Sample records for geophysics planetary physics

  1. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics 1993 annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M. [eds.

    1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief papers on the research being conducted at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics in 1993 in Geosciences, High-Pressure sciences, and Astrophysics.

  2. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty members (from both UC and other institutions) on sabbatical leave. To focus attention on areas of topical interest i

  3. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. 2006 Annual Report Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics & Planetary Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    Yehuda Bock, Research Geodesist and Senior Lecturer Catherine Constable, Professor of Geophysics Steven Constable, Professor of Geophysics J. Peter Davis, Specialist Catherine de Groot-Hedlin, Project Scientist

  5. Planetary Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog »Physics PhysicsWeek »

  6. Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory - I 1 GLY 1101 Intro. to Physical Geology 4 GLY 2250 Evolution of the Earth 4 GLY 4705 Adv

  7. Geophysical evolution of planetary interiors and surfaces : Moon & Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Alexander Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interiors and surfaces of the terrestrial planetary bodies provide us a unique opportunity to gain insight into planetary evolution, particularly in the early stages subsequent to accretion. Both Mars and the Moon are ...

  8. Institute of geophysics and planetary physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.; Budwine, C.M. (eds.)

    1991-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on topics of high-pressure sciences, astrophysics, and geosciences. (LSP)

  9. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Labratory staff Providing Los Alamos National Laboratory programs with systematic infusion of new ideas, people, and contact with the larger university community Direct support...

  10. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and Novel ComputationalBecky OlignerJennaInstitute of

  11. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign InReactionResearch Center4nIGPPS

  12. Institute of Geophyics and Planetary Physics. Annual report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.J. [ed.

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside, and Irvine and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the six branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, high-pressure sciences, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and is structured around three research centers. The Center for Geosciences, headed by George Zandt and Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Center for High-Pressure Sciences, headed by William Nellis, sponsors research on the properties of planetary materials and on the synthesis and preparation of new materials using high-pressure processing.

  13. Planetary, Atmospheric, and Environmental Applications of Physics Frank Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    solar energy production Evaluating, forecasting, and managing suburb-scale distributed solar electricity of clouds on the production of solar energy. Most of my research is done in collaboration with other groups production My research applies physics to a range of problems in planetary, atmospheric, and environmental

  14. Z .Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 119 2000 2536 www.elsevier.comrlocaterpepi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Robert

    Z .Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 119 2000 25­36 www a Department of Earth and Planetary Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Uni?ersity, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo algorithms, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., this issue . q 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

  15. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: SpacePhysics RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    of the high-energy solar particles in interplanetary space. The method includes the determination , and I. G. Usoskin1,3 1 Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (Oulu Unit), University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 2 Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

  16. Internal geophysics (Physics of Earth's interior) Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internal geophysics (Physics of Earth's interior) Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension of momentum across the interface, a possibly anisotropic surface tension and terms including an inter- face equals the jump of pressure; and in the presence of surface tension defined as a capillary action due

  17. Brittle and Ductile Friction and the Physics of Tectonic Tremor 1. Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daub,Eric G.

    for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory 3. United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park 4Brittle and Ductile Friction and the Physics of Tectonic Tremor 1. Geophysics Group, Los Alamos

  18. Frontiers of the Physics of Dense Plasmas and Planetary Interiors: Experiment, Theory, Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortney, J J; Glenzer, S H; Koenig, M; Brambrink, E; Militzer, B; Saumon, D; Valencia, D

    2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. We examine several applications of this work. These include the structure of massive 'Super Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as our benchmark for giant planets. We are now in an era of dramatic improvement in our knowledge of the physics of materials at high density. For light elements, this theoretical and experimental work has many applications, including internal confinement fusion as well as the interiors of gas giant planets. For heavy elements, experiments on silicates and iron at high pressure are helping to better understand the Earth, as well as terrestrial planets as a class of objects. In particular, the discovery of rocky and gaseous planets in other planetary systems has opened our imaginations to planets not found in our own solar system. While the fields of experiments of matter at high densities, first principles calculations of equations of state (EOS), planetary science, and astronomy do progress independently of each other, it is important for there to be communication between fields. For instance, in the realm of planets, physicists can learn of key problems that exist in the area of planetary structure, and how advances in our understanding of input physics could shed new light in this area. Astronomers and planetary scientists can learn where breakthroughs in physics of materials under extreme conditions are occurring, and be ready to apply these findings within their fields.

  19. Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics & Planetary Physics S C R I P P S I N S T I T U T I O N O F O C E A N O G R A P H Y , U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I F O R N I A , S A N D I E G O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    the behavior of ice sheets, improved methods of ener- gy exploration, monitoring of carbon dioxide sequestration and so on. Our work spans a broad range of subject matter in geophysics and oceanography. A wide

  20. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, 1992. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M. [eds.

    1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on topics in the following areas: High-pressure sciences; astrophysics; and geosciences.

  1. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 160 (2007) 5159 Making sound inferences from geomagnetic sounding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    geomagnetic sounding Ashley E. Medin, Robert L. Parker, Steven Constable Green Institute of Geophysics

  2. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors xxx (2004) xxxxxx High pressure crystal chemistry of hydrous ringwoodite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Joseph R.

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors xxx (2004) xxx­xxx High pressure crystal chemistry of hydrous ringwoodite and water in the Earth's interior Joseph R. Smytha,, Christopher M. Holla, Daniel J November 2002; received in revised form 12 May 2003; accepted 18 August 2003 Abstract The crystal chemistry

  3. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 143144 (2004) 271278 High pressure crystal chemistry of hydrous ringwoodite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 143­144 (2004) 271­278 High pressure crystal chemistry of hydrous ringwoodite and water in the Earth's interior Joseph R. Smytha,, Christopher M. Holla, Daniel J November 2002; received in revised form 12 May 2003; accepted 18 August 2003 Abstract The crystal chemistry

  4. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 176 (2009) 143156 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Shijie

    's dynamic system. In this paper we review recent progresses in relevant fields and suggest that the EarthDirect Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/pepi Review has illustrated convincingly the whole-mantle nature of mantle convection, and the lower mantle origin

  5. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 153 (2005) 12 Studies of the Earth's Deep Interior--Eighth Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 153 (2005) 1­2 Editorial Studies of the Earth's Deep Interior--Eighth Symposium The Eighth Symposium on the Study of the Earth's Deep Interior (SEDI) was held. On this occasion attention was also turned to the deep interior of other planets as well as the Earth. To decipher

  6. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126 (2001) 93108 Rock-magnetic properties of TRM carrying baked and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126 (2001) 93108 Rock-magnetic properties of TRM produced large areas of thermally altered sedimentary rocks with large magnetic moments. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) intensities and low

  7. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 133 (2002) 127146 Palaeomagnetic study of Oligocene (2430 Ma) lava flows from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 133 (2002) 127­146 Palaeomagnetic study of Oligocene previously obtained radiometric dates to correlate the sections [J. Petrol. 39 (4) (1998) 711; Earth Planet the composi- tion and dynamics of the Earth's core directly, one indirect method is to study the Earth

  8. Research overview 2009 Department of Geophysics, belonging to the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    also planetary aspects. Research is tightly coupled with education at the bachelor, master and doctoral microearthquakes induced by drilling for oil. Preparations were also carried to join one new European project

  9. Research overview 2008 Department of Geophysics, belonging to the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    also planetary aspects. Research is tightly coupled with education at the bachelor, master and doctoral microearthquakes induced by drilling for oil. We were invited to join also three new European project proposals

  10. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  11. PHYSICAL STRUCTURE OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 3242 FROM THE HOT BUBBLE TO THE NEBULAR ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, Nieves; Guerrero, MartIn A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada 18008 (Spain); Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A., E-mail: nieves@iaa.es, E-mail: mar@iaa.es, E-mail: yhchu@astro.illinois.edu, E-mail: gruendl@astro.illinois.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One key feature of the interacting stellar winds model of the formation of planetary nebulae (PNe) is the presence of shock-heated stellar wind confined in the central cavities of PNe. This so-called hot bubble should be detectable in X-rays. Here we present XMM-Newton observations of NGC 3242, a multiple-shell PN whose shell morphology is consistent with the interacting stellar winds model. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected within its inner shell with a plasma temperature of {approx}2.35 x 10{sup 6} K and an intrinsic X-ray luminosity of {approx}2 x 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1} at the adopted distance of 0.55 kpc. The observed X-ray temperature and luminosity are in agreement with 'ad hoc' predictions of models including heat conduction. However, the chemical abundances of the X-ray-emitting plasma seem to imply little evaporation of cold material into the hot bubble, whereas the thermal pressure of the hot gas is unlikely to drive the nebular expansion as it is lower than that of the inner shell rim. These inconsistencies are compounded by the apparent large filling factor of the hot gas within the central cavity of NGC 3242.

  12. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  13. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  14. NANJING INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICAL PROSPECTING AND INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICS AND ENGINEERING J. Geophys. Eng. 1 (2004) 128133 PII: S1742-2132(04)76378-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ursin, Bjørn

    OF GEOPHYSICS AND ENGINEERING J. Geophys. Eng. 1 (2004) 128­133 PII: S1742-2132(04)76378-5 New travel

  15. Asteroseismic determination of the physical characteristics of the planetary system host HR\\,8799 ($\\lambda$ Bootis nature and age)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya, A; Barrado, D; Hernndez, A Garc\\'\\ia; Aberasturi, M; Montesinos, B; Aceituno, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HR\\,8799 is a $\\lambda$ Bootis, $\\gamma$ Doradus star hosting a planetary system and a debris disk with two rings. This makes this system a very interesting target for asteroseismic studies. In particular, this work is devoted to the determination of the internal metallicity of this star, linked with its $\\lambda$ Bootis nature, and its age, taking the advantage of its $\\gamma$ Doradus-type pulsations. To do so we have used the equilibrium code CESAM and the non-adiabatic pulsational code GraCo. We have applied the Frequency Ratio Method and the Time Dependent Convection theory to estimate the mode identification, the Brunt-Va\\"is\\"al\\"a frequency integral and the mode instability, making a selection of the possible models fulfilling all observational constraints. Using the position of the star in the HR diagram, the solar metallicity models is discarded. This result contradicts one of the main assumptions of the most accepted hypothesis explaining the $\\lambda$ Bootis nature, the accretion/diffusion of gas f...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - air force geophysics Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UCLA... Angeles Ph.D. in Geophysics and Space Physics 1997 National Taiwan University B.Sc. in Physics 1989... Employment History Jul. 2004 - present Associate Research...

  17. Planetary geography: a college course curriculum development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Greg Alan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consists of six units, including an introduction to physical geography and the solar system, a review of planetary morphologic processes, and units about the Moon, Mercury, Venus, and Mars. The introduction to the solar system provides basic information...

  18. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  19. Properties of Proto--Planetary Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Meixner

    2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This review describes some general properites of proto-planetary nebulae with particular emphasis on the recent work of morpholgical studies. The weight of observational evidence shows that proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) are most certainly axisymmetric like planetary nebulae. Recent work suggests two subclasses of PPNe optical morphology, DUst-Prominent Longitudinally-EXtended (DUPLEX) and Star-Obvious Low-level Elongated (SOLE). Radiative transfer models of an example DUPLEX PPN and SOLE PPN, presented here, support the interpretation that DUPLEX and SOLE are two physically distinct types of PPNe. The DUPLEX PPNe and SOLE PPNe may well be the precursors to bipolar and elliptical PNe, respectively.

  20. Cluster Dynamics of Planetary Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova; Victor S. L'vov

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of nonlinear atmospheric planetary waves is determined by a small number of independent wave clusters consisting of a few connected resonant triads. We classified the different types of connections between neighboring triads that determine the general dynamics of a cluster. Each connection type corresponds to substantially different scenarios of energy flux among the modes. The general approach can be applied directly to various mesoscopic systems with 3-mode interactions, encountered in hydrodynamics, astronomy, plasma physics, chemistry, medicine, etc.

  1. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  2. Geophysical Exploration (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas...

  3. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  4. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 18, doi:10.1002/jgra.50448, 2013 Characteristics of long recovery early VLF events observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Libya). The results indicate that the observation of long recovery events depends strongly on the modal, Université de Tunis El Manar I, Tunis, Tunisia. 5 Department of Physics, Sebha University, Sebha, Libya

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 77837797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiments are performed with the 21.4 kHz, 424 kW VLF transmitter NPM in Lualualei, Hawaii, and physical effects of the NPM transmissions are studied with a subionospherically propagating VLF probe signal but rather appear to be the result of scattering from extended lateral heating of the ionosphere by the NPM

  6. Planetary Nebulae Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenshaw, Michael

    layers develop deep convective zone, surface expands, mass loss due to stellar wind · Star moves from tip1 Planetary Nebulae · Detection · Distribution in the Galaxy · Central Stars · Evolution · Bipolar to dust) · Difficult to detect in radio (fainter than H II regions) · Projected number based on surveys

  7. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  8. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

  9. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Instituto del Gas y del Petroleo, Facultad de Ingenier?a UBA. ,. Facultad de ... hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production. Local variations in the fluid ... physical process of wave propagation can be inspected during the experiment. ..... Black-Oil simulator. CO2 saturation...

  10. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program . Description teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including...

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 18, PAGES 3545-3548, SEPTEMBER 15, 2001 A method for estimating 2D wrinkle ridge strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mege, Daniel

    on the central Columbia Plateau are a succession of thrusted anticlines thought to be analogs of planetary in the inner Solar Sys- tem [e.g., Watters, 1988], and the conclusion that developing a method for estimating Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 2001GL012934. 0094-8276/01/2001GL012934

  12. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 2530 Reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 25­30 Reservoir geophysics Wayne D. Pennington INTRODUCTION The concept of petroleum reservoir geophysics is relatively new. In the past industry and as major assets near abandonment, geophysics has increasingly been recognized as a tool

  13. Toward directed energy planetary defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earths orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of ...

  14. Planetary Microlensing Perturbations: True Planets or Binary Sources?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Scott Gaudi

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A planetary microlensing event is characterized by a short-lived perturbation to the standard Paczy\\'nski curve. Planetary perturbations typically last from a few hours to a day, and have maximum amplitudes, $\\dmax$, of $5-20%$ of the standard curve. There exist a subset of binary-source events that can reproduce these main features, and thus masquerade as planetary events. These events require a binary source with a small flux ratio, $\\epsil \\sim 10^{-2}-10^{-4}$, and a small impact parameter for the fainter source, $\\beta_2 \\lsim \\epsil / \\dmax$. The detection probability of events of this type is $\\sim \\beta_2$, and can be as high as $\\sim 30%$; this is comparable to planetary detection rates. Thus a sample of planetary-like perturbations could be seriously contaminated by binary-source events, and there exists the possibility that completely meaningless physical parameters would be derived for any given perturbation. Here I derive analytic expressions for a binary-source event in the extreme flux ratio limit, and use these to demonstrate the basic degeneracy between binary source and planet perturbations. I describe how the degeneracy can be broken by dense and accurate sampling of the perturbation, optical/infrared photometry, or spectroscopic measurements.

  15. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog »Physics Physics Print Because

  16. Stochastic resonance for exploration geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omerbashich, Mensur

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon in which signal to noise (SN) ratio gets improved by noise addition rather than removal as envisaged classically. SR was first claimed in climatology a few decades ago and then in other disciplines as well. The same as it is observed in natural systems, SR is used also for allowable SN enhancements at will. Here I report a proof of principle that SR can be useful in exploration geophysics. For this I perform high frequency GaussVanicek variance spectral analyses (GVSA) of model traces characterized by varying levels of complexity, completeness and pollution. This demonstration justifies all further research on SR in applied geophysics, as energy demands and depletion of reachable supplies potentially make SR vital in a near future.

  17. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A'Hearn, Michael F. - Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland at College Park Aalberts, Daniel P. - Department...

  18. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

  19. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of...

  20. A small RTG for future planetary missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockfield, R.D.; Kull, R.A. [Lockheed Martin Missiles Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design study was conducted to characterize conceptual designs for a small Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), one that might be suitable for future planetary missions. Conceptual design configurations were derived from the General Purpose Heat Source{emdash}RTG (GPHS-RTG), with the design goal of providing 70 watts of electrical power at the end of a ten year mission life. Design improvements for mass minimization were evaluated, considering also the technical risk of the corresponding engineering development required. It was concluded that an RTG mass of 18 kg could be achieved with moderate risk. Further studies are recommended to define in detail the testing and other development activities that would be required to bring the conceptual design for such an RTG to reality. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation. Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone...

  2. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced...

  3. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization DOE...

  4. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and Modeling Los AlamosAerosol.Physics

  5. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenter |Photoinduced2Zoe Martin'sPhysics Print

  6. Z .Global and Planetary Change 20 1999 93123 Global sea level rise and glacial isostatic adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    adjustment W.R. Peltier ) Department of Physics, Uniersity of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Z .rather recently Peltier and Tushingham, 1989 , it was not clearly;( )W.R. PeltierrGlobal and Planetary Change 20 1999 9312394 Z .existed at that time e.g., Peltier

  7. Geophysical investigations of certain Montana geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wideman, C.J. (Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte); Dye, L.; Halvorson, J.; McRae, M.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected hot springs areas of Montana have been investigated by a variety of geophysical techniques. Resistivity, gravity, seismic, and magnetic methods have been applied during investigations near the hot springs. Because the geology is extremely varied at the locations of the investigations, several geophysical techniques have usually been applied at each site.

  8. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437 SPRING 2014 OF NATURAL RESOURCES INCLUDING OIL, COAL, MINERALS AND GROUNDWATER. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF GEOPHYSICS MAY, IF AVAILABLE, WE WILL VISIT AN OIL DRILLING RIG IN OPERATION. DATES FOR FIELD TRIPS WILL DEPEND ON THE WEATHER

  9. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  10. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production, among other fields. Local of wave-induced fluid pressure gradients via a slow-wave diffusion process that can be analyzed using inexpensive and informative, allowing to inspect the physical process of wave propagation using alternative

  11. A LAGRANGIAN INTEGRATOR FOR PLANETARY ACCRETION AND DYNAMICS (LIPAD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levison, Harold F. [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Duncan, Martin J. [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Thommes, Edward, E-mail: hal@boulder.swri.edu [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first particle-based Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a large number of kilometer-sized planetesimals through the entire growth process of becoming planets. We refer to it as the Lagrangian Integrator for Planetary Accretion and Dynamics or LIPAD. LIPAD is built on top of SyMBA, which is a symplectic N-body integrator. In order to handle the very large number of planetesimals required by planet formation simulations, we introduce the concept of a tracer particle. Each tracer is intended to represent a large number of disk particles on roughly the same orbit and size as one another and is characterized by three numbers: the physical radius, the bulk density, and the total mass of the disk particles represented by the tracer. We developed statistical algorithms that follow the velocity and size evolution of the tracers due to close gravitational encounters and physical collisions with one another. The tracers mainly dynamically interact with the larger objects (planetary embryos) in the normal N-body way. LIPAD's greatest strength is that it can accurately model the wholesale redistribution of planetesimals due to gravitational interaction with the embryos, which has recently been shown to significantly affect the growth rate of planetary embryos. We verify the code via a comprehensive set of tests that compare our results with those of Eulerian and/or direct N-body codes.

  12. Charles University Prague Faculty of Mathematics and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Charles University Prague Faculty of Mathematics and Physics an abstract of the thesis submittedD. Department of Geophysics Faculty of Mathematics and Physics Charles University Prague V Holesovick´ach 2 180

  13. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?nite-element formulation (Smith. I975). handle any kind of waves in complex media but are limited mainly because nu- merical dispersion prevents them from

  14. The Roles of Discs for Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Chin Yeh; Ing-Guey Jiang

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the discs are detected for some of the extra-solar planetary systems. It is also likely that there was a disc mixing with planets and small bodies while our Solar System was forming. From our recent results, we conclude that the discs play two roles: the gravity makes planetary systems more chaotic and the drag makes planetary systems more resonant.

  15. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  16. New Indivisible Planetary Science Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present here a new, indivisible planetary science paradigm, a wholly self-consistent vision of the nature of matter in the Solar System, and dynamics and energy sources of planets. Massive-core planets formed by condensing and raining-out from within giant gaseous protoplanets at high pressures and high temperatures. Earth's complete condensation included a 300 Earth-mass gigantic gas/ice shell that compressed the rocky kernel to about 66% of Earth's present diameter. T-Tauri eruptions stripped the gases away from the inner planets and stripped a portion of Mercury's incompletely condensed protoplanet, and transported it to the region between Mars and Jupiter where it fused with in-falling oxidized condensate from the outer regions of the Solar System and formed the parent matter of ordinary chondrite meteorites, the main-Belt asteroids, and veneer for the inner planets, especially Mars. In response to decompression-driven planetary volume increases, cracks form to increase surface area and mountain ranges ...

  17. Bulgarian Geophysical Journal, 2006, Vol. 32 Geophysical Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    Geophysical Journal, 2006, Vol. 32 Thermal water is a source of renewable energy and its utilization distribution maps at three depth levels below the surface - 50, 100 and 150m and geothermal gradient map have been prepared and analyzed together with existing geophysical results of gravity, magnetic, electric

  18. The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicola Scafetta

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system, which since Pythagoras of Samos (ca. 570-495 BC) is known as the music of the spheres, is briefly reviewed from the Renaissance up to contemporary research. Copernicus' heliocentric model from 1543 suggested that the planets of our solar system form a kind of mutually ordered and quasi-synchronized system. From 1596 to 1619 Kepler formulated preliminary mathematical relations of approximate commensurabilities among the planets, which were later reformulated in the Titius-Bode rule (1766-1772) that successfully predicted the orbital position of Ceres and Uranus. Following the discovery of the ~11 yr sunspot cycle, in 1859 Wolf suggested that the observed solar variability could be approximately synchronized with the orbital movements of Venus, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Modern research have further confirmed that: (1) the planetary orbital periods can be approximately deduced from a simple system of resonant frequencies; (2) the solar system oscillates with a specific set of gravitational frequencies, and many of them (e.g. within the range between 3 yr and 100 yr) can be approximately constructed as harmonics of a base period of ~178.38 yr; (3) solar and climate records are also characterized by planetary harmonics from the monthly to the millennia time scales. This short review concludes with an emphasis on the contribution of the author's research on the empirical evidences and physical modeling of both solar and climate variability based on astronomical harmonics. The general conclusion is that the solar system works as a resonator characterized by a specific harmonic planetary structure that synchronizes also the Sun's activity and the Earth's climate.

  19. Instrumental Methods for Professional and Amateur Collaborations in Planetary Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, O; Beaulieu, J -P; Bouley, S; Carry, B; Colas, F; Klotz, A; Pellier, C; Petit, J -M; Rousselot, P; Dib, M Ali; Beisker, W; Birlan, M; Buil, C; Delsanti, A; Frappa, E; Hammel, H B; Levasseur-Regourd, A -C; Orton, G S; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Santerne, A; Tanga, P; Vaubaillon, J; Zanda, B; Baratoux, D; Boehm, T; Boudon, V; Bouquet, A; Buzzi, L; Dauvergne, J -L; Decock, A; Delcroix, M; Drossart, P; Esseiva, N; Fischer, G; Fletcher, L N; Foglia, S; Gomez-Forrellad, J M; Guarro-Flo, J; Herald, D; Kugel, F; Lebreton, J -P; Lecacheux, J; Leroy, A; Maquet, L; Masi, G; Maury, A; Meyer, F; Prez-Hoyos, S; Rajpurohit, A S; Rinner, C; Rogers, J H; Roques, F; Schmude,, R W; Sicardy, B; Tregon, B; Vanhuysse, M; Wesley, A; Widemann, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of Planetary Astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which collaborations between professional and amateur astronomers are effective and regularly lead to scientific publications. We discuss the instruments, detectors, softwares and methodologies typically used by amateur astronomers to collect the scientific data in the different domains of interest. Amateur contributions to the monitoring of planets and interplanetary matter, characterization of asteroids and comets, as well as the determination of the physical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects and exoplanets are discussed.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial geomagnetic field Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography,University of California at San Diego Collection: Geosciences 2 Annales Geophysicae, 23, 29692974, 2005...

  1. Design and development of the planetary pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Tchong Chin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE PLANETARY PUMP A Thes1s by TCHONG CHIN MAO Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas MM University fn partial fulf1llment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject...: Agricul tural Eng1neering DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE PLANETARY PUMP A Thesis by TCHONG CHIN MAO Approved as to style and content by: airman of Coam ttee ea of epartment Member August 1973 ABSTRACT Design and Development of the Planetary Pump...

  2. Spatial correlation structure estimation using geophysical and hydrogeological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Spatial correlation structure estimation using geophysical and hydrogeological data Susan S investigate the use of tomographic geophysical data in combination with hydrogeological data in the spatial of data having different support scales and spatial sampling windows was facilitated. Comparison

  3. Contribution of Geophysical Prospecting to Geohazard Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolich, Rinaldo [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Trieste, via Valerio 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical properties of the subsoil are studied using geophysical methods. These studies are always indirect, such as gravimetric, magnetometric, magnetotelluric or reflection-refraction seismic surveys and are often combined to obtain more accurate and reliable results. With these tools the oil industry commonly investigates the sedimentary basins to localize structures that may favor the accumulation of hydrocarbons. Above all, seismic prospecting allow the understanding of the underground geology, defining boundaries of the geological formations as well as mechanical and physical properties of the rocks. New cutting-edge techniques allow high quality data to be obtained in almost all geological contexts and make reflection seismic the most powerful tool in subsurface observations. The seismic method was utilized in geothermal resources investigation, research of water strategic resources, volcanic risks assessment, etc. The refraction method was the first to be used in the exploration of oil reservoirs. At present the industry employs mainly refraction seismics to study shallow formations. Conversely, university researchers have applied wide-angle reflection-refraction surveys to localize deep crustal interfaces analyzing the high amplitudes of the wide-angle reflections and the velocities obtained from the refracted signals. Moho discontinuity and velocity distribution within the crust were mapped out, indicating thickness and boundary conditions in different geological settings. The maps have been used in the analysis of geodynamical behavior and of active movements within the crust, useful for seismotectonic investigations. The further addition of the seismic reflection imaging, with deep penetration and long transects, completed multidisciplinary programs to unravel the structure of the crust with clear seismic images and models. High-resolution application of seismic has a central role in the identification and characterization of seismotectonic and seismogenetic zones and of the related capable faults. The earthquakes represent an important external risk for key constructions and nuclear power plants and capable faults cause near-surface displacements being considered to be the more critical for site safety. A close cooperation among geophysicists, geologists and seismologists is recommended in the hazards evaluation, alike in macrozoning for location of seismic sources and in microzoning for the measure of terrains mechanical properties and dynamic responses. Here I present and discuss the results of integrated multidisciplinary studies to unravel the peculiarity of the crustal structures and seismicity in Southern Tuscany, Italy.

  4. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hydrothermal alteration) - Geologic field work - OSU detailed mapping - Geophysics * Gravity - 1km grid collected * High resolution aeromagnetic - currently being collected *...

  5. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  6. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The Effects of Hard Spectra Solar Proton Events on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    to deposit their energy28 in the mesosphere and stratosphere. Therefore Solar Proton Events provide a directJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The Effects of Hard Spectra Solar Helsinki, Finland. (annika.seppala@fmi.fi) M. A. Clilverd, Physical Sciences Division (NERC), British

  7. Zinc abundances of planetary nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christina L; Dinerstein, Harriet L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625um for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the VLT. Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionisation correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10% or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be sub-solar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with Solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.

  8. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total

  9. INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH ADVANCED CONSTRAINED INVERSIONS by Peter George framework (i.e. minimization of an objective function). I developed several methods to reach this goal constraints to the inverse problem. Lastly, I developed an iterative procedure for cooperatively inverting

  10. Statistical Analysis of EXTREMES in GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilleland, Eric

    Statistical Analysis of EXTREMES in GEOPHYSICS Zwiers FW and Kharin VV. 1998. Changes in the extremes of the climate simulated by CCC GCM2 under CO2 dou- bling. J. Climate 11:2200­2222. http://www.ral.ucar.edu/staff/ericg/readinggroup.html #12;Outline · Some background on Extreme Value Statistics ­ Extremal Types Theorem ­ Max

  11. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: SpacePhysics RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the radar signal returns from various ground-based radar facilities. Finally, simulated backscattered of relativistic electrons, injected from a balloon, rocket, or spacecraft could be used for field line tracing on the ATLAS-1 mission [e.g., Burch et al., 1993] included a 6.25 keV electron beam of up to 1.2 A current

  12. Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the reservoir is based on much less corroborative evidence. Extensive use was made of computer plotting techniques to arrive at some interpretations.Both the stratigraphic...

  13. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: SpacePhysics RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ing electrons up to MeV energies via cyclotron resonant wave-particle interactions. There is evidence is that wave-particle interactions involving chorus can also result in significant losses due to the scattering studies of chorus-driven accel

  14. Geophysics of Chemical Heterogeneity in the Mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stixrude, Lars

    as a Review in Advance on March 8, 2012 The Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences is online at earth.annualreviews.org This article's doi: 10.1146/annurev.earth.36.031207.124244 Copyright c 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights is localized. The mantle below the surface boundary layer is the source of energy for and an active participant

  15. Hypervelocity impacts and the evolution of planetary surfaces and interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watters, Wesley Andrs, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis consists of five studies relating impact processes to the evolution of planetary interiors as well as impact structures on planetary surfaces. Chapter 2 is concerned with developing methods for estimating the ...

  16. Mission design for safe traverse of planetary hoppers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohanim, Babak, 1980-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary hoppers are a new class of vehicle being developed that will provide planetary surface mobility by reusing the landing platform and its actuators to propulsively ascend, translate, and descend to new landing ...

  17. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C.

  18. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2013 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  19. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2012 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  20. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2014 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  1. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the ongoing development of joint geophysical imaging methodologies for geothermal site characterization and demonstrate their potential in two regions: Krafla volcano and associated geothermal fields in ...

  2. advanced borehole geophysical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: and depth of penetration). Techniques used for...

  3. Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot...

  4. Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce...

  5. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Geothermal Prospecting Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Use of Geophysical Techniques...

  6. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and test combined geophysical techniques to characterize fluid flow, in relation to fracture orientations and fault distributions in a geothermal system. Average Overall Score:...

  7. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  8. NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration on Unleased State LandsLegal Published NA Year...

  9. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical...

  10. Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known Geothermal Resource Area, Rye Patch, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Dissertation: Geophysical...

  11. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto del Gas y del Petrleo, Facultad de Ingenie? a UBA ... Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics

  12. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Principal Investigator: Greg Newman, Michael Fehler Organizations: LBL & MIT Track Name April...

  13. Six Hot Topics in Planetary Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Jewitt

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Six hot topics in modern planetary astronomy are described: 1) lightcurves and densities of small bodies 2) colors of Kuiper belt objects and the distribution of the ultrared matter 3) spectroscopy and the crystallinity of ice in the outer Solar system 4) irregular satellites of the giant planets 5) the Main Belt Comets and 6) comets and meteor stream parents.

  14. 3D-Spectroscopy of extragalactic planetary nebulae as diagnostic probes for galaxy evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Kelz; Ana Monreal-Ibero; Martin M. Roth; Christer Sandin; Detlef Schoenberner; Matthias Steffen

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to study extragalactic stellar populations in their integrated light, the detailed analysis of individual resolved objects has become feasible, mainly for luminous giant stars and for extragalactic planetary nebulae (XPNe) in nearby galaxies. A recently started project at the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP), called ``XPN--Physics'', aims to verify if XPNe are useful probes to measure the chemical abundances of their parent stellar population. The project involves theoretical and observational work packages.

  15. Patricia Burchat Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osheroff, Douglas D.

    Patricia Burchat Department of Physics Stanford University Dark Matter, Dark Energy: Mysteries University Dark Matter, Dark Energy: Mysteries of the Universe Dark Energy 70% Dark Matter 26% Ordinary://janus.astro.umd.edu/javadir/orbits/ssv.html Planetary Motion Credit: The Astronomy Workshop A collection of interactive web-based programs

  16. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  17. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

  18. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  19. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  20. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics Graduate work in Geology are designed to provide you with an understanding of the fundamentals and principles of geology, geochemistry and Environmental Geochemistry Mineralogy/Petrology/Economic Geology Geophysics/Tectonics/Remote Sensing

  1. Planetary Microlensing: From Prediction to Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas James Rattenbury

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Four planets have recently been discovered by gravitational microlensing. The most recent of these discoveries is the lowest-mass planet known to exist around a normal star. The detection of planets in gravitational microlensing events was predicted over a decade ago. Microlensing is now a mature field of astrophysical research and the recent planet detections herald a new chapter in the hunt for low mass extra-solar planets. This paper reviews the basic theory of planetary microlensing, describes the experiments currently in operation for the detection and observation of microlensing events and compares the characteristics of the planetary systems found to date by microlensing. Some proposed schemes for improving the detection rate of planets via microlensing are also discussed.

  2. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors-581-7250) Faculty Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

  3. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2013-14 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

  4. Detailed Geophysical Fault Characterization in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore H. Asch; Donald Sweetkind; Bethany L. Burton; Erin L. Wallin

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Between the years 1951 and 1992, 659 underground nuclear tests took place in Yucca Flat; most were conducted in large, vertical excavations that penetrated alluvium and the underlying Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Radioactive and other potential chemical contaminants at the NTS are the subject of a long-term program of investigation and remediation by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, under its Environmental Restoration Program. As part of the program, the DOE seeks to assess the extent of contamination and to evaluate the potential risks to humans and the environment from byproducts of weapons testing. To accomplish this objective, the DOE Environmental Restoration Program is constructing and calibrating a ground-water flow model to predict hydrologic flow in Yucca Flat as part of an effort to quantify the subsurface hydrology of the Nevada Test Site. A necessary part of calibrating and evaluating a model of the flow system is an understanding of the location and characteristics of faults that may influence ground-water flow. In addition, knowledge of fault-zone architecture and physical properties is a fundamental component of the containment of the contamination from underground nuclear tests, should such testing ever resume at the Nevada Test Site. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a detailed understanding of the geometry and physical properties of fault zones in Yucca Flat. This study was designed to investigate faults in greater detail and to characterize fault geometry, the presence of fault splays, and the fault-zone width. Integrated geological and geophysical studies have been designed and implemented to work toward this goal. This report describes the geophysical surveys conducted near two drill holes in Yucca Flat, the data analyses performed, and the integrated interpretations developed from the suite of geophysical methodologies utilized in this investigation. Data collection for this activity started in the spring of 2005 and continued into 2006. A suite of electrical geophysical surveys were run in combination with ground magnetic surveys; these surveys resulted in high-resolution subsurface data that portray subsurface fault geometry at the two sites and have identified structures not readily apparent from surface geologic mapping, potential field geophysical data, or surface effects fracture maps.

  5. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J. [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Prototype Climate Modelling, NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Grooms, Ian, E-mail: grooms@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse spacetime superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for eddy-permitting mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  6. Geochemical Characterization Using Geophysical Data and Markov Chain Monte Carolo methods: A Case Study at the South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Murray, Chris; Roden, Eric; Majer, Ernest

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of field-scale geochemical parameters, such as extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III), influences microbial processes and thus the efficacy of bioremediation. Because traditional characterization of those parameters is invasive and laborious, it is rarely performed sufficiently at the field-scale. Since both geochemical and geophysical parameters often correlate to some common physical properties (such as lithofacies), we investigated the utility of tomographic radar attenuation data for improving estimation of geochemical parameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. The data used in this study included physical, geophysical, and geochemical measurements collected in and between several boreholes at the DOE South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site in Virginia. Results show that geophysical data, constrained by physical data, provided field-scale information about extractable Fe(II) and Fe(III) in a minimally invasive manner and with a resolution unparalleled by other geochemical characterization methods. This study presents our estimation framework for estimating Fe(II) and Fe(III), and its application to a specific site. Our hypothesis--that geochemical parameters and geophysical attributes can be linked through their mutual dependence on physical properties--should be applicable for estimating other geochemical parameters at other sites.

  7. Frontiers in Planetary and Stellar Magnetism through High-Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hwang, project co-PI Frontiers in Planetary and Stellar Magnetism through High-Performance Computing PI Name: Jonathan Aurnou PI Email: aurnou@ucla.edu Institution: University...

  8. Volatiles as a link between planetary interiors and the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Benjamin A. (Benjamin Alexander)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatiles derived from planetary interiors influence magma evolution and environmental processes. Over appropriate timescales, Earth's mantle, crust, ocean, and atmosphere constitute coupled systems. The apparently synchronous ...

  9. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical logging case history of the...

  10. airborne geophysical survey: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V; Vaalsta, Timo P; Li, Ju; Blair, David G 2011-01-01 12 A Virtual Excavation: Combining 3D Immersive Virtual Reality and Geophysical Surveying Computer Technologies and...

  11. airborne geophysical surveys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V; Vaalsta, Timo P; Li, Ju; Blair, David G 2011-01-01 12 A Virtual Excavation: Combining 3D Immersive Virtual Reality and Geophysical Surveying Computer Technologies and...

  12. Accepted to the Journal Geophysical Research Laboratory measurements of electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Accepted to the Journal Geophysical Research Laboratory measurements of electrical conductivities measurements of electrical conductivities of natural magma compositions. The electrical conductivities of three. The electrical conductivity increases with temperature and is higher in the order tephrite, phonotephrite

  13. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Authors Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace and T.L. Published Journal Geophysics, 21...

  14. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  15. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geothermal...

  16. Energetic neutral atoms at Mars 4. Imaging of planetary oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukyanov, Alex

    Energetic neutral atoms at Mars 4. Imaging of planetary oxygen S. Barabash and M. Holmstro of the Martian oxygen exosphere/corona results in the production of planetary oxygen ions. The newborn ions start. The oxygen ions can then charge exchange with the neutral gases (H, H2, and O) of the Martian exosphere

  17. The (In)Stability of Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rory Barnes; Thomas Quinn

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of numerical simulations which examine the dynamical stability of known planetary systems, a star with two or more planets. First we vary the initial conditions of each system based on observational data. We then determine regions of phase space which produce stable planetary configurations. For each system we perform 1000 ~1 million year integrations. We examine upsilon And, HD83443, GJ876, HD82943, 47UMa, HD168443, and the solar system (SS). We find that the resonant systems, 2 planets in a first order mean motion resonance, (HD82943 and GJ876) have very narrow zones of stability. The interacting systems, not in first order resonance, but able to perturb each other (upsilon And, 47UMa, and SS) have broad regions of stability. The separated systems, 2 planets beyond 10:1 resonance, (we only examine HD83443 and HD168443) are fully stable. Furthermore we find that the best fits to the interacting and resonant systems place them very close to unstable regions. The boundary in phase space between stability and instability depends strongly on the eccentricities, and (if applicable) the proximity of the system to perfect resonance. In addition to million year integrations, we also examined stability on ~100 million year timescales. For each system we ran ~10 long term simulations, and find that the Keplerian fits to these systems all contain configurations which may be regular on this timescale.

  18. Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

  19. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 62, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997); P. 14191431, 15 FIGS. Inversion of geophysical data over a copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    of geophysical data over a copper gold porphyry deposit: A case history for Mt. Milligan Douglas W. Oldenburg polarization (IP), and airborne electromagnetic (EM) data from the Mt. Milligan copper-gold porphyry de- posit

  20. Prudence in estimating coherence between planetary, solar and climate oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holm, Sverre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are claims that there is correlation between the speed of center of mass of the solar system and the global temperature anomaly. This is partly grounded in data analysis and partly in a priori expectations. The magnitude squared coherence function is the proper measure for testing such claims. It is not hard to produce high coherence estimates at periods around 15--22 and 50--60 years between these data sets. This is done in two independent ways, by wavelets and by a periodogram method. But does a coherence of high value mean that there is coherence of high significance? In order to investigate that, four different measures for significance are studied. Due to the periodic nature of the data, only Monte Carlo simulation based on a non-parametric random phase method is appropriate. None of the high values of coherence then turn out to be significant. Coupled with a lack of a physical mechanism that can connect these phenomena, the planetary hypothesis is therefore dismissed.

  1. APPLIED PHYSICS APPLIED PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    MSc APPLIED PHYSICS #12;MSc APPLIED PHYSICS This taught Masters course is based on the strong research in Applied Physics in the University's Department of Physics. The department has an impressive photonics and quantum optics, Physics and the Life Sciences, and solid state physics. The knowledge gained

  2. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

  3. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 113 (2014) Printed 10 November 2014 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) On the Stability of Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Anthony

    . Bloch3 1Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2Astronomy Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 3Mathematics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI). Many extra- solar planetary systems with Hot Jupiters (apparently) do not have an equilibrium state

  4. 871 The Meteoritical Society, 2009. Printed in USA. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 44, Nr 6, 871878 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    871 © The Meteoritical Society, 2009. Printed in USA. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 44, Nr 6, 871

  5. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale Vikranth scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical

  6. NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, HYDERABAD, INDIA. Induction Workshop: (18 -23 October, 2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    . 13. Open session · Venue:: National Geophysical Research Institute (An ISO 9001 Organisation in different sectors of the Himalaya. #12;· Venue:: National Geophysical Research Institute (An ISO 9001

  7. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data using Bayesian techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data velocity for hydraulic conductivity estimation at the South Oyster Site, using a Bayesian framework. Since site- specific relations between hydraulic conductivity and geophysical properties are often nonlinear

  8. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  9. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented documenting potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers.

  10. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt482

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    Kalscheuer2 and Jasper A. Vrugt3,4 1Applied and Environmental Geophysics Group, Faculty of Geosciences

  11. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Objectives of the project * Forward modeling geophysical response with fluid flowheat modeling * Joint inversion (stochasticdeterministic) for ground water flow imaging *...

  12. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships observed for unconsolidated sediments. Wateron unsaturated, unconsolidated sands. Geophysics 69:762-771.saturated and unsaturated unconsolidated samples (Vanhala

  13. airless planetary bodies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of space plasma near planetary bodies. Hear we provide a short review of recent low-energy ENA observations (up to 1 keV) near Mars, Venus and the Moon. Futaana, Yoshifumi...

  14. A unified vision and inertial navigation system for planetary hoppers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Theodore J., III (Theodore Joseph)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to hopping as a novel mode of planetary exploration. Hopping vehicles provide advantages over traditional surface exploration vehicles, such as wheeled rovers, by ...

  15. Tradespace model for planetary surface exploration hopping vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunio, Phillip M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic planetary surface exploration, which has greatly benefited humankind's scientific knowledge of the solar system, has to date been conducted by sedentary landers or by slow, terrain-limited rovers. However, there ...

  16. An Integrated Traverse Planner and Analysis Tool for Planetary Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Aaron William

    Future planetary explorations will require surface traverses of unprecedented frequency, length, and duration. As a result, there is need for exploration support tools to maximize productivity, scientific return, and safety. ...

  17. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  18. Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

  19. CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics Sonneggstrasse 5 of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 2008 - 2010 Postdoctoral Research Associate, Dept. of Geosciences, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich 2008 ­ 2010 Ph.D. student co-superviser: Andrea Colombi, Percy Galvez

  20. Classification of ISO SWS 01 spectra of proto-planetary nebulae: a search for precursors of planetary nebulae with [WR] central stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Szczerba; G. Stasi{?}ska; N. Si{}dmiak; S. K. G{}rny

    2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed ISO SWS 01 observations for 61 proto-planetary nebulae candidates and classified their spectra according to their dominant chemistry. On the basis of our classification and the more general classification of SWS 01 spectra by Kraemer et al. (2002) we discuss the connection between proto-planetary nebulae candidates and planetary nebulae, with emphasis on possible precursors of planetary nebulae with [WR] central stars.

  1. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  2. MICHAEL E. WYSESSION: CURRICULUM VITAE PRESENT POSITION: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Campus Box 1169;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysession, Michael E.

    -1986. DEGREES: Ph.D. (Geophysics), Northwestern U., 1991; Sc.B. (Geophysics), Brown U., 1984. RESEARCH INTERESTS, 2003-2004; Seismology Working Group, 2005-present. ESLI (Earth Science Literacy Initiative): Chair

  3. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  4. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  5. Radio Planetary Nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filipovi?, M D; Reid, W A; Payne, J L; Parker, Q A; Crawford, E J; Boji?i?, I S; De Horta, A Y; Hughes, A; Dickel, J; Stootman, F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the extragalactic radio-continuum detection of 15 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) from recent Australia Telescope Compact Array+Parkes mosaic surveys. These detections were supplemented by new and high resolution radio, optical and IR observations which helped to resolve the true nature of the objects. Four of the PNe are located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 11 are located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Based on Galactic PNe the expected radio flux densities at the distance of the LMC/SMC are up to ~2.5 mJy and ~2.0 mJy at 1.4 GHz, respectively. We find that one of our new radio PNe in the SMC has a flux density of 5.1 mJy at 1.4 GHz, several times higher than expected. We suggest that the most luminous radio PN in the SMC (N S68) may represent the upper limit to radio peak luminosity because it is ~3 times more luminous than NGC 7027, the most luminous known Galactic PN. We note that the optical diameters of these 15 MCs PNe vary from very small (~0.08 pc or ...

  6. Planetary systems and real planetary nebulae from planets destruction near white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bear, Ealeal

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that tidal destruction of Earth-like and icy planets near a white dwarf (WD) might lead to the formation of one or more low-mass planets in tight orbits around the WD. More massive planets contain hydrogen which will start burning on the surface of the WD and inflate an envelope, part of which be ejected to form a nebula. This nebula will be ionized and be observed as a planetary nebulae. The formation of the WD planetary system starts with a tidal break-up of icy or lower mass planets to planetesimals near their tidal radius of about 1Rsun. Internal stress forces keep the planetesimal from tidal break-up when their radius is less than about 100km. We suggest that the planetesimals then bind together to form new sub-Earth-like planets around the WD at a few solar radii. More massive planets that contain hydrogen will supply the WD with fresh nuclear fuel to reincarnate its stellar-giant phase. Some of the hydrogen will be inflated in a large envelope that will cause the planetesimal formed from the...

  7. Geophysical remote sensing of water reservoirs suitable for desalinization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Bonal, Nedra; Engler, Bruce Phillip

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many parts of the United States, as well as other regions of the world, competing demands for fresh water or water suitable for desalination are outstripping sustainable supplies. In these areas, new water supplies are necessary to sustain economic development and agricultural uses, as well as support expanding populations, particularly in the Southwestern United States. Increasing the supply of water will more than likely come through desalinization of water reservoirs that are not suitable for present use. Surface-deployed seismic and electromagnetic (EM) methods have the potential for addressing these critical issues within large volumes of an aquifer at a lower cost than drilling and sampling. However, for detailed analysis of the water quality, some sampling utilizing boreholes would be required with geophysical methods being employed to extrapolate these sampled results to non-sampled regions of the aquifer. The research in this report addresses using seismic and EM methods in two complimentary ways to aid in the identification of water reservoirs that are suitable for desalinization. The first method uses the seismic data to constrain the earth structure so that detailed EM modeling can estimate the pore water conductivity, and hence the salinity. The second method utilizes the coupling of seismic and EM waves through the seismo-electric (conversion of seismic energy to electrical energy) and the electro-seismic (conversion of electrical energy to seismic energy) to estimate the salinity of the target aquifer. Analytic 1D solutions to coupled pressure and electric wave propagation demonstrate the types of waves one expects when using a seismic or electric source. A 2D seismo-electric/electro-seismic is developed to demonstrate the coupled seismic and EM system. For finite-difference modeling, the seismic and EM wave propagation algorithms are on different spatial and temporal scales. We present a method to solve multiple, finite-difference physics problems that has application beyond the present use. A limited field experiment was conducted to assess the seismo-electric effect. Due to a variety of problems, the observation of the electric field due to a seismic source is not definitive.

  8. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT between pore fluid flow and the concurring deformation of the solid rock matrix. The governing equations and constitutive relations of fluid flow are coupled to stress-strain relations. With the appropriate boundary

  9. 2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics N.J. Balmforth1 and R.V. Craster2 1, London, SW7 2BZ, UK 2.1 Introduction Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is a vast subject that has several journals partly, or primarily, dedicated to its investigation (Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

  10. Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modication experiment at Troms, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modi®cation experiment at Tromsù, Norway N. F-9037, Tromsù, and The University Courses of Svalbard, Svalbard, Norway 3 EISCAT, N-9027 Ramfjùrdbotn, Norway Received: 13 October 1997 / Revised: 11 May 1998 / Accepted: 26 May 1998 Abstract. We present

  11. Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

  12. Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.

    Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Jordan, T. H., H. W. Menard, and D.K. Smith, Density and size distribution of seamounts in the eastern. Smith, H. W. Menard, J. A. Orcutt and T. H. Jordan, Seismic reflection site survey: correlation

  13. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2002) 9: 7578 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Society 2002 A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features type modes downstream of the Earth's bow shock were reported (Hubert et al., 1989). The dispersion

  14. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  15. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 201209 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of prediction of climate changes due to hu- man activity. All anthropogenic actions on the climate sys- tem Geophysical Society 2001 Climate model attractors: chaos, quasi-regularity and sensitivity to small, Russia Received: 6 July 2000 ­ Revised: 25 October 2000 ­ Accepted: 28 November 2000 Abstract

  16. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-11992, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , geological maps were focussed on solid geology. Present societal needs increasingly require knowledge of regolith properties: superficial studies combining geology, geochemistry and geophysics become essential km. This method provides maps of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) which are the only

  17. J. Geomag. Geoelectr., 45, 707728, 1993 Constraints on Mantle Electrical Conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    and Laboratory Measurements Steven Constable Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, La Jolla CA92093 electrical conductivity to temperature in mantle materials 707 #12;708 S. Constable supports further analysis

  18. Page:01-Nov-2013 1 ofCALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Chemistry Laboratory MRE Moore Laboratory NMD North Mudd Building of Geological Sciences NYS Noyes and Physics SMD South Mudd Building of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences SPL Spalding Laboratory of Chemical

  19. JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 54, 123303 (2013) A stochastic perturbation theory for non-autonomous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 54, 123303 (2013) A stochastic perturbation theory for non-autonomous order nonlinear non-autonomous stochastic ordinary differential equations that arise in climate physics be autonomous or non-autonomous (see Refs. 3 a)Present address: Institute of Theoretical Geophysics, Department

  20. Optimizing the Ptolemaic Model of Planetary and Solar Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushkin, Ilia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ptolemy-s planetary model is an ancient geocentric astronomical model, describing the observed motion of the Sun and the planets. Ptolemy accounted for the deviations of planetary orbits from perfect circles by introducing two small and equal shifts into his model. We show that Ptolemy-s choice of shifts allowed him to approximate the true eccentricity of planetary orbits only in the first order, linear in eccentricity. We show that, if the shifts were tuned in the ratio 5/3, the model precision could be improved substantially, perhaps delaying its rejection. The best achievable precision is quadratic in eccentricities. Although, to achieve it fully, one would have to introduce Ptolemaic shifts in the epicycles as well as in deferents the planets.

  1. History of geophysical studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysics Dept.

    1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of geophysical methods including the spectrum of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic and potential field techniques have supported characterization, monitoring and experimental studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The geophysical studies have provided significant understanding of the nature of site deformation, tectonics and stability. Geophysical methods have delineated possible brine reservoirs beneath the underground facility and have defined the disturbed rock zone that forms around underground excavations. The role of geophysics in the WIPP project has evolved with the project. The early uses were for site characterization to satisfy site selection criteria or factors. As the regulatory framework for WIPP grew since 1980, the geophysics program supported experimental and field programs such as Salado hydrogeology and underground room systems and excavations. In summary, the major types of issues that geophysical studies addressed for WIPP are: Site Characterization; Castile Brine Reservoirs; Rustler/Dewey Lake Hydrogeology; Salado Hydrogeology; and Excavation Effects. The nature of geophysics programs for WIPP has been to support investigation rather than being the principal investigation itself. The geophysics program has been used to define conceptual models (e.g., the Disturbed Rock Zone-DRZ) or to test conceptual models (e.g., high transmissivity zones in the Rustler Formation). The geophysics program primarily supported larger characterization and experimental programs. Funding was not available for the complete documentation and interpretation. Therefore, a great deal of the geophysics survey information resides in contractor reports.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aspherical planetary nebulae Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objects called planetary nebulae. M57 is located in Lyra, south of its brightest star Vega... ,300 light-years from Earth. It has a visual magnitude of 8.8. Planetary...

  3. Evaluation of multi-vehicle architectures for the exploration of planetary bodies in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alibay, Farah

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary exploration missions are becoming increasingly complex and expensive due to ever more ambitious scientific and technical goals. On the other hand, budgets in planetary science have suffered from dramatic cuts ...

  4. Mechanical alloying of Si and Ge in a planetary ball mill: Milling parameters and microscopic evolution of alloy formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilz, J.; Pixius, K.; Amend, W. [Institute of Materials Research, German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR), Linder Hoehe, 51147 Koehn (Germany); Plate, M.; Meyer, H. [Retsch Co., Rheinische Str. 36, 42781 Haan (Germany)

    1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The external parameters geometry and frequency of a planetary ball mill were adjusted in order to minimize the duration of mechanically induced Si-Ge alloy formation. Experimental results were compared with theoretical calculations on impact energies and milling power. It was found that a planetary ball mill with a ratio of the planetary to the system wheel`s frequency of {minus}3 delivers the best milling performance for vial sizes between 0.2 and 0.33 that of the system wheel size. Microstructural investigations on powder compacts revealed that a solid state diffusion mechanism of Ge into the harder Si seems to be the responsible process for realizing a homogeneous Si-Ge alloy. Crystallite sizes of the processed powders were 30 nm. The knowledge of the influence of external milling parameters on the comminution and alloying behavior of substances and the resulting internal structure of the processed ingots may help in a future correlation between thermoelectrical properties and microstructure. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Assistant Professor in Planetary Sciences The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Santa (tenure-track) level. Applicants' research should focus primarily on processes and bodies in this solar

  6. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

  7. Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

  8. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  9. Constraints on the formation mechanism of the planetary mass companion of 2MASS 1207334-393254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lodato; E. Delgado-Donate; C. J. Clarke

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss the nature and the possible formation scenarios of the companion of the brown dwarf 2MASS 1207334-393254. We initially discuss the basic physical properties of this object and conclude that, although from its absolute mass ($5M_{\\rm Jup}$), it is a planetary object, in terms of its mass ratio $q$ and of its separation $a$ with respect to the primary brown dwarf, it is consistent with the statistical properties of binaries with higher primary mass. We then explore the possible formation mechanism for this object. We show that the standard planet formation mechanism of core accretion is far too slow to form this object within 10 Myr, the observed age of the system. On the other hand, the alternative mechanism of gravitational instability (proposed both in the context of planet and of binary formation) may, in principle, work and form a system with the observed properties.

  10. Joshua P. Emery Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    and emission spectroscopy and spectrophotometry of primitive and icy bodies in the near- (0.8 to 5.0 m) and mid-infrared of organic material. As an observational planetary astronomer, I apply the techniques of reflection member, 2007 NASA Infrared Telescope Facility Time Allocation Committee, 2007 2009 Spitzer Space

  11. Ab initio theory of planetary materials Artem R. Oganov*, I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    ) density (r), and pressure (P) as a function of depth. Seismic tomography gives 3D-variations of seismicAb initio theory of planetary materials Artem R. Oganov*, I , G. David PriceII and Sandro Scandolo and Neptune), referring the reader to an excellent book [1] for more details. Internal structure For the Earth

  12. TRANSONIC HYDRODYNAMIC ESCAPE OF HYDROGEN FROM EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sterck, Hans

    . The model uses a two-dimensional energy depo- sition calculation instead of the single-layer heating planets is investigated using the model. The importance of hydrogen hydrodynamic escape for the longTRANSONIC HYDRODYNAMIC ESCAPE OF HYDROGEN FROM EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES Feng Tian,1, 2 Owen

  13. Calculation of Synthetic Ionizing Spectra for Planetary Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Rauch

    2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new grid (solar and halo abundance ratios) of state-of-the-art fully line-blanketed NLTE model atmospheres which covers the parameter range of central stars of planetary nebulae. The grid is available at the WWW.

  14. Constrained Inverse Volume Rendering for Planetary Nebulae Marcus Magnor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Inverse Volume Rendering I.4.m [Image Processing and Computer Vision]: Miscellaneous--Volumetric Modeling that we are observing 2D projections of 3D volumes of glowing gas, the actual spatial struc- ture of PNeConstrained Inverse Volume Rendering for Planetary Nebulae Marcus Magnor MPI Informatik, Germany

  15. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; source code (programs H-P)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving source code for potential-field geophysical programs (programs H-P) for VAX 7xx computers.

  16. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; source code (programs A-G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving the source code of potential-field geophysical programs (programs A-G) for VAX 7xx computers.

  17. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; source code (programs R-Y)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving source code for Potential-field geophysical programs (programs R-Y) for VAX 7xx computers.

  18. An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Abstract The results of...

  19. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32100 Modern Physics for Engineers Designation to one- electron atoms, atomic shell structure and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity. Prerequisites: Prereq.: Physics 20800 or equivalent, Math 20300 or 20900 (elective for Engineering students

  20. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 21900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 21900 Physics for Architecture Students Designation suggested material: Giancoli, Physics, Principles with Applications (6th ed.) (required), Prentice Hall Giancoli, Physics, Principles with Applications, Student Guide (6th ed.) (optional), Prentice Hall Course

  1. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 20300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 20300 General Physics Designation: Required Undergraduate Catalog description: For majors in the life sciences (biology, medicine, dentistry, psychology, physical therapy) and for liberal arts students. Fundamental ideas and laws of physics from mechanics to modern

  2. 1 Short-Term Advance Prediction of the San Simeon Earthquake ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya Zaliapin

    2004-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    1International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geophysics, Russian Ac. Sci.,. Moscow; 2Institute of Geophysics and Planetary...

  3. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, 2014GL060962R 2014, DOI:10.1029/, 1. Supplementary information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, 2014GL060962R 2014, DOI:10.1029/, 1. Supplementary information 1, 2014, 2:15pm #12;GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, 2014GL060962R 2014, DOI:10.1029/, (1) 72-day 60 S-60 N, 2014GL060962R 2014, DOI:10.1029/, climatological fluxes, generated from CERES data over the 2001

  4. MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM ACTIVE VOLCANIC Name: MAURI Guillaume Degree: PhD of Science Title of Thesis: Multi-scale analysis of multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data from active volcanic systems Examining Committee: Chair: Dr John Clague

  5. Geology and Geophysics: Building Partnerships Forging New Links and Strengthening Old Ones Builds a Stronger Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    , course-work tracks that equip students for roles in industry, geological engineering, oil and mineralGeology and Geophysics: Building Partnerships Forging New Links and Strengthening Old Ones Builds. The Geology and Geophysics Department at the University of Utah has a long history of successful partnerships

  6. AFFILIATIONS: Smith, minder, nugent, and Storelvmo--Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minder, Justin

    AFFILIATIONS: Smith, minder, nugent, and Storelvmo-- Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale Science, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Professor Ronald B. Smith, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 E-mail: ronald.smith

  7. Planetary systems based on a quantum-like model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T., N Poveda; C, N Y Buitrago

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary systems have their origin in the gravitational collapse of a cloud of gas and dust. Through a process of accretion, is formed a massive star and a disk of planetesimals orbiting the star. Using a formalism analogous to quantum mechanics (quantum-like model), the star-planetesimal system is described and the flow quantizing the gravitational field theoretical model parameters are obtained. Goodness of fit (chi-square) of the observed data with model quantum-like, to the solar system, satellites, exoplanets and protoplanetary disk around HL Tauri is determined. Shows that the radius, eccentricity, energy, angular momentum and orbital inclination of planetary objects formed take discrete values depending only on the mass star.

  8. Long-term planetary integration with individual time steps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasenjit Saha; Scott Tremaine

    1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an algorithm for long-term planetary orbit integrations, including the dominant post-Newtonian effects, that employs individual timesteps for each planet. The algorithm is symplectic and exhibits short-term errors that are $O(\\epsilon\\Omega^2\\tau^2)$ where $\\tau$ is the timestep, $\\Omega$ is a typical orbital frequency, and $\\epsilon\\ll1$ is a typical planetary mass in solar units. By a special starting procedure long-term errors over an integration interval $T$ can be reduced to $O(\\epsilon^2\\Omega^3\\tau^2T)$. A sample 0.8 Myr integration of the nine planets illustrates that Pluto can have a timestep more than 100 times Mercury's, without dominating the positional error. Our algorithm is applicable to other $N$-body systems.

  9. Chondrule Formation in Bow Shocks around Eccentric Planetary Embryos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Melissa A; Desch, Steven J; Athanassiadou, Themis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas & Pourmond (2011) have established that large (~ 3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules - millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites - were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow, and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere, with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body, and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rate...

  10. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non-uniform ambient noise on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. T. Nissen-Meyer, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. Olaf Schenk, Institute of Computational of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. 3 ISTEP, UMR 7193, UPMC Universite Paris 6

  11. Cosmogonic aspects of the evolution of planetary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stiller, H. (Deutsche Akademie der Wissenschaften, Forschungsbereich Geo- und Kosmoswissenschaften, Potsdam, East Germany); Moehlmann, D. (Deutsche Akademie der Wissenschaften, Zentralinstitut fuer Astrophysik, Potsdam, East Germany)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental approaches to the problem of the formation of planetary and satellite systems are considered. Emphasis is placed on the hetegony principle and its proposed generalization to a formation principle including the central body, and a restricted actualistic principle. Relevant characteristic parameters (i.e., energy levels of orbits, mass distribution in satellite systems, and angular momentum) for identifying the formation processes are examined, and possible future planetological tasks that should be undertaken in the foregoing framework are discussed.

  12. Solar System Processes Underlying Planetary Formation, Geodynamics, and the Georeactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Only three processes, operant during the formation of the Solar System, are responsible for the diversity of matter in the Solar System and are directly responsible for planetary internal-structures, including planetocentric nuclear fission reactors, and for dynamical processes, including and especially, geodynamics. These processes are: (i) Low-pressure, low-temperature condensation from solar matter in the remote reaches of the Solar System or in the interstellar medium; (ii) High-pressure, high-temperature condensation from solar matter associated with planetary-formation by raining out from the interiors of giant-gaseous protoplanets, and; (iii) Stripping of the primordial volatile components from the inner portion of the Solar System by super-intense solar wind associated with T-Tauri phase mass-ejections, presumably during the thermonuclear ignition of the Sun. As described herein, these processes lead logically, in a causally related manner, to a coherent vision of planetary formation with profound implications including, but not limited to, (a) Earth formation as a giant gaseous Jupiter-like planet with vast amounts of stored energy of protoplanetary compression in its rock-plus-alloy kernel; (b) Removal of approximately 300 Earth-masses of primordial gases from the Earth, which began Earth's decompression process, making available the stored energy of protoplanetary compression for driving geodynamic processes, which I have described by the new whole-Earth decompression dynamics and which is responsible for emplacing heat at the mantle-crust-interface at the base of the crust through the process I have described, called mantle decompression thermal-tsunami; and, (c)Uranium accumulations at the planetary centers capable of self-sustained nuclear fission chain reactions.

  13. Star-planet magnetic interaction and evaporation of planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanza, A F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stars interact with their close-in planets through radiation, gravitation, and magnetic fields. We investigate the energy input to a planetary atmosphere by reconnection between stellar and planetary magnetic fields and compare it to the energy input of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation field of the star. We quantify the power released by magnetic reconnection at the boundary of the planetary magnetosphere that is conveyed to the atmosphere by accelerated electrons. We introduce simple models to evaluate the energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons and the energy dissipated in the atmospheric layers in the polar regions of the planet upon which they impinge. A simple transonic isothermal wind flow along field lines is considered to estimate the increase in mass loss rate in comparison with a planet irradiated only by the EUV flux of its host star. We find that energetic electrons can reach levels down to column densities of 10^{23}-10^{25} m^{-2}, comparable with or deeper than EUV photons, and incr...

  14. @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major. From the basic laws of physics to the resulting emergent behavior, physics studies what the universe is made of and how it works. As a Physics major that surrounds us, to the structure and evolution of the entire universe. We offer three degrees in Physics

  15. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  16. User's manual for geophysical well-logging software programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G.M.; Gibson, D.; Blair, S.C.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1958 the Ground-Water Surveillance Program for the Hanford Site has made geophysical logging measurements in most of the 800 wells and deep boreholes that have been drilled on the Hanford Site. In 1980 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which conducts the Ground-Water Surveillance Program, began forming a computerized data base for storing and retrieving geophysical well log data and developing software for quantitative analysis of the well log data. This report, designed to serve as a user's guide, documents the data base system that handles the well log data. Two programs, DIGLOG1 and LOGIT, are used to manipulate the data. The program DIGLOG1 translates analog paper strip charts into digital format; the program LOGIT is a general utility program that edits, displays, checks, stores, writes, and deletes sets of well log data. These two programs do not provide sophisticated display and analytical capabilities; rather, they provide programs that give the user easy access to powerful standard analytical software.

  17. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  18. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-481, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E. [National Securities Technologies, Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  19. Lithium abundances in exoplanet host stars as test of planetary formation scenarii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; O. Richard; S. Vauclair

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the observations of Israelian et al. 2004, we compare different evolutionary models in order to study the lithium destruction processes and the planetary formation scenarii.

  20. Physical response of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems to local earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    : Heat flow (benthic) and hydrothermal processes; 3035 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Midocean ridge processes; 8135 Tectonophysics: Hydrothermal systems (8424). Received 23 January 2004; Revised 9 July 2004Physical response of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems to local earthquakes William S. D

  1. NOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate data available from NOAA's various climate observing systems as well as the output data from state range of solar, geophysical, environmental, and human dimensions data. As an example of dataNOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

  2. are exploring planet Earth is the part of earth science dealing with the physical processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    GeoKids are exploring planet Earth Geophysics is the part of earth science dealing with the physical processes and characteristics of the Earth and its environment. Volcanism, earthquakes of earth processes. Children are fully involved in measuring processes, data collection, analysis

  3. Reactor Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor Physics Reactor and nuclear physics is a key area of research at INL. Much of the research done in reactor physics can be separated into one of three categories:...

  4. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32300 Quantum Mechanics for Engineers Designation: required for Physics majors in the Applied Physics Option Undergraduate Catalog description: Basic experiments, wave: Physics 20700 and 20800, Math 39100 and Math 39200 Textbook and other suggested material: Scherrer

  5. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 42200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 42200 Biophysics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog and membranes. In depth study of the physical basis of selected systems including vision, nerve transmission. Prerequisites: Prereq.: 1 yr. of Math, 1 yr. of Physics (elective for Physics Majors and Biomedical Engineering

  6. Research overview 2007 Department of Geophysics, belonging to the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    aspects. Research is tightly coupled with education at the bachelor, master and doctoral levels. In 2007 and applied geophysicists (Schlumberger Cambridge Research), studying microearthquakes induced by oil drilling

  7. Research overview 2005 Department of Geophysics, belonging to the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    aspects. Research is tightly coupled with education at bachelor, master and doctoral levels. In 2005 Cambridge Research), studying microearthquakes induced by oil drilling. In 2005, we participated and prediction. Fruitful cooperation with several major oil companies, lasting since 1993, has continued in 2005

  8. Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,RockRipple, Indiana: EnergyRogersRogueBasin

  9. Proposed geologic model based on geophysical well logs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz C, S.; Puente C, I.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the subsurface based on a qualitative interpretation of well logs was carried out at Cerro Prieto to obtain information on the distribution of the different lithofacies that make up a deltaic depositional system. The sedimentological interpretation derived from the resistivity and spontaneous potential are shown in several cross-sections of the field. In addition to the sedimentological interpretation, a map of the structural geology of the region based on well logs and available geophysical information was prepared, including the results of gravity and seismic refraction surveys. The depth to the zone of hydrothermal alteration described by Elders (1980) was found by means of temperature, electrical, and radioactive logs. Two maps showing the configuration of the top of this anomaly show a clear correlation with the gravity anomalies found in the area.

  10. Geophysical investigation of the ``Thimble,`` 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the geophysical investigations conducted as part of the characterization of the buried ``Thimble`` site. The site is located just south of the 116-H-2 Crib and is in the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit. Available documentation has it located between, and at the convergence of, two railroad spurs that run north-south. A concrete monument is believed to mark the site. The burial ground is suspected of containing a vertical safety rod thimble that is reportedly 40 ft long. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other similar investigations on the Hanford Site. The objective of the investigation was to locate the buried thimble.

  11. Deterministic treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes a novel approach for the treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation. In this method, model error is treated as a deterministic process fully correlated in time. This allows for the derivation of the evolution equations for the relevant moments of the model error statistics required in data assimilation procedures, along with an approximation suitable for application to large numerical models typical of environmental science. In this contribution we first derive the equations for the model error dynamics in the general case, and then for the particular situation of parametric error. We show how this deterministic description of the model error can be incorporated in sequential and variational data assimilation procedures. A numerical comparison with standard methods is given using low-order dynamical systems, prototypes of atmospheric circulation, and a realistic soil model. The deterministic approach proves to be very competitive with only minor additional computational c...

  12. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

  13. Clean enough for industry? An airborne geophysical case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Beard, L.P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from two airborne geophysical surveys of the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were extremely valuable in deciding whether a 1000-acre (400 hectare) parcel of the ORR should be released to the City of Oak Ridge for industrial development. Our findings, based on electromagnetic and magnetic data, were incorporated in the federally mandated Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS), and in general supported claims that this land was never used as a hazardous waste disposal site. We estimated the amount of iron required to produce each anomaly using a simple dipole model. All anomalies with equivalent sources greater than approximately 1000 kg of iron were checked in the field, and the source of all but one identified as either a bridge, reinforced concrete debris, or a similarly benign object. Additionally, some smaller anomalies (equivalent sources of roughly 500 kg) have been checked; thus far, these also have innocuous sources. Airborne video proved invaluable in identifying logging equipment as the source of some of these anomalies. Geologic noise may account for some of the remaining anomalies. Naturally occurring accumulations of magnetic minerals in the soil on the ORR have been shown to produce anomalies which, at a sensor height of 30 m, are comparable to the anomaly produced by about 500 kg of iron. By comparison, the electronic noise of the magnetic gradiometer, 0.01--0.02 nT/m, is equivalent to only about 50--100 kg of iron at a 30 m sensor height. The electromagnetic data, combined with field mapping of karst structures, provided evidence of a northeast-southwest striking conduit spanning the parcel. The possible existence of a karst conduit led the EAS authors to conclude that this is a ``sensitive hydrologic setting.`` We conclude that aerial geophysics is an extremely cost-effective, and efficient technique for screening large tracts of land for environmental characterization.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SEVENTEENTH LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE CONFERENCE, PART 2 JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL, 92, NO. 84, PAGES 8447-E461, MARCH 30, 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, St. Louis, Missowi Concentrations of Co, Ni, Ir, and Au in small samples of submature and mature composition is also found in metal-rich, noritic impact melt breccias that occur as discrete rocks as well (0.4-0.570), i.e., no other source is lequird. The soil also contains l-2Vo carbonreous chondrite

  15. Proposal for a Planetary Geology and Geophysics Initiative on Lunar Drilling Shaopeng Huang, Dept. Geol. Sciences., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    and technology. As the Moon is the cornerstone for deep space exploration, lunar drilling will become technologies for lunar drilling is lagging behind deep space exploration strategy and planning. Compelling verification of those new conceptual models. · Borehole drilling is the only means of directly measuring

  16. Mission to the Trojan Asteroids: lessons learned during a JPL Planetary Science Summer School mission design exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diniega, Serina; Balcerski, Jeffrey; Carande, Bryce; Diaz-Silva, Ricardo A; Fraeman, Abigail A; Guzewich, Scott D; Hudson, Jennifer; Nahm, Amanda L; Potter-McIntyre, Sally; Route, Matthew; Urban, Kevin D; Vasisht, Soumya; Benneke, Bjoern; Gil, Stephanie; Livi, Roberto; Williams, Brian; Budney, Charles J; Lowes, Leslie L; 10.1016/j.pss.2012.11.011

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2013 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified a detailed investigation of the Trojan asteroids occupying Jupiter's L4 and L5 Lagrange points as a priority for future NASA missions. Observing these asteroids and measuring their physical characteristics and composition would aid in identification of their source and provide answers about their likely impact history and evolution, thus yielding information about the makeup and dynamics of the early Solar System. We present a conceptual design for a mission to the Jovian Trojan asteroids: the Trojan ASteroid Tour, Exploration, and Rendezvous (TASTER) mission, that is consistent with the NASA New Frontiers candidate mission recommended by the Decadal Survey and the final result of the 2011 NASA-JPL Planetary Science Summer School. Our proposed mission includes visits to two Trojans in the L4 population: a 500 km altitude fly-by of 1999 XS143, followed by a rendezvous with and detailed observations of 911 Agamemnon at orbital altitudes of 1000 - 100 km over ...

  17. in press Earth and Planetary Science Letters 1 FULL LENGTH ARTICLE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in press Earth and Planetary Science Letters 1 FULL LENGTH ARTICLE1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Mechanisms pincelli.hull@yale.edu46 #12;in press Earth and Planetary Science Letters 2 Abstract47 The interpretation shape, the correspondence in mixing extent61 between iridium and microfossils, and the fit of sediment

  18. Definition, Expansion and Screening of Architectures for Planetary Exploration Class Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Power Systems By Bryan K. Smith Submitted to the System Design, expansion and screening of Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Power concepts capable of achieving planetaryDefinition, Expansion and Screening of Architectures for Planetary Exploration Class Nuclear

  19. Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts V with short gamma ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The IPN localisation of short gamma ray bursts is limited to extended error

  20. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    and rare earth elements, in combination with grain size distribution data, from a set of core-top sedimentsEarth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252­263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Earth and Planetary Science Letters www.elsevier.com/locate/epsl Eolian dust input to the Subarctic

  1. Geophysical evidence of multiple glacier advances in Lago Fagnano (54 southernmost Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Geophysical evidence of multiple glacier advances in Lago Fagnano (54 S), southernmost Patagonia t The Island of Tierra del Fuego, at the southernmost extreme of Patagonia, is located in one of the most

  2. The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

  3. Geophysical Fault Mapping Using the Magnetic Method at Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Llano Uplift, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Antonio Do Nascimento

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic study over a 95 m x 150 m area of the Hickory sandstone aquifer in central Texas was carried out as part of multitechnique geophysical investigation that included ground penetrating radar (GPR), electromagnetic (EM), seismic...

  4. Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Beatrice Smith

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

  5. Reduced rank filtering in chaotic systems with application in geophysical sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahanin, Adel, 1977-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological advancements have enabled us to collect large volumes of geophysical noisy measurements that need to be combined with the model forecasts, which capture all of the known properties of the underlying ...

  6. Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical and petrological modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical; published 11 October 2011. [1] The electrical conductivity of mantle minerals is highly sensitive, and compositional variations. The bulk electrical conductivity model has been integrated into the software package

  7. The Dynamics of Tectonic Tremor Throughout the Seismic Cycle 1. Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daub,Eric G.

    Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory 3. United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park 4. DepartmentThe Dynamics of Tectonic Tremor Throughout the Seismic Cycle 1. Geophysics Group, Los Alamos

  8. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of another new branch of seismology recently developed in petroleum reservoir seismology is commonly known in the petroleum industry, differs from earlier

  9. A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilt, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rio Arriba Counties, New Mexico. Union Oil Internal ReportGoil Company of California, and Public Service Company of New Mexico,New Mexico. Private geophysical survey for Union Oil Co.

  10. A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilt, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil Company of California, and Public Service Company of New Mexico,Rio Arriba Counties, New Mexico. Union Oil Internal ReportGNew Mexico. Private geophysical survey for Union Oil Co.

  11. The frequency of planetary debris around young white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koester, Detlev; Farihi, Jay

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) We present the results of the first unbiased survey for metal pollution among H-atmosphere (DA) white dwarfs with cooling ages of 20-200 Myr and 17000K 0.8 Msun is found to be currently accreting, which suggests a large fraction are double-degenerate mergers, and the merger discs do not commonly reform large planetesimals or otherwise pollute the remnant. We reconfirm our previous finding that two white dwarf Hyads are currently accreting rocky debris. At least 27%, and possibly up to ~50%, of all white dwarfs with cooling ages 20-200 Myr are accreting planetary debris. At Teff > 23000K, the luminosity of white dwarfs is likely sufficient to vaporize circumstellar dust, and hence no stars with strong metal-pollution are found. However, planetesimal disruption events should occur in this cooling age and Teff range as well, and likely result in short phases of high mass transfer rates. It appears that the formation of rocky planetary material is common around 2-3 Msun late B- and A-type stars.

  12. Transient chaos and fractal structures in planetary feeding zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tams Kovcs; Zsolt Regly

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The circular restricted three body problem is investigated in the context of accretion and scattering processes. In our model a large number of identical non-interacting mass-less planetesimals are considered in planar case orbiting a star-planet system. This description allows us to investigate in dynamical systems approach the gravitational scattering and possible captures of the particles by the forming planetary embryo. Although the problem serves a large variety of complex motion, the results can be easily interpreted because of the low dimensionality of the phase space. We show that initial conditions define isolated regions of the disk, where accretion or escape of the planetesimals occur, these have, in fact, a fractal structure. The fractal geometry of these "basins" implies that the dynamics is very complex. Based on the calculated escape rates and escape times, it is also demonstrated that the planetary accretion rate is exponential for short times and follows a power-law for longer integration. A new numerical calculation of the maximum mass that a planet can reach (described by the expression of the isolation mass) is also derived.

  13. FORMATION OF PLANETARY CORES AT TYPE I MIGRATION TRAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandor, Zsolt; Dullemond, Cornelis P. [Max Planck Research Group, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: sandor@mpia.de [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the long-standing unsolved problems of planet formation is how solid bodies of a few decimeters in size can 'stick' to form large planetesimals. This is known as the 'meter-size barrier'. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that some form of 'particle trapping' must have played a role in overcoming the meter-size barrier. Particles can be trapped in long-lived local pressure maxima, such as those in anticyclonic vortices, zonal flows, or those believed to occur near ice lines or at dead zone boundaries. Such pressure traps are the ideal sites for the formation of planetesimals and small planetary embryos. Moreover, they likely produce large quantities of such bodies in a small region, making it likely that subsequent N-body evolution may lead to even larger planetary embryos. The goal of this Letter is to show that this indeed happens, and to study how efficient it is. In particular, we wish to find out if rocky/icy bodies as large as 10 M{sub +} can form within 1 Myr, since such bodies are the precursors of gas giant planets in the core accretion scenario.

  14. Partial Averaging Near a Resonance in Planetary Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nader Haghighipour

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the general numerical analysis of Melita and Woolfson (1996), I showed in a recent paper that a restricted, planar, circular planetary system consisting of Sun, Jupiter and Saturn would be captured in a near (2:1) resonance when one would allow for frictional dissipation due to interplanetary medium (Haghighipour, 1998). In order to analytically explain this resonance phenomenon, the method of partial averaging near a resonance was utilized and the dynamics of the first-order partially averaged system at resonance was studied. Although in this manner, the finding that resonance lock occurs for all initial relative positions of Jupiter and Saturn was confirmed, the first-order partially averaged system at resonance did not provide a complete picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the system and the similarity between the dynamical behavior of the averaged system and the main planetary system held only for short time intervals. To overcome these limitations, the method of partial averaging near a resonance is extended to the second order of perturbation in this paper and a complete picture of dynamical behavior of the system at resonance is presented. I show in this study that the dynamics of the second-order partially averaged system at resonance resembles the dynamical evolution of the main system during the resonance lock in general, and I present analytical explanations for the evolution of the orbital elements of the main system while captured in resonance.

  15. Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

  16. Frontier of the physics of dense plasmas and planetary interiors: experiments, theory, applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fortney, Jonathan J [UC SANTA CRUZ; Glenzer, Siegfried H [LLNL; Koenig, Michel [LULI (FRANCE); Brambrink, E [LULI(FRANCE); Militzer, Burkhard [UC BERKELEY; Valencia, Diana [HARVARD U

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter are reviewed, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. Several applications of this work are examined. These include the structure of massive 'super-Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as the benchmark for giant planets.

  17. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 35400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 35400 Electricity and Magnetism II Designation potentials and radiation, special relativity. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Prereq.: Physics 35300; pre- or coreq.: Math 39200 (required for Physics majors, except those in the Biomedical Option). Textbook

  18. Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    for mantle conductivity Steven Constable and Catherine Constable Institute of Geophysics and Planetary

  19. physics | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics physics Leads No leads are available at this time. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOxCeO2. Abstract: Pulsing 15N18O onto...

  20. Electroweak Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hollik

    2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on electroweak precision calculations and event generators for electroweak physics studies at current and future colliders is summarized.

  1. Cavity opening by a giant planet in a protoplanetary disc and effects on planetary migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Crida; A. Morbidelli

    2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a Jovian planet on the gas distribution of a protoplanetary disc, using a new numerical scheme that allows us to take into consideration the global evolution of the disc, down to an arbitrarily small inner physical radius. We find that Jovian planets do not open cavities in the inner part of the disc (i.e. interior to their orbits) unless (a) the inner physical edge of the disc is close to the planet's location or (b) the planet is much more massive than the disc. In all other cases the planet simply opens a gap in the gas density distribution, whose global profile is essentially unchanged relative to the one that it would have if the planet were absent. We recognize, though, that the dust distribution can be significantly different from the gas distribution and that dust cavities might be opened in some situations, even if the gas is still present in the inner part of the disc. Concerning the migration of the planet, we find that classical Type-II migration (with speed proportional to the viscosity of the disc) occurs only if the gap opened by the planet is deep and clean. If there is still a significant amount of gas in the gap, the migration of the planet is generally slower than the theoretical Type-II migration rate. In some situations, migration can be stopped or even reversed. We develop a simple model that reproduces satisfactorily the migration rate observed in the simulations, for a wide range of disc viscosities and planet masses and locations relative to the inner disc edge. Our results are relevant for extra-solar planetary systems, as they explain (a) why some hot Jupiters did not migrate all the way down to their parent stars and (b) why the outermost of a pair of resonant planets is typically the most massive one.

  2. Detection of the Water Reservoir in a Forming Planetary System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Brinch, Christian; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Blake, Geoffrey A; Dominik, Carsten; Lis, Dariusz C; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Panic, Olja; Pearson, John C; Kristensen, Lars; Yildiz, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Icy bodies may have delivered the oceans to the early Earth, yet little is known about water in the ice-dominated regions of extra-solar planet-forming disks. The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on-board the Herschel Space Observatory has detected emission from both spin isomers of cold water vapor from the disk around the young star TW Hydrae. This water vapor likely originates from ice-coated solids near the disk surface hinting at a water ice reservoir equivalent to several thousand Earth Oceans in mass. The water's ortho-to-para ratio falls well below that of Solar System comets, suggesting that comets contain heterogeneous ice mixtures collected across the entire solar nebula during the early stages of planetary birth.

  3. An atlas of synthetic line profiles of planetary nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Morisset; G. Stasinska

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a grid of photoionization models of spherical, elliptical and bipolar planetary nebulae. Assuming different velocity fields, we have computed line profiles corresponding to different orientations, slit sizes and positions. The atlas is meant both for didactic purposes and for the interpretation of data on real nebulae. As an application, we have shown that line profiles are often degenerate, and that recovering the geometry and velocity field from observations requires lines from ions with different masses and different ionization potentials. We have also shown that the empirical way to measure mass-weighted expansion velocities from observed line widths is reasonably accurate if considering the HWHM. For distant nebulae, entirely covered by the slit, the unknown geometry and orientation do not alter the measured velocities statistically. The atlas is freely accessible from internet. The Cloudy_3D suite and the associated VISNEB tool are available on request.

  4. Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

  5. Resource-Optimal Planning For An Autonomous Planetary Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Della Penna, Giuseppe; Magazzeni, Daniele; Mercorio, Fabio; 10.5121/ijaia.2010.1302

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous planetary vehicles, also known as rovers, are small autonomous vehicles equipped with a variety of sensors used to perform exploration and experiments on a planet's surface. Rovers work in a partially unknown environment, with narrow energy/time/movement constraints and, typically, small computational resources that limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling, thus they represent a great challenge in the field of autonomous vehicles. Indeed, formal models for such vehicles usually involve hybrid systems with nonlinear dynamics, which are difficult to handle by most of the current planning algorithms and tools. Therefore, when offline planning of the vehicle activities is required, for example for rovers that operate without a continuous Earth supervision, such planning is often performed on simplified models that are not completely realistic. In this paper we show how the UPMurphi model checking based planning tool can be used to generate resource-optimal plans to control the engine of ...

  6. REVIEWS OF GEOPHYSICS, SUPPLEMENT, PAGES 585-589, JULY 1995 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY A N D GEOPHYSICS 1991-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) [Kahler 1992], it was tempting to assume that the particle accel eration emphasized the presence of two accel eration mechanisms and prophetically suggested that particle abundances UNION OF GEODESY A N D GEOPHYSICS 1991-1994 Solar energetic particles: A paradigm shift Donald V. Reames

  7. Living Rev. Solar Phys., 5, (2008), 3 http://www.livingreviews.org/lrsp-2008-3 in solar physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Living Rev. Solar Phys., 5, (2008), 3 http://www.livingreviews.org/lrsp-2008-3 in solar physics L I V I N G REVIEWS A History of Solar Activity over Millennia Ilya G. Usoskin Sodankyl¨a Geophysical here is a review of present knowledge of the long-term behavior of solar activity on a multi

  8. SP-100 planetary mission/system preliminary design study. Final report, technical information report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.M. [ed.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a discussion on many aspects of a nuclear electric propulsion planetary science mission and spacecraft using the proposed SP-100 nuclear power subsystem. A review of the science rationale for such missions is included. A summary of eleven nuclear electric propulsion planetary missions is presented. A conceptual science payload, mission design, and spacecraft design is included for the Saturn Ring Rendezvous mission. Spacecraft and mission costs have been estimated for two potential sequences of nuclear electric propulsion planetary missions. The integration issues and requirements on the proposed SP-100 power subsystems are identified.

  9. Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ond?ej rmek; William F. McDonough; Edwin S. Kite; Vedran Leki?; Steve Dye; Shijie Zhong

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the amount and distribution of radiogenic heating in the mantle is crucial for understanding the dynamics of the Earth, including its thermal evolution, the style and planform of mantle convection, and the energetics of the core. Although the flux of heat from the surface of the planet is robustly estimated, the contributions of radiogenic heating and secular cooling remain poorly defined. Constraining the amount of heat-producing elements in the Earth will provide clues to understanding nebula condensation and planetary formation processes in early Solar System. Mantle radioactivity supplies power for mantle convection and plate tectonics, but estimates of mantle radiogenic heat production vary by a factor of more than 20. Recent experimental results demonstrate the potential for direct assessment of mantle radioactivity through observations of geoneutrinos, which are emitted by naturally occurring radionuclides. Predictions of the geoneutrino signal from the mantle exist for several established estimates of mantle composition. Here we present novel analyses, illustrating surface variations of the mantle geoneutrino signal for models of the deep mantle structure, including those based on seismic tomography. These variations have measurable differences for some models, allowing new and meaningful constraints on the dynamics of the planet. An ocean based geoneutrino detector deployed at several strategic locations will be able to discriminate between competing compositional models of the bulk silicate Earth.

  10. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 30. NO. 10, 10.1029/2003GL038308, 2003 A 3-D geodynamic model of lateral crustal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mian

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 30. NO. 10, 10.1029/2003GL038308, 2003 A 3-D geodynamic model 2003 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 2003GL018308. 0094-8762/2003GL018308 This volume

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbine Planetary Gears Using an Extended Harmonic Balance Approach: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Parker, R. G.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of wind turbine planetary gears with gravity effects are investigated using an extended harmonic balance method that extends established harmonic balance formulations to include simultaneous internal and external excitations. The extended harmonic balance method with arc-length continuation and Floquet theory is applied to a lumped-parameter planetary gear model including gravity, fluctuating mesh stiffness, bearing clearance, and nonlinear tooth contact to obtain the planetary gear dynamic response. The calculated responses compare well with time domain integrated mathematical models and experimental results. Gravity is a fundamental vibration source in wind turbine planetary gears and plays an important role in system dynamics, causing hardening effects induced by tooth wedging and bearing-raceway contacts. Bearing clearance significantly reduces the lowest resonant frequencies of translational modes. Gravity and bearing clearance together lowers the speed at which tooth wedging occurs lower than the resonant frequency.

  12. Reconfigurable wheels : re-inventing the wheel for the next generation of planetary rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Brittany, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiences with Spirit and Opportunity, the twin Mars Exploration Rovers, showed that one of the major issues that needs to be addressed in order to expand the exploration capabilities of planetary rovers is that of wheel ...

  13. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 38, Nr 6, 871885 (2003) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Meteoritics & Planetary Science 38, Nr 6, 871­885 (2003) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org 871 © Meteoritical Society, 2003. Printed in USA. Searching for the source regions of martian

  14. Development of a mechanical counter pressure Bio-Suit System for planetary exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Zhe Liang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is critical for human spaceflight and particularly for human planetary exploration. The MIT Man Vehicle Laboratory is developing a Bio-Suit EVA System, based on mechanical counterpressure ...

  15. he Earth and Planetary Sciences section of the Platinum Jubilee volume contains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    -Tibet region and the Bay of Bengal, along with crustal structure inverted from receiver functions to create to the Moon, Mars, as well as comets and asteroids. As in the case of planetary exploration, recent advances

  16. Localization instability and the origin of regularly-spaced faults in planetary lithospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montsi, Laurent Gilbert Joseph, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brittle deformation is not distributed uniformly in planetary lithospheres but is instead localized on faults and ductile shear zones. In some regions such as the Central Indian Basin or martian ridged plains, localized ...

  17. Physics Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as Institute of Physics Fellow January 18, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 18, 2011-Alan Bishop, Los Alamos National Laboratory's associate director for theory, simulation,...

  18. Department of Geology and Geophysics-Frederick A. Sutton Building 115 South 1460 East, Room 383, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Department of Geology and Geophysics- Frederick A. Sutton Building to The University of Utah Department of Geology and Geophysics Donor's Information, to the Department of Geology and Geophysics of the University of Utah as an unrestricted gift. Fill out and sign

  19. Geophysical characterization of mineral and energy resources at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenheim, V.E.; Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hoover, D.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Yucca Mountain Project (Department of Energy) as part of the study of the mineral and energy resource potential of the site (Activity 8.3.1.9.2.1.5) under the Human Interference part of the program. Most of the 1991 geophysical scoping activities in the Mineral Resources Study were involved with the acquisition and evaluation of existing data. This report presents an overview of how geophysical data (existing and planned) will aid in the evaluation of the potential for mineral and energy resource potential at Yucca Mountain and vicinity.

  20. Physics & Astronomy Degree options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    148 Physics & Astronomy Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics MPhys (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics Theoretical Physics BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Physics) Theoretical Physics and Mathematics MSci (Joint Honours Degree) Physics and Chemistry Entrance Requirements

  1. Refined Properties of the HD 130322 Planetary System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkel, Natalie R; Henry, Gregory W; Feng, Y Katherina; Boyajian, Tabetha; Wright, Jason; Fischer, Debra A; Howard, Andrew W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exoplanetary systems closest to the Sun, with the brightest host stars, provide the most favorable opportunities for characterization studies of the host star and their planet(s). The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey uses both new radial velocity measurements and photometry in order to greatly improve planetary orbit uncertainties and the fundamental properties of the star, in this case HD 130322. The only companion, HD 130322b, orbits in a relatively circular orbit, e = 0.029 every ~10.7 days. Radial velocity measurements from multiple sources, including 12 unpublished from the Keck I telescope, over the course of ~14 years have reduced the uncertainty in the transit midpoint to ~2 hours. The transit probability for the b-companion is 4.7%, where M_p sin i = 1.15 M_J and a = 0.0925 AU. In this paper, we compile photometric data from the T11 0.8m Automated Photoelectric Telescope at Fairborn Observatory taken over ~14 years, including the constrained transit window, which results in a dispos...

  2. Oxygen enrichment in carbon-rich planetary nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Inglada, Gloria; Peimbert, Manuel; Stasi?ska, Gra?yna; Morisset, Christophe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between the chemical composition and the type of dust present in a group of 20 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) that have high quality optical and infrared spectra. The optical spectra are used, together with the best available ionization correction factors, to calculate the abundances of Ar, C, Cl, He, N, Ne, and O relative to H. The infrared spectra are used to classify the PNe in two groups depending on whether the observed dust features are representative of oxygen-rich or carbon-rich environments. The sample contains one object from the halo, eight from the bulge, and eleven from the local disc. We compare their chemical abundances with nucleosynthesis model predictions and with the ones obtained in seven Galactic H II regions of the solar neighbourhood. We find evidence of O enrichment (by $\\sim$ 0.3 dex) in all but one of the PNe with carbon-rich dust (CRD). Our analysis shows that Ar, and especially Cl, are the best metallicity indicators of the progenitors of PNe. There is a tig...

  3. VISCOSITY IN PLANETARY RINGS WITH SPINNING SELF-GRAVITATING PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Daisaka, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Commerce and Management, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo 186-8601 (Japan)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using local N-body simulation, we examine viscosity in self-gravitating planetary rings. We investigate the dependence of viscosity on various parameters in detail, including the effects of particle surface friction. In the case of self-gravitating rings with low optical depth, viscosity is determined by particle random velocity. Inclusion of surface friction slightly reduces both random velocity and viscosity when particle random velocity is determined by inelastic collisions, while surface friction slightly increases viscosity when gravitational encounters play a major role in particle velocity evolution, so that viscous heating balances with increased energy dissipation at collisions due to surface friction. We find that including surface friction changes viscosity in dilute rings up to a factor of about two. In the case of self-gravitating dense rings, viscosity is significantly increased due to the effects of gravitational wakes, and we find that varying restitution coefficients also change viscosity in such dense rings by a factor of about two. We confirm that our numerical results for viscosity in dense rings with gravitational wakes can be well approximated by a semianalytic expression that is consistent with a previously obtained formula. However, we find that this formula seems to overestimate viscosity in dense rings far from the central planet, where temporary gravitational aggregates form. We derive semianalytic expressions that reproduce our numerical results well for the entire range of examined parameters.

  4. Planetary Nebulae Principles & Paradigms: Binaries, Accretion, Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Blackman; Jason T. Nordhaus

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations suggest that many, if not all, post AGB systems evolve through an aspherical outflow phase. Such outflows require a sufficient engine rotational energy which binaries can provide. Via common envelope evolution, binaries can directly eject equatorial outflows or produce poloidal outflows from magnetized accretion disks around the primary or secondary. We discuss how accretion driven magnetohydrodynamic outflow models all make similar predictions for the outflow power and speed and we distinguish between the launch vs. propagation regimes of such outflows. We suggest that the high velocity bipolar outflows observed in planetary nebulae (PNe) and the lower velocity but higher power bipolar outflows observed in pre-PNe (pPNe) are kinematically consistent with time dependent accretion onto a white dwarf (WD) within a depleting envelope. Since the WD primary core is always present in all post-AGB systems, accretion onto this core is potentially common. Previous work has focused on core accretion from sub-stellar companions, but low mass stellar companions may be more important, and further work is needed.

  5. The formation of planetary disks and winds: an ultraviolet view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana I. Gomez de Castro

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary systems are angular momentum reservoirs generated during star formation. This accretion process produces very powerful engines able to drive the optical jets and the molecular outflows. A fraction of the engine energy is released into heating thus the temperature of the engine ranges from the 3000K of the inner disk material to the 10MK in the areas where magnetic reconnection occurs. There are important unsolved problems concerning the nature of the engine, its evolution and the impact of the engine in the chemical evolution of the inner disk. Of special relevance is the understanding of the shear layer between the stellar photosphere and the disk; this layer controls a significant fraction of the magnetic field building up and the subsequent dissipative processes ougth to be studied in the UV. This contribution focus on describing the connections between 1 Myr old suns and the Sun and the requirements for new UV instrumentation to address their evolution during this period. Two types of observations are shown to be needed: monitoring programmes and high resolution imaging down to, at least, milliarsecond scales.

  6. Age determination of the HR8799 planetary system using asteroseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya, A; Barrado, D; Hernndez, A Garca; Aberasturi, M; Montesinos, B; Aceituno, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovery of the first planetary system by direct imaging around HR8799 has made the age determination of the host star a very important task. This determination is the key to derive accurate masses of the planets and to study the dynamical stability of the system. The age of this star has been estimated using different procedures. In this work we show that some of these procedures have problems and large uncertainties, and the real age of this star is still unknown, needing more observational constraints. Therefore, we have developed a comprehensive modeling of HR8799, and taking advantage of its gamma Doradus-type pulsations, we have estimated the age of the star using asteroseismology. The accuracy in the age determination depends on the rotation velocity of the star, and therefore an accurate value of the inclination angle is required to solve the problem. Nevertheless, we find that the age estimate for this star previously published in the literature ([30,160] Myr) is unlikely, and a more accurate value ...

  7. Dynamical Friction and Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nader Haghighipour

    1998-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A restricted planar circular three-body system, consisting of the Sun and two planets, is studied as a simple model for a planetary system. The mass of the inner planet is considered to be larger and the system is assumed to be moving in a uniform interplanetary medium with constant density. Numerical integrations of this system indicate a resonance capture when the dynamical friction of the interplanetary medium is taken into account. As a result of this resonance trapping, the ratio of orbital periods of the two planets becomes nearly commensurate and the eccentricity and semimajor axis of the orbit of the outer planet and also its angular momentum and total energy become constant. It appears from the numerical work that the resulting commensurability and also the resonant values of the orbital elements of the outer planet are essentially independent of the initial relative positions of the two bodies. The results of numerical integrations of this system are presented and the first-order partially averaged equations are studied in order to elucidate the behavior of the system while captured in resonance.

  8. Probing long-period companions to planetary hosts. VLT and CFHT near infrared coronographic imaging surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Chauvin; A. -M. Lagrange; S. Udry; T. Fusco; F. Galland; D. Naef; J. -L. Beuzit; M. Mayor

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a deep imaging survey of stars surrounded by planets detected with the radial velocity technique. The purpose is to search for and to characterize long-period stellar and substellar companions. The sample contains a total of 26 stars, among which 6 exhibit additional radial velocity drifts. We used NACO, at the ESO Very Large Telescope, and PUEO-KIR, at the Candian French Hawaiian Telescope, to conduct a near-infrared coronographic survey with adaptive optics of the faint circumstellar environment of the planetary hosts. The domain investigated ranges between 0.1 to 15" (i.e. about 3 to 500 AU, according to the mean distance of the sample). The survey is sensitive to companions within the stellar and the substellar domains, depending on the distance to the central stars and on the star properties. The images of 14 stars do not reveal any companions once the field objects are removed. 8 stars have close potential companions that need to be re-observed within 1-2 years to check for physical companionship. 4 stars are surrounded by faint objects which are confirmed or very probable companions. The companion to HD13445 (Gliese 86) is already known. The HD196885 star is a new close visual binary system with a high probability of being bound. The 2 newly discovered companions, HD1237 B and HD27442 B, share common proper motions with the central stars. Orbital motion is detected for HD1237 B. HD1237 B is likely a low-mass M star, located at 70 AU (projected distance) from the primary. HD27442 B is most probably a white dwarf companion located at about 240 AU (projected distance).

  9. Cosmic bombardment V: Threat object-dispersing approaches to active planetary defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.; Wood, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ishikawa, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hyde, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth-impacting comets and asteroids with diameters {approx}0.03 - 10 km pose the greatest threats to the terrestrial biosphere in terms of impact frequency-weighted impact consequences, and thus are of most concern to designers of active planetary defenses. Specific gravitational binding energies of such objects range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -2} J/gm, and are small compared with the specific energies of 1x10{sup 3} to 3x10{sup 3} J/gm required to vaporize objects of typical composition or the specific energies required to pulverize them, which are 10{sup -1} to 10 J/gm. All of these are small compared to the specific kinetic energy of these objects in the Earth- centered frame, which is 2x10{sup 5} to 2x10{sup 6} J/gm. The prospect naturally arises of negating all such threats by deflecting, pulverizing or vaporizing the objects. Pulverization-with-dispersal is an attractive option of reasonable defensive robustness. Examples of such equipments - which employ no explosives of any type - are given. Vaporization is the maximally robust defensive option, and may be invoked to negate threat objects not observed until little time is left until Earth-strike, and pulverization-with-dispersal has proven inadequate. Physically larger threats may be vaporized with nuclear explosives. No contemporary technical means of any kind appear capable of directly dispersing the -100 km diameter scale Charon- class cometary objects recently observed in the outer solar system, although such objects may be deflected to defensively useful extents. Means of implementing defenses of each of these types are proposed for specificity, and areas for optimization noted. Biospheric impacts of threat object debris are briefly considered, for bounding purposes. Experiments are suggested on cometary and asteroidal objects.

  10. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  11. Documenting the Physical Universe:Preserving the Record of SLAC from 1962 to 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1905, Albert Einstein's ''miraculous year'', modern physics has advanced explosively. In 2005, the World Year of Physics, a session at the SAA Annual meeting discusses three institutional initiatives--Einstein's collected papers, an international geophysical program, and a research laboratory--to examine how physics and physicists are documented and how that documentation is being collected, preserved, and used. This paper provides a brief introduction to the research laboratory (SLAC), discusses the origins of the SLAC Archives and History Office, its present-day operations, and the present and future challenges it faces in attempting to preserve an accurate historical record of SLAC's activities.

  12. EMSL - physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics en 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOxCeO2. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications15n2-formation-and-fast-oxygen-i...

  13. Physical Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Senior Headquarters (HQ) Physical Scientist for the Carbon Storage Program. The Carbon Storage Program focuses on the development of...

  14. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a hierarchy problem? Are there new physical principles at the TeV scale? Is the Higgs boson a fundamental particle or composite, like a pion? What is the final state of...

  15. Physical Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of...

  16. New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Zhdanov

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The research during the first two years of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The developed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using effective-medium theory and advanced methods of 3-D modeling and inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. In this project, we have developed a rigorous physical/mathematical model of heterogeneous conductive media based on the effective-medium approach. The new generalized effective-medium theory of IP effect (GEMTIP) provides a unified mathematical method to study heterogeneity, multi-phase structure, and polarizability of rocks. The geoelectrical parameters of a new composite conductivity model are determined by the intrinsic petrophysical and geometrical characteristics of composite media: mineralization and/or fluid content of rocks, matrix composition, porosity, anisotropy, and polarizability of formations. The new GEMTIP model of multi-phase conductive media provides a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, and the volume content of different minerals using electromagnetic data. We have developed a 3-D EM-IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IE) method. Our IE forward modeling software is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have demonstrated that the generalized effective-medium theory of induced polarization (GEMTIP) in combination with the IE forward modeling method can be used for rock-scale forward modeling from grain-scale parameters. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology introduced in this project can be used for the discrimination between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

  17. New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Zhdanov

    2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The research during the first year of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The proposed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using modern distributed acquisition systems and advanced methods of 3-D inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. One of the most popular is the Cole-Cole relaxation model. In this progress report we have constructed and analyzed a different physical and mathematical model of the IP effect based on the effective-medium theory. We have developed a rigorous mathematical model of multi-phase conductive media, which can provide a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, using the conductivity relaxation model parameters. The parameters of the new conductivity relaxation model can be used for discrimination of the different types of rock formations, which is an important goal in mineral exploration. The solution of this problem requires development of an effective numerical method for EM forward modeling in 3-D inhomogeneous media. During the first year of the project we have developed a prototype 3-D IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IP) method. Our IE forward modeling code INTEM3DIP is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have tested the working version of the INTEM3DIP code for computer simulation of the IP data for several models including a southwest US porphyry model and a Kambalda-style nickel sulfide deposit. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology envisioned in this proposal, will be used for the discrimination of different rocks, and in this way will provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

  18. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEology College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907-474-7565 www.uaf.edu/geology/ MS, phD Degrees Minimum Requirements for Degrees: MS: 30 credits; PhD: 18 thesis credits Graduates in geology have broad backgrounds in the earth sciences and firm foundations

  19. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    geoscience College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907-474-7565 www.uaf.edu/geology/ Bs Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 120 credits Graduates in geoscience. Four con- centrations are available to allow students to pursue their own emphasis: geology

  20. Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah Spring 2002 down to earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    1 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah Spring 2002 down to earth Message From of Bill Parry and Duke Picard resulted in openings in both Geological Engineer- ing and Sedimentary Geology. Our search for their replacements has been successful and we are once again at full strength

  1. 1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geophysics The increasing world demand and record-high costs for energy and mineral resources, along to unprecedented levels. This is not only a national need; it's a critical global need. As Earth scientists sites, and studying subsurface structure and water resources of the Rio Grande rift near Santa Fe, New

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Auxiliary material for paper 2011GL048739

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Auxiliary material for paper 2011GL), The reversibil- ity of sea ice loss in a state-of-the-art climate model, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi: 10.1029/2011GL the simulation but may take on different values depending on season and hemisphere. Figure S1g-l shows

  3. An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2005 American Geophysical Union.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Atlantic Ocean- Atmosphere Interaction, Geophysical Research Letters 32, L24619, doi: 10.1029/2005GL024871 et al., 2005 1 Observations of SST, Heat Flux and North Atlantic Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction# Na Wen is generated largely by the surface heat flux, and then forces the early winter atmosphere through the release

  4. Global Land Ice Measurements from Space Publisher: Springer Praxis Books, Subseries: Geophysical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Land Ice Measurements from Space Publisher: Springer Praxis Books, Subseries: Geophysical perceptions about the importance of fluctuations of glaciers and ice sheets (Jeffrey S. Kargel) 1.1Early.2.2. Modern impacts of changing glaciers and ice sheets on people 0.2.3. Recent public perceptions about

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Subordinated Kinematic Wave Equation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bäumer, Boris

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Subordinated Kinematic Wave this assumption, a subordinated kinematic wave equa- tion is proposed for moderately to highly heterogeneous at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA. 5 Also at: Department of Water Management, Faculty of Civil Engineering

  6. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Geophysical flight line flying and flight path recovery utilizing the Litton LTN-76 inertial navigation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitkus, A.F.; Cater, D.; Farmer, P.F.; Gay, S.P. Jr.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Litton LTN-76 Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) with Inertial Track guidance System (ITGS) software is geared toward the airborne survey industry. This report is a summary of tests performed with the LTN-76 designed to fly an airborne geophysical survey as well as to recover the subsequent flight path utilizing INS derived coordinates.

  8. In this article, I suggest a new style of geophysics as a critical system, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geophysics for the oil industry is that the high-resolution details of fluid-sat- urated reservoirs and rocks effects. Those proven to date include: (1) oil production that has been shown by Heffer et al the virtual reality!). We extract oil from an integrated crack-critical rock mass. Future advances depend

  9. Marine Geophysical Researches 21: 489511, 2000. 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , UK; 3Department of Geology & Geophysics, School of Ocean & Earth Science &Technology, University margins, map series, multibeam bathymetry, tectonic erosion, Tonga forearc, Tonga Trench Abstract Four new-going programs in the region, particularly the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the National Science Foundation

  10. Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network. Informations about lunar seismicity and seismic subsurface models from the Apollo missions are used as a priori information in this study to optimise the geometry of future lunar seismic networks in order to best resolve

  11. Annales Geophysicae (2002) 20: 711715 c European Geophysical Society 2002 Geophysicae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Annales Geophysicae (2002) 20: 711­715 c European Geophysical Society 2002 Annales Geophysicae al. (1973), Gedzelman (2000), Atlas (2001), and many cloud atlases and web-sites. Fallstreaks that parent clouds of fallstreaks are often located in a layer of strong wind-shear, adiabatic lapse rate

  12. EOS (transactions, American Geophysical Union) Volume 90, number 43, pp. 386-387.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    EOS (transactions, American Geophysical Union) Volume 90, number 43, pp. 386-387. 27 October 2009. For a typical incident solar flux of 240 watts per square meter at the snow sur- face in the Arctic during and 2008. The expeditions were carried out as a central part of a com- prehensive IPY survey over

  13. Course MA59800: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Description Wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production, among other fields. Local variations in the fluid and solid gradients via a slow-wave diffusion process that can be analyzed using numerical experiments. Numerical rock

  14. Charles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Change Impacts on Living Marine Resources", 2012 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Salt Lake City 2012-13 MemberCharles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton-mail: Charles.Stock@noaa.gov Education 2005 Ph.D., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/MIT Joint Program Civil

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 14, Three-dimensional energetic ion sounding of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,4 Abstract. We present new results using energetic parti- cles to remotely sound the highGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 14, Three-dimensional energetic ion sounding present a new technique to remotely sense the magnetopause in three dimensions as a function of time

  16. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

  17. Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

  18. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. , XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. , XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Sun V­dimensional evolution of solar eruptions as they leave the Sun and move into the interplanetary space. One of the most important processes, responsible for many dynamical phenomena ob­ served in the Sun, is the emergence

  19. Geophysical Disaster Computational Fluid Dynamics Center Our scientific advances.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Improve how Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models work. (numerics, dynamics, physics) · Use mountain-weather random errors by making many different NWP runs. (ensemble numerical prediction) · Reduce systematic outcomes. (probabilistic forecasting) · Predict weather and turbulence in the lower atmosphere where people

  20. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    , Hezi Yizhaq1 , Eli Zaady3 , and Yosef Ashkenazy1 1Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics disturbance area below which crust recovery is much faster · Sde-Hallamish sand dunes become more active of vegetation. In July 2008, 10 ? 10 m plots on the four dune habitats (crest, interdune, north slope, and south

  1. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

  2. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

  3. The Planetary Nebula population of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Zijlstra; K. Gesicki; J. R. Walsh; D. Pequignot; P. A. M. van Hoof; D. Minniti

    2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of two new Planetary Nebulae in the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy (Sgr) is presented. This brings the total number to four. The first, StWr 2-21, belongs to the main body of Sgr. The second, the halo PN BoBn 1, has a location, distance and velocity in agreement with the leading tidal tail of Sgr. We estimate that 10 per cent of the Galactic halo consists of Sgr debris. The specific frequency of PNe indicates a total luminosity of Sgr, including its tidal tails, of M_V=-14.1. StWr 2-21 shows a high abundance of [O/H]=-0.23, which confirms the high-metallicity population in Sgr uncovered by Bonaficio et al. (2004). The steep metallicity--age gradient in Sgr is due to ISM removal during the Galactic plane passages, ISM reformation due to stellar mass loss, and possibly accretion of metal-enriched gas from our Galaxy. The ISM re-formation rate of Sgr, from stellar mass loss, is 5 X 10^-4 M_sun yr^-1, amounting to ~10^6 M_sun per orbital period. HST images reveal well-developed bipolar morphologies, and provide clear detections of the central stars. All three stars with deep spectra show WR-lines, suggesting that the progenitor mass and metallicity determines whether a PN central star develops a WR spectrum. One Sgr PN belongs to the class of IR-[WC] stars. Expansion velocities are determined for three nebulae. Comparison with hydrodynamical models indicates an initial density profile of rho ~ r^-3. This is evidence for increasing mass-loss rates on the AGB. Peak mass-loss rates are indicated of ~ 10^-4 M_sun yr^-1. The IR-[WC] PN, He 2-436, provides the sole direct detection of dust in a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, to date.

  4. Physics Based on Physical Monism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seong-Dong Kim

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a physical monism, which holds that the matter and space are classified by not a difference of their kind but a difference of magnitude of their density, I derive the most fundamental equation of motion, which is capable of providing a deeper physical understanding than the known physics. For example, this equation answers to the substantive reason of movement, and Newton's second law, which has been regarded as the definition of force, is derived in a substantive level from this equation. Further, the relativistic energy-mass formula is generalized to include the potential energy term, and the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations are newly derived.

  5. A physical model to estimate snowfall over land using AMSU-B observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    . Weinman,3 W. S. Olson,4,5 D.-E. Chang,6 G. Skofronick-Jackson,7 and J. R. Wang7 Received 26 February 2007.-J., J. A. Weinman, W. S. Olson, D.-E. Chang, G. Skofronick-Jackson, and J. R. Wang (2008), A physical; Skofronick-Jackson et al., 2004; Liu, 2004; Noh et al., JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 113, D09201

  6. Moderately to Poorly Welded Tuff, Bishop, California: Geophysical and Geological Characterization to Determine the Source of Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    of Earth, Material, and Planetary Sciences, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio@swri.org) , Department of Earth, Material, and Planetary Sciences, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San in the Volcanic Tableland (Bishop, California) as an analog site because some Martian volcanoes and the Stealth

  7. Geophysical Laboratory/CDAC*Geophysical Laboratory/CDAC* Carnegie Institution of WashingtonCarnegie Institution of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemley, Russell J.

    advantages has been tapped for high-pressure geoscience · Brilliance · High energy · Energy resolution and bodies outside our solar system · New observations and space missions · Implications for life elsewhere, with the discovery..." The Physics of High Pressure" (1931). #12;2 x 2.5 mm diamonds Radial Energy (keV) Axial 2 mm

  8. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities, and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, briefly describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

  9. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.3. Particle Physics Information Platforms . . . . . . . . .14. Particle Physics Education and Outreach

  10. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . .ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . . . 12.

  11. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities c...

  12. Long-Period Objects in the Extrasolar Planetary Systems 47 UMa and 14 Her

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Wittenmyer; Michael Endl; William D. Cochran

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The possible existence of additional long-period planetary-mass objects in the extrasolar planetary systems 47 UMa and 14 Her is investigated. We combine all available radial-velocity data on these stars, spanning up to 18 years. For the 47 UMa system, we show that while a second planet improves the fit to all available data, there is still substantial ambiguity as to the orbital parameters of the proposed planetary companion 47 UMa c. We also present new observations which clearly support a long-period companion in the 14 Her system. With a period of 6906+/-70 days, 14 Her c may be in a 4:1 resonance with the inner planet. We also present revised orbital solutions for 7 previously known planets incorporating recent additional data obtained with the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory.

  13. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog »Physics PhysicsWeekPlasma

  14. NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense August 17 and 20, 2010 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense August 17 and 20, 2010 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC) Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense MINUTES Meeting Date: August 17 and 20, 2010 AGENDA: · Ad-Hoc Task Force Final Report and Recommendations ATTENDING: Ad-Hoc Task Force: Tom Jones (Co-Chair), Rusty

  15. A Planetary Data Systemfor the 2006 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Era PV-2004, "Ensuring the Long -Term Preservation and Adding Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    archive for NASA's planetary science community and currently contains about 10 terabytes of data collected from over thirty years of solar system exploration missions. The PDS is an online archive that consists to the planetary science community. The success of the PDS is primarily due to the early development and use

  16. Evaluating the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer and Cloud Microphysical Parameterization Schemes in Convection-Permitting Ensemble Forecasts using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    uncertainty in how to include various processes (e.g., drop breakup and ice-phase categories 1 Evaluating the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer and Cloud Microphysical Parameterization In this study, the ability of several cloud microphysical and planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes

  17. Annales Geophysicae (2001) 19: 425434 c European Geophysical Society 2001 Geophysicae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    waves, such as planetary scale Rossby waves, and by changes in solar irradiance and high energy particle in solar UV irradiance and geomagnetic activity. Changes in the altitude of the mean meteor layer observed, as measured by the CUT- LASS Finland radar, in the days preceding and following a Storm Sudden Commencement

  18. Characterizing planetary orbits and trajectories of light in the Reissner-Nordstrom metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. T Hioe

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact analytic expressions for planetary orbits and light trajectories in the Reissner-Nordstrom geometry are presented. They are characterized in a map specified by three dimensionless parameters for the planetary orbits, while two dimensionless parameters are required to map the trajectories of light. Notable differences with the corresponding orbits and trajectories in the Schwarzschild geometry are indicated. In particular, when the energy and angular momentum of the planet are fixed, the precession angle of the orbit decreases as the net electric charge of the massive star or black hole increases. A similar result also holds for the deflection angle of a light ray.

  19. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  20. Integrated geophysical study of near-surface faults in the Wilcox Group, Texas, with application to lignite mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satti, Sara A

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are exposed. Several geophysical tools, namely magnetics, frequency and time domain electromagnetics (FEM and TEM), ground penetrating radar (GPR) as well as seismic refraction were tested in an attempt to qualitatively determine the most efficient...

  1. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 67, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2002); P. 3849, 12 FIGS. 10.1190/1.1451322

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    ). Although continuity log- ging (or in-seam seismic) is a method commonly used in coal geophysics to determine structures such as clay dikes and faults in coal seams (Buchanan, 1993), this method has not been

  2. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

    2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

  3. Experiments in Physics Physics 1291

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course-3 Velocity, Acceleration, and g 35 1-4 Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy 45 1-5 Conservation. Whenever possible, the material will have been discussed in lecture before you come to the laboratory

  4. Experiments in Physics Physics 1291

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most of the experiments are designed to illustrate

  5. Experiments in Physics Physics 1291

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most-8 Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory

  6. Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerlich, Gerhard

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861 and Arrhenius 1896 and is still supported in global climatology essentially describes a fictitious mechanism in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, ...

  7. Hypernuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview of progress made in the study of hypernuclear physics is presented. The use of ..lambda..-hypernuclei to study properties of conventional (nonstrange) nuclei is explored. Our knowledge of the hyperon-nucleon force is reviewed. Anecdotal examples of interesting hypernuclear phenomena are discussed. The status of ..sigma..-hypernuclei is considered along with a search for the ''H'' dibaryon. 30 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  9. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  10. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  11. Some Mathematical and Numerical Issues in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianping Li; Shouhong Wang

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we address both recent advances and open questions in some mathematical and computational issues in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) and climate dynamics. The main focus is on 1) the primitive equations (PEs) models and their related mathematical and computational issues, 2) climate variability, predictability and successive bifurcation, and 3) a new dynamical systems theory and its applications to GFD and climate dynamics.

  12. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE WWW.GEOLOGY" for a complete range of advising information plus the latest Environmental Geology requirements. CORE COURSES (check each as completed): (30 credits) ____Choose one of the following introductory geology classes

  13. C.14 PLANETARY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY THROUGH ANALOG RESEARCH 1. Scope of Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ) Science Operations: PSTAR seeks systems-level terrestrial field campaigns which are conducted exploration requires the development of relevant, miniaturized instrumentation capable of extensive operations environments on Earth in order to develop a sound technical and scientific basis to conduct planetary research

  14. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 398 (2014) 4857 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    of Petroleum Resource and Prospecting, and Unconventional Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum of Petroleum Resource and Prospecting, and Unconventional Natural Gas Institute, China University of PetroleumDirect Earth and Planetary Science Letters www.elsevier.com/locate/epsl Crustal structure beneath NE China

  15. Dynamos in Asymptotic-Giant-Branch Stars As the Origin of Magnetic Fields Shaping Planetary Nebulale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Blackman; Adam Frank; J. Andrew Markiel; John H. Thomas; Hugh M. Van Horn

    2001-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary nebulae are thought to be formed when a slow wind from the progenitor giant star is overtaken by a subsequent fast wind generated as the star enters its white dwarf stage$^{1}$. A shock forms near the boundary between the winds, which creates a relatively dense shell that provides the characteristic appearance of a planetary nebula. A spherically symmetric wind will produce a spherically symmetric shell, yet over half of known planetary nebulae are not spherical; rather, they are elliptical or bipolar in shape$^{2}$. While a magnetic field could launch and collimate a bipolar outflow, the origin of such a field has hitherto been unclear, as previous work suggested that a field could not be generated${^3}$. Here we show that an asymptotic-giant-branch (AGB) star can indeed generate a strong magnetic field, in a dynamo at the interface between a rapidly rotating core and the more slowly rotating envelope of the star. The field is strong enough to shape the bipolar outflows that produce the observed bipolar planetary nebulae. Magnetic braking of the stellar core during this process may also explain the puzzlingly$^{4}$ slow rotation of most white dwarf stars.

  16. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 404 (2014) 8997 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    M. Tikoo a,, Benjamin P. Weiss a , William S. Cassata b , David L. Shuster c,d , Jérôme Gattacceca a,e and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA g University of Hawaii at Manoa

  17. Stability of Earth-Mass Planets in the Habitable Zones of Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    Stability of Earth-Mass Planets in the Habitable Zones of Extrasolar Planetary Systems Dr. Ravi Kumar Kopparapu Dept. of Geosciences, College of Earth and Mineral Science Over 500 planets orbiting and Saturn but in the last couple of years several "super-earths", planets with mass less than 10 times Earth

  18. Calculation of Planetary Precession from Quantum-corrected Newton's Gravitation Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Wang

    1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With consideration of quantization of space, we relate Newton's gravitation with the Second Law of thermodynamics. This leads to a correction to its original form, which takes into consideration the role of classical measurement. Our calculation shows this corrected form of gravitation can give explanation for planetary precession.

  19. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 38, Nr 2, 197224 (2003) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly Jr, Harold C.

    , New York 11235, USA; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West, New York, New York 10024, USA; and Department of Geological Sciences, Rutgers-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) were among the first igneous rocks produced within our solar system. These cm-sized spheres

  20. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 390 (2014) 175185 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of materials such as (Mg, Fe)SiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite found in D . However, the thermal conductivity. Historically, estimates of thermal conductivities at the CMB from low pres- sure or low temperature experimentsDirect Earth and Planetary Science Letters www.elsevier.com/locate/epsl Variation of thermal conductivity

  1. Z .Global and Planetary Change 31 2001 255264 www.elsevier.comrlocatergloplacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, ?lafur

    changes on Yugorski Peninsula, Kara Sea, Russia, during the last 12,800 radiocarbon years a,) b ´ c dZ .Global and Planetary Change 31 2001 255­264 www.elsevier.comrlocatergloplacha Environmental vegetation. Climate was colder than today. Betula nana became dominant during the Early Preboreal period

  2. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    different geochemical tracers of eolian dust, 4 He, 232 Th and rare earth elements, in combination Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Eolian dust is a major driver in the global climateEarth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252­263 Contents lists available at Science

  3. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  4. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lumley, David [U. W. AUSTRALIA; Sherlock, Don [CHEVRON; Daley, Tom [LBNL; Lawton, Don [U CALGARY; Masters, Ron [SHELL; Verliac, Michel [SCHLUMBERGER; White, Don [GEOL. SURVEY CANADA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  5. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  6. Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Electromagnetic Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics.) taken Grade PHY 4620 Optics 4 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 4730 Analog Circuits 3 PHY 4640 Quantum

  7. Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Environucleonics Lab 1 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 PHY 4820 Medical Physics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro. Chemistry I Lab 1 CHE 1102 Intro

  8. PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYSICS OF BURNING PLASMAS: PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES FIRE Physics Workshop May 2000 F. Perkins and N. Sauthoff Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FIRE Workshop 1 May 2000 #12;OUTLINE · Introduction · Three Classes of Burning Plasma Physics inaccessable to contemporary tokamak

  9. Department of Physics Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Department of Physics Department of Physics Life Sciences Building 3101 S. Dearborn St. Chicago, IL 60616 312.567.3480 www.iit.edu/csl/physics Chair: Grant Bunder The Department of Physics offers B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics. Within the department, there are many opportunities for interdisciplinary

  10. 314 Department of Physics Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    314 Department of Physics Department of Physics Physics, one of the basic sciences, has its origin led to the detailed understanding of a remarkable variety of physical phenomena. Our knowledge now comprehension of the physical world forms an impressive part of the intellectual and cultural heritage of our

  11. Physics (Phys) (Department of Physics and Engineering)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    229Physics Physics (Phys) (Department of Physics and Engineering) McCormick Foundation PROFESSORSILU INSTRUCTOR CUMMING VISITING PROFESSOR BOLLER MAJORS A major in physics leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of 50 credits including the following: 1. Physics 111, 112, 113, 114, 210, 215

  12. Department of Physics Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Department of Physics Department of Physics Life Sciences Building 3101 S. Dearborn St. Chicago, IL 60616 312.567.3480 www.iit.edu/csl/physics Chair: Christopher White The Department of Physics offers B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics. Within the department, there are many opportunities

  13. ARE PLANETARY SYSTEMS FILLED TO CAPACITY? A STUDY BASED ON KEPLER RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We used a sample of Kepler candidate planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii (R{sub Circled-Plus }) to determine the typical dynamical spacing of neighboring planets. To derive the intrinsic (i.e., free of observational bias) dynamical spacing of neighboring planets, we generated populations of planetary systems following various dynamical spacing distributions, subjected them to synthetic observations by the Kepler spacecraft, and compared the properties of observed planets in our simulations with actual Kepler detections. We found that, on average, neighboring planets are spaced 21.7 mutual Hill radii apart with a standard deviation of 9.5. This dynamical spacing distribution is consistent with that of adjacent planets in the solar system. To test the packed planetary systems hypothesis, the idea that all planetary systems are dynamically packed or filled to capacity, we determined the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed by performing long-term (10{sup 8} years) numerical simulations. In each simulation, we integrated a system with planets spaced according to our best-fit dynamical spacing distribution but containing an additional planet on an intermediate orbit. The fraction of simulations exhibiting signs of instability provides an approximate lower bound on the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed; we found that {>=}31%, {>=}35%, and {>=}45% of two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet systems are dynamically packed, respectively. Such sizeable fractions suggest that many planetary systems are indeed filled to capacity. This feature of planetary systems is another profound constraint that formation and evolution models must satisfy.

  14. Hadron physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunce, G.

    1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain.

  15. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |Navy Nuclear NavyNuclear Physics

  16. MODERATELY TO POORLY WELDED TUFF, BISHOP, CALIFORNIA: GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF RADAR SCATTERING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    . Stillman2 , 1 Dept. of Earth, Material, and Planetary Sci- ences, Southwest Research Institute,® 6220- bleland, Bishop, California (Fig. 1), as an analog [1] because some Martian volcanoes and the Stealth

  17. January 2010 Physics 3300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    1 January 2010 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Instructor: Brad de Young Physics and Physical Oceanography Memorial University, bdeyoung@mun.ca Room C-3000 737-8738 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography deals with the physics of the processes in the ocean, providing an integrating view

  18. Particle Physics Booklet 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    et al., C. Amsler

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    212 25. Accelerator physics of colliders ? 26. High-energythe full Review. PARTICLE PHYSICS BOOKLET TABLE OF CONTENTSrev. ) Summary Tables of Particle Physics Gauge and Higgs

  19. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Heavy Ion Fusion," Research Trends in Physics, La JollaInternational School of Physics, New York, New York (1992),Professor and Chairman Physics Department University of

  20. The Poisson ratio of the Australian crust: geological and geophysical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevrot, Sébastien

    ¨bastien Chevrot, Robert D. van der Hilst * Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts at the base of the crust. ? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Poisson's ratio; crust reserved. PII: S 0 0 1 2 - 8 2 1 X ( 0 0 ) 0 0 2 6 4 - 8 * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1-617-253-6977; Fax

  1. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A Physical Model for Seismic Noise Generation from Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    Generation from Sediment Transport in Rivers Victor C. Tsai1,2 , Brent Minchew1,2 , Michael P. Lamb2 , and Jean-Paul Ampuero1,2 Measuring sediment flux in rivers remains a significant problem in studies provide such mea- surements, but the lack of models linking observed seismic quan- tities to sediment flux

  2. Research overview 2006 Department of Geophysics, belonging to the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    aspects. Research is tightly coupled with education at the bachelor, master and doctoral levels. In 2006 microearthquakes induced by oil drilling. An important contribution related to our participation in the SPICE continued successfully in 2006. The project has been supported by 6 oil companies (BP America Inc., U

  3. Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs Department of Physics College of Engineering University to undergraduate education. Over the last 15 years, in collaboration with our nationally recognized Physics Education Research Group, our faculty has reinvented the way undergraduate physics courses are taught

  4. Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography · Instructor: Dr. Iakov Afanassiev · Office: Physics C-4065 · email: yakov@physics.mun.ca · Course Times: TBD Room TBD · Office Hours: unlimited · Web Page: http://www.physics

  5. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Science Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing Research Pioneering...

  6. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    #12;People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics) "Each discovery, each advance, each increase in the sum of human riches, owes its being to the physical

  7. Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 16 Physics Procedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 1­6 Physics Procedia Educating the next generation of Computational Physicists Joan Adler Physics Department, Technion -IIT, Haifa, Israel, 32000 Abstract Many "senior" Computational Physics researchers began their careers perched on of the other vertices of the Landau triangle

  8. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics) "Each discovery, each advance, each increase in the sum of human riches, owes its being to the physical

  9. Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4640 Quantum Mechanics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics & Engineering 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro

  10. Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 15 Physics Procedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 1­5 Physics Procedia Educating the next generation of Computational Physicists Joan Adler Physics Department, Technion -IIT, Haifa, Israel, 32000 Abstract Many "senior" Computational Physics researchers began their careers perched on of the other vertices of the Landau triangle

  11. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    of students (from physics, engineering physics, elec- trical engineering, nuclear engineering and other un;PREFACE Plasma physics is a relatively new branch of physics that became a mature science over the last). Thus, plasma physics has developed in large part as a branch of applied or engineering physics

  12. Eta Carinae and Nebulae Around Massive Stars: Similarities to Planetary Nebulae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some observational properties of aspherical nebulae around massive stars, and conclusions inferred for how they may have formed. Whether or not these ideas are applicable to the shaping of planetary nebulae is uncertain, but the observed similarities between some PNe and bipolar nebulae around massive stars is compelling. In the well-observed case of Eta Carinae, several lines of observational evidence point to a scenario where the shape of its bipolar nebula resulted from an intrinsically bipolar explosive ejection event rather than an interacting winds scenario occurring after ejection from teh star. A similar conclusion has been inferred for some planetary nebulae. I also briefly mention bipolar nebulae around some other massive stars, such as the progenitor of SN 1987A and related blue supergiants.

  13. Theory for planetary exospheres: I. Radiation pressure effect on dynamical trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this first paper, we present the complete exact solutions of particles trajectories, which are not conics, under the influence of the solar radiation pressure. This problem was recently partly solved by Lantoine and Russell (2011) and Biscani and Izzo (2014). We give here the full set of solutions, including solutions not previously derived, as well as simpler formulations for previously known cas...

  14. Abundances in Planetary Nebulae An Autopsy of Low and Intermediate Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James F. Buell

    2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work I report on the results of synthetic thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch models (TP-AGB) and compare the results to the abundance ratios in a sample of planetary nebulae. I use updated input parameters for mass-loss, the stellar luminosity, and dredge-up. I calculated models with masses between 0.8 solar masses and 8.0 solar masses. I also calculated models with [Fe/H] between -2.5 and 0.3. The effects of the first, second, third dredge-ups and hot-bottom burning are reported on. Models of the planetary nebula in M15 are reported on. The analysis of samples of Galactic bulge and disk nebulae are also reported.

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 16, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728, 2013 Up-gradient eddy fluxes of potential vorticity near the subtropical jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 1­6, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728, 2013 Up-gradient eddy fluxes the subtropical jet, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728. 1. Eddies and the General Circulation [2 Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. 0094-8276/13/10.1002/2013GL057728 scales are small compared

  16. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 59885993, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728, 2013 Up-gradient eddy fluxes of potential vorticity near the subtropical jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 5988­5993, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728, 2013 Up-gradient eddy near the subtropical jet, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 5988­5993, doi:10.1002/2013GL057728. 1. Eddies@atmos.colostate.edu) ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. 0094-8276/13/10.1002/2013GL057728 scales

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 10, PAGES 119-1 119-4 , 10.1029/2001GL013666, 2002 Propagation of auroral hiss at high altitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 10, PAGES 119-1 ­ 119-4 , 10.1029/2001GL013666, 2002 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 2001GL013666. 0094-8276/02/2001GL013666$5.00 of 3000­6000 km

  18. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 14, doi:10.1002/2013GL057751, 2013 Agulhas ring formation as a barotropic instability of the retroflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijer, Wilbert

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 1­4, doi:10.1002/2013GL057751, 2013 Agulhas ring formation. Res. Lett., 40, doi:10.1002/2013GL057751. 1. Introduction [2] One of the most fascinating phenomena Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. 0094-8276/13/10.1002/2013GL057751 [3] The dynamical reason

  19. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 23, PAGES 14, 2120, DOI:10.1029/2002GL015273, 2002 Mechanisms controlling the global oceanic distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamme, Roberta C.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 29, NO. 23, PAGES 1­4, 2120, DOI:10.1029/2002GL015273, 2002 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 2002GL015273. 0094-8276/03/2002GL015273$5.00 2. Methods Water

  20. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 65, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 2000); P. 492501, 13 FIGS. Reconstruction of 1-D conductivity from dual-loop EM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    manuscript received August 25, 1999. Formerly Univ. of British Columbia, Geophysical Inversion Facility; currently Baker Atlas, Baker Hughes, 10201 Westheimer, Bldg. 1A, Houston, Texas 77042. E-mail: ian.zhang@bakeratlas.com. Univ. of British Columbia, Geophysical Inversion Facility, Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Vancouver

  1. Student-based archaeological geophysics in northern Thailand Emily A. Hinz*, Lee M. Liberty, and Spencer H. Wood, Boise State University, Fongsaward Singharajawarapan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Student-based archaeological geophysics in northern Thailand Emily A. Hinz*, Lee M. Liberty participants to evaluate the practicality and effectiveness of various geophysical techniques: seismic methods including refraction and reflection (not discussed here), ground- penetrating-radar (GPR), DC resistivity

  2. LuHf zircon evidence for rapid lunar differentiation Dianne J. Taylor , Kevin D. McKeegan, T. Mark Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reservoir termed KREEP (e.g., Warren, 1988) due to its high concentrations of potassium (K), rare-earth Harrison Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics with their source magmas containing a component (KREEP) that evolved during chemical differentiation of a global

  3. Abundances of s-process elements in planetary nebulae: Br, Kr & Xe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; R. Williams; E. Pellegrini; K. Cavagnolo; J. A. Baldwin; B. Sharpee; M. Phillips; X. -W. Liu

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify emission lines of post-iron peak elements in very high signal-to-noise spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae. Analysis of lines from ions of Kr and Xe reveals enhancements in most of the PNe, in agreement with the theories of s-process in AGB star. Surprisingly, we did not detect lines from Br even though s-process calculations indicate that it should be produced with Kr at detectable levels.

  4. Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classifiedProject) | Open EnergyEnergy Information geophysics:

  5. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 174 (2009) 2432 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    method has been developed to measure thermal diffusivity of mantle materials at high P­T using time to obtain a functional pressure dependence of thermal diffusivity and calculated thermal conductivity University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 17 October 2007 Received

  6. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 184 (2011) 194207 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    , Steven Constable Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman. Constable). URLs: http://marineemlab.ucsd.edu/kkey (K. Key), http://marineemlab.ucsd.edu/steve (S. Constable

  7. Z .Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 108 1998 129141 Short and long baseline tiltmeter measurements on axial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolstoy, Maya

    measurements on axial seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge Maya Tolstoy ) , Steven Constable 1 , John Orcutt 2 , Hubert

  8. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 172 (2009) 235240 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    as it approaches the transition to the CaCl2-type phase. The bounds on the aggregate adi- abatic bulk and shear to an orthorhombic CaCl2-type structure around 50 GPa (Cohen, 1992; Kingma et al., 1995). This transition may12)/2 (Cohen, 1992). Many AX2 com- pounds with the rutile structure undergo a transition to CaCl2

  9. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 175 (2009) 12 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clouard, Valerie

    (French Ministry of Research and Higher Education), and MAE (French Min- istry of Foreign Affairs and the associated investigations were entrusted to Fernand de Montessus de Ballore, a French seis- mologist an automatic and real-time system for the processing of broad- band seismometer wavefield implemented at ERI

  10. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 170 (2008) 156169 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are on powder samples and the stress was measured by X-ray peak broadening. In the deforming powder sample preparation and characterization A wadsleyite sample was synthesized from San Carlos olivine powder at P = 15 GPa and T 1400 K for 1 h and an olivine sample was hot-pressed from San Carlos olivine powder at P

  11. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

  12. PLANETARY TRANSITS WITH THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY RADIO INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Barbosa, C. L. [IP and D, Universidade do Vale do Paraba (UNIVAP), So Jos dos Campos, SP (Brazil)] [IP and D, Universidade do Vale do Paraba (UNIVAP), So Jos dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Vlio, Adriana, E-mail: caius@univap.br [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)] [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary transits are commonly observed at visible wavelengths. Here we investigate the shape of a planetary transit observed at radio wavelengths. Solar maps at 17 GHz are used as a proxy for the stellar eclipse by several sizes of planets from super-Earths to hot Jupiters. The relative depth at mid-transit is the same as observed at visible wavelengths, but the limb brightening of the stellar disk at 17 GHz is clearly seen in the shape of the transit light curve. Moreover, when the planet occults an active region the depth of the transit decreases even further, depending on the brightness of the active region relative to the surrounding disk. For intense active region, with 50 times the brightness temperature of the surrounding disk, the decrease can supercede the unperturbed transit depth depending on the size of the eclipsing planet. For a super-Earth (R{sub p} = 0.02 R{sub s} ) crossing, the decrease in intensity is 0.04%, increasing to 0.86% in the case when a strong active region is present. On the other hand, for a hot Jupiter with R{sub p} = 0.17R{sub s} , the unperturbed transit depth is 3% increasing to 4.7% when covering this strong active region. This kind of behavior can be verified with observation of planetary transits with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array radio interferometer.

  13. The Strengths of Near-Infrared Absorption Features Relevant to Interstellar and Planetary Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Gerakines; J. J. Bray; A. Davis; C. R. Richey

    2005-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundances of ices in planetary environments have historically been obtained through measurements of near-infrared absorption features (lambda = 1.0-2.5 microns), and near-IR transmission measurements of materials present in the interstellar medium are becoming more common. For transmission measurements, the band strength (or absorption intensity) of an absorption feature must be known in order to determine the column density of an ice component. In the experiments presented here, we have measured the band strengths of the near-IR absorption features for several molecules relevant to the study of interstellar icy grain mantles and icy planetary bodies: CO (carbon monoxide), CO2 (carbon dioxide), C3O2 (carbon suboxide), CH4 (methane), H2O (water), CH3OH (methanol), and NH3 (ammonia). During a vacuum deposition, the sizes of the near-IR features were correlated with that of a studied mid-IR feature whose strength is well known from previous ice studies. These data may be used to determine ice abundances from observed near-IR spectra of interstellar and planetary materials or to predict the sizes of near-IR features in spectral searches for these molecules in astrophysical environments.

  14. Department of Geology and Geophysics Frederick A. Sutton Building 115 South 1460 East, Room 383, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0102 (801) 581-7162 FAX (801) 581-7065

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Department of Geology and Geophysics Frederick A. Sutton Building 115 South 1460 East, Room 383/2012 Deed of Gift to The University of Utah Department of Geology and Geophysics Donor's Information, to the Department of Geology and Geophysics of the University of Utah as an unrestricted gift. Filled out and sign

  15. Three-Dimensional Surface Geophysical Exploration of the 200-Series Tanks at the 241-C Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crook, N. [HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., Tuscon, AZ (United States); McNeill, M. [HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., Tuscon, AZ (United States); Dunham, Ralph [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (United States); Glaser, Danney R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States)

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface geophysical exploration (SGE) survey using direct current electrical resistivity was conducted within the C Tank Farm in the vicinity of the 200-Series tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This survey was the second successful SGE survey to utilize the Geotection(TM)-180 Resistivity Monitoring System which facilitated a much larger survey size and faster data acquisition rate. The primary objective of the C Tank Farm SGE survey was to provide geophysical data and subsurface imaging results to support the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation, as outlined in the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation / Corrective Measures work plan RPP-PLAN-39114.

  16. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

  17. Environmental geophysics at Kings Creek Disposal Site and 30th Street Landfill, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Benson, M.A.; Padar, C.A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical studies on the Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, delineate landfill areas and provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low seal levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits in the Kings Creek area. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal a paleochannel greater than 50 ft deep, with a thalweg trending offshore in a southwest direction into Kings Creek. Onshore, the ground-penetrating radar data indicate a 35-ft-deep branch to the main channel, trending to the north-northwest directly beneath the 30th Street Landfill. Other branches are suspected to meet the offshore paleochannel in the wetlands south and east of the 30th Street Landfill. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Electromagnetic surveys have delineated the pre-fill lowland area currently occupied by the 30th Street Landfill. Magnetic and conductive anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, large-scale dumping has not occurred north of the Kings Creek Disposal Site or east of the 30th Street Landfill.

  18. A field test of electromagnetic geophysical techniques for locating simulated in situ mining leach solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tweeton, D.R.; Hanson, J.C.; Friedel, M.J.; Sternberg, B.K.; Dahl, L.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Bureau of Mines, The University of Arizona, Sandia National Laboratories, and Zonge Engineering and Research Organization, Inc., conducted cooperative field tests of six electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods to compare their effectiveness in locating a brine solution simulating in situ leach solution or a high-conductivity plume of contamination. The brine was approximately 160 m below the surface. The testsite was the University's San Xavier experimental mine near Tucson, AZ. Geophysical surveys using surface and surface-borehole, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) induction; surface controlled-source audiofrequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT); surface-borehole, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FEM) induction; crosshole FEM; and surface magnetic field ellipticity were conducted before and during brine injection. The surface TEM data showed a broad decrease in resistivity. CSAMT measurements with the conventional orientation did not detect the brine, but measurements with another orientation indicated some decrease in resistivity. The surface-borehole and crosshole methods located a known fracture and other fracture zones inferred from borehole induction logs. Surface magnetic field ellipticity data showed a broad decrease in resistivity at depth following brine injection.

  19. B Physics (Experiment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Kreps

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In past few years the flavor physics made important transition from the work on confirmation the standard model of particle physics to the phase of search for effects of a new physics beyond standard model. In this paper we review current state of the physics of b-hadrons with emphasis on results with a sensitivity to new physics.

  20. General Syllabus Physics 45100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    General Syllabus Physics 45100 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog description: 45100: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Temperature; equation of state; work and statistical mechanics; low-temperature physics; the Third Law. 3 HR./Wk.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Physics 35100

  1. Physics Resources for Teachers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    Physics Resources for Teachers University of Wisconsin ­ Madison Department of Physics 1150 University Ave. Madison, WI 53706 wonders@physics.wisc.edu (608) 262-2927 Plasma Physics Web Resources Center Plasma Physics Lab http://science-education.pppl.gov/ Coalition for Plasma Science http

  2. Department of Physics High Energy Physics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Physics High Energy Physics Group Electrical Engineer (Job ref: 0004) The High Energy and experience. A job description and an application form can be obtained from http

  3. Physics 4: Introductory Physics Electromagnetism and Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Physics 4: Introductory Physics Electromagnetism and Light Professor Jeffrey D. Richman Department: Electromagnetism and Light Welcome to Physics 4! What is your goal in life? If it is to become an engineer or to pursue a career in science, this is a key class for you. Understanding electromagnetism and light

  4. March 7, 2003 15:37 Geophysical Journal International gji1906 Geophys. J. Int. (2003) 153, 277286

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    ­286 Effects of near-surface conductance on global satellite induction responses Mark E. Everett,1 Steven Constable2 and Catherine G. Constable2 1Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College 1984; Oraevsky et al. 1993; Olsen 1999; Constable & Constable 2000; Tarits 2000; Tarits & Grammatica

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Intermittent Upper Ocean1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heat content locally. Recent studies5 suggest that TC-induced ocean mixing can have global climate climate impacts by contributing to oceanic poleward heat transport [Emanuel,32 2001; Sriver and HuberJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Intermittent

  6. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Response to a Geoengineered Brightening of1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Response to a Geoengineered: CLIM. RESPONSE TO GEOENGINEERED CLOUD BRIGHTENING As a means of mitigating anthropogenic climate change to this geoengineering scheme is currently poorly under-6 stood. We simulate cloud seeding in a coupled mixed-layer ocean

  7. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  8. Revised for Journal of Geophysical Research1 Effects of the Diurnal Cycle in Solar Radiation on the2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation diurnal cycle on intraseasonal mixed layer variability15 in the tropical Indian Ocean during1 Revised for Journal of Geophysical Research1 Effects of the Diurnal Cycle in Solar Radiation on the2 Tropical Indian Ocean Mixed Layer Variability during3 Wintertime Madden-Julian Oscillations4

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Solar forced Dansgaard-Oeschger events and their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chialvo, Dante R.

    to two century-scale solar cycles with periods close to 1470/7 (=210) and 1470/17 (87) years [Braun et alGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Solar forced Dansgaard-Oeschger events and their phase relation with solar proxies H. Braun Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, University

  10. Long-period fading in atmospherics during severe meteorological activity and associated solar geophysical phenomena at low latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Long-period fading in atmospherics during severe meteorological activity and associated solar activity with the solar geophysical phenomena was studied. The results are indicative of an interesting sequence of solar- terrestrial events. A tentative conclusion is reached, suggesting an origin

  11. 1.5 References Batzle, M. and Wang, Z., 1992, Seismic properties of pore fluids: Geophysics, Vol.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prop- erty Effects and Seismic Gas Detection (Fluid Project): HARC & CSM, 163 pp. Biot, M.A., 195667 1.5 References Batzle, M. and Wang, Z., 1992, Seismic properties of pore fluids: Geophysics, Vol. 57, No. 11, p. 1396-1408. Batzle, M.L., Han, D., Wang, W., Wu, X., Ge, H., and Zhao, H., 1997, Fluid

  12. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Cirrus Ice Nucleation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    in the climate system. Ice clouds reflect solar radiation23 back to space, cooling the planet. However, cold ice finely balanced between warming and cooling, with warming thought to be slightly larger.27 Changes to iceJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Cirrus Ice

  13. Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error Paul E. Johnson and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error -Wind I Paul E. Johnson (which relates the wind to the normalized radar cross section, NRCS, of the ocean surface) is uncertainty in the NRCS for given wind conditions. When the estimated variability is in- cluded in the maximum likelihood

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, In-flight degradation correction of SCIAMACHY UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, In-flight degradation correction of SCIAMACHY UV reflectances and Absorbing Aerosol Index L. G. Tilstra, 1 M. de Graaf, 1 I. Aben, 2 and P. D R A F T February 1, 2012, 12:28pm D R A F T #12;X - 2TILSTRA ET AL.: DEGRADATION CORRECTION

  15. Environmental geophysics deals with issues ranging from local-scale fluid-rock changes to large-scale climatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    Environmental geophysics deals with issues ranging from local-scale fluid-rock changes to large and quarries, military bases, oil and gas fields, petroleum refineries, etc. Many derelict sites such as crankcase oils), mine spoils, and other inorganic pollutants. Accidental spills or poor disposal practice

  16. Geophysical modeling of two willemite deposits, Vazante (Brazil) and Beltana (Australia) Richard A. Krahenbuhl* and Murray Hitzman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ore bodies or through imaging of associated hydrothermal alteration. Introduction Due to recent technological advances in developing solvent-extraction and electro-winning processes for treatment of zinc by conventional processing techniques and geophysical inversion. Vazante deposit in Brazil The Vazante willemite

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 3, PAGES 377-380, FEBRUARY 1, 2000 Anomalous scaling of mesoscale tropospheric humidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 3, PAGES 377-380, FEBRUARY 1, 2000 Anomalous scaling will take up to 20 s to respond. In this paper we report the first sci- entific results using the full 20-Hz on the idea of chaotic isentropic lateral mixing [e.g., Emanuel and Pierrehumbert, 1996]. Our present study

  18. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1999); P. 3347, 17 FIGS. Simultaneous reconstruction of 1-D susceptibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    ; revised manuscript received June 16, 1998. Formerly UBC-Geophysical Inversion Facility, 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4; currently Western Atlas Logging Services, 10201 Westheimer, Houston, TX 77042 Facility, 2219 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4; E-mail: doug@geop.ubc.ca. c 1999 Society

  19. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 22452248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Subsurface nuclear tests monitoring through the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

    nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS is based upon four waves will help check for underground, under­water and atmospheric nuclear tests. The fourth networkGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245­2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub­surface nuclear

  20. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves generated by the1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves TSUNAMI Abstract. Detection of low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves as precur-4 sor components model gave us the opportunity to study13 the hydro-acoustic wave propagation in a large-scale domain

  1. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    , and to bottom velocity obtained from a global ocean model. The total energy flux into internal lee wavesGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global energy conversion rate from distribution of the energy flux is largest in the Southern Ocean which accounts for half of the total energy

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps to sea level rise:1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps - 2 BJORNSSON ET AL.: MASS LOSS FROM ICELANDIC ICE CAPS In total, Icelandic ice caps contain 3,600 km3 of ice, which if melted would3 raise sea level by 1 cm. Here, we present an overview of mass

  3. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2005) 12: 311320 SRef-ID: 1607-7946/npg/2005-12-311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Processes in Geophysics Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction B. Knopf1, H, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the cur- rently preferred strategy for simulating. Such a simplifying tech- nique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources

  4. Mechanical action and Geophysical reaction: Equipment Oil sand Interactions (Originally presented at CAMI, September 8 10, 2003, Calgary, Alberta)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    . Vibrations from on-board equipment, as was found with shovels to a lesser extent, such as pumps, motors and other moving sources, dirties the ground response signal with noise. To facilitate a better correlation geophysical computer applications are manipulated and enhanced to evaluate the extent of this noise problem

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvth, kos

    ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS LABORATORY PRACTICES #12;Foundations of Environmental Science Lecture Enviromental Physics Methods Laboratory Practices #12;Etvs Lornd University Faculty of Science ENVIRONMENTAL tanknyvsorozat" (KMR Foundations of Environmental Science Lecture Series). KEYWORDS: Environmental physics

  6. GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the vadose zone (i.e., 79 m [260 ft] bgs) within the footprint of the Crib, and (b) 15 to 30 m (50 to 100 ft) east of the Crib footprint, where contaminants are inferred to have migrated through relatively permeable soils. Confirmation of the presence of contamination in historic boreholes correlates well with mapping from the 2010 survey, and serves as a basis to site future characterization boreholes that will likely intersect contamination both laterally and at depth.

  7. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

  8. B Physics: Theory Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David London

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an overview of B physics that can be done at the LHC with the purpose of searching for new physics.

  9. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  10. Office of Physical Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  11. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  12. EVOLUTION OF PLANETARY ORBITS WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS AND TIDAL DISSIPATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Fred C. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bloch, Anthony M. [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermediate mass stars and stellar remnants often host planets, and these dynamical systems evolve because of mass loss and tides. This paper considers the combined action of stellar mass loss and tidal dissipation on planetary orbits in order to determine the conditions required for planetary survival. Stellar mass loss is included using a so-called Jeans model, described by a dimensionless mass loss rate ? and an index ?. We use an analogous prescription to model tidal effects, described here by a dimensionless dissipation rate ? and two indices (q, p). The initial conditions are determined by the starting value of angular momentum parameter ?{sub 0} (equivalently, the initial eccentricity) and the phase ? of the orbit. Within the context of this model, we derive an analytic formula for the critical dissipation rate ?, which marks the boundary between orbits that spiral outward due to stellar mass loss and those that spiral inward due to tidal dissipation. This analytic result ? = ?(?, ?, q, p, ?{sub 0}, ?) is essentially exact for initially circular orbits and holds to within an accuracy of ?50% over the entire multi-dimensional parameter space, where the individual parameters vary by several orders of magnitude. For stars that experience mass loss, the stellar radius often displays quasi-periodic variations, which produce corresponding variations in tidal forcing; we generalize the calculation to include such pulsations using a semi-analytic treatment that holds to the same accuracy as the non-pulsating case. These results can be used in many applications, e.g., to predict/constrain properties of planetary systems orbiting white dwarfs.

  13. The Kinematics and Dynamics of the Globular Clusters and the Planetary Nebulae of NGC 5128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristin A. Woodley; William E. Harris; Michael A. Beasley; Eric W. Peng; Terry J. Bridges; Duncan A. Forbes; Gretchen L. H. Harris

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kinematic and dynamic study of the halo of the giant elliptical galaxy, NGC 5128, is presented. From a spectroscopically confirmed sample of 340 globular clusters and 780 planetary nebulae, the rotation amplitude, rotation axis, velocity dispersion, and the total dynamical mass are determined for the halo of NGC 5128. The globular cluster kinematics were searched for both radial dependence and metallicity dependence by subdividing the globular cluster sample into 158 metal-rich ([Fe/H] > -1.0) and 178 metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1.0) globular clusters. Our results show the kinematics of the metal-rich and metal-poor subpopulations are quite similar. The kinematics are compared to the planetary nebula population where differences are apparent in the outer regions of the halo. The total mass of NGC 5128 is found using the Tracer Mass estimator (Evans et al. 2003), to determine the mass supported by internal random motions, and the spherical component of the Jeans equation to determine the mass supported by rotation. We find a total mass of (1.0+/-0.2) x 10^(12) Msun from the planetary nebulae data out to a projected radius of 90 kpc and (1.3+/-0.5) x 10^(12) Msun from the globular clusters out to a projected radius of 50 kpc. Lastly, we present a new and homogeneous catalog of known globular clusters in NGC 5128. This catalog combines all previous definitive cluster identifications from radial velocity studies and HST imaging studies, as well as 80 new globular clusters from a study of M.A. Beasley et al. (2007, in preparation).

  14. Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Predoi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration; K. Hurley; for IPN

    2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline the scientific motivation behind a search for gravitational waves associated with short gamma ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The IPN localisation of short gamma ray bursts is limited to extended error boxes of different shapes and sizes and a search on these error boxes poses a series of challenges for data analysis. We will discuss these challenges and outline the methods to optimise the search over these error boxes.

  15. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods forMonitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their wide application within the petroleumindustry it is natural to consider geophysical techniques for monitoringof CO2 movement within hydrocarbon reservoirs, whether the CO2 isintroduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic sequestration.Among the available approaches to monitoring, seismic methods are by farthe most highly developed and applied. Due to cost considerations, lessexpensive techniques have recently been considered. In this article, therelative merits of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) methods as monitoringtools for geological CO2 sequestration are examined for two syntheticmodeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhancedoil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, theSchrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The secondscenario is a simplified model of a brine formation at a depth of 1,900m.

  16. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES AT THE POWELL STAGE STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Julie B. Braun; Brenda R. Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the boundaries of the Idaho National Laboratory, an ongoing archaeological investigation of a late 19th century stage station was expanded with the use of Electro-Magnetic and Magnetic geophysical surveying. The station known as the Powell Stage Station was a primary transportation hub on the Snake River Plain, bridging the gap between railroad supply depots in Blackfoot, Idaho and booming mining camps throughout Central Idaho. Initial investigations have shown a strong magnetic signature from a buried road and previously unknown features that were not detected by visual surface surveys. Data gained from this project aids in federally directed cultural resource and land management and use requirements and has contributed additional information for archeological interpretation and cultural resource preservation.

  17. Mechanism of destruction of transport barriers in geophysical jets with Rossby waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uleysky, M Yu; Prants, S V; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.017202

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of destruction of a central transport barrier in a dynamical model of a geophysical zonal jet current in the ocean or the atmosphere with two propagating Rossby waves is studied. We develop a method for computing a central invariant curve which is an indicator of existence of the barrier. Breakdown of this curve under a variation of the Rossby wave amplitudes and onset of chaotic cross-jet transport happen due to specific resonances producing stochastic layers in the central jet. The main result is that there are resonances breaking the transport barrier at unexpectedly small values of the amplitudes that may have serious impact on mixing and transport in the ocean and the atmosphere. The effect can be found in laboratory experiments with azimuthal jets and Rossby waves in rotating tanks under specific values of the wave numbers that are predicted in the theory.

  18. Current issue Physics Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    History Physics Education Industrial Outreach Programs that Match Every Interest - Master's Degrees, it became clear that physics master's programs were not easily categorized. The original classification the strengths of physics master's degree programs. Over half of physics departments offer at least one master

  19. PHYSICS 106 Summer 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    PHYSICS 106 Summer 2011 Instructor: Stephanie Magleby (sam25@physics.byu.edu) Office Hours: MWF 2 -3 pm, N311 ESC Office Phone (physics): 422-7056 Office Phone (engineering): 422-8319 TA: Corbin Jacobs [corbinjacobs@gmail.com] Email Corbin with any reading quiz questions or Mastering Physics issues

  20. Aspects of Unparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind Rajaraman

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some theoretical and experimental issues in unparticle physics, focusing mainly on collider signatures.

  1. NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense Apr 15-16, 2010 CORRECTED 6/10/10 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    NAC Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense Apr 15-16, 2010 ­ CORRECTED 6/10/10 1 NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL (NAC) Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense CORRECTED MINUTES Meeting Date: April 15-16, 2010 AGENDA: · Ad-Hoc Task Force Terms of Reference · NASA Near Earth Objects Observation (NEOO) Program

  2. Interpretation of the Helix Planetary Nebula using Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics: Planets and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; Rudolph E. Schild

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hubble Space Telescope images of the Helix Planetary Nebula are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational-dynamics theory (HGD) of Gibson 1996-2006. HGD claims that baryonic-dark-matter (BDM) dominates the halo masses of galaxies (Schild 1996) as Jovian (Primordial-fog-particle [PFP]) Planets (JPPs) in proto-globular-star-cluster (PGC) clumps for all galaxy halo diameters bounded by stars. From HGD, supernova Ia (SNe Ia) events always occur in planetary nebulae (PNe) within PGCs. The dying central star of a PNe slowly accretes JPP mass to grow the white-dwarf to instability. Plasma jets, winds and radiation driven by contraction and spin-up of the carbon star evaporate JPPs revealing its Oort accretional cavity. SNe Ia events may thus be obscured or not obscured by radiation-inflated JPP atmospheres producing systematic SNe Ia distance errors, so the otherwise mysterious ``dark energy'' concept is unnecessary. HST/ACS and WFPC2 Helix images show >7,000 cometary globules and SST/IRAC images show >20,000-40,000, here interpreted as gas-dust cocoons of JPPs evaporated by the spin powered radiation of the PNe central white-dwarf. Observed JPP masses fossilizes the primordial density existing when the plasma universe fragmented into proto-superclusters, proto-clusters, and proto-galaxies. Pulsar scintillation spectra support the postulated multi-planet atmospheres.

  3. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION OF NEAR-RESONANCE PLANETARY PAIRS: CONFIRMATION OF 12 MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Ji-Wei, E-mail: xiejiwei@gmail.com, E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract transit timing variation (TTV) signals for 12 pairs of transiting planet candidates that are near first-order mean motion resonances (MMR), using publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q14). These pairs show significant sinusoidal TTVs with theoretically predicted periods, which demonstrate these planet candidates are orbiting and interacting in the same system. Although individual masses cannot be accurately extracted based only on TTVs because of the well-known degeneracy between mass and eccentricity, TTV phases and amplitudes can still place upper limits on the masses of the candidates, confirming their planetary nature. Furthermore, the mass ratios of these planet pairs can be relatively tightly constrained using these TTVs. The planetary pair in KOI 880 seems to have particularly high mass and density ratios, which might indicate very different internal compositions of these two planets. Some of these newly confirmed planets are also near MMR with other candidates in the system, forming unique resonance chains (e.g., KOI 500)

  4. The planetary system host HR\\,8799: On its $\\lambda$ Bootis nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya, A; Barrado, D; Hernndez, A Garca; Aberasturi, M; Montesinos, B; Aceituno, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HR\\,8799 is a $\\lambda$ Bootis, $\\gamma$ Doradus star hosting a planetary system and a debris disk with two rings. This makes this system a very interesting target for asteroseismic studies. This work is devoted to the determination of the internal metallicity of this star, linked with its $\\lambda$ Bootis nature (i.e., solar surface abundances of light elements, and subsolar surface abundances of heavy elements), taking advantage of its $\\gamma$ Doradus pulsations. This is the most accurate way to obtain this information, and this is the first time such a study is performed for a planetary-system-host star. We have used the equilibrium code CESAM and the non-adiabatic pulsational code GraCo. We have applied the Frequency Ratio Method (FRM) and the Time Dependent Convection theory (TDC) to estimate the mode identification, the Brunt-Va\\"is\\"al\\"a frequency integral and the mode instability, making the selection of the possible models. When the non-seismological constraints (i.e its position in the HR diagram)...

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 34863494, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50339, 2013 The signature of the stratospheric Brewer-Dobson circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The signature of the stratospheric Brewer-Dobson circulation in tropospheric clouds Ying Li1 and David W. J Collins, Colorado 80523, USA. (yingli@atmos.colostate.edu) ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights

  6. Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. D13, PAGES 16,417-16,421,NOVEMBER 20, 1989 Greenhouse Effect of Chlorofluorocarbons and Other Trace Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridlind, Ann

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. D13, PAGES 16,417-16,421,NOVEMBER 20, 1989 Greenhouse Effect of Chlorofluorocarbons and Other Trace Gases JAMESHANSEN,ANDREW LACIS,AND MICHAEL PRATHER NASA

  8. Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

  9. DOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Slovenia is producing a significant share of its electricity in nuclear power plant. The doctoral programme of nuclear engineering stems from the requirements of the Nuclear power plant Krsko, Slovenian Nuclear SafetyDOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS, Module NUCLEAR ENGINEERING

  10. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  11. Imaging the transition between pre-planetary and planetary nebulae: Integral Field Spectroscopy of hot post-AGB stars with NIFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, T M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 2 to 2.4 micron integral field spectroscopy of a sample of hot post-AGB stars with early-B spectral types, using the NIFS instrument on Gemini North. These stars are just beginning to ionize their immediate environments and turn into planetary nebulae (PNe).We use molecular hydrogen emission lines together with hydrogen and helium recombination lines to explore the distribution of molecular and atomic gas and the extent of the developing ionized region. We see a range of evolutionary stages: IRAS 18062+2410 and IRAS 18379-1707 have recently developed compact and unresolved regions of photoionized H within axisymmetric molecular envelopes, with the former object increasing its Br-Gamma flux by a factor of 5.3 in 14 years; IRAS 22023+5249 and IRAS 20462+3416 have extended Br-Gamma nebulae and in the latter object only weak H2 emission remains; IRAS 19336-0400 is at a more advanced stage of PN formation where H2 is mostly dissociated and we see structure in both the H and He recombination line nebulae...

  12. NEAR-INFRARED BAND STRENGTHS OF MOLECULES DILUTED IN N{sub 2} AND H{sub 2}O ICE MIXTURES RELEVANT TO INTERSTELLAR AND PLANETARY ICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richey, C. R.; Gerakines, P. A., E-mail: christina.r.richey@nasa.gov, E-mail: gerak@uab.edu [Astro- and Solar-System Physics Program, Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-1170 (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative abundances of ices in astrophysical environments rely on accurate laboratory measurements of physical parameters, such as band strengths (or absorption intensities), determined for the molecules of interest in relevant mixtures. In an extension of our previous study on pure-ice samples, here we focus on the near-infrared absorption features of molecules in mixtures with the dominant components of interstellar and planetary ices, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}. We present experimentally measured near-infrared spectral information (peak positions, widths, and band strengths) for both H{sub 2}O- and N{sub 2}-dominated mixtures of CO (carbon monoxide), CO{sub 2} (carbon dioxide), CH{sub 4} (methane), and NH{sub 3} (ammonia). Band strengths were determined during sample deposition by correlating the growth of near-infrared features (10,000-4000 cm{sup -1}, 1-2.5 {mu}m) with better-known mid-infrared features (4000-400 cm{sup -1}, 2.5-25 {mu}m) at longer wavelengths.

  13. Kepler photometry and optical spectroscopy of the ZZ Lep central star of the Planetary Nebula NGC 6826: rotational and wind variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handler, G; Urbaneja, M A; Antoci, V; Twicken, J D; Barclay, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three years of long-cadence and over one year of short-cadence photometry of the central star of the Planetary Nebula NGC 6826 obtained with the Kepler spacecraft, and temporally coinciding optical spectroscopy. The light curves are dominated by incoherent variability on time scales of several hours, but contain a lower-amplitude periodicity of 1.23799 d. The temporal amplitude and shape changes of this signal are best explicable with a rotational modulation, and are not consistent with a binary interpretation. We argue that we do not observe stellar pulsations within the limitations of our data, and show that a binary central star with an orbital period less than seven days could only have escaped our detection in the case of low orbital inclination. Combining the photometric and spectroscopic evidence, we reason that the hourly variations are due to a variable stellar wind, and are global in nature. The physical cause of the wind variability of NGC 6826 and other ZZ Leporis stars is likely relate...

  14. Chemical Abundances and Dust in the Halo Planetary Nebula K648 in M15: Its Origin and Evolution based on an Analysis of Multiwavelength Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Tajitsu, Akito

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an investigation of the extremely metal-poor and C-rich planetary nebula (PN) K648 in the globular cluster M15 using the UV to far-IR data obtained using the Subaru, HST, FUSE, Spitzer, and Herschel. We determined the nebular abundances of ten elements. The enhancement of F ([F/H]=+0.96) is comparable to that of the halo PN BoBn1. The central stellar abundances of seven elements are determined. The stellar C/O ratio is similar to the nebular C/O ratios from recombination line and from collisionally excited line (CEL) within error, and the stellar Ne/O ratio is also close to the nebular CEL Ne/O ratio. We found evidence of carbonaceous dust grains and molecules including Class B 6-9 um and 11.3 um polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the broad 11 um feature. The profiles of these bands are similar to those of the C-rich halo PNe H4-1 and BoBn1. Based on the theoretical model, we determined the physical conditions of the gas and dust and their masses, i.e., 0.048 Msun and 4.95x10^{-7} Msun, respective...

  15. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA_Appendix 4_Geophysical Survey Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CR Environmental, Inc. (CR) was contracted by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA) to perform hydrographic and geophysical surveys of an approximately 3.35 square mile area off the eastern shore of Hull, Massachusetts. Survey components included: Single-beam bathymetry; 100-kHz and 500-kHz side scan sonar; Magnetometry; and Low to mid-frequency sub-bottom profiling.

  16. Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

  17. A theoretical framework for volcanic degassing chemistry in a comparative planetology perspective and implications for planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    gases dominated by H2O. This simple pattern broadly mirrors the atmospheres of Venus- Earth of extra-solar planets. Volatile abundances within the planetary body interiors also matter but they play a secondary role. Furthermore, our analysis shows that any difference in redox conditions prevailing during

  18. Francis Nimmo Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz CA 95064

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    on Mars, Venus and Earth Identified shear-heating as the cause of double ridges on Europa and Enceladus- National Academies' Planetary Decadal Survey, Satellites Panel 2008- Jupiter Europa Orbiter Science) Planet formation conference (Ascona, Switz., July 2008) Solar Systems Ices workshop (Oxnard, May 2008

  19. CHEMICAL CLUES ON THE FORMATION OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS: C/O VERSUS Mg/Si FOR HARPS GTO SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bond, J. C. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Santos, N. C. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Udry, S.; Mayor, M., E-mail: edm@iac.e [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 Ch. des Mailletes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical studies suggest that C/O and Mg/Si are the most important elemental ratios in determining the mineralogy of terrestrial planets. The C/O ratio controls the distribution of Si among carbide and oxide species, while Mg/Si gives information about the silicate mineralogy. We present a detailed and uniform study of C, O, Mg, and Si abundances for 61 stars with detected planets and 270 stars without detected planets from the homogeneous high-quality unbiased HARPS GTO sample, together with 39 more planet-host stars from other surveys. We determine these important mineralogical ratios and investigate the nature of the possible terrestrial planets that could have formed in those planetary systems. We find mineralogical ratios quite different from those of the Sun, showing that there is a wide variety of planetary systems which are not similar to our solar system. Many planetary host stars present an Mg/Si value lower than 1, so their planets will have a high Si content to form species such as MgSiO{sub 3}. This type of composition can have important implications for planetary processes such as plate tectonics, atmospheric composition, or volcanism.

  20. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 39, Nr 8, 14091411 (2004) Abstracts available online at http://meteoritics.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contributions to particle physics, nuclear physics (the discovery of nuclear particle tracks and the invention this technique to diverse problems in meteoritics, neutron dosimetry and cosmic rays, as well as archaeology

  1. Probing new physics with flavor physics (and probing flavor physics with new physics)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosef Nir

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a written version of a series of lectures aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in particle theory/string theory/particle experiment familiar with the basics of the Standard Model. We begin with an overview of flavor physics and its implications for new physics. We emphasize the "new physics flavor puzzle". Then, we give four specific examples of flavor measurements and the lessons that have been (or can be) drawn from them: (i) Charm physics: lessons for supersymmetry from the upper bound on $\\Delta m_D$. (ii) Bottom physics: model independent lessons on the KM mechanism and on new physics in neutral B mixing from $S_{\\psi K_S}$. (iii) Top physics and beyond: testing minimal flavor violation at the LHC. (iv) Neutrino physics: interpreting the data on neutrino masses and mixing within flavor models.

  2. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

  3. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

  4. Physics 151 Lecture 1 Physics 207: Lecture 1, Pg 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    Page 1 Physics 151 ­ Lecture 1 Physics 207: Lecture 1, Pg 1 Physics 207, Sections: 301/601Physics 207, Sections: 301/601 ­­ 314/614314/614 General Physics IGeneral Physics I MichaelMichael Winokur of the courseScope of the course Begin chapter 1Begin chapter 1 Homepage:Homepage: http://romano.physics

  5. Whither Nuclear Physics ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed Afsar Abbas

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Physics has had its ups and downs. However in recent years, bucked up by some new and often puzzling data, it has become a potentially very rich field. We review some of these exciting developments in a few important sectors of nuclear physics. Emphasis shall be on the study of exotic nuclei and the new physics that these nuclei are teaching us.

  6. in Condensed Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Master in Condensed Matter Physics ­ Master académique #12;2 #12;3 Students at the University. Condensed matter physics is about explaining and predicting the relationship between the atomic, and broad education in the field of condensed matter physics · introduce you to current research topics

  7. PHYSICS, QUALITATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kleer, Johan

    PHYSICS, QUALITATIVE C BIBLIOGRAPHY D. G. Bobrow and R J. Hayes, eds., Artif. Intell. 24," in Gentner and Stevens, 1983, pp. 155--190. J. de Kleer and J. S. Brown "A Qualitative Physics Based.J., 1983. P. Hayes, "The Naive Physics Manifesto," in Hobbs and Moore, 1985, pp 1--36 J R Hobbs and R C

  8. B Physics at LHCb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monica Pepe Altarelli; Frederic Teubert

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    LHCb is a dedicated detector for b physics at the LHC. In this article we present a concise review of the detector design and performance together with the main physics goals and their relevance for a precise test of the Standard Model and search of New Physics beyond it.

  9. Quantum Physics Einstein's Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Quantum Physics confronts Einstein's Gravity Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint Louis USA Science Saturdays 13 October 2001 #12; Quantum Physics confronts Einstein's Gravity and with Einstein's theory of gravity (the general relativity) is still the single biggest theoretical problem

  10. Physical Probability Patrick Maher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Physical Probability Patrick Maher University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign October 13, 2007 ABSTRACT. By "physical probability" I mean the empirical concept of probability in or- dinary language-extreme physical probabilities are compatible with determin- ism. Two principles, called specification

  11. The destruction of inner planetary systems during high-eccentricity migration of gas giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustill, Alexander J; Johansen, Anders

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Jupiters are giant planets on orbits a few hundredths of an AU. They do not share their system with low-mass close-in planets, despite these latter being exceedingly common. Two migration channels for hot Jupiters have been proposed: through a protoplanetary gas disc or by tidal circularisation of highly-eccentric planets. We show that highly-eccentric giant planets that will become hot Jupiters clear out any low-mass inner planets in the system, explaining the observed lack of such companions to hot Jupiters. A less common outcome of the interaction is that the giant planet is ejected by the inner planets. Furthermore, the interaction can implant giant planets on moderately-high eccentricities at semimajor axes $<1$ AU, a region otherwise hard to populate. Our work supports the hypothesis that most hot Jupiters reached their current orbits following a phase of high eccentricity, possibly excited by other planetary or stellar companions.

  12. CONSTRAINING THE PLANETARY SYSTEM OF FOMALHAUT USING HIGH-RESOLUTION ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boley, A. C.; Payne, M. J.; Ford, E. B.; Shabram, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Corder, S. [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Dent, W. R. F. [ALMA, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical evolution of planetary systems leaves observable signatures in debris disks. Optical images trace micron-sized grains, which are strongly affected by stellar radiation and need not coincide with their parent body population. Observations of millimeter-sized grains accurately trace parent bodies, but previous images lack the resolution and sensitivity needed to characterize the ring's morphology. Here we present ALMA 350 GHz observations of the Fomalhaut debris ring. These observations demonstrate that the parent body population is 13-19 AU wide with a sharp inner and outer boundary. We discuss three possible origins for the ring and suggest that debris confined by shepherd planets is the most consistent with the ring's morphology.

  13. The chemistry of planetary nebulae in the outer regions of M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corradi, R L M; Balick, B; Henry, R B C; Hensley, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopy of nine planetary nebulae (PNe) in the outskirts of M31, all but one obtained with the 10.4m GTC telescope. These sources extend our previous study of the oxygen abundance gradient of M31 to galactocentric radii as large as 100 kpc. None of the targets are bona fide members of a classical, metal-poor and ancient halo. Two of the outermost PNe have solar oxygen abundances, as well as radial velocities consistent with the kinematics of the extended disk of M31. The other PNe have a slightly lower oxygen content ([O/H] ~ -0.4) and in some cases large deviations from the disk kinematics. These PNe support the current view that the external regions of M31 are the result of a complex interaction and merger process, with evidence for a widespread population of solar-metallicity stars produced in a starburst that occurred ~2 Gyr ago.

  14. Growth of asteroids, planetary embryos and Kuiper belt objects by chondrule accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Anders; Lacerda, Pedro; Bizzarro, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized spherules that dominate primitive meteorites (chondrites) originating from the asteroid belt. The incorporation of chondrules into asteroidal bodies must be an important step in planet formation, but the mechanism is not understood. We show that the main growth of asteroids can result from gas-drag-assisted accretion of chondrules. The largest planetesimals of a population with a characteristic radius of 100 km undergo run-away accretion of chondrules within ~3 Myr, forming planetary embryos up to Mars sizes along with smaller asteroids whose size distribution matches that of main belt asteroids. The aerodynamical accretion leads to size-sorting of chondrules consistent with chondrites. Accretion of mm-sized chondrules and ice particles drives the growth of planetesimals beyond the ice line as well, but the growth time increases above the disk life time outside of 25 AU. The contribution of direct planetesimal accretion to the growth of both asteroids and Kuiper belt objects is...

  15. Optical Spectra of Radio Planetary Nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Payne; M. D. Filipovi?; E. J. Crawford; A. Y. De Horta; G. L. White; F. H. Stootman

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from spectral observations of four candidate radio sources co-identified with known planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These were made using the Radcliffe 1.9-meter telescope in Sutherland, South Africa. These radio PNe were originally found in Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) surveys of the SMC at 1.42 and 2.37 GHz, and were further confirmed by new high resolution ATCA images at 6 and 3 cm (4"/2"). Optical PNe and radio candidates are within 2" and may represent a subpopulation of selected radio bright objects. Nebular ionized masses of these objects may be 2.6 MSol or greater, supporting the existence of PNe progenitor central stars with masses up to 8 MSol.

  16. Optical Spectra of Radio Planetary Nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, J L; Crawford, E J; De Horta, A Y; White, G L; Stootman, F H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from spectral observations of four candidate radio sources co-identified with known planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These were made using the Radcliffe 1.9-meter telescope in Sutherland, South Africa. These radio PNe were originally found in Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) surveys of the SMC at 1.42 and 2.37 GHz, and were further confirmed by new high resolution ATCA images at 6 and 3 cm (4"/2"). Optical PNe and radio candidates are within 2" and may represent a subpopulation of selected radio bright objects. Nebular ionized masses of these objects may be 2.6 MSol or greater, supporting the existence of PNe progenitor central stars with masses up to 8 MSol.

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON THE LIFETIMES OF DISKS RESULTING FROM TIDALLY DESTROYED ROCKY PLANETARY BODIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girven, J.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Brinkworth, C. S.; Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Farihi, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Koester, D., E-mail: j.m.girven@warwick.ac.uk [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer IRAC observations of 15 metal-polluted white dwarfs reveal infrared excesses in the spectral energy distributions of HE 0110-5630, GD 61, and HE 1349-2305. All three of these stars have helium-dominated atmospheres, and their infrared emissions are consistent with warm dust produced by the tidal destruction of (minor) planetary bodies. This study brings the number of metal-polluted, helium and hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs surveyed with IRAC to 53 and 38, respectively. It also nearly doubles the number of metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs found to have closely orbiting dust by Spitzer. From the increased statistics for both atmospheric types with circumstellar dust, we derive a typical disk lifetime of log [t{sub disk}(yr)] = 5.6 {+-} 1.1 (ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr). This assumes a relatively constant rate of accretion over the timescale where dust persists, which is uncertain. We find that the fraction of highly metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs that have an infrared excess detected by Spitzer is only 23%, compared to 48% for metal-polluted hydrogen-rich white dwarfs, and we conclude from this difference that the typical lifetime of dusty disks is somewhat shorter than the diffusion timescales of helium-rich white dwarf. We also find evidence for higher time-averaged accretion rates onto helium-rich stars compared to the instantaneous accretion rates onto hydrogen-rich stars; this is an indication that our picture of evolved star-planetary system interactions is incomplete. We discuss some speculative scenarios that can explain the observations.

  18. Physics at Strathclyde N. Langford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    #12;Physics at Strathclyde N. Langford Department of Physics University of Strathclyde #12 and Misconceptions o "There's no money in physics" o "I like the idea of a physics degree but what actual jobs do physics degree is great ­ if you want to teach physics" Untrue Physics leads to engineering NO

  19. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Kayser

    2013-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures.

  20. Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe An; Daniel Rey; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

    2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the analysis of a broad spectrum of complex systems where measurements are sparse. When the model of the complex system has errors, the method still enables accurate estimation of the state of the model and thus evaluation of the model errors in a manner separated from uncertainties in the data assimilation procedure.