal scenario. Physical properties of the liner and pipe samples were measured before immersion and every 30 days after immersion, in accordance with EPA Method 9090. In addition, some of the materials were exposed to four different radiation doses after 30 days of immersion. Physical properties of these materials were measured immediately after exposure and after an additional 90 days of immersion to determine each material's response to radiation, and whether radiation exposure affected the chemical compatibility of the material. 20 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Detection and Quantification of Expansive Clay Minerals in Geologically-Diverse Texas Aggregate Fines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, George 1983-

    2012-11-28

    minerals identified from XRD pattern of Jones Mill clay ???... 48 4.2 Rankin clay with HIM plateau at 12 ? of ?Mg, RT? treatment ............... 48 4.3 Armor aggregate with palygorskite (10.6 ?) and sepiolite (12.2 ?) ?.. 49 4.4 Fibrous palygorskite... and sepiolite minerals in Armor clay (29000X) ?. 50 4.5 Clay mineral quantities in aggregate fines (- 2 mm starting material) ?. 54 4.6 SEM image of high-crystallinity kaolinite ?books? in Rankin fines ?? 59 4.7 SEM images of Scarmado, Tolar, and Yarrington...

  14. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to an alkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    parameters (permeability, capillary pressure of concrete/Concrete Clay Van Genuchten Po (Pa) Van Genuchten m Specific Heat (J/kg K) Permeability (

  15. Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. Clay County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources

  17. Clay County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Clay County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana: Energy

  19. Clay County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Clay County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. Clay County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota: Energy

  2. Clay County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota:

  3. Clay County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota:Missouri:

  4. Clay County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: Energy Resources

  5. Clay County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: Energy

  6. Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: EnergyTennessee:

  7. Clay County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:

  8. Clay-Union Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliamsCentralClay-Union

  9. MgAl2O4 spinel refractory as containment liner for high-temperature alkali salt containing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peascoe-Meisner, Roberta A [Knoxville, TN; Keiser, James R [Oak Ridge, TN; Hemric, James G [Knoxville, TN; Hubbard, Camden R [Oak Ridge, TN; Gorog, J Peter [Kent, WA; Gupta, Amul [Jamestown, NY

    2008-10-21

    A method includes containing a high-temperature alkali salt containing environment using a refractory containment liner containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel. A method, includes forming a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel having an exterior chill zone defined by substantially columnar crystallization and an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and removing at least a portion of the exterior chill zone from the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel by scalping the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel to define at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization. A product of manufacture includes a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel including an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization.

  10. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO?-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more »in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  11. Change in the hydraulic properties of a Brazilian clay Ferralsol on clearing for pasture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Change in the hydraulic properties of a Brazilian clay Ferralsol on clearing for pasture L. C 80 to 300 m in size. The aim of this study was to analyze how the hydraulic properties of a clay retention properties were determined by using pressure cell equipment. We determined the saturated hydraulic

  12. A Simple Method To Improve the Clarity and Rheological Properties of Polymer/Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 ABSTRACT We present a simple method to improve. INTRODUCTION P olymer nanocomposites made by mixing thermo- plastic polymers with clay particles have been applications. The one property of polymers/plastics that is adversely impacted by the addition of clay

  13. Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

  14. Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces R. G. Ford Metal sorption to clay minerals may lead to the formation of secondary precipitates structurally similar to the mineral takovite. Saturation with respect to this phase is promoted, in part

  15. Seawater Osmium Isotope Records from Pacific ODP and IODP Sites- Refining the Paleogene Curve and Dating Red Clay Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolewicz, Zachary Louis

    2013-02-04

    exclusively of pelagic clay with little existing age control. Recent work indicates that seawater Osmium (Os) isotope analyses provide useful age control for red clay sequences due to its relatively long residence time compared to oceanic mixing. The drawback...

  16. A New Application of Potassium Nitrate as an Environmentally Friendly Clay Stabilizer in Water-Based Drilling Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jing

    2015-04-15

    The application of potassium chloride (KCl) as a temporary clay stabilizing additive in water-based drilling fluids is problematic in chloride-sensitive formations. However, failure to utilize clay stabilization leads to additional costs to drilling...

  17. Model of crack propagation in a clay soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriere, Patrick Edwidge

    1985-01-01

    of variance (ANOVA) to obtain the best selection to be included in the model. The ANOYA model was expressed by: Model = BO(H) + Bl(CL) + B2(M) + B3(H"M) + B4(H*CL) + B5(M*CL) + B6(H~M*CL) where: H = humidity effect, CL = clay content effect, M = initial.... 0280* T5 0. 7413 0. 5771 6. 16 0. 0001* T6 0. 2973 0. 2887 4. 94 0. 001* T7 0. 2065 0. 3432 2. 89 0. 0084* T8 0. 2543 0. 0767 15. 89 0. 0001* * significant at level 0. 05 30 Table 3. ANOVA results for crack de th. Source Sum of Degrees of Mean F...

  18. Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2 , A. M. In the present work, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay samples from the borehole Essen-1 at a depth and hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay from Essen at 227-m, 240-m and 248-m depths are similar

  19. Rotating Liner Engine: Improving Efficiency of Heavy Duty Diesels by Significant Friction Reduction, and Extending the Life of Heavy Duty Engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dardalis, Dimitrios

    2013-12-31

    This report describes the work on converting a 4 cylinder Cummins ISB engine into a single cylinder Rotating Liner Engine functioning prototype that can be used to measure the friction benefits of rotating the cylinder liner in a high pressure compression ignition engine. A similar baseline engine was also prepared, and preliminary testing was done. Even though the fabrication of the single cylinder prototype was behind schedule due to machine shop delays, the fundamental soundness of the design elements are proven, and the engine has successfully functioned. However, the testing approach of the two engines, as envisioned by the original proposal, proved impossible due to torsional vibration resonance caused by the single active piston. A new approach for proper testing has been proposed,

  20. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  1. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic liner-on-plasma simulations for the compression phase of a magnetized target fusion system based on inverse Z pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash, P. V.; Madhavan, S.; Chaturvedi, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2006-07-15

    This article reports, for the first time, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic liner-on-plasma simulations for the compression phase of a magnetized target fusion (MTF) system with an inverse Z-pinch target. These simulations evolve the complete liner-plasma system along with the driving pulsed-power source. First, it has been demonstrated that closely coupled liner-on-plasma simulations produce results that are significantly different from loosely coupled simulations that have been reported in the literature. Second, it has been found that an initially stable plasma, satisfying the Kadomtsev criteria, and with a small initial pressure perturbation in the axial direction, remains stable all through the compression phase, even though there are large changes in the pressure and magnetic field levels. Third, a plasma that violates the Kadomtsev criteria, even by a small amount, turns out to be unstable, as predicted by theory. In practical terms, this means that it is preferable to stay well away from the stability limit, even at the cost of some reduction of initial plasma pressure. Fourth, even during the burn phase, when there is a large and rapid increase in plasma pressure due to fusion energy deposition, an initially stable plasma generally tends to remain stable, and even improves its stability margin. This observation shows that the inverse Z pinch is fairly benign as a MTF target, as an initially stable plasma remains stable during both the compression and burn phases. Fifth, certain unusual features are observed in the temperature profile--these depend upon the time scale for implosion. This has implications for plasma-surface interactions at the liner and central conductor.

  2. Spectral Models for Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei in LINERs: The Role of Advection-dominated Accretion and Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S; Eracleous, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We perform an exploratory study of the physical properties of accretion flows and jets in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) by modeling the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 12 LLAGNs in low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs). These SEDs we constructed from high-resolution radio, X-ray and optical/UV observations of the immediate vicinity of the black hole. We adopt a coupled accretion-jet model comprising an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and an outer standard thin disk. We present best-fit models in which either the ADAF or the jet dominate the X-ray emission. Six sources in our sample display an optical-UV excess with respect to ADAF and jet models; this excess can be explained as emission from the truncated disk with transition radii 30-225 Rs in four of them. In almost all sources the optical emission can also be attributed to unresolved, old stellar clusters with masses ~1E7-1E8 Msun. We find evidence for a correlation between the accretion rate and jet...

  3. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    rock laboratory: Characterization, simulation and application, Engineering Geology, 117, 39-51. #12; with structural geology, Applied clay science, 33, 21-34. Nicollin, F., Gibert, D., Lesparre, N. & Nussbaum, C

  4. Dechlorination of Pentachlorophenol by ammonium amended clays: development of field applicable techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Junying

    1997-01-01

    superfund sites in both soil and groundwater. The objective of this thesis is to study mechanisms to dechlorinate PCP into less harmful derivatives. The method that we are interested in utilizes ammonium-amended clays to dechlorinate PCP. Based...

  5. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per...

  6. A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House, Robert Donald

    2012-01-01

    Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

  7. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  8. Investigating the Use of Chelating Agents for Clay Dissolution and Sandstone Acidizing Purposes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andotra, Gautam

    2014-08-06

    Mud acid, a mixture of HCl and HF, has been frequently used for stimulating sandstone reservoirs. However, using HCl in such environments can be problematic, especially at higher temperatures. Some of the most common problems are the following: clay...

  9. Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc cla#y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc cla#y CAIDA, SDSC techniques, specifically the Radon transform previously applied in geophysics [6] and computer tomography [7

  10. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Clay-filled Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Woo-Sik

    2010-01-14

    robotic dipping system, for the preparation of these thin films, was built. The robot alternately dips a substrate into aqueous mixtures with rinsing and drying in between. Thin films of sodium montmorillonite clay and cationic polymer were grown...

  11. 182 28th ANNUAL eMS Sorption and Desorption of Quaternary Amine Cations on Clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    . L. Sparks Dent of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717 The1ldsorption. (1970). Clays Clay Miner., 18,203-212. 3. Greenland, D.J. and J.P. Quirk. (1964) J. Soil ScL, 15, 178.A., P.R. Jaffe, and C.T. Chiou. (1990). Environ. Sci. Techno!., 24, 1167-1172. 6. Cadena, F. and R

  12. Retention of anhydrous ammonia as influenced by clay mineral types, cations, temperature and moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBee, George G

    1956-01-01

    samples . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 13 Ammonia retained by clays heated to various temperature levels prior to treatment with anhydrous ammonia . . . . ~ 1'9 Ammonia retained by clays treated with anhydrous ammonia prior to heating... to various temperature levels . . . . . ~ 20 5a 6. 70 Ammoni. a retained sxuressed as psr cent of cation-exchange capacity for olays treated with anhydrous ammonia prior to heating to various temperature levels . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 21 Ammonia retained...

  13. Muffle furnace evaluation of FGD sludge-coal-clay mixtures as potential synthetic aggregates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettit, Jesse William

    1978-01-01

    MUFFLE FURNACE EVALUATION OF FGD SLUDGE-COAL-CLAY MIXTURES AS POTENTIAL SYNTHETIC AGGREGATES A Thesis JESSE WILLIAM PETTIT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Suoject: Civil Engineering MUFFLE FURNACE EVALUATION OF FGD SLUDGE-COAL-CLAY MIXTURES AS POTENTIAL SYNTHETIC AGGREGATES A Theseus by JESSE WILLIAM PETTIT Approved as to style and content by: r n of Commi tee...

  14. HDS and deep HDS activity of Co/Mo/S-mesostructured synthetic clays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Song, C.; Kim, J. H.; Castagnola, N.; Fernandez-Saavedra, R.; Marshall, C. L.; Schwartz, M. M.; Penn State Univ.; ICMM-CSIC

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work is to identify more promising supports from synthetic clay materials to advance hydrotreating catalyst development. Silica sol can be used as the silicon-containing starting material when creating nanoporous layered silicate catalysts with a certain portion of unreacted sol particles incorporated into the final matrix. The resulting structure then has mesoporosity and a unique morphology. Hectorite-based clays have been prepared using different silica sols in order to ascertain the importance of sol characteristics on the final matrix. Several techniques have been applied to characterize the materials, including XRD, TGA, N2 porosimetry, and TEM. For hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to biphenyl was examined at 400 degrees C using CoMoS-loaded mesostructured clay supports. No hydrogenation or hydrocracking was observed with any of the clay supports. The most active clay was derived from Ludox silica sol AS-30 with an activity of 65% DBT conversion and 100% selectivity to biphenyl (BP). For comparison, a reference commercial catalyst displayed 94% BP selectivity. For deep HDS, the conversion of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was tested at 325 and 350 degrees C. At 325 degrees C, conversions are 92% of commercial catalysts for a CoMoS-loaded mesostructured clay derived from Ludox AM-30 silica sol. A commercially available synthetic hectorite called laponite has very low activity, indicating that the unique morphology of the mesostructured clays is important. Hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation pathways are compared for the deep HDS reaction. HR-TEM of the most active deep HDS catalyst revealed a multilayered MoS2 morphology.

  15. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A. [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France)] [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France); Maysonnave, T. [International Technologies for High Pulsed Power, F-46500 Thégra (France)] [International Technologies for High Pulsed Power, F-46500 Thégra (France); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-?s Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-?s LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic diffusion across the liner. The potential of the technique in terms of applications and achievable ramp pressure levels lies in the prospects for improving the DLCM efficiency through the use of a closing switch (currently under development), reducing the load dimensions and optimizing the diagnostics.

  16. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic elimination of a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibanova, Daria

    2010-01-01

    of semiconductor photocatalysis Chem. Rev. 1995, 95, 69-effluents by TiO 2 photocatalysis Catalysis Today 2000, 63,clay on adsorption and photocatalysis of gaseous molecules

  17. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

  18. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  19. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  20. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  1. Effect of composite microstructure on electrical and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl acetate) composites with carbon black and clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriyala, Sethu M.

    2009-05-15

    black with a primary particle size of 20 nm (a) and a schematic of networked high structure carbon black (b). Clay Overview Hydrous sodium or aluminium phyllosilicates which are typically less than 2 ?m in diameter are known as clay [44, 45...

  2. Long-Term Monitoring of a Drilled Shaft Retaining Wall in Expansive Clay: Behavior Before and During Excavation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Long-Term Monitoring of a Drilled Shaft Retaining Wall in Expansive Clay: Behavior Before are that the instrumentation survived construction and is working, residual stresses developed in the drilled shafts prior The motivation for this work is uncertainty in the design of drilled shaft retaining walls in expansive clay

  3. La052605k(250) "Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions" Table of Contents Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 La052605k(250) "Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions" Table" #12;2 Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions Céline Martin1 , Frédéric, mechanical compression, and osmotic stress (dialysis against a polymer solution). The positional

  4. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    ) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals Erik Oerter a, , Kari Finstad a , Justin Schaefer b , Gregory R the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral­water systems, we created a series of monominerallic with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The d18 O

  5. 069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM OXIDES USING X-RAY ABSORPTICN FINE STRUCIURE (XAFS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM and oxide minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature on surfaces of clay minerals and aluminum oxides. #12;

  6. Formation of Replicating Saponite from a Gel in the Presence of Oxalate: Implications for the Formation of Clay Minerals in Carbonaceous Chondrites and the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Dirk

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous ...

  7. Ultimate capacity of suction caisson in normally and lightly overconsolidated clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Partha Pratim

    2005-08-29

    is used for the numerical prediction. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models using hybrid elements. A simplified elastic perfectly plastic model with von-Mises yield criterion is used for the study. The saturated clay...

  8. Study on the hydraulic conductivity of Boom clay1 Yong-Feng Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Study on the hydraulic conductivity of Boom clay1 2 Yong-Feng Deng1, 2 , Anh-Minh Tang2 , Yu Geotechnical Journal 48 (2011) 1461-1470" DOI : 10.1139/T11-048 #12;2 Abstract1 The hydraulic conductivity. Experimental results show that the hydraulic conductivity3 is mainly governed by the soil porosity

  9. Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 Â 10À22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

  10. Phosphonic-Based HF Acid: Interactions With Clay Minerals And Flow In Sandstone Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lijun

    2015-05-13

    , phosphonic-based HF acid systems (HF and a phosphonic acid) have been used as an alternative to mud acid. However, very limited research has been performed to investigate the interactions of phosphonic-based acid systems with clay minerals in sandstone...

  11. Influence of an adsorbing polymer in the aging dynamics of Laponite clay suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zulian; B. Ruzicka; G. Ruocco

    2008-11-18

    Clay-polymer dispersions in aqueous solutions have attracted a great interest in recent years due to their industrial applications and intriguing physical properties. Aqueous solutions of bare Laponite particles are known to age spontaneously from an ergodic state to a non ergodic state in a time varying from hours to months depending on Laponite concentration. When a polymer species like Polyethylene Oxide (PEO) is added to the solution, it weakly adsorbs on clay particle surfaces modifying the effective interaction potential between Laponite particles. A dynamic light scattering study, varying polymer concentration at fixed polymer molecular weight (Mw=200.000 g/mol), has been performed in order to understand the effect of polymer on the aging dynamics of the system. The results obtained show that arresting phenomena between clay particles are hindered if PEO is added and consequently the aging dynamics slows down with increasing PEO concentration. This process is possibly due to the progressive coverage of the clay surface by polymers that grow with increasing PEO concentration and may lead to steric stabilization.

  12. Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier of coatings for medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds, there is a need for thin coatings a self-assembled, polymer-based conformal coating, built by using a water-based layer-by-layer (Lb

  13. Evaluating the Effects of Environmentally Acceptable Clay Stabilizer on Bandera Sandstone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emecheta, Akunna C

    2013-08-26

    it possible for large areas of the formation to be effectively treated. 3.2.1.1 BENTONITE Bentonite is impure clay consisting mainly of montmorillonite. It is an absorbent aluminum phyllosilicate (Casás, L. M., M. Pozo, et al. 2013). Bentonite...

  14. On the dynamics of subaqueous clay rich gravity mass flows--the giant Storegga slide, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the dynamics of subaqueous clay rich gravity mass flows--the giant Storegga slide, Norway F, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1047 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway b Norges Geotekniske Institutt, Postboks 3930 Ulleva°l Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway c Norsk Hydro ASA, 0246 Oslo, Norway Received 10 November 2003

  15. Redox-driven dissolution of clay minerals by uranium under high pressure CO2 conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    online 21 June 2014 Editor: J. Fein Keywords: Carbon sequestration Iron-bearing clay minerals Uranium, indicative of potential risks associated with geologic carbon sequestration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is a process where CO2 is captured

  16. THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES Andreas C minerals may proceed via formation of surface precipitates, which may lead to a significant long the formation of several mineral phases with distinct solubilities. While turbostratic a-type metal hydroxides

  17. Evaluation of Alpha-Phased Zirconium Phosphate Nanoparticles as a Clay Stabilizer and an EOR Agent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yi

    2014-12-15

    Migration. Paper presented at the Nigeria Annual International Conference and Exhibition, Lagos, Nigeria, July 30 - August 1. SPE-167503. I.A. El-Monier, H.A.Nasr-El-Din, T.L. Harper, R. Rosen. 2013. A New Environmentally Friendly Clay Stabilizer. SPE...

  18. Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models of oblique rifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models have used high-resolution scanned air photos and field measurements to analyze fracture population on the evolution of fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, SW Iceland. The peninsula is oriented

  19. RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    2) Institute of Mineralogy, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg, Germany #12;clays and hydrocarbons conventional resource non-conventional resource project: Nicht-konventionelle Kohlenwasserstoffe (non-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale

  20. Application of the Modified Methylene Blue Test to Detect Clay Minerals in Coarse Aggregate Fines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitre, Brandon

    2012-12-04

    ............................................................................... 34 3.2. Plasticity Index (ASTM D 4318) ..................................................................... 41 3.3. Bar Linear Shrinkage (Tex-107-E) .................................................................. 42 3.3.1. Results... ............................................................................... 47 vi 4. CONCRETE PERFORMANCE TESTING ............................................................. 50 4.1. Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Mixes with Pure Clays ............................... 51 4.1.1. Effect on Drying Shrinkage...

  1. Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale. Sharp exhibit features consistent with eolian sandstones that may be cemented by sulfates. As described to features observed in terrestrial eolian sandstones such as the Navajo sandstone in the southwestern U

  2. Initial magnetic field compression studies using gas-puff Z-pinches and thin liners on COBRA This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroupp, Eyal

    to the fusion fuel requires an axial magnetic field to insulate the hot compressed plasma from the cold liner. Fusion 53 083006 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/53/8/083006) Download details: IP Address: 132 Contact us My IOPscience #12;IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl

  3. The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco, Ersan Demiralp, Tahir Cagin, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çagin, Tahir

    The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco inhibitor oil production chemical. 1. Introduction Molecular modeling studies of clay and related zeolite of water, hydrocarbons, and polar organic compounds such as oil field production chemicals on clay mineral

  4. Kinetics of Ion Exchange on Clay Minerals and Soil: I. Evaluation of Methods1 R. A. OGWADA AND D. L. SPARKS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Ion Exchange on Clay Minerals and Soil: I. Evaluation of Methods1 R. A. OGWADA AND D. L,vermiculite. Ogwada, R.A., and D.L. Sparks. 1986. Kinetics of ion exchangeon clay minerals and soil: I. Evaluation displacement or flow techniques to investigate kinetics of ion exchange on soils and clay minerals (Sparks

  5. THE INTERNATIONAL GEOSYNTHETICS SOCIETY (IGS): NO BORDERS FOR THE GOOD USE OF GEOSYNTHETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    in 1980 (Giroud 2008). Subsequently, during the Second International Conference on Geotextiles held in Las Geotextile Society," as it was named at the time, was officially founded on November 10, 1983 with Charles

  6. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  7. Report on "Methodologies for Investigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions: A Clay Minerals Society Short Course"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia A. Maurice

    2010-02-08

    A workshop entitled, “Methods of Investigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions,” was held at the Clay Minerals Society meeting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA on June 19, 2004. The workshop was organized by Patricia A. Maurice (University of Notre Dame) and Lesley A. Warren (McMaster University, CA). Speakers included: Dr. P. Bennett, Dr. J. Fredrickson (PNNL), Dr. S. Lower (Ohio State University), Dr. P. Maurice, Dr. S. Myneni (Princeton University), Dr. E. Shock (Arizona State), Dr. M. Tien (Penn State), Dr. L. Warren, and Dr. J. Zachara (PNNL). There were approximately 75 attendees at the workshop, including more than 20 students. A workshop volume was published by the Clay Minerals Society [Methods for Study of Microbe-Mineral Interactions (2006), CMS Workshop Lectures, vol. 14?(Patricia A. Maurice and Leslie A. Warren, eds.) ISBN 978-1-881208-15-0, 166 pp.

  8. Effects of aluminosilicate minerals in clay soil fractions on pore water hydroxide ion concentrations in soil/cement matrices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Evan Russell

    1998-01-01

    between clay minerals and calcium hydroxide. Pozzolanic reactions between aluminosilicate minerals in soils and portiandite or calcium silicate hydrate, generated by cement hydration, may significantly reduce the hydroxide ion concentration in soi...

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex molecules at interfaces: dendritic surfactants in clay and amyloid peptides near lipid bilayers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Kunwoo

    2009-06-02

    We apply a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique to complex molecules at interfaces. Partitioning of dendritic surfactants into clay gallery and Ab protein behavior near hydrated lipids are chosen for the purpose. ...

  10. An investigation of some of the effects of anhydrous ammonia on the clay minerals montmorillonite and illite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiteley, Eli Lamar

    1959-01-01

    A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

  11. The effects of the interphase and strain gradients on the elasticity of layer by layer (LBL) polymer/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yaning

    A synergistic stiffening effect observed in the elastic mechanical properties of LBL assembled polymer/clay nanocomposites is studied via two continuum mechanics approaches. The nanostructure of the representative volume ...

  12. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  13. The aggregation of clay minerals and marine microalgal cells : physicochemical theory and implications for controlling harmful algal blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengco, Mario Rhuel

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the use of clay minerals has emerged as one of the most promising strategies for directly controlling harmful algal blooms (HABs). Its principle is based on the mutual aggregation of algal cells and mineral ...

  14. The effectiveness of a foliar spray of kaolinite clay in reducing transpiration of cotton plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMichael, Bobbie Lee

    1967-01-01

    in light and to keep them from closing in darkness. Lower temperatures tended to cause the reverse. Culm (8) reported that leaf temperatures are usually higher than the surround- ing air temperatures and that transpiration accounts for a cooling effect...THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A FOLIAR SPRAY OI" KAOLINITE CLAY IN REDUCING TRANSPIRATION OF COTTON PLANTS A Thesis Bobble L. McMichael Submitted to the Graduate Col]ege cf the Texas A&I University ir, Partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  15. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  16. Sub-THz complex dielectric constants of smectite clay thin samples with Na$^{+}$/Ca$^{++}$-ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezwanur Rahman; Douglas K. McCarty; Manika Prasad

    2015-07-28

    We implement a technique to characterize the electromagnetic properties at frequencies 100 to 165 GHz (3 cm$^{-1}$ to 4.95 cm$^{-1}$) of oriented smectite samples using an open cavity resonator connected to a sub-millimeter wave VNA (Vector Network Analyzer). We measured dielectric constants perpendicular to the bedding plane on oriented Na$^{+}$ and Ca$^{++}$-ion stabilized smectite samples deposited on a glass slide at ambient laboratory conditions (room temperature and room light). The clay layer is much thinner ($\\sim$ 30 $\\mu$m) than the glass substrate ($\\sim$ 2.18 mm). The real part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{re}$, is essentially constant over this frequency range but is larger in Na$^{+}$- than in Ca$^{++}$-ion infused clay. The total electrical conductivity (associated with the imaginary part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{im}$) of both samples increases monotonically at lower frequencies ($$ 110 GHz. The dispersion of the samples display a dependence on the ionic strength in the clay interlayers, i.e., $\\zeta$-potential in the Stern layers.

  17. The occurrence of clays and their bearing on evaporite mineralogy in the Salado Formation, Delaware Basin, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harville, Donald Gene

    1985-01-01

    THE OCCURRENCE OF CLAYS AND THEIR BEARING ON EVAPORITE MINERALOGY IN THE SALADO FORMATION, DELAWARE BASIN, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by DONALD GENE HARVILLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Geology THE OCCURRENCE OF CLAYS AND THEIR BEARING ON EVAPORITE MINERALOGY IN THE SALADO FORMATION, DELAWARE BASIN, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by DONALD GENE HARVILLE Approved as to style...

  18. Authigenic clay minerals in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group: Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, Waha Field, West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walling, Suzette Denise

    1992-01-01

    AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SUZETTE DENISE WALLING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Geology AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS...

  19. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  20. A study of the effects of repeated loadings and free water on the stability of a lime stabilized clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantos, Carl Thomas

    1959-01-01

    . Sere Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Results . 9, Twe Percent Lime Triaxial Results . 10. Four Percent Lime Triaxial Results 37 37 40 LIST OF FIGURES 1. Triaxial Compression Device and Universal Testing Nachine . 2. Harvard Nlniature Compactor... Equipment 3. Typical Test Speoimens 4. Ltterberg Limits - Brasos River Clay 5. Modified JULS80 Compaction - Brasos River Clay 6. Nohr's Circles and Rupture Envelopes 7, 0 Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Test, 15 psi 45 47 48 Lateral Pressure 49 S...

  1. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

  2. 488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.

    2014-11-17

    At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

  3. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  4. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  5. High gradient magnetic separation of iron oxide minerals from soil clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Darrell Gene

    1977-01-01

    steel wool, placed in a strong magnetic field (1. 6 Tesla), provides the magnetic field and magnetic field gradients necessary to trap weakly magnetic, clay size particles flowing through the filter as a dilute suspension in pH 10. 5 Na C03 solution...- magnetic particles. 2. There must be magnetic field gradients across the volume of the particles for magnetic attraction and trapping to occur. A magnetic field on the order of 1-2 Tesla produced by an electro- magnet is necessary to magnetize...

  6. Areal distribution of clay minerals and their relationship to physical properties, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hottman, William Edward

    1975-01-01

    of Commi t e lead of De rtment Member Member December 1975 ABSTRACT Areal Distribution of Clay Minerals and their Relationship to Physical Properties, Gulf of Mexico. (December 1975) William E. Hottman, B. A. , California State University (Fullerton... 2 5 12 X 52 X 52 5 X 52 X 2 5 X 52 5 25. 2 11. 7 3. 42 25. 5 20 5 4. 5 25. 25 72. 5 8. 5 24. 0 7. 67 2 ' 77 29, 8 24. 7 4-97 34. 7 36. 24 6. 02 21. 25 6. 92 2, 63 24. o 17, 6 4. 2 21. 0 68. o 8. 8 28. 0 70. 0...

  7. Field tests and new design procedure for laterally loaded drilled shafts in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierschwale, Mark W.

    1980-01-01

    , and develop a new design procedure for drilled shafts supporting precast panel retaining walls. FIELD LOAD TESTS The prediction of the behavior of laterally loaded shafts involves the determination of the shaft-soil interaction. One approach... 4ft to l3 ft 5 -very stiff red clay(CH) below 5ft I-O zL 128 l30 P IC WA R L I QUI 0 LIMIT CONTENT /o LI Ml T ? + 7 IO 20 30 COHESIVE SHEAR STRENGTH, Cu, 0. 6 0, 8 I 0 I. 2 I, 4 I, 6 I. 8 ~ Unconfined Compression Test + Miniature Vane...

  8. Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) chargingWASHINGTON, DC - Jeffrey Clay Sell was

  9. CO2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk; Hauss, Thomas; Schaef, Herbert T.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Krukowski, Elizabeth; Stack, Andrew G.; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-15

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ??0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 Å. The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.

  10. CO2 Adsorption to Sub-Single Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Hauss, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Schaef, Herbert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may react with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of 0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At low pressure increasing CO2 adsorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak or no temperature dependence. Supercritical fluids, sorption phenomena, carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, caprock integrity

  11. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  12. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 9, 1992--August 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of mixed pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported catalysts and determination of their catalytic activities were continued in this quarter. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the preparative method for high activity iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite catalysts, a new batch of the catalyst was prepared and tested for hydrocracking activity with bibenzyl. This preparation gave conversion and product distribution similar to that reported previously. The mixed iron/alumina-pillared clay was also prepared using a pillaring solution that was aged for longer period of time. To determine the importance of the type of pillaring support in hydrocracking activity, iron/zirconia-pillared montmorillonite was prepared using the same technique as that for iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite. The reaction of bibenzyl with the sulfided iron/zirconia-pillared catalyst gave a lower hydrocracking conversion than the iron/alumina-pillared catalyst. Addition of a second catalytic metal to the clay support was attempted to determine if a synergistic effect could improve liquefaction. Ferric nitrate and stannous chloride were added to the clay, but the resulting catalyst was relatively poor for hydrocracking and hydrogenation compared with ferric nitrate supported on the clay. New disposable iron catalysts with high acidity and surface area are desired for coal liquefaction. Synthetic iron aluminosilicates were prepared by methods similar to those used for the nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM) catalysts, which are very effective for hydrogenation and reforming of hydrocarbons. The iron aluminosilicate catalysts were tested for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of bibenzyl, naphthalene and pyrene. Pyrene hydrogenation was effectively catalyzed by the sulfided synthetic iron catalyst.

  13. GEOC Martial Taillefert Tuesday, April 09, 2013 130 Realtime sorption and precipitation of nickel on clay minerals: An in situ QuickEXAFS investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of nickel on clay minerals: An in situ QuickEXAFS investigation Matthew Siebecker1, mgs@udel.edu, Wei Li1 of nickel sorption on Alrich clay minerals utilizing QuickEXAFS spectroscopy and a custom built flow cell Chemical Interactions at the MineralWater Interface (01:00 PM 05:30 PM) Location: Morial Convention Center

  14. Thermo-Hydrological-Mechanical Analysis of a Clay Barrier for Radioactive Waste Isolation: Probabilistic Calibration and Advanced Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dontha, Lakshman

    2012-07-16

    The engineered barrier system is a basic element in the design of repository to isolate high level radioactive waste (HLW). In this system, the clay barrier plays a prominent role in dispersing the heat generated from the waste, reduce the flow...

  15. A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history-dependent plastic potential function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history- dependent plastic and failure criteria are found to be strongly dependent on the principal stress rotation angle () and plastic work. A unique plastic potential function determined solely by the current stress state

  16. WRIGHT, MELANIE CLAY. The Effects of Automation on Team Performance and Team Coordination. (Under the direction of David B. Kaber).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    ABSTRACT WRIGHT, MELANIE CLAY. The Effects of Automation on Team Performance and Team Coordination of automation in a number of work domains, including team environments. However, assessment of the effects of automation on teamwork has been primarily limited to the aviation domain (comparing early conventional

  17. An oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari) from the Oxford Clay (Jurassic: Upper Callovian) of South Cave Station Quarry, Yorkshire, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selden, Paul A.; Baker, Anne S.; Phipps, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    in mar- ine strata: evidence from the British Jurassic, including a review of the allochthonous vertebrate assemblage from the marine Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Great Britain. 47–83. In COLECTIVO ARQUEOLO´GICO-PALEON- TOLO´GICO SALENSE...

  18. Soil damping constants related to common soil properties in sands and clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Gary Clive

    1968-01-01

    SOIL D'c~. 'I'IIIG COESTAlxI. S PI', IslTED TO CO!~i'iOI& SOII. PRO& ERTIES J3I SAE1)S AND CL?"S A Thesis by Gary Olive G'boon Sr b':I' te'I to tho Gra=lu. . te Col lope of Texas Afxl Univcrsi ty in pert'al fulfillsent of the requirenent... for the Je;, ree of YiASTER Ol" SCIEI!CE August ISSS II. ';or Subject: Civil I:nSin er. nb SOIL DAMPING CONSTANTS REIATED TO COMMON SOIL PROPERTIES IN SANDS AND CLAYS A Thesis by Gary Clive Gibson Approved as to style and content by: (Head...

  19. The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

    2010-02-01

    Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

  20. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  1. Effect of Residence Time on Ni-Sorption Mechanisms on Clay and Oxide Minerals: An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Effect of Residence Time on Ni-Sorption Mechanisms on Clay and Oxide Minerals: An X-ray Absorption minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature the decline

  2. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  3. Capillary suction-time tests on selected clays and shales. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Shale stability has been an ongoing problem in the drilling of oil wells. The Capillary Suction Time test is simple and easy to use, allowing operators to conduct the test at the rigsite. However because of difficulty in reproducing results, the test should be used only qualitatively. The CST, along with the Methylene Blue, Specific Surface Area and Ensilin tests, accurately predicts shale swelling and dispersion. The tests have the added advantage of being able to be conducted relatively quickly. These tests could be carried out at the rigsite while the drilling is taking place. The experiments conducted also demonstrated the usefulness of KCL as an inhibitor of shale swelling and dispersion. From the CST data, it can be seen that KCL concentrations as low as 0.5% are effective in controlling the swelling of Phillips Ekofisk, Phillips Andrews County, Texaco Mississippi Canyon and Pierre Texaco. However a greater concentration of KCL is required to inhibit the swelling of Gold Seal Bentonite, Standard Arizona, Standard Wyoming and Standard Texas. It is recommended that more concentrations of KCL be tested of the high swelling clays to determine the minimum concentration required to inhibit swelling and dispersion.

  4. LESSONS LEARNED FROM AN IMPOUNDMENT SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYNTHETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    underwent final closure construction in the summer of 1994. The landfill previously accepted an average for the sedimentation pond and the landfill closure was completed by 31 December 1994. The GCL used at this site, Shearbox test, Failure, Landfill, Sedimentation pond AUTHORS: Kyle E. Nay, Environmental Specialist, Ohio

  5. Stress distribution and development within geosynthetic-reinforced soil slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    September 2011, accepted 2 December 2011 ABSTRACT: Numerical methods combined with centrifuge tests are used is evaluated using finite element analysis. Advanced models and an integration algorithm are implemented by centrifuge tests of two GRS slopes with different backfill densities. Numerical results indicate that soil

  6. 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetic inclusions within a soil mass can pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    the model in a geotech- nical centrifuge (Zornberg et al., 1998). The use of inclusions to improve Fall Conference 2008 / November 21, 2008 / Seoul / Korea Advances in Soil Reinforcement Technology of conventional reinforced soil applications, this paper focuses on recent advances in reinforced soil technology

  7. Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    FIELD PERFORMANCE OF STEEP WALLS OF NONWOVEN AND WOVEN GEOTEXTILES REINFORCING POORLY DRAINING SOILS, construction and performance of two 5.4 m-high steep geotextile-reinforced soil walls with fine local soils are described in this paper. A relative weak and extensible nonwoven geotextile and a stronger woven geotextile

  8. Geosynthetics 2013 April 1-4, Long Beach, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    equipment. A biaxial geogrid and a nonwoven geotextile were used in these tests, which comprised creep

  9. Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    tests were conducted using a polyester non-woven geotextile to evaluate the new equipment. Afterwards

  10. Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    HYDRAULIC CLASSIFICATION OF UNSATURATED NONWOVEN GEOTEXTILES FOR USE IN CAPILLARY BARRIERS C.B. Pickles different non-woven geotextile properties and the materials performance under unsaturated conditions function. Due to the low water entry suction of all nonwoven geotextiles it was found that when

  11. Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    force is measured. The pullout force F measured during the pullout test is generally reported as a normalized value per unit width of the specimen and has units of force per unit width (i.e. kN/m). (a) Roller grips Reaction frame Support system for grips Hydraulic Pistons LVDT support frame Lvdt's Load cell

  12. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-08-04

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the corrosion reaction. The water flow toward the canister is maintained even for very low permeabilities of the Opalinus clay, sustaining the anaerobic corrosion of the steel canister.

  13. Design of the Long-term Waste Management Facility for Historic LLRW Port Hope Project - 13322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Don; Barton, David; Case, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The Municipality of Port Hope is located on the northern shores of Lake Ontario approximately 100 km east of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Starting in the 1930's, radium and later uranium processing by Eldorado Gold Mines Limited (subsequently Eldorado Nuclear Limited) (Eldorado) at their refinery in Port Hope resulted in the generation of process residues and wastes that were disposed of indiscriminately throughout the Municipality until about the mid-1950's. These process residues contained radium (Ra- 226), uranium, arsenic and other contaminants. Between 1944 and 1988, Eldorado was a Federal Crown Corporation, and as such, the Canadian Federal Government has assumed responsibility for the clean-up and long-term management of the historic waste produced by Eldorado during this period. The Port Hope Project involves the construction and development of a new long-term waste management facility (LTWMF), and the remediation and transfer of the historic wastes located within the Municipality of Port Hope to the new LTWMF. The new LTWMF will consist of an engineered above-ground containment mound designed to contain and isolate the wastes from the surrounding environment for the next several hundred years. The design of the engineered containment mound consists of a primary and secondary composite base liner system and composite final cover system, made up of both natural materials (e.g., compacted clay, granular materials) and synthetic materials (e.g., geo-synthetic clay liner, geo-membrane, geo-textiles). The engineered containment mound will cover an area of approximately 13 hectares and will contain the estimated 1.2 million cubic metres of waste that will be generated from the remedial activities within Port Hope. The LTWMF will also include infrastructure and support facilities such as access roads, administrative offices, laboratory, equipment and personnel decontamination facilities, waste water treatment plant and other ancillary facilities. Preliminary construction activities for the Port Hope LTWMF commenced in 2012 and are scheduled to continue over the next few years. The first cell of the engineered containment mound is scheduled to be constructed in 2015 with waste placement into the Port Hope LTWMF anticipated over the following seven year period. (authors)

  14. Structural evaluation of WIPP disposal room raised to Clay Seam G.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Holland, John F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-01

    An error was discovered in the ALGEBBRA script used to calculate the disturbed rock zone around the disposal room and the shear failure zone in the anhydrite layers in the original version. To correct the error, a memorandum of correction was submitted according to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Quality Assurance program. The recommended course of action was to correct the error, to repeat the post-process, and to rewrite Section 7.4, 7.5, 8, and Appendix B in the original report. The sections and appendix revised by the post-process using the corrected ALGEBRA scripts are provided in this revision. The original report summarizes a series of structural calculations that examine effects of raising the WIPP repository horizon from the original design level upward 2.43 meters. Calculations were then repeated for grid changes appropriate for the new horizon raised to Clay Seam G. Results are presented in three main areas: (1) Disposal room porosity, (2) Disturbed rock zone characteristics, and (3) Anhydrite marker bed failure. No change to the porosity surface for the compliance re-certification application is necessary to account for raising the repository horizon, because the new porosity surface is essentially identical. The disturbed rock zone evolution and devolution are charted in terms of a stress invariant criterion over the regulatory period. This model shows that the propagation of the DRZ into the surrounding rock salt does not penetrate through MB 139 in the case of both the original horizon and the raised room. Damaged salt would be expected to heal in nominally 150 years. The shear failure does not occur in either the upper or lower anhydrite layers at the moment of excavation, but appears above and below the middle of the pillar one day after the excavation. The damaged anhydrite is not expected to heal as the salt in the DRZ is expected to.

  15. The effect of sources of nitrogen on nitrate formation and nitrogen uptake by cotton plants growing on Miller clay loam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Zilmar Ziller

    1958-01-01

    LIB RARV A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE EFFECT OF SOURCES OF NITROGEN ON NITRATE FORMATION AND NITROGEN UPTAKE HX COTTON PIANTS GROWXNG ON MILLER CIAY LOAN A Thesis ZXINAR ZXLLER NARCOS AAS Submitted, to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ 66 APPEEDIXt ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 73 Tables l. Treatments Used in the Study. 2 Nitrate Content (ppm) of Miller Clay (0-6 ') on the 10th of July as Affected. by Rate and Source of' Nitrogen, Avexage oi' Two Repli- Nitrate Content (ppm) of Miller...

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  17. Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12:18 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12 of nuclear reactors are designed to prevent exactly what we old Fukushima Daiichi plant. Which is good the world rush to reconsider their nuclear plans, nuclear experts look toward a future of smaller, safer

  18. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic eliminationof a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibanova, Daria; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Clay-supported TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially improve the performance of air treatment technologies via enhanced adsorption and reactivity of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, a bench-top photocatalytic flow reactor was used to evaluate the efficiency of hectorite-TiO2 and kaolinite-TiO2, two novel composite materials synthesized in our laboratory. Toluene, a model hydrophobic VOC and a common indoor air pollutant, was introduced in the air stream at realistic concentrations, and reacted under UVA (gamma max = 365 nm) or UVC (gamma max = 254 nm) irradiation. The UVC lamp generated secondary emission at 185 nm, leading to the formation of ozone and other short-lived reactive species. Performance of clay-TiO2 composites was compared with that of pure TiO2 (Degussa P25), and with UV irradiation in the absence of photocatalyst under identical conditions. Films of clay-TiO2 composites and of P25 were prepared by a dip-coating method on the surface of Raschig rings, which were placed inside the flow reactor. An upstream toluene concentration of ~;;170 ppbv was generated by diluting a constant flow of toluene vapor from a diffusion source with dry air, or with humid air at 10, 33 and 66percent relative humidity (RH). Toluene concentrations were determined by collecting Tenax-TA (R) sorbent tubes downstream of the reactor, with subsequent thermal desorption -- GC/MS analysis. The fraction of toluene removed, percentR, and the reaction rate, Tr, were calculated for each experimental condition from the concentration changes measured with and without UV irradiation. Use of UVC light (UV/TiO2/O3) led to overall higher reactivity, which can be partially attributed to the contribution of gas phase reactions by short-lived radical species. When the reaction rate was normalized to the light irradiance, Tr/I gamma, the UV/TiO2 reaction under UVA irradiation was more efficient for samples with a higher content of TiO2 (P25 and Hecto-TiO2), but not for Kao-TiO2. In all cases, reaction rates peaked at 10percent RH, with Tr values between 10 and 50percent higher than those measured under dry air. However, a net inhibition was observed as RH increased to 33percent and 66percent, indicating that water molecules competed effectively with toluene for reactive surface sites and limited the overall photocatalytic conversion. Compared to P25, inhibition by co-adsorbed water was less significant for Kao-TiO2 samples, but was more dramatic for Hecto-TiO2 due to the high water uptake capacity of hectorite.

  19. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-12

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 Å, while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  20. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  1. Design and development of a laboratory suction measuring device 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayhan, Serpil Rezzan

    1996-01-01

    in an and region, it loses water and cracks. Cracks decrease the performance of the clay liner as a contaminant barrier. The loss of water is due to the suction head gradient between the liner and the and region soil. In this research, a laboratory test method...

  2. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  3. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  4. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  5. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01

    and Patna1k (1 ) partially support th1s explanation. They found that lime at ths rate of one percent of the weight of the so11 increased mineralisat1on of nitrogen, but most of the n1trogen in their tests accumulated as ammonia rather than nitrate under...RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural...

  6. Construction quality assurance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-09-08

    This report provides a summary of the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and test results, including: The results of the geosynthetic and soil materials conformance testing. The observation and testing results associates with the installation of the soil liners. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the HDPE geomembrane liner systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the leachate collection and removal systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the working surfaces. The observation and testing results associated with in-plant manufacturing process. Summary of submittal reviews by Golder Construction Services, Inc. The submittal and certification of the piping material specifications. The observation and verification associated of the Acceptance Test Procedure results of the operational equipment functions. Summary of the ECNs which are incorporated into the project.

  7. Cloud Monitoring for Large Cosmic Ray Sites R.W. Clay, B.R. Dawson, R.T. Pace, D.S. Riordan, A.G.K. Smith, N.R. Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OG 4.5.23 Cloud Monitoring for Large Cosmic Ray Sites R.W. Clay, B.R. Dawson, R.T. Pace, D monitoring of the cloud distribution in the night sky within the experimental fiducial volume. We have developed infra-red detectors which are capa- ble of responding to cloud in daytime or night-time. We

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    . Seven different types of geosynthetics, including six biaxial geogrids and one geotextile, were tested. Key Words Geosynthetics, geogrid, geotextiles, pullout, base reinforcement 18. Distribution Statement

  9. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Center of Technology Education, Maceió, Brazil J.G. Zornberg, Civil Engineering Department (Outdoor Weathering Plastics) are used. This procedure is intended to define conditions for exposure of plastic materials to weather. It is a comparative test that depends on climate, time of year, atmospheric

  10. Geosynthetics International, 2004, 11, No. 3 State-of-the-art report: GCL shear strength and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ displacement behavior and shear strength interpretation are presented, including long-term performance issues (GCLs) are needed for static and seismic stability analyses in the design of waste containment of GCLs. Essential concepts of shear stress­displacement behavior and shear strength interpretation

  11. Advances in Transportation and Geoenvironmental Systems Using Geosynthetics Geotechnical Special Publication No. 103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Revetment Geotextile Filter Subjected to Cyclic Wave Loading .........................162 S.H. Chew, Z in Soil and Geotextile Filters.....................176 Ming Xiao and Lakshmi N. Reddi Evaluating the Puncture Survivability of Geotextiles in Construction of Coastal Revetments

  12. Geosynthetics in Hydraulic Projects Prepared by J. Zornberg and M. Bouazza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    drainage and/or filtration through the use of geotextiles and geonets Provide reinforcement, such as puncturing caused by the overlying and/or underlying materials. Geotextiles are often placed underneath or geonet/geotextile geocomposites are typically used as drainage behind the geomembrane. The leak water

  13. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Nonwoven Geotextiles as Hydraulic Barriers to Capillary Rise J.S. McCartney, University of Arkansas geotextiles and geocomposite drainage layers as moisture barriers in geotechnical applications where capillary occurred more slowly when a nonwoven geotextile was placed between two soil layers. This is attributed

  14. Pullout of Geosynthetic Reinforcement with In-plane Drainage Capability J.G. Zornberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    capabilities considered to reinforce poorly draining soils specifically include reinforced nonwoven geotextiles is a continuous polypropylene filament nonwoven geotextile reinforced by a biaxial grid network of polyester yarns channels involving a polypropylene and polyethylene nonwoven geotextile. It should be noted

  15. Poorly Draining Soil Reinforced with Geosynthetic with in Plane Drainage: Efficiency and Pore Pressure Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    ), showed that permeable geotextile has an excellent performance in dissipating the pore pressure when

  16. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    and polyester geogrids; and a polypropylene woven geotextile. A clayey soil (subgrade) and a sandy-silty gravely, Chan et al. (1989) showed that geogrids are better reinforcements than geotextiles when inserted into base layer, even the geogrid having lesser unconfined stiffness than the geotextile. In this case

  17. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    -Dependent Deformations of Geotextile-Reinforced Walls in Reduced-Scale Models C.M.L. Costa, Federal Center centrifuge tests performed to investigate the time-dependent deformations of geotextile-reinforced soil walls

  18. Geosynthetics International, 2004, 11, No. 3 Reliability-based stability analysis considering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    different manufacturing lots. In addition, uncertainty was observed to arise from differences in test material differences among specimens from the same manufacturing lot as well as among specimens from

  19. The First Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition 2-5 March 2008, Cancun, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    and infiltration of water were investigated in this study. Soil specimens were prepared with and without fiber-reinforcement and subjected to identical infiltration and desiccation stages over a period of nine months. Surficial the duration of testing. The results of this study provide evidence that fiber-reinforcement reduces the size

  20. The Masterbuilder -June 2011 www.masterbuilder.co.in26 Cellular Geosynthetics: Geofoams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    cement), and - cellular glass. The polymeric category is further subdivided depending on the polymer; and - development of 'anti-buoyancy' EPS blocks that allow groundwater infiltration during times of flooding so

  1. Geosynthetics International, 2004, 11, No. 4 Occurrence and effect of bentonite migration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration or non-uniform stresses, such as a rock or roughness in the subgrade, a leachate sump, or wrinkles GCLs (Stark and Eid 1997); . lower puncture resistance (Daniel 1991); . smaller leachate attenuation

  2. Mathematical Modeling of the Stress-Strain-Time Behavior of Geosynthetics Using the Findley Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    ......................................................................................................... 9 3.3 Portrayal of Creep-Test Data ............................................................................................................................... 2 Section 2 - Creep Models 2.1 Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 9 3.2 Description of Test Conditions

  3. Discussions and Closures Discussion of "Numerical Modeling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    similar to other geosynthetic product categories such as geomembrane and geotextile. As with other types

  4. Pavement roughness on expansive clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasco, Manuel O

    1980-01-01

    available weather station data over 20 years. b The roadway sections within this area are located in two different counties. IQ O'I CC O O 0 O CA O c I I- I/I I/I 0 0 0 0 0 /Q Ql 0 0 Z I/I C/I I/I IO 3: Z Z E tJJ Ql 0 O 0 I/I 0 CL m IQ QI... L Qt O V '?C Ct J N ~K 0 Vl ' /U 3 Ct I/I O Ct V E IU UD l- CU O V I CZI IU J O V N tV E Qt IJ- 0 3: C I/I O IU V E tll 5- N CU CJ X N tt- IL 0 Vl ' CU I/I O IU ' V E IU l- Cl N IU C J D N tt- U 0 I/I CJ I/I O...

  5. Effective forces in saturated clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teetes, George Ray

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the culmination of a five-phase research effort investigating overpressured soil and rock formations. These formations, found all over the world, at varying depths, contain pore water confined at pressures ...

  6. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-10-22

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

  7. Case history of liner veneer instability , B. Queen2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 13, No. 1, 36­46 1. INTRODUCTION The General James M. Gavin Power Plant is owned by American Electric construction. The landfill was being developed for final disposal of flue gas desulfurization by Act amendments of 1990, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system was installed on each generating unit

  8. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  9. PNNL STC Workshop Getter/Liner Tube Properties and Manufacturing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    product. Determine boron levels to wt. ppm by 4 He increase from 10 B(n,) reaction. 11 Helium analysis system 12 Cold Trap (77 K) High Temperature Cu Block Furnace (graphite...

  10. Large Eddy Simulations of Combustor Liner Flows | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    barrels of oil per day, or about 6 percent of the world's total oil usage. Aviation gas turbine engines are also significant producers of CO2 and other harmful greenhouse gas...

  11. Equipment pressure applied to geomembrane in composite liner system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thicknesses of sandy structural fill and rounded stone, i.e. a leachate collection and removal layer stone at most landfill sites. In particular, a dozer is usually used to place the leachate collection

  12. On Performance of Covers and Liners In Performance Assessments | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravelInformationCollection Request Title:of2 Oil Overcharge Refund CasesChallengesof

  13. Liners and Covers: Field Performance & Life Expectancy | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravelInformation Resources»Jim Manion Leading theViolations

  14. Large Eddy Simulations of Combustor Liner Flows | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory program LabsDesign

  15. The feasibility of electrophoretic repair of impoundment leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Ji-Seok

    2002-01-01

    to the impoundment. The cathode is placed inside and the anode is placed outside the impoundment. An electric field is imposed externally across the leaks of geomembrane liner. The negative charged clay particles are repelled by the cathode and attracted by the anode...

  16. International PhD Symposium in Civil Engineering Walraven, Blaauwendraad, Scarpas & Snijder (eds),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    and hazardous waste containment systems in the United States is prescribed by the Resource Recovery systems involve a liner (e.g. a compacted clay layer) constructed with a low saturated hydraulic and numerical modeling to verify percolation measured by a lysimeter. Inconsistencies between the recorded

  17. Geosynthetics and Geosynthetic-Engineered Soil Structures, Symposium sponsored by the ASCE Engineering Mechanics Division, honoring Prof. R.M. Koerner, McMat 2005, Baton Rouge, Louisiana June 2, 2005.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    to construction over weak soils. Application of the kinematic approach of limit analysis to reinforced soil and tensile rupture. The framework of the kinematic approach of limit analysis was used to arrive at the limit or retaining walls. The kinematic approach of limit analysis as applied to reinforced soil is reviewed in 1

  18. Geosynthetic drainage layers in contact with unsaturated soils Drainage des geosynthetiques dans le contact avec les sols non saturs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    as with a drainage geocomposite (a geonet sandwiched between geotextiles). In contrast to the performance sandwiched entre geotextiles). Par opposition à l'exécution de couches de drainage saturées, les couches de between nonwoven geotextile filters. The in-plane flow through geotextiles and geonets can be reasonably

  19. Plasticity of the Dakota Clays of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belchic, George

    1915-06-01

    of the Dakota formation from various parts of the State of Kansas were experimented with. Three sets of experiments were made, and the results and comparisons are tatulated in Chapter II, The first experiment consisted in following the method established... are, the velocity of the fall is lower, due to increased resistance. Besides gravity, other factors are to be con- sidered in examining the stability of colloids. The most important, perhaps, is the electric charge taken by the part- icles when...

  20. Stress-dependent behavior of saturated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulhadi, Naeem O.

    A program of K[subscript 0]-consolidated undrained triaxial compression tests has been performed to investigate the effects of consolidation stress level on the compression and shear behavior of resedimented Boston blue ...

  1. Herbicide Update Ian Willoughby and David Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and recommendations 15 Label approvals 15 Off-label approvals 15 Off-label arrangements for Christmas trees 16 List recommendations and off-label approvals 20 Forest use 20 Atrazine and cyanazine 20 Cycloxydim 28 Dichlobenil 30

  2. ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF CLAYS Arpita Pal Bathija

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Experiments were conducted to study the dilation factor (R) under different stress conditions on sandstones should be avoided. This study shows that absolute R values increase for sandstones and decrease

  3. Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948California (MillionThousandChemicalsPaperCarbon

  4. Clay Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliamsCentral

  5. Fracture characterization of clays and clay-like materials using flattened Brazilian Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agaiby, Shehab Sherif Wissa

    2013-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has been used for many years to study the mechanical behavior of brittle and quasi-brittle materials like concrete, rock, wood, and ceramics. To date, the application of fracture mechanics to soils has ...

  6. 265GEOSYNTHETICS INTERNATIONAL S 1995, VOL. 2, NO. 1 Technical Paper by J.K. Mitchell and J.G. Zornberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    materials could be used in reinforced soil construction. Interestingly, however, the first geotextile of this first geotextile- reinforced structure, built in 1971 by the French Highway Administration in Rouen, were to test its stability and to verify the magnitude of deformations caused by the soil- geotextile

  7. Design of a composite combat helmet liner for prevention of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vechart, Andrew (Andrew Peter)

    2011-01-01

    Air blast-induced traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) represent a significant percentage of military personnel injuries observed in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Prevalence of blast-induced ...

  8. Fluid-filled helmet liner concept for protection against blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Allison L. (Allison Lynne)

    2012-01-01

    Due to changes in modem warfare threats, as well as advances in body armor, soldier survivability in combat has increased, but blast-induced Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has become a prevalent injury in the battlefield. ...

  9. Development of a helmet liner for protection against blast induced trauma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christou, George Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries caused by shock waves have attracted increased medical and scientific attention due to the large percentage of combat troops that have sustained such injuries in recent conflict theatres. To this ...

  10. long-Term Tritium Transport through Field-Scale Compacted Soil Liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted by the illinois State Geological Survey to detennine the long-term performance of compacted soil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801. 5Geochemist, Illinois State Geological Survey., Natural Resources Building, 615 Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820. 6professor, Dept

  11. Evaluation of Multidimensional Transport through a Field-Scale Compacted Soil Liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Champaign, Urbana, IL 6180l. 4Geochemist, Illinois State Geological Survey, Natural Resources Building, 615 E State Geological Survey in 1988 to investigate chemical transport rates through low permeability at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by the U.S. Environ mental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Illinois

  12. A search for periodicities from a ULX in the LINER galaxy NGC 4736

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avdan, H; Akyuz, A; Balman, S

    2014-01-01

    We report our findings on a new quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a long period from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) X-2 in nearby galaxy NGC 4736 based on the Chandra and XMM-Newton archival data. To examine the timing properties, power density spectra of the source have been obtained using Fast Fourier Transform. Also the spectral parameters of the source have been calculated by obtaining and fitting the energy spectra. Power density spectrum of this source reveals a QPO peak at $0.73_{-0.14}^{+0.16}$ mHz with an fractional rms variability of 16% using the Chandra data (in the year 2000-lower state of the source). The XMM-Newton data analysis indicates a peak at $0.53_{-0.35}^{+0.09}$ mHz with a fractional rms variation of 5% (in the year 2006-higher state of the source). These recovered QPOs overlap within errors and may be the same oscillation. In addition, we detect a long periodicity or a QPO in the Chandra data of about $(5.2\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-5}$ Hz ($\\sim$ 5.4 hrs) over 3 $\\sigma$ confidence l...

  13. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-15

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  14. Computations and modeling of oil transport between piston lands and liner in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Tianshi

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of lubricating oil in internal combustion engines is a continuous interest for engine developers and remains to be one of the least understood areas. A better understanding on oil transport is critical to ...

  15. Study of an advanced helmet liner concept to reduce TBI : experiments & simulation using sandwich structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Rahul, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    A large percentage of combat troops suffered Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) in recent wars in the Middle East. The majority of TBIs were caused by exposure to blast waves. Use of ...

  16. SERVICE LIFE OF A LANDFILL LINER SYSTEM SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .edu and R. Kerry Rowe, Ph.D., D.Eng., P.Eng., F.ASCE Professor of Civil Engineering Queen's University 58.D., P.E., D.GE, F.ASCE Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana@illinois.edu Navid H. Jafari Student Member, ASCE Graduate Research Assistant of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  17. Experimental Demonstration of Fusion-Relevant Conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent)pressure|the typE IA supernova SN4-4519J

  18. Experimental Studies on Geocells and Mat Systems for Stabilization of Unpaved Shoulders and Temporary Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jun

    2014-12-31

    Table 3.4 Average root length on day 25. 79 Table 3.5 Average root length on day 397. 79 Table 4.1 Specification and parameters of the polyethylene mat system (Presto 2009) 94 Table4.2 Specifications and parameters of woven geotextile... 50 years. Geosynthetics have many types and used for different functions. Reinforcement is one of the common functions for geosynthetics. Common geosynthetics used for reinforcement include woven geotextile, geogrid, and geocell. Geocell...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON TRIANGULAR APERTURE GEOGRID-REINFORCED BASES OVER WEAK SUBGRADE UNDER CYCLIC LOADING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Yu

    2009-12-09

    in civil engineering including roads, airfields, railroads, embankments, earth retaining structures, reservoirs, canals, dams, and bank and coastal protection. Geosynthetics can be divided into nine main types: (1) geotextile, (2) geogrid, (3) geonet... the geosynthetic provides full or partial separation, lateral restraint of the overlying granular material, and a tensioned membrane effect when deformed extensively. Geotextiles and geogrids are two main types of geosynthetics used in unpaved roads. However...

  20. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01

    International Workshop on Geomechanics, hydromechanical andflow, heat transport and geomechanics, by linking the twotransport modeling and geomechanics using the reactive

  1. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01

    and the future path of diagenesis have important effects onthe basic basin model for diagenesis. Therefore, some method

  2. Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    visited senior government officials and business leaders in Moscow, Russia and Kyiv, Ukraine. Media contact(s): Craig Stevens, (202) 586-4940 Addthis Related Articles Deputy...

  3. Clay Mathematics Proceedings Lectures on self-avoiding walks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slade, Gordon

    Classification. Primary 82B41; Secondary 60K35 December 9, 2010. c 2010 The authors 1 #12;2 BAUERSCHMIDT, DUMINIL was drafted by himself. The final manuscript was integrated and prepared jointly by the four authors. 1

  4. Modeling of strain rate effects on clay in simple shear 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Byoung Chan

    2006-08-16

    The objective of this research is the development of a new constitutive model to describe the behavior of cohesive soils under time dependent loading. In the work presented here, the modified SIMPLE DSS model is expanded to account for the effects...

  5. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01

    ionic transport in porous shales, J. Geophys. Res. 109 , p.During the Early Compaction of Shales, from Fluid Flow andand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

  6. Effect of sample disturbance in opalinus clay shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    The sample disturbance problem for different geomaterials is reviewed in this thesis. A general discussion on the disturbance sources and complexities of the disturbance problem is followed by detailed reviews on disturbance ...

  7. Influence of loading rate on axially loaded piles in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland Ponce, Enrique Eduardo

    1984-01-01

    28. 0 0. 12 26. 4 I. nn 13. 3 NA 30. 2 HA 33. 7 Im Cul Csi I ID% UDS 4. 32 In. oo 0. 00 0. 00 I. sn S. OSMxtei 11. 17 1. 60tisxlni 0. 40 6. 6667 10 O. ze 6 666?10-1 2 IMnats. z 6. 982lxln I I. ZSIOxtn I 3. 00eoxlo-l 1. 57 11. 94... 93. 1 NA HA HA 83. 3 NA 0. 64 lb. 8 NA 62. 4 NA 0. 21 54. 9 NA sn. n I. nn sz. n t. sn uns ODS UOS CUT Cul Csl CUT CIIT Cur Cul 0. Oe 0. 00 O. nn 4. 32 0. 51 I. 82 2. 05 4. 10 7. 56 0. 7 5 0. 63 6. 6667xlo I 4. 450oxtn-t n...

  8. Experimental and numerical study of primary consolidation of soft clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korchaiyapruk, Attasit, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    This research investigates, experimentally and numerically, the three main factors that differentiate predictions based on Terzaghi's one-dimensional consolidation theory from those observed in the laboratory and field. ...

  9. Soil strength from geophysical measurements for soft clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murali, Madhuri; Biscontin, Giovanna; Aubeny, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of seabed soils is essential if offshore and nearshore structures are to be safely designed and properly built. A large part of the commercial and operational risk involved relates to uncertainties about the soil properties at the site...

  10. Upper bound analysis for drag anchors in soft clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Byoung Min

    2007-04-25

    This study presents an upper bound plastic limit analysis for predicting drag anchor trajectory and load capacity. The shank and fluke of the anchor are idealized as simple plates. The failure mechanism involves the motion ...

  11. Deep ocean clay crusts: behaviour and biological origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, Matthew Yih-Han

    2011-03-15

    sliding resistance by minimising the risk of pellet crushing. This thesis proposes that wet sieving of core samples should be undertaken during the site investigations for future deep-water, hot-oil pipeline installations to provide design information...

  12. Compaction characteristics of clay soil using the gyratory testing machine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khafaji, Abbas Nasir

    1964-01-01

    xagijk;:M ~t &Sr; &?+a~t~ . kel4?. , g @'w:, 4j, . t'@%%jr'. e', 0 ~~ ~?'tkx $4ie444f, ' L~ kg& , ri~ iigaf~ f4. ~'~'~"~Q' ~~~jjj gjjjjp%g4. ";, ':& ?qere0sm'ft 5%?jr''sk E'aa "~ yjig$y ?~~. Q~?'. ~'~ ~gqg$f~, ?: ', - :?'??''??'&~::?id~'4'j..."' 1 'C l '*' . 7 4ei&"&?~ "&~?~': kN~ &@~ jg~ ~". ga&AAp~ , !S ~ @?'@'!i '~i'j &' '~~pg J ~~& w'. V, 4. :-' "r*:" ~- s ) y. j+g~; + gf 'Q ~~ jj~pj; l 'C 'l i ''A$" ~+M jhp8. tg;:"i . . ~1 . y t~', "'rgwc. ', 1 ' F 1 I . "K4 ?~. ~ I...

  13. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) used nuclear fuel. The firstrepository tunnels, the PWR type of used fuel is typicallyby the length of individual PWR fuel elements and the number

  14. Aflatoxin Detoxification Method Combining Mesoamerican Nixtamalization and Clay Absorption Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arteaga, Stacy E

    2013-02-28

    supernatant of corn meal mixed with DI water and lime water. The spectra of DI water and AfB1 solution were plotted in the figure for comparison... so rb an ce Wavelength DI Water Corn Meal & DI Water Corn Meal & Ca(OH)2 AfB1 -­?0.1 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.5 200 300 400 500 600 700 800...

  15. By HENRY CLAY WEBSTER Posted: December 6, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    be quite high. Education and preparation: To enter the field, candidates can obtain a master's degree who is too extroverted might not be good at that." Suggested job searches: Counselor jobs | Clinical reserved. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our Terms and Conditions of Use and Privacy Policy

  16. Clay Mathematics Proceedings FRACTAL AND MULTIFRACTAL PROPERTIES OF SLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawler, Gregory F.

    (winter) school in Buzios, Brazil. The theme is the fine properties of Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE theme tying the results together is the SLE curve. Fine analysis of the curve requires estimates. These are standard methods in stochastic analysis. One of the most fun- damental techniques in large deviation theory

  17. A New Environmentally Friendly AL/ZR-Based Clay Stabilizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Monier, Ilham Abdallah

    2013-01-18

    tests showed that this new chemical was effective, and unlike previous Al-based and Zr-based stabilizers (hydroxy aluminum and zirconium oxychloride solutions), it did not dissolve in acids and worked very well up to 300oF. Stabilizer A proved...

  18. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01

    Transport Modelling in the Paris Basin over Geologic Time,hydrologic phenomena in the Paris Basin (Jost et al. 2005)

  19. Tensile strengths of problem shales and clays. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechner, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The greatest single expense faced by oil companies involved in the exploration for crude oil is that of drilling wells. The most abundant rock drilled is shale. Some of these shales cause wellbore stability problems during the drilling process. These can range from slow rate of penetration and high torque up to stuck pipe and hole abandonment. The mechanical integrity of the shale must be known when the shalers are subjected to drilling fluids to develop an effective drilling plan.

  20. Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryof Energy ElevenLGJuly 2013Response:ThreeEnergy

  1. City of Clay Center, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgiaBurley, IdahoChefornak,Kansas (Utility Company) Jump

  2. Clay County Electric Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler, IowaScottsboro,KansasKansasWindom,Wray,County Rural

  3. Clay Center, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York: EnergySouthClarkstown,Clawson,

  4. Clay County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York: EnergySouthClarkstown,Clawson,Alabama:

  5. Clay County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:

  6. Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliamsCentral Everly

  7. Clay County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliamsCentral EverlyTexas:

  8. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Conservation Loans | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy <ofEnergy Today,FASTconsisting of

  9. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solidSwitchgrass| SciTech Connect(Patent) |Article) |

  10. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solidSwitchgrass| SciTech Connect(Patent) |Article)

  11. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative ActivitySciTech ConnecttermsMimics byand

  12. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative ActivitySciTech ConnecttermsMimics byandDeep

  13. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative ActivitySciTech ConnecttermsMimicsArticle) |

  14. Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchool District

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    testing, and weather data gathering in order to establish the threshold of the proposed parameter. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Geosynthetic-Reinforced Unbound Base Courses the performance of geosynthetics used as reinforcement for unbound base courses. This implementation involves

  16. American Society of Civil Engineers Geo-Institute Geo-Trans 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    on transportation- related projects with an emphasis on new trends and developments. INTRODUCTION Materials.E., Member, Geo-Institute ABSTRACT: Cellular geosynthetics is the generic term for geosynthetic materials such as geogrids, geomembranes and geotextiles. This paper summarizes the geofoam and geocomb materials

  17. New Horizons in Earth Reinforcement Otani, Miyata & Mukunoki (eds) 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN 978-0-415-45775-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    geosynthetic inclusions such as geogrids and geotextiles. The acceptance of geosynthetics in reinforced soil used as reinforcement elements are nonwoven geotextiles, woven geotextiles, geogrids, and geocells for the design of earth retaining structures. A reduced scale geotextile-reinforced slope model built using dry

  18. MMaannhhaattttaann CCoolllleeggee CCeenntteerr ffoorr GGeeootteecchhnnoollooggyy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    Research Project - Cellular Geosynthetics 2001: Geofoam Lightweight Fills and Beyond Research Report No/Center for Geotechnology Manhattan College School of Engineering Center for Geotechnology Bronx, New York, U.S.A. November 2001 #12;Manhattan College School of Engineering Center for Geotechnology Cellular Geosynthetics 2001

  19. Clays and Clay Minerals, Vol.45, No.5, 690-708, 1997. COMPARISON OF HEMATITE COAGULATION BY CHARGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    affects the stability of colloidal suspensions by influencing the magnitude and range of particle surface, in some cases, can be predicted from the time evolu- tion of aggregate size (Meakin 1991). Colloidal

  20. Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-11-29

    The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate.

  1. Screen and slotted liner horizontal completion: : correcting for wellbore pressure drop in the inflow performance relationships (IPR) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agbongiator, Eddie Osarenmwida

    2002-01-01

    Error (P.E.) correlation. The correlation, which was simplified using the Table Curve program, is a function of horizontal well length, viscosity, well diameter, wellbore roughness, and production rate. The validation of two commonly used...

  2. Development of NZP ceramic based {open_quotes}cast-in-place{close_quotes} diesel engine port liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaswaran, R.; Limaye, S.Y.

    1996-02-01

    BSX (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6-2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24}) and CSX (Ca{sub l-x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) type NZP ceramics were fabricated and characterized for: (i) thermal properties viz., thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, thermal stability and thermal shock resistance; (ii) mechanical properties viz., flexure strength and elastic modulus; and (iii) microstructures. Results of these tests and analysis indicated that the BS-25 (x=0.25 in BSX) and CS-50 (x=0.50 in CSX) ceramics had the most desirable properties for casting metal with ceramic in place. Finite element analysis (FEA) of metal casting (with ceramic in place) was conducted to analyze thermomechanical stresses generated and determine material property requirements. Actual metal casting trials were also conducted to verify the results of finite element analysis. In initial trials, the ceramic cracked because of the large thermal expansion mismatch (hoop) stresses (predicted by FEA also). A process for introduction of a compliant layer between the metal and ceramic to alleviate such destructive stresses was developed. The compliant layer was successful in preventing cracking of either the ceramic or the metal. In addition to these achievements, pressure slip casting and gel-casting processes for fabrication of NZP components; and acoustic emission and ultrasonics-based NDE techniques for detection of microcracks and internal flaws, respectively, were successfully developed.

  3. Compression of a spherically symmetric deuterium-tritium plasma liner onto a magnetized deuterium-tritium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, J. F.

    2012-07-15

    Converging plasma jets may be able to reach the regime of high energy density plasmas (HEDP). The successful application of plasma jets to magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) would heat the plasma by fusion products and should increase the plasma energy density. This paper reports the results of using the University of Wisconsin's 1-D Lagrangian, radiation-hydrodynamics, fusion code BUCKY to investigate two MIF converging plasma jet test cases originally analyzed by Samulyak et al.[Physics of Plasmas 17, 092702 (2010)]. In these cases, 15 cm or 5 cm radially thick deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma jets merge at 60 cm from the origin and converge radially onto a DT target magnetized to 2 T and of radius 5 cm. The BUCKY calculations reported here model these cases, starting from the time of initial contact of the jets and target. Compared to the one-temperature Samulyak et al. calculations, the one-temperature BUCKY results show similar behavior, except that the plasma radius remains about twice as long near maximum compression. One-temperature and two-temperature BUCKY results differ, reflecting the sensitivity of the calculations to timing and plasma parameter details, with the two-temperature case giving a more sustained compression.

  4. "',: .,,:' ~~ .; J' 4 _____ GRMSL (after Viswalladha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . (1996). "Geosynthetic reinforced mineral sealing layers of landfills," PhD dissertation, Serial No. 28, Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany. Closure by David E. Daniels The method used to calculate tensile

  5. Award of Excellence ~ Darling Downs Tarpaulins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    selvedges suffi- ciently to allow welding. Geotextile: E-VapCap from Sealed Air Australia Pty.Ltd. Designer and was fea- tured in the April 2003 issueof GFRmagazine. Geotextiles: geosynthetic ciayliner (GCL

  6. Recent research and development of ground column technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jie

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, ground columns, such as vibro-concrete columns and geosynthetic-reinforced stone columns, have been increasingly used to support superstructures and embankments when they are constructed on soft foundations. Several new column...

  7. Numerical Analyses of Geocell-Reinforced Granular Soils under Static and Repeated Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaoming

    2010-09-01

    Since 1970s, geosynthetics have been increasingly used as construction materials in civil engineering projects such as roads, retaining walls, landfills, etc. Today, there are many types of geosynthetic products (e.g., geogrid, geotextile, geocell... geotextile is often placed under the geocell to separate the infill material from the underlying soil. The infill material is then poured into the pockets of the geocell. Compaction may be required depending on the type of application. Today, geocell...

  8. Contributions to the theory of soundpropagation in ducts with bulk-reacting lining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rienstra, Sjoerd W.

    Contributions to the theory of soundpropagation in ducts with bulk-reacting lining S.W. Rienstra interfaceduct/liner modalamplitudeductfield outer radius duct with liner modalamplitudelinerfield wavenumber duct radial wavenumber liner axial wavenumber smallparameter ratioradialpressuregradientsat

  9. Probabilistic aerothermal design of gas turbine combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Sean D. (Sean Darien), 1978-

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a probability-based framework for assessing the impact of manufacturing variability on combustor liner durability. Simplified models are used to link combustor liner life, liner temperature variability, ...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a liner aimed at helping prosthetic limbs fit better. Sandia's Intelligent Systems, Robotics, and Cybernetics group is developing a liner with sensors that tell what's going on...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (6533) demonstrates a liner aimed at helping prosthetic limbs fit better. Sandia's Intelligent Systems, Robotics, and Cybernetics group is developing a liner with sensors...

  12. Cost savings associated with landfilling wastes containing very low levels of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boggs, C.J. [Argonne National Lab., Germantown, MD (United States); Shaddoan, W.T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Paducah, KY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has operated captive landfills (both residential and construction/demolition debris) in accordance with the Commonwealth of Kentucky regulations since the early 1980s. Typical waste streams allowed in these landfills include nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste (such as paper, plastic, cardboard, cafeteria waste, clothing, wood, asbestos, fly ash, metals, and construction debris). In July 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued new requirements for the disposal of sanitary wastes in a {open_quotes}contained landfill.{close_quotes} These requirements were promulgated in the 401 Kentucky Administrative Record Chapters 47 and 48 that became effective 30 June 1995. The requirements for a new contained landfill include a synthetic liner made of high-density polyethylene in addition to the traditional 1-meter (3-foot) clay liner and a leachate collection system. A new landfill at Paducah would accept waste streams similar to those that have been accepted in the past. The permit for the previously existing landfills did not include radioactivity limits; instead, these levels were administratively controlled. Typically, if radioactivity was detected above background levels, the waste was classified as low-level waste (LLW), which would be sent off-site for disposal.

  13. een pklad z posledn kapitoly uebnch text Liner algebra docenta Slovka. Na een se podleli David Holec, Jan Mysliveek, Ondej Pibyla a Luk Voknek.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slovák, Jan

    A A F nede#12;nováno A GFA = 0 @ 4 2 5 59 7 13 1 A 1 #12; BACE BFB T = (BA)(CE) (BF )B T = = 3 4 #1; #18

  14. Chemo-poro-elastic fracture mechanics of wellbore cement liners : the role of eigenstress and pore pressure on the risk of fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Thomas Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Between 2001 and 2010, United States natural gas wells have been drilled at a mean annual rate of 24,500. Moreover, an investigation in the Marcellus region revealed a 3.4% incidence rate of well-barrier leakages that were ...

  15. Coolside waste management research. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research is to produce sufficient information on the physical and chemical nature of Coolside waste to design and construct physically stable and environmentally safe landfills. This quarterly report consists of three monthly progress reports. The first is on an ongoing field test where additional data obtained during this reporting period support earlier results indicating that mineralogical transformations continue in the field lysimeters as a function of available moisture, aging and static loading of the Coolside materials. The second report presents results from an ongoing laboratory testing which support earlier data that mineralogical transformations cause swell in the FBC ash samples. The objectives of this part of study focuses on long-term changes in permeability of clay liners caused by water leaching through FGD- materials into compacted clay liners. The third report summarizes results from an ongoing investigation of the capacity of dry FGD wastes to absorb acidic gases. This work is part of a continuing effort to identify and evaluate potential commercial applications for FGD waste materials. Results from an investigation of CO{sub 2} absorption in which waste samples were evaluated in both hydrated- solid and aqueous-slurry forms were previously reported. In that study, emphasis was placed on the removal of CO{sub 2} from multi- component gas streams, particularly, natural-gas streams. The current probe is an expansion of the CO{sub 2} absorption study and includes results from testing of H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, NO, CH{sub 4}, and NO{sub 2} absorption. The relative affinity of the dry FGD wastes for the gases examined thus far was found to be SO{sub 2} > CO{sub 2} > H{sub 2}S. CH{sub 4} and NO are not absorbed and NO{sub 2} apparently decomposes on contact with surface water to NO and HNO{sub 3}.

  16. Smectite clay adsorbents of aflatoxin B1 to amend animal feed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kannewischer, Ines

    2009-05-15

    of the publications and papers that have been mentioned in the previous section refer frequently to a hydrated sodium calcium aluminium silicate (HSCAS) as a specific sorbent of AfB 1 . In some cases, bentonite is used to identify the mineral (e.g. Galvano et al...

  17. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01

    J-C. (2002) Geological and hydraulic characterization of thegeological, hydrogeological, geochemical, and geotechnical characterization

  18. Studies of crack dynamics in clay soil II. A physically based model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Heiko

    ; accepted 20 July 2004 Available online 23 August 2004 Abstract The temporal dynamics of soil structure are capable of treating water and solute transport within macro- pores and within the surrounding soil matrix, 1976; Gerke and van Genuchten, 1993; Jarvis, 1994). Assessing preferential flow requires information

  19. PROPERTIES OF HDPE/CLAY/WOOD NANOCOMPOSITES , C. M. Clemons 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as biodegradable reinforcing materials alternative for the use of glass or carbon fiber and inorganic fillers/natural fibers composites, especially wood plastic composites (WPC) which have successfully proven their high materials. Natural organic fibers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act

  20. A finite element analysis of the pullout capacity of suction caissons in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgardeli, Christina G. (Georgia-Chrysouli C.)

    2009-01-01

    Suction caissons are increasingly becoming the foundation of choice for offshore structures in deep water. They are used extensively in Tension Leg Platforms and provide the most efficient foundations for many offshore ...

  1. Three-dimensional mechanical behavior of kaolin clay with controlled microfabric using true triaxial testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    influence on the mechanical properties of soil, which makes the study of soil behavior to be a rather, (a) Flocculated, and (b) Dispersed Microfabric, (Penumadu, 1996) #12;problems in soil mechanics and formed the basis for several existing theories such as Critical State Soil Mechanics (Roscoe and Burland

  2. "Application of an anisotropic constitutive model for structured clay to seismic slope stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Kaynia, Amir; Dafalias, Yannis

    2011-01-01

    and critical state soil mechanics, Cambridge Universitylaw of critical state soil mechanics in conjunction with the

  3. Cyclic softening of low plasticity clay and its effect on seismic foundation performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Daniel B; Stewart, Jonathan P; Boulanger, R W; Lin, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    11th Int. Conf. Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering,solutions for soil and rock mechanics, John Wiley & Sons,

  4. Estimating Undrained Strength of Clays from Direct Shear Testing at Fast Displacement Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bro, Andrew D; Stewart, Jonathan P; Pradel, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    and Mesri, G. (1996) Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice,soil shearing near the edge of the tank. Bro (2007) discussed in greater detail the mechanics

  5. Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    code or Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number (where applicable), program source, and an award title descriptive of the purpose of each funding action; 3) the name and...

  6. Evalutaion of Multi-Stage Sandstone Acidizing Uging an Organic Mud Acid and a Clay Stabalizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakipour, Armin

    2013-05-29

    of the reactions involved in this process. These reactions result in potentially damaging precipitation and cause formation damage. The problem is more severe when dealing with Bandera sandstone formations that contain a high concentration of carbonate minerals...

  7. A prediction of meander migration based on large-scale flume tests in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namgyu

    2009-05-15

    Meander migration is a complex and dynamic process of the lateral movement of a river due to erosion on one bank and deposition on the opposite bank. As a result, the channel migrates in a lateral direction, which might be a major concern...

  8. PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH USING MODIFIED CAM CLAY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    -ash is a fine powdery silty material, produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. It shows specific to pozollanic hardening. In view of using fly-ash as a geo-material the studies on geotechnical properties as a state variable in the model. Using the yield surface and consolidation properties, the stable state

  9. Laboratory development of reconsolidation cycle for settlement analysis of precompressed clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Philip Norton

    1959-01-01

    NEE RS IN I'Av, I'~. t. THE COMMI TTEE OUT L I NEO I N THI S REPORT THE BAS I 0 PROBLEM OF CONSOLIDATION IT ALSO REPORTED ON ITS FINDINGS CONCERN I NG I'RESSURE D I STR I l3i31 i QN AND SET FORTH f FOR THE F I R s T I' I M E I N F N G L I s H r T E... MA- QN OF WHA? Ar TUA, L? OCCURS THE UL T, MA rE RESULT S a MORE ACCURArE SETTLEMENI J'RED Cr ON IN ORDER ?0 SUBSTANi JTE TH. S L NE OF REASON'. NG? SAMPLES , JERE OBTAINED F'RQM THE +QUIS ANA PlGHWAY PJEPART MENT. IHE SAMPLES WERE TAKEN WITH A F...

  10. Identification of Pore Structure and Clay Content from Seismic Data within an Argillaceous Sandstone Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schelstrate, Robert

    2014-08-11

    on the depositional environment. Increasing amounts of shale become a limiting factor in reservoir quality by creating baffles to fluid flow. Seismic inversion has been used to map reservoir properties such as lithology and porosity. Previous studies have established...

  11. Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-10-12

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy’s River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

  12. Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2012-02-24

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

  13. The sensitivity of rock mechanical properties to the method by which the clay volume is determined 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivey, Henry Alexander

    1986-01-01

    Relationship Poisson's ratio Shear modulus 2 0. 5(At /At ) - 1 s c (At /At ) -1 8 c &e e 1. 34x10 p /At s Young's modulus 2. 0xGx(1. 0+g) Bulk modulus 1 34~10 p I - x ] 10 2 At At c s Bulk Cb compressibility 1/K routinely measured until... s Poisson's ratio: . (2) w 1 - G 2 3xK . . (3) Young's modulus: E 2(1+v)G [ ] psi . . (4) Bulk compressibility: Cb ~ 1/K [ j psi . (5) When the three logging values, p , At , At , are directly measured, the c s elastic constants can be accurately...

  14. Derivation, Parameterization and Validation of a Sandy-Clay Material Model for Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    to design and fabricate personnel carriers with higher landmine-detonation survivability characteristics-mining equipment and personnel protection gear used in landmine clearing are expected to benefit from a better to blast loading including the role of target design and use of blast attenuation materials; (c

  15. Cyclic behaviour of monopile foundations for offshore wind turbines in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Ben Hong

    2015-06-09

    Investment into offshore wind farms has been growing to address the growing threat of climate change. The majority of offshore wind turbines (both current and planned) are founded on monopiles, large circular steel pipe piles ranging from 4.0 m – 7...

  16. Characterization of Soft Clays and the Response of Soil Foundation Systems for Offshore Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murali, Madhuri

    2015-06-01

    population and bring about the benefits of a diversified energy portfolio. The oceans are teeming with energy, whether it be the more established offshore oil and gas fields or the newer renewable sources such as tidal, wave and offshore wind...

  17. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A.; Dugan, Patrick R.

    1995-04-04

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  18. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Dugan, Patrick R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  19. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole VC-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    However, the range of ages obtained from illites in Permian sands and pebbles and from Precambrian crystalline rocks indicates that Valles hydrothermal activity is overwhelming...

  20. Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , industrial waste disposal, atmospheric deposition, and application of fertilizers and pesticides (1 and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, 147 Townsend Hall, Newark, Delaware 19717-1303, and Waste Management Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland The kinetics of mixed Ni

  1. Bearing capacity of spatially random soil: the undrained clay Prandtl problem revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    variant dans l'espace. Cette investiga- tion a pour but de deÂterminer les effets sur les statistiques de

  2. Ground source heat storage and thermo-physical response of soft clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxe, Shoshanna Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Ground source heat storage can condition buildings with reduced consumption of fossil fuels, an important issue in modem building design. However, seasonal heat storage can cause soil temperature fluctuations and possibly ...

  3. Inuence of rift obliquity on fault-population systematics: results of experimental clay models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifton, Amy Elizabeth

    University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8066, USA c ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, 3120 a power-law relationship. An exponential distribution best describes the data for whole faults

  4. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01

    BVE 98 inferred data BVE 100 Base model D 0ref model D 0refdata BVE99 inferred data BVE100 base model dispersivity =

  5. Salinity: effect on germination of native plants and leaching in clay soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neighbors, James Olen

    1974-01-01

    studies. NaC1 Solutions Osmotic Tension (bars) NaC1 g/1 CaC12 g/1 Conductivity (mmhos/cm) 3. 0 7. 0 10. 0 4. 0 10. 1 13. 5 6. 6 16. 0 NaC1 and CaC1 Mixed Salt Solutions 3. 00 7. 00 10. 00 2. 80 6. 44 9. 00 1. 40 3, 22 4. 50 6...-disulfide) to control pathogens. Treated seeds of each species were distributed evenly over 2 sheets of No. 3 [&hetman filter paper moistened with 5. 5 ml of the appropriate salinity solution in closed 9. 0 cm diameter Petri dishes. Germination tests were conducted...

  6. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Applied Clay Science Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : Synthesis and transformation of iron-based layered double hydroxides Article Type: Special Issue: Synthesis of dissolved species or by oxidation of hydroxilated FeII species. The synthesis routes are visualised of ferric oxyhydroxides such as goethite (FeOOH). hal-00524159,version1-7Oct2010 Author manuscript

  7. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleber, S.-C.

    2008-01-01

    no. 8 and the edge of the goethite particle mentioned aboveCluster of particles of a goethite dispersion in a capillaryedges and centers of the goethite and hematite particles

  8. Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    significant and tangible step to date, towards the construction of the first new nuclear power plant in the United States in over 30 years. DOE is confident that with NRG's...

  9. Clay minerals of recent marine sediments to the west of the Mississippi Delta 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Raymond Francis

    1958-01-01

    A Galveston groin was surveyed bimonthly from July 1991 through May 1992. Four transacts were established along one side of the groin. Four contiguous quadrats (QI-QIV), each 100 wide x 50 cm height, extended from the ...

  10. Demonstration of artificial visual percepts generated through thalamic microstimulation John S. Pezaris, and R. Clay Reid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, R. Clay

    Demonstration of artificial visual percepts generated through thalamic microstimulation John S.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Demonstration of artificial visual percepts generated through thalamic into the visual path, the hope is that an analogue of vision can be created. Research efforts in visual prostheses

  11. A study of the durability of lime as a stabilizing agent of clay soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Harvey Earl

    1958-01-01

    tested for their strength in a triaxLal testing 4ovioe, using lateral pressures of ths same order as those used bp the Texas Highwgr Seysrtsmnt (15), Thop mare tested for their Atterberg limits to asoertain if thep nero still ha- flienoad bp the lime... of thks factor Fox ths first ssi3. , tho yexeentagaxof kins used moxa too~ four& sirv eight, and ten, For the second soils the percentages vere tao, ~ and ton It uas shomn l8 the test of the first eamyle that the same information could be obtaLnek RF...

  12. Evaluation of Nonlinear Site Response of Soft Clay Using Centrifuge Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afacan, Kamil Bekir

    2014-01-01

    was placed atop the slurry. A geotextile was placed atop thewas lowered onto the surface of the geotextile. The purposethick Nevada sand layer and geotextile was to provide a seal

  13. Upper Bound Analysis of Bearing and Overturning Capacities of Shallow Foundations in Soft Clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartsfield, Randal James

    2013-12-03

    ................................................................................................................. 79 viii LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Mudmat foundation before installation (courtesy of confidential client) ........... 1 Figure 2. Mudamt foundation with two footings (Randolph et al, 2010) ......................... 2 Figure 3. Example... in one direction. Figure 2. Mudmat foundation with two footings (Randolph et al, 2010) There is extensive literature discussing methodologies for assessing the bearing capacity of mudmat foundations for the offshore environment...

  14. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    and spalling. Transient pore-pressure dissipation. Plasticstrength increase. Transient pore-pressure dissipation.of in situ stress and pore pressure. (Non-linear) elastic

  15. Cyclic softening of low plasticity clay and its effect on seismic foundation performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Daniel B; Stewart, Jonathan P; Boulanger, R W; Lin, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    A. W. ?1954?. “The pore-pressure coef?cients A and B. ” Geo-at a frequency of 1 Hz. Pore pressure was measured from thewe accepted the fact that pore pressure measurements during

  16. Coupled thermohydromechanical analysis of a heater test in unsaturated clay and fractured rock at Kamaishi Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01

    injection and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements inlevel measured with hydraulic fracturing (reproduced from

  17. Preferential nanoreinforcement of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers with dispersed nano-clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liff, Shawna M. (Shawna Marie)

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult for scientists to engineer elastomeric materials that are both strong and tough like spider dragline silk. Inspired by the morphology of spider dragline silk and motivated to develop strong, tough, elastomeric ...

  18. Behavior of 10 full-scale ground anchors installed in stiff clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, William Francis

    1993-01-01

    ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22. Contractual Arrangement for Research Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. Site Location Map 20 23 26 28 30 31 32 34 39 40 44 46 48 51 54 55 LIST OF FIGURES (cont. ) FIGURE PAGE 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32. 33 34 35...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical modeling of the Soultz-sous-Forêts Hot Dry Rocken géothermie profonde (Soultz-sous-Forêts, Bas Rhin,chemical modeling at the Soultz-sous-Forêts HDR reservoir (

  20. Journal of Hazardous Materials B136 (2006) 654662 Characterization of aqueous lead removal by phosphatic clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    2006-01-01

    September 2005; received in revised form 22 December 2005; accepted 22 December 2005 Available online 17 966 8592; fax: +1 306 966 8593. E-mail address: sas772@duke.usask.ca (S.P. Singh). able phosphatic

  1. Size dependence of microprobe dynamics during gelation of a discotic colloidal clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and are used as rheological modifiers in many applications, such as paints, drilling fluids, consumer products

  2. Adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of formaldehyde on a clay TiO2 composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibanova, Daria

    2014-01-01

    McIlyaine. Sources of formaldehyde, other aldehydes andlavage fluid due to formaldehyde inhalation. Int. Arch.Adsorption and PCO - formaldehyde Submitted to the Journal

  3. Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Suzanne E

    2005-01-01

    One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

  4. Measuring clay property variation and effects on ceramic pot filter performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Joshua (Joshua C.)

    2012-01-01

    Pure Home Water (PHW) is a non-profit organization in Ghana whose mission is to provide safe drinking water to Ghana's Northern Region - the poorest part of the country. Originally a distributor of ceramic pot filters ...

  5. Development of a Biomarker and Clay Based Remediation Strategy for Populations at Risk for Fumonisin Toxicosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Abraham

    2012-07-16

    F. nygamai FA1-3, FB1-5, FAK1, FBK1, FC1,4, FP1-3, PH1a-b 7200 530 140 F. dlamini FB1 82 NT NT F. napiforme FB1 480 NT NT F. pseudonygamai FB1-2 Tr Tr NT F. andiyazi FB1 Tr ND NT Section Elegans F. oxysporum FC1,3-4, N...-acetyl-FC1,iso-FC1, N-acetyl-iso-FC1, OH-FC1, N-acetyl-OH-FC1 NT NT NT F. oxysporum var. redolens FB1-3 300 6 0.9 Section Arthrosporiella F. polyphialidicum FB1 500 NT NT NT, not tested. Tr, trace amounts (1 to 4 ng g -1) were detected. ND...

  6. Characterization and Safety of Clays as Potential Dietary Supplements to Prevent Aflatoxicosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marroquin-Cardona, Alicia 1979-

    2011-05-10

    Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus fungi. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most toxic and is a potent carcinogen with antinutritional and immunosuppressive effects. Several natural outbreaks of poisoning...

  7. Safety and efficacy of NovaSil clay as a dietary supplement to prevent aflatoxicosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afriyie-Gyawu, Evans

    2006-04-12

    It is well documented that aflatoxin contamination in foods presents significant economic and public health burdens worldwide. Aflatoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), have been implicated in the etiology of disease and death in many parts...

  8. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow-Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore Tsotsis

    2010-01-08

    Arsenic (As) and Selenium (Se) are found in water in the form of oxyanions. Relatively high concentrations of As and Se have been reported both in power plant discharges, as well as, in fresh water supplies. The International Agency for Research on Cancer currently classifies As as a group 1 chemical, that is considered to be carcinogenic to humans. In Phase I of this project we studied the adsorption of As and Se by uncalcined and calcined layered double hydroxide (LDH). The focus of the present work is a systematic study of the adsorption of As and Se by conditioned LDH adsorbents. Conditioning the adsorbent significantly reduced the Mg and Al dissolution observed with uncalcined and calcined LDH. The adsorption rates and isotherms have been investigated in batch experiments using particles of four different particle size ranges. As(V) adsorption is shown to follow a Sips-type adsorption isotherm. The As(V) adsorption rate on conditioned LDH increases with decreasing adsorbent particle size; the adsorption capacity, on the other hand, is independent of the particle size. A homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) and a bi-disperse pore model (BPM) - the latter viewing the LDH particles as assemblages of microparticles and taking into account bulk diffusion in the intraparticle pore space, and surface diffusion within the microparticles themselves - were used to fit the experimental kinetic data. The HSDM estimated diffusivity values dependent on the particle size, whereas the BPM predicted an intracrystalline diffusivity, which is fairly invariant with particle size. The removal of As(V) on conditioned LDH adsorbents was also investigated in flow columns, where the impact of important solution and operational parameters such as influent As concentration, pH, sorbent particle size and flow rate were studied. An early breakthrough and saturation was observed at higher flow rates and at higher influent concentrations, whereas a decrease in the sorbent particle size and a decrease in influent pH resulted in an increase in the bed volumes treated at breakthrough. Both the HSDM and BPM were shown capable of predicting the column behavior.

  9. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON NICKEL SORPTION ON CLAY MINERAL AND OXIDE SURFACES. K. G. Scheckel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    chemical reaction processes [1]. For example, Ea values for gibbsite dissolution in various acid solu- tions ranged from 59 to 67 kJ mol-1 [2] while pesticide sorption on humic acid had an Ea value of 6.7 k

  10. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

  11. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    in nuclear waste disposal studies, tunnel construction, andin construction of an underground nuclear waste repository.waste disposal in such formations. The first construction

  12. Seismic Response of a Soft, High Plasticity, Diatomaceous Naturally Cemented Clay Deposit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera-Grunauer, Xavier F.

    2014-01-01

    Concept of overstrength in seismic design. Proceedings ofSite characterization and seismic zonation of Guayaquiland Baratau, J. (2003). Micro-seismic zonation and elastic

  13. Alternate stabilizers: solution towards reducing sulfate swell in expansive clay subgrades in Dallas district 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, Deepa

    1997-01-01

    The practice of using lime as a stabilizer during construction of pavements is widespread and is considered economical. However under certain conditions, the beneficial effects of lime stabilization is overridden. Proximity ...

  14. EVALUATION OF A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL FOR SOFT CLAY USING THE CENTRIFUGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, R.Y.K.; Tse, E.C.; Kuhn, M.R.; Mitchell, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    gravity field in the centrifuge is radial and the verticalADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL CENTRIFUGE MODELING A symposium onAdvances in Geotechnical Centrifuge Modeling was held on

  15. Evaluation of Nonlinear Site Response of Soft Clay Using Centrifuge Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afacan, Kamil Bekir

    2014-01-01

    spreading ground during centrifuge tests." J. Geotech.densesand in laminated centrifuge container." J. Geotech. &response in laminated centrifuge container." Proc. 1st

  16. Jurassic and Cretaceous clays of the northern and central North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    within North Sea sandstones is detrital in origin, the majority of workers have concluded flushing. Within sandstones, the earliest authigenic kaolin has a vermiform morphology, the distribution, and can degrade reservoir quality significantly. Both within sandstones and shales, there is an apparent

  17. Ground movements due to excavation in clay: physical and analytical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Sze Yue

    2010-11-16

    submitted in whole or part for consideration for any other degree, diploma or other qualification to this University or any other institution, except where cited specifically. This dissertation contains no more than 65,000 words, inclusive... measured in a triaxial apparatus with local strain measurement and by using bender elements to record seismic wave speeds. Results of the model tests including wall deformation profiles and ground movements for excavations with different excavation...

  18. Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, A. M

    2010-01-01

    factors as type, degree of crystallinty, and fineness of the used pozzolana in addition to the ESL-IC-10-10-09 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 curing conditions (4... for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 strength of the hardened specimens decreases with increasing waste material content in the mix. The continuous growth of the compressive strength is mainly due to the formation and accumulation...

  19. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York:Just Hot Resources

  20. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryof EnergyWASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy

  1. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015Verizon and VerizonCells: S. DEPARTMENT OF|

  2. Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015Verizon and VerizonCells: S. DEPARTMENTon

  3. Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7Responsibility, Committee onDepartment

  4. Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American Gas Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety Standards Implementation July 17,76Patterson -Written Remarks

  5. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItron (California)JointJosephine,

  6. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative ActivitySciTech ConnecttermsMimics

  7. Predicting Porosity in Clean and Clay-Ricj Sediments Using Resistivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2) surface: A(Technical Report) | SciTechSystemLogs:

  8. Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping new measuresEstimated |Women

  9. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6Fuel Oil andF2:3)GLADY

  10. The Development of Short and Long Term Continuous and Real Time In Situ Medical Pressure Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Polypohosphazene Fluoroelastomer for Denture Liners andPelseal PLV2040), a fluoroelastomer (vinylidene fluoride-

  11. Paper D-018, in: E.A. Foote and G.S. Durell (Conference Chairs), Remediation of Contaminated Sediments--2007. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (Savannah, Georgia;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    or excavated materials. Due to stability requirements, a geonet or other geotextile liner materials would

  12. Comprehensive experimental studies were conducted as part of this project in order to evaluate the unsaturated hydraulic and shear strength properties of Eagle Ford clay. The clay was subjected to cycles of wetting and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Comprehensive experimental studies were conducted as part of this project in order to evaluate conducted to evaluate the effect of soil placement conditions (i.e., soil conditions immediately after compaction operations). Project Summary Background Research Performed by: Center for Transportation Research

  13. L.C. SMITH COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    , an environmental chemistry and a microbiology laboratory, a geosynthetics laboratory, a geofoam research laboratoryL.C. SMITH COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE MASTER OF SCIENCE

  14. Paper No. 8.07 1 Design of Lightweight Fills for Road Embankments on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    geosynthetics (geofoams and geocombs), especially block-molded expanded polystyrene (EPS) geofoam, on highway contract. The use of EPS-block geofoam on the CA/T included the first-time implementation of newly) and expanded-shale aggregate (used in limited quantities). INTRODUCTION The C09C2 construction contract

  15. Validation of Discrete Framework for the Design of Fiber-Reinforced Soil and J. G. Zornberg2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    the performance under seismic conditions. GRI-18 Geosynthetics Research and Development in Progress #12;The designValidation of Discrete Framework for the Design of Fiber-Reinforced Soil C. Li1 and J. G. Zornberg2 conventionally designed using homogenized approaches. This has possibly compromised a rational basis for design

  16. Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineers are concerned with anything built on, in, or of the earth. These concerns involve both the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the seismic design of geosynthetic lined landfills being conducted at ASU combines our strengths in waste properties and seismic analysis and design. Geotechnical research at ASU also includes groundbreaking work the analysis and design of foundation systems, slope stability analysis, design and construction of earthworks

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    surveys, subsurface exploration, and weather data gathering in order to establish the threshold. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Geosynthetic-Reinforced Unbound Base Courses as reinforcement for unbound base courses. This implementation includes the use of the new testing device

  18. UV degradation of hdpe and pvc geomembranes in laboratory exposure So Paulo State University (UNESP) -Ilha Solteira (Brazil)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    University (UNESP) - Ilha Solteira (Brazil) Bueno, B.S. University of State of São Paulo (USP) at São Carlos (Brazil) Zornberg, J.G. University of Texas (UT) at Austin (USA) Keywords: UV degradation, weathering International Conference on Geosynthetics, Brazil, 2010 821 3 #12;were used like a guide: ASTM D638 (Standard

  19. GIGSA GeoAfrica 2009 Conference Cape Town 2 -5 September 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    with contrasting hydraulic conductivity (e.g. a fine-grained soil and a nonwoven geotextile). Finally, specific of the enhanced performance offered by the inclusion of nonwoven geotextiles at the base of the soil component (e.g., sand, gravel), or a porous geosynthetic (e.g., a nonwoven geotextile). Key

  20. ZORNBERG ADVANCES IN REINFORCED SOIL TECHNOLOGY Jorge G. Zornberg, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    involve the use of continuous geosynthetic inclusions such as geogrids and geotextiles. The acceptance products typically used as reinforcement elements are nonwoven geotextiles, woven geotextiles, geogrids SOIL TECHNOLOGY - 156 - A reduced scale geotextile-reinforced slope model built using dry sand