Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Techniques Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: may be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: may be inferred Hydrological: may be inferred Thermal: may be inferred Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques: Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Geophysical techniques measure physical phenomena of the earth such as gravity, magnetism, elastic waves, electrical and electromagnetic waves.

2

Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

Zhdanov; Michael S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research during the first year of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The proposed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using modern distributed acquisition systems and advanced methods of 3-D inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. One of the most popular is the Cole-Cole relaxation model. In this progress report we have constructed and analyzed a different physical and mathematical model of the IP effect based on the effective-medium theory. We have developed a rigorous mathematical model of multi-phase conductive media, which can provide a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, using the conductivity relaxation model parameters. The parameters of the new conductivity relaxation model can be used for discrimination of the different types of rock formations, which is an important goal in mineral exploration. The solution of this problem requires development of an effective numerical method for EM forward modeling in 3-D inhomogeneous media. During the first year of the project we have developed a prototype 3-D IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IP) method. Our IE forward modeling code INTEM3DIP is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have tested the working version of the INTEM3DIP code for computer simulation of the IP data for several models including a southwest US porphyry model and a Kambalda-style nickel sulfide deposit. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology envisioned in this proposal, will be used for the discrimination of different rocks, and in this way will provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research during the first two years of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The developed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using effective-medium theory and advanced methods of 3-D modeling and inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. In this project, we have developed a rigorous physical/mathematical model of heterogeneous conductive media based on the effective-medium approach. The new generalized effective-medium theory of IP effect (GEMTIP) provides a unified mathematical method to study heterogeneity, multi-phase structure, and polarizability of rocks. The geoelectrical parameters of a new composite conductivity model are determined by the intrinsic petrophysical and geometrical characteristics of composite media: mineralization and/or fluid content of rocks, matrix composition, porosity, anisotropy, and polarizability of formations. The new GEMTIP model of multi-phase conductive media provides a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, and the volume content of different minerals using electromagnetic data. We have developed a 3-D EM-IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IE) method. Our IE forward modeling software is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have demonstrated that the generalized effective-medium theory of induced polarization (GEMTIP) in combination with the IE forward modeling method can be used for rock-scale forward modeling from grain-scale parameters. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology introduced in this project can be used for the discrimination between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Definition: Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic)

6

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

7

Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geophysical Techniques page? For detailed information on Geophysical Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geophysical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geophysical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total. E [+] Electrical Techniques‎ (2 categories) 5 pages G [×] Gravity Techniques‎ 3 pages M [×] Magnetic Techniques‎ 3 pages S [+] Seismic Techniques‎ (2 categories) 2 pages Pages in category "Geophysical Techniques" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. D DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) E Electrical Techniques G Gravity Techniques M Magnetic Techniques

8

Applications of Geophysical and Geological Techniques to Identify Areas for Detailed Exploration in Black Mesa Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

A recent report submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (NIPER/BDM-0226) discussed in considerable detail, the geology, structure, tectonics, and history of oil production activities in the Black Mesa basin in Arizona. As part of the final phase of wrapping up research in the Black Mesa basin, the results of a few additional geophysical studies conducted on structure, stratigraphy, petrophysical analysis, and oil and gas occurrences in the basin are presented here. A second objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of relatively inexpensive, noninvasive techniques like gravity or magnetic in obtaining information on structure and tectonics in sufficient detail for hydrocarbon exploration, particularly by using the higher resolution satellite data now becoming available to the industry.

George, S.; Reeves, T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, M.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Geophysical Exploration (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geophysical Exploration (Montana) Geophysical Exploration (Montana) Geophysical Exploration (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, including those pertaining to: (a) Adequate identification of seismic exploration crews operating in this

10

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

11

Geophysical Exploration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Exploration Technologies Geophysical Exploration Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Geophysical Exploration Technologies Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

12

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

13

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Abstract We present integrated geophysical data to characterize a geothermal system at Neal Hot Springs in eastern Oregon. This system is currently being developed for geothermal energy production. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the Western Snake River Plain. The intersection of these two fault systems, coupled with high geothermal gradients from thin continental crust produces pathways for surface water and deep geothermal water interactions at Neal Hot Springs.

14

Category:Exploration Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geothermal Exploration page? For detailed information on Geothermal Exploration, click here. Category:Exploration Techniques Add.png Add a new Exploration Technique Subcategories This category has the following 9 subcategories, out of 9 total. D [+] Data and Modeling Techniques‎ (2 categories) 2 pages [+] Downhole Techniques‎ (5 categories) 10 pages [+] Drilling Techniques‎ (2 categories) 4 pages F [+] Field Methods‎ (1 categories) [+] Field Techniques‎ (2 categories) 4 pages G [+] Geochemical Techniques‎ (1 categories) 1 pages G cont. [+] Geophysical Techniques‎ (4 categories) 5 pages L [+] Lab Analysis Techniques‎ (2 categories) 4 pages R [+] Remote Sensing Techniques‎ (2 categories) 2 pages

15

Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

taking of bowhead whales due to certain oil and gas exploration activities by NMFS. Section 101 (a)(5) prepared by MMS, as well as pertinent research on the bowhead whale and matters related to oil exploration effect on the species or stock and its habitat. These authorizations are often requested for oil and gas

16

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Existing geologic data show that the basalt has been broken by complex intersecting fault zones at the hot springs. Natural state hot water flow patterns in the fracture network will be interpreted from temperature gradient wells and then tested with moderate depth core holes. Production and injection well tests of the core holes will be monitored with an innovative combination of Flowing Differential Self-Potential (FDSP) and resistivity tomography surveys. The cointerpretation of all these highly detailed geophysical methods sensitive to fracture permeability patterns and water flow during the well tests will provide unprecedented details on the structures and flow in a shallow geothermal aquifer and support effective development of the low temperature reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets.

17

Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Methods Geophysical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geophysical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geophysical Methods: Methods used to measure the physical properties of the earth Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction There are five main types of geophysical methods used for geothermal resource discovery: Seismic Methods (active and passive) Electrical Methods Magnetic Methods Gravity Methods Radiometric Methods Seismic methods dominates oil and gas exploration, and probably accounts

18

CRC handbook of geophysical exploration at sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The broad subject matter presented in this volume can be classified into two general categories: potential field methods as represented by gravity magnetic, electrical and telluric methods; and those based on elastic wave theory with emphasis on acoustic and seismic waves. Geographic coverage is broad, including operational methods conducted in continental as well as deep waters in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico and Alaska. The results of recent diversified research and operational techniques are described.

Geyer, R.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assessment of surface geophysical methods in geothermal exploration and recommendations for future research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The four classes of geophysical methods considered are: passive seismic methods; active seismic methods; natural field electrical and electromagnetic methods; and, controlled-source electrical and electromagnetic methods. Areas of rsearch for improvement of the various techniques for geothermal exploration are identified. (JGB)

Goldstein, N.E.; Norris, R.A.; Wilt, M.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Wavelet denoising techniques with applications to experimental geophysical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare Fourier-based and wavelet-based denoising techniques applied to both synthetic and real experimental geophysical data. The Fourier-based technique used for comparison is the classical Wiener estimator, and the wavelet-based ... Keywords: Denoising, Empirical Bayes, Wavelet, Wavelet thresholding, Wiener filter

Albert C. To; Jeffrey R. Moore; Steven D. Glaser

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GRR/Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit 04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A Geophysical Exploration Permit is necessary for conducting seismic

22

Template:ExplorationTechnique | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

'ExplorationTechnique' template. To define a new Exploration 'ExplorationTechnique' template. To define a new Exploration Technique, please use the Exploration Technique Form. Parameters Definition - A link to the OpenEI definition of the technique (optional) ExplorationGroup - ExplorationSubGroup - ParentExplorationTechnique - parent technique for relationship tree LithologyInfo - the type of lithology information this technique could provide StratInfo - the type of stratigraphic and/or structural information this technique could provide HydroInfo - the type of hydrogeology information this technique could provide ThermalInfo - the type of temperature information this technique could provide EstimatedCostLowUSD - the estimated value only of the low end of the cost range (units described in CostUnit) EstimatedCostMedianUSD - the estimated value only of the median cost

23

Property:ExplorationTechnique | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationTechnique ExplorationTechnique Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationTechnique Property Type Page Description The ExplorationTechnique used in the Exploration Activity. Use the form ExplorationTechnique to create new exploration technique pages. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: A Aeromagnetic Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Pages using the property "ExplorationTechnique" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + 2-M Probe Survey + 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + 2-M Probe Survey + 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) + 2-M Probe Survey + 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + 2-M Probe Survey +

24

Property:ExplorationGroup | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationGroup ExplorationGroup Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationGroup Property Type Page Description Exploration Group for Exploration Activities Pages using the property "ExplorationGroup" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey + Field Techniques + A Acoustic Logs + Downhole Techniques + Active Seismic Methods + Geophysical Techniques + Active Seismic Techniques + Geophysical Techniques + Active Sensors + Remote Sensing Techniques +, Remote Sensing Techniques + Aerial Photography + Remote Sensing Techniques + Aeromagnetic Survey + Geophysical Techniques + Airborne Electromagnetic Survey + Geophysical Techniques + Airborne Gravity Survey + Geophysical Techniques + Analytical Modeling + Data and Modeling Techniques +

25

Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect

A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geophysical Techniques Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borehole geophysics were completed at the Raft River valley, Idaho. References Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. (1 February 1977) Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geophysical_Method_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=594349" Category: Exploration Activities

28

Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

Barnhart, Kevin Scott

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Opportunities in geophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What are the chances of a physicist finding an agreeable job in geophysics? The apparently poor prospects for jobs in academic physics led me to explore the possibilities in geophysics; this field

H. Richard Crane

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...

31

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a leucogranite which intruded the metamorphic rocks. Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the drillhole itself was strongly influenced by structural zones. Water chemistry indicates that this geothermal resource is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Several geophysical logs were employed to characcterize the drillhole geology. The natural gamma and neutron porosity logs indicate gross rock type and the accoustic logs indicate fractured rock and potentially permeable zones. A series of temperature logs run as a function of time during and after the completion of drilling were most useful in delineating the zones of maximum heat flux. Convective heat flow and temperatures greater than 350/sup 0/F appear to occur only along an open fracture system encountered between depths of 1850 and 2775 feet. Temperature logs indicate a negative thermal gradient below 3000 feet.

Galbraith, R.M.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

PETERSEN SW

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

ON THE PHYSICS OF GALVANIC SOURCE ELECTROMAGNETIC GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

A numerical study was conducted to investigate the governing physics of galvanic source electromagnetic (EM) methods for terrestrial and marine exploration scenarios. The terrestrial exploration scenario involves the grounded electric dipole source EM (GESTEM) method and the examination of how the GESTEM method can resolve a thin resistive layer representing underground gas and/or hydrocarbon storage. Numerical modeling studies demonstrate that the loop transient EM (TEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) methods are insensitive to a thin horizontal resistor at depth because they utilize horizontal currents. In contrast to these standard EM methods, the GESTEM method generates both vertical and horizontal transient currents. The vertical transient current interacts with a thin horizontal resistor and causes charge buildup on its surface. These charges produce a measurable perturbation in the surface electric field at early time. The degree of perturbation depends on source waveform. When the GESTEM method is energized with step-off waveform, the perturbation due to a thin horizontal resistor is small. This is because the step-off waveform mainly consists of low frequency signals. An alternative is taking the time-derivative of the step-off responses to approximate the impulse response which includes higher frequency signals. In order to improve degree of perturbation especially due to a localized small 3-D resistor, the diffusion angle of the vertical transient current, 45 should be considered to make vertical currents coupled to a resistive target efficiently. The major drawback of the GESTEM method lies in the fact that GESTEM sounding can not be interpreted using 1-D inversion schemes if there is near-surface inhomogeneity. The marine exploration scenario investigates the physics of marine frequency-domain controlled source EM (FDCSEM) and time-domain controlled source EM (TDCSEM) methods to explore resistive hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine environments. Unlike the marine MT (MMT) method, these two methods are very sensitive to a thin hydrocarbon reservoir at depth because their sources generate vertical as well as horizontal currents. As for the FDCSEM method, the normalized EM peak response occurs where the airwave starts to dominate the seafloor EM response in the background model. This point is a function of source frequency, seawater depth and seafloor resistivity. The peak magnitude of the normalized EM response depends on whether the high concentration of vertical currents can reach and interact with the reservoir effectively. Noise levels of the EM receivers are important factors for successful FDCSEM and TDCSEM survey design. The major benefit of using magnetic field responses over electric ones is that the noise level of magnetic receiver theoretically allows for greater surface coverage compared to that of the electric receiver. Like the GESTEM method, the TDCSEM method also requires the use of a proper transient EM pulse such that the relatively high frequencies are produced. The impulse response of the TDCSEM method is characterized by two-path diffusion of the EM signal. The initial response is caused by faster signal diffusion through the less conductive seafloor, while the later arrivals result from slower diffusion through the more conductive seawater. Therefore, at larger separations, the effects of the seafloor and seawater are separable. This can be useful in reducing the airwave problem associated with the FDCSEM method in shallow marine environments.

David Alumbaugh and Evan Um

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Abstract In order to evaluate the suitability of the soil mercury geochemical survey as a geothermal exploration technique, soil concentrates of mercy are compared to the distribution of measured geothermal gradients at Dixie Valley, Nevada; Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and Nova, Japan. Zones containing high mercury values are found to closely correspond to high geothermal gradient zones in all three areas. Moreover, the highest mercury values within the anomalies are found near the wells with the highest geothermal gradient. Such close correspondence between soil concentrations

35

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geophysical Techniques Activity Date 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic and geophysics studies were completed at the Raft River valley. References Williams, P.L.; Mabey, D.R.; Pierce, K.L.; Zohdy, A.A.R.; Ackermann, H.; Hoover, D.B. (1 May 1975) Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geophysical_Method_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1975)&oldid=59434

36

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

37

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast tumor (black color in top image of monitor screen) using the software to visualize in color the various intensities of neutron transmissions through the breast tissue. ORNL and University of Tennessee collaboration now analyzing first results from neutron radiographs of cancerous tissue samples Today's range of techniques for detection of breast and other cancers include mammography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET), and optical imaging. Each technology has advantages and disadvantages, with limitations either

38

A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

42

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This collaborative project will perform the following tasks to fully define the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoir underlying the Jemez Reservation: - Conduct 1-6,000-scale geologic mapping of 6 mi2 surrounding the Indian Springs area. - Using the detailed geologic map, locate one N-S and two E-W seismic lines and run a seismic survey of 4 mi2; reduce and analyze seismic data using innovative high-resolution seismic migration imaging techniques developed by LANL, and integrate with 3-D audio-frequency MT/MT data acquired at the same area for fault and subsurface structure imaging and resource assessment.

43

Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques M *Corresponding author: ayman.al-falou@isen.fr Underwater target detection is investigated by combining active. This experimentally study illustrates the potential of polarization imaging for underwater target detection and opens

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

Evaluation of the mercury soil mapping geothermal exploration techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the suitability of the soil mercury geochemical survey as a geothermal exploration technique, soil concentrations of mercury are compared to the distribution of measured geothermal gradients at Dixie Valley, Nevada; Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and Noya, Japan. Zones containing high-mercury values are found to closely correspond to high geothermal gradient zones in all three areas. Moreover, the highest mercury values within the anomalies are found near the wells with the highest geothermal gradient. Such close correspondence between soil concentrations of mercury and high-measured geothermal gradients strongly suggests that relatively low-cost soil mercury geochemical sampling can be effective in identifying drilling targets within high-temperature areas.

Matlick, J.S.; Shiraki, M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques:

46

The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

Thomas Chidsey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents  

SciTech Connect

The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

Thomas Chidsey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Simple Nonparametric Techniques for Exploring Changing Probability Distributions of Weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic influences are expected to cause the probability distribution of weather variables to change in nontrivial ways. This study presents simple nonparametric methods for exploring and comparing differences in pairs of probability ...

Christopher A. T. Ferro; Abdelwaheb Hannachi; David B. Stephenson

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geothermal exploration techniques: a case study. Final report. [Coso geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to review and perform a critical evaluation of geothermal exploration methods and techniques. The original intent was to publish the work as a handbook; however, the information is not specific enough for that purpose. A broad general survey of geothermal exploration techniques is reported in combination with one specific case study.

Combs, J.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

51

Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetic Techniques Magnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Presence of magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Stratigraphic/Structural: Mapping of basement structures, horst blocks, fault systems, fracture zones, dykes and intrusions. Hydrological: The circulation of hydrothermal fluid may impact the magnetic susceptibility of rocks. Thermal: Rocks lose their magnetic properties at the Curie temperature (580° C for magnetite) [1] and, upon cooling, remagnetize in the present magnetic field orientation. The Curie point depth in the subsurface may be determined in a magnetic survey to provide information about hydrothermal activity in a region.

52

Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Techniques Gravity Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gravity Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Gravity Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. Stratigraphic/Structural: Delineation of steeply dipping formations, geological discontinuities and faults, intrusions and the deposition of silicates due to hydrothermal activity. Hydrological: Density of sedimentary rocks are strongly influenced by fluid contained within pore space. Dry bulk density refers to the rock with no moisture, while the wet bulk density accounts for water saturation; fluid content may alter density by up to 30%.(Sharma, 1997)

53

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques (Redirected from Electromagnetic Sounding Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

54

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

55

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

56

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques (Redirected from Ground Electromagnetic Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

57

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

58

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

59

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

60

DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production Abstract InSAR is a remote sensing tool that has applications in both geothermal exploration and in the management of producing fields. The technique has developed rapidly in recent years and the most evolved algorithms, now capable of providing precise ground movement measurements with unprecedented spatial density over large areas, allow, among other things, the monitoring of the effects of fluid injection and extraction on surface deformation and the detection of active faults. Multi-interferogram approaches have been used at several geothermal sites in the US and abroad.

62

Guided Exploration: an Inductive Minimalist Approach for Teaching Tool-related Concepts and Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce Guided Exploration as an inductive teaching approach. It is based on Minimalism and makes use of the pattern format. Guided Exploration addresses a couple of problems when teaching tool-related concepts and techniques, like ... Keywords: Educational Patterns, Inductive Teaching, Learning Styles

Christian Kppe, Rick Rodin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

64

Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERS Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation detection and characterization for nuclear nonproliferation

Eustice, Ryan

65

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage on Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana: A Comparison of Surface Exploration Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, head gas and thermal desorption methods best match production; other methods also mapped depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, head gas along with microbial, iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, results are preliminary. Reconnaissance mapping of magnetic susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent soil gas and head gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential.

Monson, Lawrence M.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

67

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

68

Evaluation of lineament analysis as an exploration technique for geothermal energy, western and central Nevada. Final report, June 1976--October 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lineament analysis as an exploration technique for geothermal energy using multi-scale, multi-format imagery and geophysical data is investigated and evaluated. Two areas in Nevada, each having distinct differences in structural style were studied. One area, which encompasses a portion of the Battle Mountain Heat Flow High, was studied to determine the relationship between regional and local structural controls and geothermal activity. Four geothermal sites within this area (Winnemucca AMS) were selected and studied in detail. These sites include: 1) Leach Hot Springs, 2) Kyle Hot Springs, 3) Beowawe geothermal area and Buffalo Valley Hot Springs. A second area encompassed by the Reno AMS Sheet was selected for further study in a region dominated by three diverse tectonic styles; these are: 1) the Sierra Nevada Front, 2) the Walker Lane, and 3) basin-and-range structures. Geothermal sites analyzed at site specific scales within the Reno AMS Sheet included Steamboat Hot Springs in the Sierra Nevada Front subprovince, Dixie Valley Hot Springs located in typical basin-and-range terrain and the Brady's-Desert Peak area which is marginal to the Walker Lane. Data products employed included LANDSAT imagery, SKYLAB photography, gravity, and aeromagnetic maps. Results of this investigation indicate that in north-central Nevada the major sites of geothermal activity are associated with northeast trending structures related to the Midas Trench lineament and that the most viable geothermal area (Beowawe is located at the intersection of the northeast trend of the Oregon-Nevada Lineament.

Trexler, D.T.; Bell, E.J.; Roquemore, G.R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description A comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach is proposed using existing geophysical exploration technology coupled with new seismic techniques and subject matter experts to determine the combination of geoscience data that demonstrates the greatest potential for identifying EGS drilling targets using non-invasive techniques. This proposed exploration methodology is expected to increase spatial resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness that is inherent in geological data, thereby reducing the uncertainty in the primary selection criteria for identifying EGS drilling targets. These criteria are, in order of importance: (1) temperatures greater than 200-250°C at 1-5 km depth; (2) rock type at the depth of interest, and; (3) stress regime.

70

An efficient technique for exploring register file size in ASIP synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance estimation is a crucial operation which drives the design space exploration in Application Specific Instruction Set Processors (ASIP) synthesis. The usual approach to estimate performance is to do simulation. With increasing dimensions of ... Keywords: ASIP Synthesis, design space exploration, global analysis, instruction scheduling, liveness analysis, register file, register spill, retargetable estimation, storage exploration

Manoj Kumar Jain; M. Balakrishnan; Anshul Kumar

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

LANL | Solid Earth Geophysics | EES-17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) Home Publications Collaboration & Links Staff Research Highlights Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Geodynamics & National Security Nonlinear Elasticity Time Reversal Los Alamos Seismic Network Stimulated Porous Fluid Flow Resource Recovery Seismic & Acoustic Imaging Exploration Geophysics Induced Seismicity Volcanoes & Earthquakes Other Research CONTACTS Group Leader Ken Rehfeldt Administrative Contacts Jody Benson Cecilia Gonzales Geophysics (EES-17) The Geophysics Group supports the national security mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory by providing technical expertise to monitor movement of Earth's crust while predicting the effects of these events on the environment. Though our focus is on seismic monitoring, we also apply electric, magnetic, radionuclide, and acoustic technologies to monitor underground explosions, maintain our ability to conduct tests, and develop the Yucca Mountain Project. In addition, we study the nonlinear properties of earth materials, imaging with seismic waves, how seismic waves affect the interaction of porous rocks and fluids, use of seismic waves to characterize underground oil reservoirs, volcanology and volcanic seismicity, advanced computational physics of earth materials, and using drilling technology to study the crust of the earth. These tasks are complemented by our extensive background in both conventional and hot dry rock geothermal energy development and geophysical support of the Nevada Test Site.

72

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 Abstract Neal Hot Springs (NHS) is an active geothermal site and home to a new binary power plant built by U.S. Geothermal and funded through the Department of Energy. Power production is scheduled to begin in late 2012 and is proposed to generate 25 mega-watts of power to its customer Idaho Power. The project has also served Boise State University as an ideal location for geophysical exploration and research. Research began in spring of 2011 during BSU's annual geophysics field camp. Students and faculty conducted various geophysical surveys to gain insight into the controlling geological structure of the area. Studies of the site continued into 2012

76

Exploring early evaluation techniques of ambient health promoting devices in home environments of senior citizens living independently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, our goal is to explore different early evaluation techniques and their effectiveness for designing better ambient health- promoting devices for the elderly. One cannot assess the complete impact of these devices without full implementation ... Keywords: Wizard of Oz, ambient technology, early evaluation methods, health monitoring devices, senior citizens, storyboarding, technology probe

Rajasee Rege; Heekyoung Jung; William Hazelwood; Greg Orlov; Kay Connelly; Kalpana Shankar

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal with CCS Sector. This law

78

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Combined MCDM techniques for exploring stock selection based on Gordon model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basing on the Gordon model perspective and applying multiple criteria decision making (MCDM), this research explores the influential factors and relative weight of dividend, discount rate, and dividend growth rate. The purpose is to establish an investment ... Keywords: Analytical network process (ANP), Discount rate, Dividend, Dividend growth rate, Gordon model, Multiple criteria decision making (MCDM)

Wen-Shiung Lee; Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng; Jyh-Liang Guan; Kuo-Ting Chien; Juan-Ming Huang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Geophysical Applications of Partial Wavelet Coherence and Multiple Wavelet Coherence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the application of partial wavelet coherence (PWC) and multiple wavelet coherence (MWC) to geophysics is demonstrated. PWC is a technique similar to partial correlation that helps identify the resulting wavelet coherence (WTC) ...

Eric K. W. Ng; Johnny C. L. Chan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

82

Computerized coal-quality prediction from digital geophysical logs  

SciTech Connect

A digital suite of geophysical logs, including gamma-ray, resistivity and gamma-gamma density, were used to develop and test a method for predicting coal quality parameters for the Wyodak coal in the Powder River basin of Wyoming. The method was developed by plotting the average of various log response increments (obtained from the contractor's 9-track digital tapes) versus the analytically determined ash, moisture, and Btu/lb for the same intervals of the coal seam. Standard curve-fitting techniques were then employed to determine which log response parameter most accurately predicted the various quality parameters. A computer program was written that reads 9-track, digital, log tapes and determines the coal quality parameters based on the relationships between log response and analytical values. The computer program was written in Fortran 77 for a VAX 11/780 minicomputer. The program was designed to run interactively with user-determined options depending on which geophysical logs were available. Preliminary results have been very encouraging to date with predicted versus analytically determined parameters being estimated to an accuracy of +/-300 Btu/lb (with the average being +/-150 Btu/lb), +/-2% ash and +/-3% moisture. This compares to ASTM lab-to-lab analytical standards of +/-100 Btu/lb, +/-0.7% ash, and +/-0.5% moisture. This prediction methods is applicable to coals from other basins and offers promise as a cost saving tool for exploration and production uses.

Nations, D.L.; Tabet, D.E.; Gerould, C.R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Passive seismic techniques for geothermal exploration. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1976-February 28, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts concentrated on the development and verification of forward modeling techniques and the processing and analysis of the teleseismic and gravity data bases for the Imperial Valley. Present capabilities include the forward modeling of surface observations of teleseismic travel-time residuals and gravity anomalies associated with three-dimensional variations in near-surface seismic velocities and densities. Considerable time was spent devising test cases that both verify the modeling programs and provide insight for the discretization scheme to be used for modeling the Imperial Valley. The teleseismic travel-time data base originally acquired during the first quarter of this project was subjected to various statistical tests for error analysis.

Savino, J.M.; Goff, R.C.; Jordan, T.H.; Lambert, D.G.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geothermal exploration technology. Annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following programs: electrical and electromagnetic computer modeling techniques; minicomputer for in-field processing of magnetotelluric data; superconducting thin-film gradiometer and magnetometers for geophysical applications; magnetotellurics with SQUID magnetometers; controlled-source electromagnetic system; geothermal seismic field system development; Klamath Basin geothermal resource and exploration technique evaluation; Mt. Hood geothermal resource evaluation; East Mesa seismic study; seismological studies at Cerro Prieto; self-potential studies at Cerro Prieto; resistivity studies at Cerro Prieto; magnetotelluric survey at Cerro Prieto; and precision gravity studies at Cerro Prieto. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

86

Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

Daniels, Jeff

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration in non-volcanic areas must above all rely on geophysical techniques to identify the reservoir, as it is unable to resort to volcanological methodologies. A brief description is therefore given of the contribution that can be obtained from certain types of geophysical prospectings. Author(s): Raffaello Nannini Published: Geothermics, 1986 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Aerial Photography (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986)

88

Gas Exploration Software for Reducing Uncertainty in Gas ...  

... * Improve estimation of reservoir parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimation when exploring for gas and oil deposits using geophysical data More ...

89

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the most definitive in providing the necessary data for successful citing of geothermal exploration, production, and injection wells, which appears to be electrical geophysical...

90

Particle Filtering in Geophysical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of particle filters in geophysical systems is reviewed. Some background on Bayesian filtering is provided, and the existing methods are discussed. The emphasis is on the methodology, and not so much on the applications themselves. ...

Peter Jan van Leeuwen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Available Energy of Geophysical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative derivation of the available energy for a geophysical fluid system is presented. It is shown that determination of the equilibrium temperature of the system by the minimization of an energy availability function is equivalent to that ...

Peter R. Bannon

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geophysical background and as-built target characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) has provided a facility for DOE, other Government agencies, and the private sector to evaluate and document the utility of specific geophysical measurement techniques for detecting and defining cultural and environmental targets. This facility is the Rabbit Valley Geophysics Performance Evaluation Range (GPER). Geophysical surveys prior to the fiscal year (FY) 1994 construction of new test cells showed the primary test area to be relatively homogeneous and free from natural or man-made artifacts, which would generate spurious responses in performance evaluation data. Construction of nine new cell areas in Rabbit Valley was completed in June 1994 and resulted in the emplacement of approximately 150 discrete targets selected for their physical and electrical properties. These targets and their geophysical environment provide a broad range of performance evaluation parameters from ``very easy to detect`` to ``challenging to the most advanced systems.`` Use of nonintrusive investigative techniques represents a significant improvement over intrusive characterization methods, such as drilling or excavation, because there is no danger of exposing personnel to possible hazardous materials and no risk of releasing or spreading contamination through the characterization activity. Nonintrusive geophysical techniques provide the ability to infer near-surface structure and waste characteristics from measurements of physical properties associated with those targets.

Allen, J.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho  

SciTech Connect

At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The present study completes a study by Thanassoulas et al. (1986) Geophys. Prosp.34, 83-97 and deals with geophysical exploration for geothermal resources in Nea Kessani area, NE Greece. The results of some deep electrical soundings (AB = 6000 m) with the interpretation of a gravity profile crossing the investigated area are considered together with thermal investigations. All subsequent information, along with the conclusions of an earlier paper dealing with a reconnaissance geophysical

95

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO 2 Sequestration Larry R. Myer (LRMyer@lbl.gov; 510/486-6456) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Science Division One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Introduction Geophysical techniques will be used in monitoring of geologic sequestration projects. Seismic and electrical geophysical techniques will be used to map the movement of CO 2 in the subsurface and to establish that the storage volume is being efficiently utilized and the CO 2 is being safely contained within a known region. Rock physics measurements are required for interpretation of the geophysical surveys. Seismic surveys map the subsurface velocities and attenuation while electrical surveys map the conductivity. Laboratory measurements are required to convert field

96

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Radon emanometry as a geothermal exploration technique; theory and an example from Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four radon survey lines were established over the geothermal field of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. The radon flux was determined using the Westinghouse Alpha 2 system which measures the flux at each station over a period of 30 days using an alpha-sensitive dosimeter. The method was very successful in locating mapped fault systems that communicate with the structurally controlled geothermal reservoir. It is concluded that this method, coupled with a structural analysis, can be useful as a site-specific exploration tool, particularly in locating exploration holes in known geothermal areas.

Nielson, D.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. First technical status report, April 1, 1978-June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial steps in a physical analytic and field study of the general applicability of the rheidity sensing techniques in the Oregon-Washington Cascade region are listed. (MHR)

Bodvarsson, G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994  

SciTech Connect

The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Field implementation of geophysical diffraction tomography  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical diffraction tomography is a new technique that shows promise as a tool for quantitative subsurface (below-ground) imaging. The approach being used is based upon the filtered backpropagation algorithm, which is a mathematical extension of the reconstruction software used in conventional X-ray CAT scanners. The difference between this method and existing methods is that the new algorithm rigorously accounts for diffraction effects through an exact inversion of the wave equation. This refinement is necessary in that it admits the use of acoustic and long-wavelength electromagnetic waves, allowing tomography to be taken from the laboratory to the field. ORNL's effort in geophysical diffraction tomography involves reducing the filtered backpropagation algorithm to practice. This requires the design and construction of field instrumentation as well as the development of an improved algorithm. The original algorithm requires the imaged region to be illuminated by plane waves. This requirement simplifies the algorithm but complicates its field implementation in that plane waves are difficult to generate. Consequently, ORNL has been working to generalize the filtered backpropagation algorithm to allow a broader range of incoming wave fields which can more easily be realized in the field. The instrumentation aspects involve the selection of appropriate sonic sources and receivers along with the development of a state-of-art, portable, computer-controlled, multichannel data acquisition system. 5 references, 6 figures.

Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

Parker, Beatrice Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of thermal remote sensing as a low-cost regional geothermal exploration technique in New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Airborne and satellite borne thermal infrared scanner data were analyzed for application in the exploration of geothermal resources in New Mexico. The location for this study was the East Mesa Geothermal Field near Las Cruces, New Mexico. Primary sensor was the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) which obtained data at 10-meter resolution. Additional data for comparison came from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite which provided data at 600-meter resolution. These data were compared to the soils, vegetation, and geology of the area, as well as borehole temperature data in an attempt to explain temperature patterns and anomalies. Thermal infrared scanner data were found to be too sensitive to solar-induced temperature anomalies to directly reflect the presence of subsurface geothermal anomalies but may provide valuable supporting information for a geothermal exploration program. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Inglis, M.; Budge, T.K.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling‎ Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole

104

Initial Report on the Development of a Monte Carlo-Markov Chain Joint Inversion Approach for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and subsequent characterization of potential resources typically employ a variety of geophysical, geologic and geochemical techniques. However, since the data collected by each technique provide information directly on only one or a very limited set of the many physical parameters that characterize a geothermal system, no single method can be used to describe the system in its entirety. Presently, the usual approach to analyzing disparate data streams for geothermal applications is to invert (or forward model) each data set separately and then combine or compare the resulting models, for the most part in a more or less ad hoc manner. However, while each inversion may yield a model that fits the individual data set, the models are usually inconsistent with each other to some degree. This reflects uncertainties arising from the inevitable fact that geophysical and other exploration data in general are to some extent noisy, incomplete, and of limited sensitivity and resolution, and so yield non-unique results. The purpose of the project described here is to integrate the different model constraints provided by disparate geophysical, geological and geochemical data in a rigorous and consistent manner by formal joint inversion. The objective is to improve the fidelity of exploration results and reservoir characterization, thus addressing the goal of the DOE Geothermal Program to improve success in exploration for economically viable resources by better defining drilling targets, reducing risk, and improving exploration/drilling success rates.

Foxall, W; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Dyer, K; Sun, Y

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy production. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the Western...

106

CRC handbook of geophysical exploration at sea, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents some of the most advanced research and operational information currently available about hard minerals and hydrocarbons. Information is provided in an integrated, interdisciplinary manner, stressing case histories and review chapters. Illustrations, graphs, tables, and color satellite images are used to graphically present the results of gravity, geodetic and seismic surveys, and 3-D sea floor sub-bottom visualizations. Data has been obtained from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea using satellites, aircraft, and ships.

Geuer, R.A. (Offshore Technology Research Center, Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the...

108

Localization of shallow gas deposits and uncontrolled gas flows in young and unconsolidated sediments by geophysical methods  

SciTech Connect

The great mass of Neogene sediments in the Hungarian basin, where several hydrocarbon accumulations are known, is affected by Pliocene strike-slip movements, resulting in many [open quotes]flower structures.[close quotes] The gas may migrate from the reservoirs upward to the surface along the faults. Thus, shallow gas deposits can be located in the young, unconsolidated sands. There are also several shallow gas deposits derived from uncontrolled gas flows. In Hungary, the shallow gas reservoirs, which are small but increasingly important, have not yet been explored properly. However, the depleting gas may pollute the water in the soil as well as cause explosions. Our purpose is to develop inexpensive, complete, and highly sophisticated field- and data-processing techniques and an integrated complex of geophysical methods in order to define the limits of shallow gas deposits. To avoid anomalous behavior on seismic sections of the depleting gas, we started from uncontrolled gas flows which require special velocity and amplitude vs. offset analyses. In addition, natural and controlled source electromagnetic/electric surveys with various parameters were applied. An industrial-scale seismic section over an uncontrolled gas flow, special sections over flower structures and geoelectric sections, and a magnetic map are presented. The integrated complex of geophysical methods outlined above is being developed in order to establish the conditions for the exploration of gas reservoirs which have been used close to their locality and which could be recovered inexpensively.

Csoergei, J.; Kummer, I.; Papa, A.; Sipos, J.; Solyom, I.; Takacs, E.; Timar, Z. (Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)); Keresztes, T. (MOL RT, Budapest (Hungary))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University at SAGEEP 2008: Geophysical Instruction for Non-Geophysicists  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), a nonprofit professional organization, conducted an educational series of seminars at the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems (SAGEEP) in Philadelphia in April 2008. The purpose of these seminars, conducted under the name Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University (EEGU) over three days in parallel with the regular SAGEEP technical sessions, was to introduce nontraditional geophysical conference attendees to the appropriate use of geophysics in environmental and engineering projects. Five half-day, classroom-style sessions were led by recognized experts in the application of seismic, electrical, gravity, magnetics, and ground-penetrating radar methods. Classroom sessions were intended to educate regulators, environmental program managers, consultants, and students who are new to near-surface geophysics or are interested in learning how to incorporate appropriate geophysical approaches into characterization or remediation programs or evaluate the suitability of geophysical methods for general classes of environmental or engineering problems.

Jeffrey G. Paine

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Borehole Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Geophysical Methods Citation Carole D. Johnson. Borehole...

111

Borehole Geophysical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Geophysical Logging Citation Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.....

112

IGPP: Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IGPP Home IGPP Astrophysics IGPP Planetary Sciences IGPP Mini Grant Seminars Phone Book LLNL Home FY09 IGPP Mini Grant The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP)...

113

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

114

The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

116

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geophysics Geophysics Focus Leader: Scott Baldridge sbaldridge@lanl.gov This focus supports a breadth of basic research concerning planetary surfaces and interiors, including numerical, experimental, and field studies of the structure, properties, processes, and dynamics of terrestrial and giant planets. It is strongly recommended that proposals exploit unique LANL resources (e.g., LANL high-performance computing resources; the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE); geochemical analyses facilities resident in EES and C divisions; and/or sensor technology capabilities resident in C, EES, ISR, and N divisions). We are particularly interested in innovative research projects in areas of current, strong international scientific interest such as the following: New techniques in passive (imaging) or active (e.g., lidar, radar)

117

Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center...

119

Alum Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Alum Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow (6 ft) temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature and seismic data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations. Four geothermal wells will be drilled and geologically characterized in Phase 2. The project will use a coiled-tube rig to test this drilling technology at a geothermal field for the first time. Two slimwells and two production wells will be drilled with core collected and characterized in the target sections of each well. In Phase 3, extended flow tests will be conducted on the producible wells to confirm the geothermal resource followed by an overall assessment of the productivity of the Alum geothermal area. Finally, Phase 3 will evaluate the relative contribution of each exploration technique in reducing risk during the early stages of the geothermal project.

120

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geophysics IV. Gravity, Magnetic, and Magnetotelluric Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric methods. Each of the 10 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

125

Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities » Opportunities » Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Promoting and supporting high-quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. Contact Director Harald Dogliani (505) 663-5309 Email Deputy and Signatures Jon Schoonover (505) 665-0772 Email Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 663-5291 Email Astophysics and Cosmology Ed Fenimore (505) 667-7371 Email Climate Manvendra K. Dubey (505) 665-3128 Email Geophysics Scott Baldridge (505) 667-4338 Email Space Physics Josef Koller (505) 665-7395 Email Expanding the frontiers of astrophysical, space, earth, and climate sciences and their signatures The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los

126

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area is located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range to the west and the Colorado Plateau to the east. We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different

127

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping in Support of Geothermal Exploration: Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA  

SciTech Connect

Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic processing techniques, and the genesis of modern multi-dimensional fluid flow and structural modeling algorithms, just to name a few. One of the newest techniques on the scene, is hyperspectral imaging. Really an optical analytical geochemical tool, hyperspectral imagers (or imaging spectrometers as they are also called), are generally flown at medium to high altitudes aboard mid-sized aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate material distribution mapping and quantitative identification at the pixel to sub-pixel level. In volcanic/geothermal regions, this capability translates to synoptic, high spatial resolution, large-area mineral maps generated at time scales conducive to both the faster pace of the exploration and drilling managers, as well as to the slower pace of geologists and other researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long run.

Pickles, W L; Martini, B A; Silver, E A; Cocks, P A

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping in Support of Geothermal Exploration: Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA  

SciTech Connect

Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic processing techniques, and the genesis of modern multi-dimensional fluid flow and structural modeling algorithms, just to name a few. One of the newest techniques on the scene, is hyperspectral imaging. Really an optical analytical geochemical tool, hyperspectral imagers (or imaging spectrometers as they are also called), are generally flown at medium to high altitudes aboard mid-sized aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate material distribution mapping and quantitative identification at the pixel to sub-pixel level. In volcanic/geothermal regions, this capability translates to synoptic, high spatial resolution, large-area mineral maps generated at time scales conducive to both the faster pace of the exploration and drilling managers, as well as to the slower pace of geologists and other researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long run.

Martini, B; Silver, E; Pickles, W; Cocks, P

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping in Support of Geothermal Exploration: Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic processing techniques, and the genesis of modern multi-dimensional fluid flow and structural modeling algorithms, just to name a few. One of the newest techniques on the scene, is hyperspectral imaging. Really an optical analytical geochemical tool, hyperspectral imagers (or imaging spectrometers as they are also called), are generally flown at medium to high altitudes aboard mid-sized aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate material distribution mapping and quantitative identification at the pixel to sub-pixel level. In volcanic/geothermal regions, this capability translates to synoptic, high spatial resolution, large-area mineral maps generated at time scales conducive to both the faster pace of the exploration and drilling managers, as well as to the slower pace of geologists and other researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long run.

Pickles, W L; Martini, B A; Silver, E A; Cocks, P A

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping in Support of Geothermal Exploration: Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic processing techniques, and the genesis of modern multi-dimensional fluid flow and structural modeling algorithms, just to name a few. One of the newest techniques on the scene, is hyperspectral imaging. Really an optical analytical geochemical tool, hyperspectral imagers (or imaging spectrometers as they are also called), are generally flown at medium to high altitudes aboard mid-sized aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate material distribution mapping and quantitative identification at the pixel to sub-pixel level. In volcanic/geothermal regions, this capability translates to synoptic, high spatial resolution, large-area mineral maps generated at time scales conducive to both the faster pace of the exploration and drilling managers, as well as to the slower pace of geologists and other researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long run.

Martini, B; Silver, E; Pickles, W; Cocks, P

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geophysical LaboratoryGeophysical Laboratory Carnegie Institution of WashingtonCarnegie Institution of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Washington Washington, DCWashington, DC Russell J. HemleyRussell J. Hemley Percy W. BridgmanPercy W. BridgmanGeophysical LaboratoryGeophysical Laboratory Carnegie Institution of WashingtonCarnegie Institution STATE VIBRATIONAL STATE ELECTRONIC STATE (K-edge, Band Gap) OPTICAL X-RAY · Diamond window opaque above

Hemley, Russell J.

132

Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Hardin, E.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)] [eds.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; INFRARED SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Watson, K. Published: Geophysics, 4/1/1976

134

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 70, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2005); P. 63ND89ND, 6 FIGS. 10.1190/1.2133785  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in oil and gas exploration. Despite being eclipsed by seismology, it has continued to be an important and sometimes crucial constraint in a number of exploration areas. In oil exploration the gravity method (Appendix A). The first geophysical oil and gas discovery, the Nash dome in coastal Texas, was the result

135

Exploration methods for hot dry rock. Report of the panel held June 22, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geological and geophysical characteristics of hot dry rock (HDR) necessary for an effective exploration program were discussed. The type of HDR project discussed, that being developed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), would utilize hydraulic fracturing to develop a large surface area in rock of low permeability, 10/sup -6/ darcys, and at temperatures greater than 200/sup 0/C. A better definition of the thermal regime in the crust and mantle at reconnaissance (hundreds to tens of kilometers) and exploration (tens of kilometers to 1 km) scales is needed. Geophysical methods capable of deep investigation would be used with the near-surface geologic information to extrapolate conditions at the depth of interest. Detection of HDR per se may be difficult because the contrast in physical properties of HDR and other rock is not always unambiguous, but boundaries between rock environments can be delineated. When patterns and coincidence of various types of geophysical anomalies and geologic maps are used, the probability of the detection of HDR is greatly increased, especially when a consistent picture is described. Various geophysical methods are required to detect these anomalies: (a) electromagnetic techniques can map deep electrically conductive structures, which to some extent can be used to infer isotherms. (b) Bouguer gravity maps corrected for regional topography are found to correlate with large silicic intrusive bodies, which are often associated with high heat flow. (c) isotherms and open crack systems at depth can be inferred from seismic wave attenuations, dispersions, and delay times. (d) heat flow measurements are useful as a primary tool and as a check on the results of other methods. Abstracts for individual presentations by the twelve panel members are included. 111 references.

West, F.G.; Shankland, T.J. (comps.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Vadose Zone Characterization Techniques Developed by EMSP Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses research contributions made by Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research in the area of geophysical characterization of the subsurface. The goal of these EMSP research projects is to develop combined high-resolution measurement and interpretation packages that provide accurate, timely information needed to characterize the vadose zone. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques can be used to characterize the shallow subsurface. Since individual geophysical characterization tools all have specific limitations, many different techniques are being explored to provide more widespread applicability over a range of hydrogeologic settings. A combination of laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of how contaminants move through the vadose zone. This entails field tests with field-hardened systems, packaging and calibration of instrumentation, data processing and analysis algorithms, forward and inverse modeling, and so forth. DOE sites are seeking to team with EMSP researchers to leverage the basic science research investment and apply these advances to address subsurface contamination issues that plague many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.

Guillen, Donna P.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

138

Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of electrical geophysical research at UURI has been to provide reliable exploration and reservoir assessment tools for the shallowest to the deepest levels of interest in geothermal fields. Three diverse methods are being considered currently: magnetotellurics (MT, and CSAMT), self-potential, and borehole resistivity. Primary shortcomings in the methods addressed have included a lack of proper interpretation tools to treat the effects of the inhomogeneous structures often encountered in geothermal systems, a lack of field data of sufficient accuracy and quantity to provide well-focused models of subsurface resistivity structure, and a poor understanding of the relation of resistivity to geothermal systems and physicochemical conditions in the earth generally. In MT, for example, interpretation research has focused successfully on the applicability of 2-D models in 3-D areas which show a preferred structural grain. Leading computer algorithms for 2-D and 3-D simulation have resulted and are combined with modern methods of regularized inversion. However, 3-D data coverage and interpretation is seen as a high priority. High data quality in our own research surveys has been assured by implementing a fully remote reference with digital FM telemetry and real-time processing with data coherence sorting. A detailed MT profile across Long Valley has mapped a caldera-wide altered tuff unit serving as the primary hydrothermal aquifer, and identified a low-resistivity body in the middle crust under the west moat which corresponds closely with teleseismic delay and low density models. In the CSAMT method, our extensive tensor survey over the Sulphur Springs geothermal system provides valuable structural information on this important thermal regime and allows a fundamental analysis of the CSAMT method in heterogeneous areas. The self-potential (SP) method is promoted as an early-stage, cost-effective, exploration technique for covered hydrothermal resources, of low to high temperature, which has little or no adverse environmental impact and yields specific targets for temperature gradient and fluid chemistry testing. Substantial progress has been made in characterizing SP responses for several known, covered geothermal systems in the Basin and Range and southern Rio Grande Rift, and at identifying likely, causative source areas of thermal fluids. (Quantifying buried SP sources requires detailed knowledge of the resistivity structure, obtainable through DC or CSAMT surveys with 2-D or 3-D modeling.) Borehole resistivity (BHR) methods may help define hot and permeable zones in geothermal systems, trace the flow of cooler injected fluids and determine the degree of-water saturation in vapor dominated systems. At UURI, we develop methods to perform field surveys and to model and interpret various borehole-to-borehole, borehole-to-surface and surface-to-borehole arrays. The status of our BHR research may be summarized as follows: (1) forward modeling algorithms have been developed and published to evaluate numerous resistivity methods and to examine the effects of well-casing and noise; (2) two inverse two-dimensional algorithms have been devised and successfully applied to simulated field data; (3) a patented, multi-array resistivity system has been designed and is under construction; and (4) we are seeking appropriate wells in geothermal and other areas in which to test the methods.

Wannamaker, Philip E.; Wright, Phillip M.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Survey of Department of Energy-Sponsored Geophysical Research for Shallow Waste Site Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface contamination plagues many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and threatens groundwater supplies. This survey discusses research sponsored by the DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) for geophysical characterization of the vadose zone at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and other contaminated sites. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques are used to characterize the shallow subsurfaceelectromagnetic, ground-penetrating radar, electrical, seismic, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Three common themes appear in the research surveyed in this article: (1) the development of high-resolution imaging capabilities to capture important details of the heterogeneous nature of subsurface properties and processes, (2) the coupling of non-intrusive survey geophysical measurements (e.g., electrical surveys) with detailed quantitative precise point-sensor measurements (e.g., lysimeters and vapor-port systems) or borehole (e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance, neutron-based moisture, and geochemical tools) measurements to extend high-precision knowledge away from the borehole, and finally (3) the application of multiple geophysical methods to constrain the uncertainty in determining critical subsurface physical properties. Laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of the manner in which contaminants travel through the vadose zone. Applications of geophysical methods to various contaminated areas at the INEEL are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/S0148-9062(97)87449-9 Source: View Original Journal Article Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Numerical_Evaluation_Of_Electromagnetic_Methods_In_Geothermal_Exploration_-_L_Pellerin,_J_M_Johnston_%26_G_W_Hohmann,_Geophysics,_61(1),_1996,_Pp_121-130&oldid=3883

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

142

Hydrologic and geophysical studies at Midnite Mine, Wellpinit, WA: Summary of 1995 field season. Report of investigations/1996  

SciTech Connect

The Midnite Mine is an inactive, hard-rock uranium mine on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State. Long-term changes in water quality and the results of slug tests and two geophysical surveys are described. Of the locations monitored, only two exhibited water quality degradation over time. Hydraulic conductivity measurements from slug tests are reported for five additional locations in the bedrock. Relative values of hydraulic conductivity from slug tests agreed well with ranked specific capacity data. A geophysical survey identified buried constructed features that channel subsurface water to a contaminated seep. Historic aerial photos corroborated the results of the geophysical study. A new geophysical technique was successfully used to monitor hydraulic and geochemical responses to a pumping test in saturated waste rock.

Williams, B.C.; Riley, J.A.; Montgomery, J.R.; Robinson, J.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Determination of lithology, grain size Stratigraphic/Structural: Thickness and geometry of rock strata, fracture identification Hydrological: Porosity, permeability, water saturation Thermal: Formation temperature with depth Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques: Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids

144

Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Data Techniques: The collection, processing, and interpretation of data from various methods so accurate interpretations can be made about the subject matter. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Data techniques are any technique where data is collected and organized in a manner so that the information is useful for geothermal purposes. The

145

Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

GV Last; DG Horton

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

146

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

147

Definition: Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploration Drilling Exploratory drilling is the Initial phase of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal Exploration is the exploration of the subsurface in search of viable active geothermal regions with the goal of building a geothermal power plant, where hot fluids drive turbines to create electricity. Exploration methods include a broad range of disciplines including geology, geophysics, geochemistry and engineering. Geothermal regions with adequate heat flow to fuel power plants are found in rift zones, subduction zones and mantle plumes. Hot spots are characterized by four geothermal elements. An active region will have: Heat Source - Shallow

148

A Hydrologic-geophysical Method for Characterizing Flow and Transport Processes Within The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this project was to employ two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar, to image a controlled infiltration of a saline tracer under unsaturated flow conditions. The geophysical techniques have been correlated to other more traditional hydrologic measurements including neutron moisture measurements and induction conductivity logs. Images that resulted during two successive infiltrations indicate the development of what appear to be preferential pathways through the finer grained materials, although the results could also be produced by cationic capture of free ions in clays. In addition the site as well as the developing solute plume exhibits electrical anisotropy which is likely related to flow properties. However the geologic significance of this phenomenon is still under investigation.

David Alumbaugh; Douglas LaBrecque; James Brainard; T.C. (Jim) Yeh

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Techniques Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Modeling Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

150

Recent advances in optimized geophysical survey design Hansruedi Maurer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- time tomography: Geophysics, 74, no.4, Q27­Q40, doi:10.1190/ 1.3141738. Atkinson, A. C., A. N. Donev

151

Geophysical Study of the Salton Trough of Southern California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1964 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geophysical Study of the Salton Trough of Southern California Citation Shawn...

152

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of...

153

Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance...

154

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

155

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEWS LIBRARY JOBS SITE MAP Emergency Maps Organization Goals Phone Search Science > LANL Institutes > Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics National Security Education...

156

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

157

An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics Abstract Physicists are finding that the skills they have learned in their training may be applied to areas beyond traditional physics topics. One such field is that of geophysics. This paper presents the electrical resistivity component of an undergraduate geophysics course at Radford University. It is taught from a physics perspective, yet the application of the theory to the real world is the overriding goal. The concepts involved in electrical resistivity studies are first discussed in a general sense, and then they are studied through the application of the relevant electromagnetic theory.

158

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Author USGS Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Citation USGS. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey [Internet]. 2013. [updated 2013/01/03;cited 2013/11/22]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/NAWC-surface.html

159

Property:ExplorationSubGroup | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationSubGroup ExplorationSubGroup Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationSubGroup Property Type Page Description Exploration sub groups for exploration activities Pages using the property "ExplorationSubGroup" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey + Data Collection and Mapping + A Acoustic Logs + Well Log Techniques + Active Seismic Methods + Seismic Techniques + Active Seismic Techniques + Seismic Techniques + Active Sensors + Active Sensors + Aerial Photography + Passive Sensors + Aeromagnetic Survey + Magnetic Techniques + Airborne Electromagnetic Survey + Electrical Techniques + Airborne Gravity Survey + Gravity Techniques + Analytical Modeling + Modeling Techniques + Audio-Magnetotellurics + Electrical Techniques +

160

Underground Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultimately is chosen. The rationale is based on models that are backed by limited data obtained from G-Tunnel thermal testing. The G-Tunnel thermal tests were conducted over Exploration and Testing Strategies 9 9). Because no additional testing has been conducted since the G-Tunnel effort was terminated in 1989

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic

162

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

163

Template:ExplorationGroup | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationGroup ExplorationGroup Jump to: navigation, search This is the 'ExplorationGroup' template. To define a new Exploration Technique, please use the Exploration Group Form. Parameters Definition - A link to the OpenEI definition of the technique (optional) ExplorationGroup - ExplorationSubGroup - LithologyInfo - the type of lithology information this technique could provide StratInfo - the type of stratigraphic and/or structural information this technique could provide HydroInfo - the type of hydrogeology information this technique could provide ThermalInfo - the type of temperature information this technique could provide EstimatedCostLowUSD - the estimated value only of the low end of the cost range (units described in CostUnit) EstimatedCostMedianUSD - the estimated value only of the median cost

164

Turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in geophysics and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a new phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion associated with turbulent transport of aerosols in the atmosphere and in laboratory experiments. The essence of this phenomenon is the appearance of a nondiffusive mean flux of particles in the direction of the mean heat flux, which results in the formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of aerosols that accumulate in regions of minimum mean temperature of the surrounding fluid. This effect of turbulent thermal diffusion was detected experimentally. In experiments turbulence was generated by two oscillating grids in two directions of the imposed vertical mean temperature gradient. We used Particle Image Velocimetry to determine the turbulent velocity field, and an Image Processing Technique based on an analysis of the intensity of Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of aerosols. Analysis of the intensity of laser light Mie scattering by aerosols showed that aerosols accumulate in the vicinity of the minimum mean temperature due to the effect of turbulent thermal diffusion. Geophysical applications of the obtained results are discussed.

A. Eidelman; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; A. Krein; I. Rogachevskii; J. Buchholz; G. Gruenefeld

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Remote Sensing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Sensing Techniques Remote Sensing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Remote Sensing Techniques: Remote sensing utilizes satellite and/or airborne based sensors to collect information about a given object or area. Remote sensing data collection methods can be passive or active. Passive sensors (e.g., spectral imagers) detect natural radiation that is emitted or reflected by the object or area

166

PHOXEL-SPACE: an interface for exploring volumetric data with physical voxels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional datasets (voxel datasets), generated by different types of sensing or computer simulations, are quickly becoming crucial to various disciplines - from biomedicine to geophysics. Phoxel-Space is an interface that enables the exploration ... Keywords: 3D laser scanner, anatomy, archeology, augmented reality, biomedicine, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), earth and atmospheric sciences, geophysics, input design and strategies, medical information systems, spatial understanding, tangible user interface, virtual reality, voxel

Carlo Ratti; Yao Wang; Ben Piper; Hiroshi Ishii; Assaf Biderman

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology  

SciTech Connect

Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lumley, David [U. W. AUSTRALIA; Sherlock, Don [CHEVRON; Daley, Tom [LBNL; Lawton, Don [U CALGARY; Masters, Ron [SHELL; Verliac, Michel [SCHLUMBERGER; White, Don [GEOL. SURVEY CANADA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Klamath Basin, Oregon: Swan Lake and Klamath Hills area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthesis and preliminary interpretation of predominantly geophysical information relating to the Klamath Basin geothermal resource is presented. The Swan Lake Valley area, northeast of Klamath Falls, and the Klamath Hills area, south of Klamath Falls, are discussed in detail. Available geophysical data, including gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, microearthquake, roving dipole resistivity, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data sets, are examined and reinterpreted for these areas. One- and two-dimensional modeling techniques are applied, and general agreement among overlapping data sets is achieved. The MT method appears well suited to this type of exploration, although interpretation is difficult in the complex geology. Roving dipole and AMT are useful in reconnaissance, while gravity and magnetics help in defining structure. For the Swan Lake Valley the data suggest buried electrically conductive zones beneath Meadow Lake Valley and Swan Lake, connected by a conductive layer at 1 kilometer depth. In the Klamath Hills area, the data suggest a conductive zone centered near the northwestern tip of Stukel Mountain, associated with a concealed northeast-trending cross-fault. Another conductive zone appears near some producing hot wells at the southwestern edge of the Klamath Hills. These conductive zones may represent geothermal reservoirs. Follow-up work is recommended for each target area.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Hege, H.; Wilt, M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geothermal resource exploration assessment and data interpretation, Klamath Basin, Oregon: Swan Lake and Klamath Hills area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthesis and preliminary interpretation of predominantly geophysical information relating to the Klamath Basin geothermal resource is presented. The Swan Lake Valley area, northeast of Klamath Falls, and the Klamath Hills area, south of Klamath Falls, are discussed in detail. Available geophysical data, including gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, microseismic, roving dipole resistivity, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data sets, are examined and reinterpreted for these areas. One- and two-dimensional modeling techniques are applied, and general agreement among overlapping data sets is achieved. The MT method appears well suited to this type of exploration, although interpretation is difficult in the complex geology. Roving dipole and AMT are useful in reconnaissance, while gravity and magnetics help in defining structure. For the Swan Lake Valley the data suggest buried electrically conductive zones beneath Meadow Lake Valley and Swan Lake, connected by a conductive layer at 1 kilometer depth. In the Klamath Hills area, the data suggest a conductive zone centered near the northwestern tip of Stukel Mountain, associated with a concealed northeast-trending cross-fault. Another conductive zone appears near some producing hot wells at the southwestern edge of the Klamath Hills. These conductive zones may represent geothermal reservoirs. Specific types of follow-up work are recommended for each target area.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Hege, M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Beyond Gaussian Statistical Modeling in Geophysical Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review discusses recent advances in geophysical data assimilation beyond Gaussian statistical modeling, in the fields of meteorology, oceanography, as well as atmospheric chemistry. The non-Gaussian features are stressed rather than the ...

Marc Bocquet; Carlos A. Pires; Lin Wu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Contour Analysis: A New Approach for Melding Geophysical Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new approach, contour analysis, for combining independent estimates of a geophysical field to produce a single realization incorporating data from all sources. Contour analysis divides the field estimates into contours and ...

Arthur J. Mariano

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Near-Inertial Oscillations of Geophysical Surface Frontal Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intrinsic oscillations of stable geophysical surface frontal currents of the unsteady, nonlinear, reduced-gravity shallow-water equations on an f plane are investigated analytically and numerically. For frictional (Rayleigh) currents ...

Angelo Rubino; Sergey Dotsenko; Peter Brandt

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research geomagnetic ionosphere currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research Keywords geomagnetic ionosphere currents Index Terms Ionosphere: Polar cap ionosphere Ionosphere: Current systems Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism: Rapid time variations Space Weather: Impacts on technological systems Space Weather: Geomagnetically induced currents

Michigan, University of

176

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electrical conductivity (FEC), to determine the fracture surface area, heat content and heat transfer, flow rates, and chemistry of the geothermal fluids encountered by the...

177

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

178

Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Data and Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Modeling Techniques and Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, and fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

180

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

182

Definition: Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotellurics is an electromagnetic geophysical method used to image the electrical resistivity structure of the subsurface through the measurement of electrical and magnetic fields at the earth's surface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Magnetotellurics (MT) is an electromagnetic geophysical method of imaging the earth's subsurface by measuring natural variations of electrical and magnetic fields at the Earth's surface. Investigation depth ranges from 300m below ground by recording higher frequencies down to 10,000m or deeper with long-period soundings. Developed in Russia and

183

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

184

Characterization Of Geothermal Resources Using New Geophysical Technology |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using New Geophysical Technology Using New Geophysical Technology Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Characterization Of Geothermal Resources Using New Geophysical Technology Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a geothermal case history using a relatively new but proven technology that can accurately map groundwater at significant depths (up to 1,000 meters) over large areas (square kilometers) in short periods of time (weeks). Understanding the location and extent of groundwater resources is very important to the geothermal industry for obvious reasons. It is crucial to have a cost-effective method of understanding where concentrations of geothermal water are located as well as the preferential flow paths of the water in the subsurface. Such

185

Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Gravity, aeromagnetic, and telluric current surveys in the southern Raft River have been used to infer the structure and the general lithology underlying the valley. The gravity data indicate the approximate thickness of the Cenozoic rocks and location of the larger normal faults, and the aeromagnetic data indicate the extent of the major Cenozoic volcanic units. The relative ellipse area contour map compiled from the telluric current survey generally conforms to the gravity map except for

186

Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

Exploring new energy alternatives.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is most likely to satisfy our energy needs in the future - wind farms and photovoltaic arrays, or something yet to be invented? Options for the world's energy future may include surprises, thanks to innovative research under way around the world. The article focuses on the energy sources alternatives in the U.S. It explores innovations for energy sources such as wind farms, solar thermal concentrators, solar cells, and geothermal energy production. It states that the attainment of energy efficiency through conversation or improved technology allows to extract more applied energy. It points out that techniques are being explored to expand the possible fuel materials to includes other types of uranium and thorium. Furthermore, it discusses the capability of nanotechnology in offering a tool which could help create designs that convert energy more efficiently.

LePoire, D.J. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Post-Injection Geophysical Evaluation of the Winding Ridge Site CRADA 98-F012, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Acid mine drainage (AMD) from underground mines is a major environmental problem. The disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCB) is also a major national problem due to the large volumes produced annually and the economics associated with transportation and environmentally safe disposal. The concept of returning large volumes of the CCB to their point of origin, underground mines, and using the typically alkaline and pozzolanic attributes of the waste material for the remediation of AMD has been researched rather diligently during the past few years by various federal and state agencies and universities. As the result, the State of Maryland initiated a full-scale demonstration of this concept in a small, 5-acre, unmapped underground mine located near Friendsville, MD. Through a cooperative agreement between the State of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Energy, several geophysical techniques were evaluated as potential tools for the post-injection evaluation of the underground mine site. Three non-intrusive geophysical surveys, two electromagnetic (EM) techniques and magnetometry, were conducted over the Frazee Mine, which is located on Winding Ridge near Friendsville, MD. The EM surveys were conducted to locate ground water in both mine void and overburden. The presence of magnetite, which is naturally inherent to CCB'S due to the combustion process and essentially transparent in sedimentary rock, provided the reason for using magnetometry to locate the final resting place of the CCB grout.

Connie Lyons; Richard Current; Terry Ackman

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Template:ExplorationActivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationActivity ExplorationActivity Jump to: navigation, search This is the 'ExplorationActivity' template. To define a new Exploration Activity, please use the Exploration Activity Form. Parameters Name - The name of the activity (typically a combination of the techniques and location, ex. Water Sampling at McCredie Hot Springs) Technique - The exploration technique used in this activity SpectralSensor - The spectral imaging sensor used in this activity Place - The name of the exploration field or location of the activity Notes - General notes about the activity (optional) Outcome - A short description of the benefit or usefulness of the activity Reference_material - The reference material documenting the activity ExpActivityDate - Date or year activity started ExpActivityDateEnd - Date or year activity ended

190

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

191

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; ELECTRICAL SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; KGRA; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USA; WELLS Author(s): Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf, R.J. Published: Geophysics, 10/12/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article

192

Well Log Techniques At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

193

Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The structural model is based on the role of subsurface igneous dikes providing a buttressing effect in a regional strain field such that permeability is greatly enhanced. The basic thermal anomaly at McCoy was defined by substantial U.S. Department of Energy-funded temperature gradient drilling and geophysical studies conducted during the period 1978 to 1982. This database will be augmented with modern magnetotelluric, controlled-source audio-magnetotelluric, and 2D/3D reflection seismic surveys to define likely fluid up-flow plumes that will be drilled with slant-hole technology. Two sites for production-capable wells will be drilled in geothermally prospective areas identified in this manner. The uniqueness of this proposal lies in the use of a full suite of modern geophysical tools, use of slant-hole drilling, and the extensive technical database from previous DOE funding.

194

Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The scope of this three phase project includes tasks to validate a variety of innovative exploration and drilling technologies which aim to accurately characterize the geothermal site and thereby reduce project risk. Phase 1 exploration will consist of two parts: 1) surface and near surface investigations and 2) subsurface geophysical surveys and modeling. The first part of Phase 1 includes: a hyperspectral imaging survey (to map thermal anomalies and geothermal indicator minerals), shallow temperature probe measurements, and drilling of temperature gradient wells to depths of 1000 feet. In the second part of Phase 1, 2D & 3D geophysical modeling and inversion of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric datasets will be used to image the subsurface. This effort will result in the creation of a 3D model composed of structural, geological, and resistivity components. The 3D model will then be combined with the temperature data to create an integrated model that will be used to prioritize drill target locations.

195

Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of exploration techniques applied to geothermal resource investigations in northern Nevada were evaluated and rated by seven investigators involved in the work. A quantitative rating scheme was used to obtain estimates of technique effectiveness. From survey cost information we also obtained and compared cost-effectiveness estimates for the various techniques. Effectiveness estimates were used to develop an exploration strategy for the area. However, because no deep confirmatory drilling has been done yet, the technique evaluations and exploration

196

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

197

Geophysical Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs, Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs, Oregon, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs, Oregon, USA Abstract Neal Hot Springs is an active geothermal area that is also the proposed location of a binary power plant, which is being developed by US Geothermal Inc. To date, two production wells have been drilled and an injection well is in the process of being completed. The primary goal of this field camp was to provide a learning experience for students studying geophysics, but a secondary goal was to characterize the Neal Hot Springs area to provide valuable information on the flow of geothermal fluids through the subsurface. This characterization was completed using a variety of

198

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) Application Form A complete application includes: An on-line application Letter of Interest two (2) references (download reference form in PDF or Word format). Referee must submit by email to georgia@lanl.gov or fax to: 505-663-5225 proof of health insurance complete transcripts (unofficial is acceptable) Foreign students, please contact Georgia Sanchez at georgia@lanl.gov regarding your application. Cost is $500, $100.00 is due with the application. Please mail deposit with a copy of your application to: SAGE IGPPS, MS-T001 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA Email: georgia@lanl.gov Voice: 505-663-5291 Note: Course credit may be possible by prior arrangement with your university (please check with your advisor) but cannot be awarded directly

199

History and Results of Surface Exploration in the Kilauea East Rift Zone |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History and Results of Surface Exploration in the Kilauea East Rift Zone History and Results of Surface Exploration in the Kilauea East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: History and Results of Surface Exploration in the Kilauea East Rift Zone Abstract Government-funded surveys of the Kilauea East Rift Zone have resulted in a wealth of geophysical and geochemical data from an active volcanic area. All data are clearly of academic interest; Hawaii was used as a testing ground for various geophysical methods in the early days of geothermal exploration. Some surveys, such as gravity and magnetic, are useful a regional perspective for determining broad structural trends and grossly identifying magmatic intrusions. Seismic data are currently being used for a more sitespecific purpose: to determine fault locations and geometries.

200

A Coordinated Exploration Program for Geothermal Sources on the Island of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Program for Geothermal Sources on the Island of Exploration Program for Geothermal Sources on the Island of Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Coordinated Exploration Program for Geothermal Sources on the Island of Hawaii Abstract Staff members of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics carried out an exploration program for geothermal sources on the island of Hawaii by using all relevant geophysical and geochemical methods. Infrared scanning aerial surveys followed by reconnaissance-type electrical surveys and group noise surveys narrowed down the promising area to the east rift of Kilauea. The surveys carried out over the east rift included magnetic, gravity, and electrical surveys by various methods: microearthquake, surveillance, temperature profiling of wells, and chemical analysis of water samples.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Regional geology and geophysics of the Jemez Mountains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The western margin of the Rocky Mountain tectonic belt is the initial site for the Los Alamos Geothermal Project. lgneous activity in the area culminated with the formation of a collapsed volcanic caldera and the deposition of thick beds of tuff. Geophysical studies indicate that the region is one of relatively highterrestrial heat flow, low-crustal density, low-crustal seismic velocities, low-crustal magnetoelectric impedance, and thin crust. 34 references. (auth)

West, F.G.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal Dataset Summary Description Output and documentation from a set of multi-century experiments performed using NOAA/GFDL's climate models. Users can download files, display data file attributes, and graphically display the data. Data sets include those from CM2.X experiments associated with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report (IPCC) and the US Climate Change Science Program (US CCSP). Tags {climate,IPCC,CCSP,pressure,SLP," sea ice","upper-level winds",ozone,"meridional winds","zonal winds",u-wind,v-wind," carbon dioxide"," volcanic",aerosol,grids,"soil moisture"," IPCC",flux,"radiation flux",thickness,radiation,emissivity,longwave,sensible,"latent heat",downwelling,upwelling,temperature,convective,runoff,"water vapor",humidity,cloudiness,transport,"geopotential height",assimilation,salinity,evaporation,freshwater}

204

Exploration de formes gomtriques par le toucher  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new technique to help people to explore geometric shapes without vision. This technique is based on a guidance using directional cues with a pin array. This is an alternative to the usual technique that consists of raising the pins corresponding ... Keywords: geometric shapes, non-visual interaction, tactile interaction, tactons

Thomas Pietrzak; Andrew Crossan; Stephen A. Brewster; Benot Martin; Isabelle Pecci

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geothermal exploration program, Hill Air Force Base, Davis and Weber Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results obtained from a program designed to locate a low- or moderate-temperature geothermal resource that might exist beneath Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Ogden, Utah are discussed. A phased exploration program was conducted at Hill AFB. Published geological, geochemical, and geophysical reports on the area were examined, regional exploration was conducted, and two thermal gradient holes were drilled. This program demonstrated that thermal waters are not present in the shallow subsurface at this site. (MHR)

Glenn, W.E.; Chapman, D.S.; Foley, D.; Capuano, R.M.; Cole, D.; Sibbett, B.; Ward, S.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne...

207

File:04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 62 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:38, 6 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:38, 6 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (62 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following 2 pages link to this file: GRR/Flowcharts GRR/Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit

208

Oil and Gas Exploration (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploration (Connecticut) Exploration (Connecticut) Oil and Gas Exploration (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting These regulations apply to activities conducted for the purpose of obtaining geological, geophysical, or geochemical information about oil or gas including seismic activities but excluding exploratory well drilling or aerial surveys. Such exploration for oil or gas must be registered with the

209

Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those processes in reservoir simulators. Second-priority research topics (4): {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced fracture detection geophysical methods, such as 3-D surface seismics, borehole seismics, and imaging using earthquake data. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced stress measurement techniques, such as borehole breakout analysis, tilt-meters, and earthquake focal mechanism analysis. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test high-temperature down-hole tools for short-term and long-term diagnostics, such as borehole imaging, geophone arrays, packers, and electrical tools.

Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Property:ExplorationBasis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationBasis ExplorationBasis Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationBasis Property Type Text Description Exploration Basis Why was exploration work conducted in this area (e.g., USGS report of a geothermal resource, hot springs with geothemmetry indicating electrical generation capacity, etc.) Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: M Mercury Vapor At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Pages using the property "ExplorationBasis" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) + Compare directly shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. 2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) + Correct previously analyzed 2-m probe data

211

An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milos From Geophysical Milos From Geophysical Experiments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of geophysical experiments carried out by eight teams on the island of Milos as part of an integrated project under the European Commission's geothermal R & D programme are considered. The combination of these data with earlier studies on the geology and geophysics of Milos allow the compilation of a possible model of the geothermal reservoir and its surroundings in the central eastern part of the island. The reservoir is fed by convection of hot fluids from a depth of several kilometres, but the geophysical data provide no strong support for the earlier hypothesis

212

At quadrennial geophysics fest, earth scientists think globally  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on two areas of current research interest from the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics meeting in July 1995. The first is the possible long and unlikely seeming change of connections. Linked are the warm surface of the tropical Pacific Ocean, the atmosphere at the midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere and the icy stratosphere over Antarctica where the warming of the sea surface 15 years ago may have set the stage for the Antarctic ozone hole. The second major research research reviewed concerned increases in ultraviolet light. Surface radiation in the DNA-damaging region of the spectrum is increasing by as much as 12% per decade at high latitudes.

Kerr, R.A.

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics 1993 annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief papers on the research being conducted at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics in 1993 in Geosciences, High-Pressure sciences, and Astrophysics.

Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M. [eds.

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Jump to:...

215

Precambrian basement geology of the Permian basin region of west Texas and Eastern New Mexico: A geophysical perspective  

SciTech Connect

Because most of the Permian basin region of west Texas and southern New Mexico is covered by Phanerozoic rocks, other means must be found to examine the Precambrian upper crustal geology of the region. We have combined geologic information on the Precambrian from outcrops and wells with geophysical information from gravity and magnetic surveys in an integrated analysis of the history and structure of basement rocks in the region. Geophysical anomalies can be related to six Precambrian events: formation of the Early Proterozoic outer tectonic belt, igneous activity in the southern Granite-Rhyolite province, an episode of pre-Grenville extension, the Grenville orogeny, rifting to form the Delaware aulacogen, and Eocambrian rifting to form the early Paleozoic continental margin. Two geophysical features were studied in detail: the Abilene gravity minimum and the Central Basin platform gravity high. The Abilene gravity minimum is shown to extend from the Delaware basin across north-central Texas and is interpreted to be caused by a granitic batholith similar in size to the Sierra Nevada batholith in California and Nevada. This batholith appears to be related to formation of the southern Granite- Rhyolite province, possibly as a continental margin arc batholith. Because of this interpretation, we have located the Grenville tectonic front southward from its commonly quoted position, closer to the Llano uplift. Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions are found to core the Central Basin platform and the Roosevelt uplift. These intrusions formed at about 1.1 Ga and are related in time to both the Mid-Continent rift system and the Grenville orogeny in Texas. Precambrian basement structures and changes in lithology have influenced the structure and stratigraphy in the overlying Permian basin, and thus have potential exploration significance.

Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

217

Petroleum - Exploration & Production - EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. ... Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf.

218

Retrieval of Geophysical Parameters from GOES: Evaluation of a Split-Window Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a physical split-window retrieval algorithm used to retrieve skin temperature (ST) and precipitable water (PW) from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) infrared measurements is evaluated. The evaluation ...

Ronnie J. Suggs; Gary J. Jedlovec; Anthony R. Guillory

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies performed by personnel from the Geothermal Program Office (GPO) strongly suggested that there is a geothermal resource beneath lands controlled by the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot. The geothermal fluid is thought to be convecting meteoric water that is derived from precipitation within the

220

Lab Analysis Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lab Analysis Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction; Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals; Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments; Obtain detailed information about rock composition and morphology; Determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology; Cuttings are used to define lithology; Core analysis is done to define lithology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A heuristic algorithm for pattern identification in large multivariate analysis of geophysical data sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to present a heuristic algorithm with factor analysis and a local search optimization system for pattern identification problems as applied to large and multivariate aero-geophysical data. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB code using ... Keywords: Aero-geophysical data, Factor analysis, Local search system, MATLAB program, Patterns identification

Joo Eduardo da Silva Pereira; Adelir Jos Strieder; Janete Pereira Amador; Jos Luiz Silvrio da Silva; Lenidas Luiz Volcato Descovi Filho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Professor in Geology and Geophysics Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

223

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2007- Associate professor in Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana Physical Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

224

Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Drilling to evaluate the geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley began in 1974 and resulted in the discovery of a geothermal reservoir at a depth of approximately 1523 m (500 ft). Several organizations and companies have been involved in the geophysical logging program. There is no comprehensive report on the geophysical logging, nor has there been a complete interpretation. The objectives of this study are to make an integrated interpretation of the available data and compile a case history. Emphasis has been on developing a simple interpretation

225

Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca, North-Central Nevada Abstract From May 2008 to September 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected data from more than 660 gravity stations, 100 line-km of truck-towed magnetometer traverses, and 260 physical-property sites in the vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley, northern Nevada (fig. 1). Gravity, magnetic, and physical-property data were collected to study regional crustal structures as an aid to understanding the geologic framework of the Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley areas, which in

226

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanding the Frontiers of Astrophysical, Space, Earth, & Climate Sciences & Their Signatures The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. These subject areas are selected based on their breadth of scientific challenges facing the international scientific community, as well as relevance to the strategic objective to extend Laboratory scientific excellence. IGPPS/LANL makes a special effort to promote and support new research ideas, which can be further developed through seed funding into major programs supported by federal or other funding sources. IGPPS also supports

227

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

crustal structure. We used results from surface geological mapping, drill hole data from water wells and geothermal exploration wells, KRISP 85 seismic data for a profile across...

228

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, a geologic and geophysical case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geochemical and geophysical data are presented for one of the major geothermal systems in the western United States. Regional data indicate major tectonic structures which are still active and provide the conduits for the geothermal system. Detailed geologic mapping has defined major glide blocks of Tertiary volcanics which moved down from the Tushar Mountains and locally act as a leaky cap to portions of the presently known geothermal system. Mapping and geochemical studies indicate three periods of mineralization have affected the area, two of which are unrelated to the present geothermal activity. The geologic relationships demonstrate that the major structures have been opened repeatedly since the Tertiary. Gravity and magnetic data are useful in defining major structures beneath alluvium and basalt cover, and indicate the importance of the Cove Fort-Beaver graben and the Cove Creek fault in localizing the geothermal reservoir. These structures and a high level of microearthquake activity also suggest other target areas within the larger thermal anomaly. Electrical resistivity surveys and thermal gradient holes both contribute to the delineation of the known reservoir. Deep exploration wells which test the reservoir recorded maximum temperatures of 178 C and almost isothermal behavior beginning at 700 to 1000 m and continuing to a depth of 1800 m. Costly drilling, high corrosion rates and low reservoir pressure coupled with the relatively low reservoir temperatures have led to the conclusion that the reservoir is not economic for electric power production at present. Plans are underway to utilize the moderate-temperature fluids for agribusiness, and exploration continues for a deep high-temperature reservoir.

Ross, Howard P.; Moore, Joseph N.; Christensen, Odin D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geophysical investigation: New Production Reactor Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic crosshole and downhole velocity measurements were performed for two borehole arrays approximately 300 feet deep in conjunction with verticality measurements and geophysical logging of borehole WO-2 (to a depth of 4,960 feet) at the NPR site of the INEL. Past studies show that the site area is covered by a thin layer of soil which overlies numerous basalt flows interrupted by sandy and clayey interbeds. Compressional and shear wave velocities computed for these arrays revealed low velocity zones at the following elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 1: 4,893 feet to 4,873 feet (basalt rubble zone) and 4,705 feet to 4,686 feet (sediment interbed). Corresponding elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 2 include: 4,830 feet to 4,815 feet (sediment interbed), 4,785 feet to 4,765 feet (highly vesicular and fractured basalt), 4,715 feet to 4,705 feet (basalt rubble zone), and 4,672 feet to 4,667 feet (sediment interbed). In general, crosshole velocity data correlated between arrays with velocity differences possibly explained by localized lithologic changes. Due to scatter in the downhole velocity data, only velocity averages were computed. However, these downhole velocities correlated to the approximate mean crosshole velocity values and therefore independent confirmed the crosshole data. Geophysical logging of well WO-2 included natural gamma, neutron, and compensated density logs to a depth of 4,960 feet at which a viscous borehole fluid inhibited further investigation. Second runs of small sections of these logs were repeated satisfactorily for confirmation of certain anomalous areas.

Filipkowski, F.; Blackey, M.; Davies, D.; Levine, E.N.; Murphy, V. [Weston Geophysical Corp., Westboro, MA (US)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Exploration of the El Hoyo-Monte Galan Geothermal Concession. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In January 1996 Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC) was granted a geothermal concession of 114 square kilometers from the Instituto Nicaragueense de Energie (INE) for the purpose of developing between 50 and 150 MWe of geothermal electrical generating capacity. The Concession Agreement required TGC to perform geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies as part of the development program. TGC commenced the geotechnical studies in January 1996 with a comprehensive review of all existing data and surveys. Based on this review, TGC formulated an exploration plan and executed that plan commencing in April, 1996. The ground magnetic (GM), self potential (SP), magnetotelluric/controlled source audio magnetotelluric (MT/CSAMT) and one-meter temperature surveys, data integration, and synthesis of a hydrogeologic model were performed. The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of all data gathered from the geophysical exploration program and to provide an integrated interpretation of that data.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Siting and drilling recommendations for a geothermal exploration well, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available exploration data relevant to the GeoProducts leasehold in the Wendel-Amedee KGRA are reviewed and interpreted. On the basis of this interpretation, locations and procedures are recommended for drilling geothermal production wells capable of supplying fluid at a temperature of 250/sup 0/F or greater. The following are covered: stratigraphy and geological history, geologic structure, geochemistry, geophysics, temperature-gradient data, and fluid quality. (MHR)

McNitt, J.R.; Wilde, W.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Exploration Best Practices and the OpenEI Knowledge Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Develop Knowledge Exchange & collect data to help identify: Best practices/pitfalls for hydrothermal exploration Techniques used in some regions, that could be implemented in other regions Techniques used to identify blind systems Techniques that could be useful with additional investment to reduce time, cost, risk Regional reconnaissance techniques to identify more of the undiscovered resource

Katherine R. Young; Timothy Reber; Kermit Witherbee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Vigorous Explorer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Explorers have made breakthroughs in many fields of astrophysics. The science from both these missions contributed to three Nobel Prizes - Giacconi (2002), Mather, and Smoot (2006). Explorers have: marked the definitive beginning of precision cosmology, discovered that short gamma-ray bursts are caused by compact star mergers and have measured metalicity to redshifts z>6. NASA Explorers do cutting-edge science that cannot be done by facility-class instruments. The Explorer program provides a rapid response to changing science and technology, to enable cutting-edge science at moderate cost. Explorers also enable innovation, and engage & train scientists, managers and engineers, adding human capital to NASA and the nation. The astrophysics Explorer launch rate now being achieved is 1 per 3 years, and budget projections are in the $150M/year range for the next five years. A newly Vigorous Explorer Program should be created to: 1. Reach the long-stated goal of annual astrophysics launches; 2. Find additional ...

Elvis, Martin; Brissenden, Roger; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cherry, Michael; Devlin, Mark; Edelstein, Jerry; Eisenhardt, Peter; Feldman, Paul; Ford, Holland; Gehrels, Neil; Golub, Leon; Marshall, Herman; Martin, Christopher; Mather, John; McCandliss, Stephan; McConnell, Mark; McDowell, Jonathan; Meier, David; Millan, Robyn; Mitchell, John; Moos, Warren; Murray, Steven S; Nousek, John; Oegerle, William; Ramsey, Brian; Green, James; Grindlay, Jonathan; Kaaret, Philip; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasper, Justin; Krolik, Julian; Kruk, Jeffrey W; Latham, David; MacKenty, John; Mainzer, Amanda; Ricker, George; Rinehart, Stephen; Romaine, Suzanne; Scowen, Paul; Silver, Eric; Sonneborn, George; Stern, Daniel; Swain, Mark; Swank, Jean; Traub, Wesley; Weisskopf, Martin; Werner, Michael; Wright, Edward

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 63, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 1998); P. 816825, 10 FIGS. Marine magnetotellurics for petroleum exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drive, Austin, TX 78759. E-mail: 73321.3045@compuserve.com. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University buried salt, carbonate, and volcanic horizons that efficiently reflect and scatter acoustic energy

Constable, Steve

235

DOE Data Explorer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI Home DDE Home DDE FAQs Help Site Map Contact Us Save searches, create alerts and export data :Sign In orCreate Account DOE Data Explorer Search Find Advanced Search Options...

236

DOE Data Explorer -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI Home DDE Home DDE FAQs Help Site Map Contact Us Save searches, create alerts and export data :Sign In orCreate Account DOE Data Explorer Search Find Advanced Search Options...

237

Exploring Beowulf clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beowulf clusters provide the computational power of parallel programming at minimal cost, making this technology available to small colleges and individual labs. In this paper, we explore the construction and programming of four distinct varieties of ...

Marsha Meredith; Teresa Carrigan; James Brockman; Timothy Cloninger; Jaroslav Privoznik; Jeffery Williams

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE Data Explorer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DDE Discovering data and non-text information in the Department of Energy DOE Data Explorer What's New About DDE DOE Data Centers OSTI's Data ID Service Featured Collection...

239

A suction lysimeter and a geophysical access port  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is described for monitoring vadose zones, geologic media or buried waste in sediment and more particularly to such an apparatus which is operable as an access port for geophysical logging and collecting fluid samples to permit analysis of such fluid samples for the presence of toxic substances, having a pipe-like, stainless steel, longitudinally extending, access tube with two ends, where the first end extends above the surface of the sediment and has a removable air tight seal. The subject invention further has a backing in fluid communication with the access tube and a fluid permeable plate contiguous with the backing, wherein the fluid permeable plate is made up of porous stainless steel. A reservoir is integrated into the second closed end of the access tube for containing the collected fluid. A vacuum pump, having a vacuum gauge/transducer attached thereto, is connected to the removable air tight seal for applying a vacuum to the access tube, such that gas and fluid samples may be drawn through the fluid permeable plate. A fluid sample connector coupled to the removable air tight seal, in addition to the vacuum pump with vacuum gauge/transducer, for withdrawing a fluid sample from the access tube.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geophysical study of the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geophysical studies in the Clear Lake region of California, north of San Francisco, have revealed a prominent, nearly circular negative gravity anomaly with an amplitude of more than 25 milligals (mgal) and an areal extent of approximately 250 square miles and, in addition, a number of smaller positive and negative anomalies. The major negative gravity anomaly is closely associated with the Clear Lake volcanic field and with an area characterized by hot springs and geothermal fields. However, the anomaly cannot be explained by mapped surface geologic features of the area. Aeromagnetic data in the Clear Lake region show no apparent correlation with the major negative gravity anomaly; the local magnetic field is affected principally by serpentine. An electrical resistivity low marks the central part of the gravity minimum, and a concentration of earthquake epicenters characterizes the Clear Lake volcanic field area. The primary cause of the major negative gravity anomaly is believed to be a hot intrusive mass, possibly a magma chamber, that may underlie the Clear Lake volcanic field and vicinity. This mass may serve as a source of heat for the geothermal phenomena in the area. Other smaller gravity anomalies in the Clear Lake region are apparently caused by near-surface geologic features, including relatively dense units of the Franciscan Formation and less dense Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rock units.

Chapman, R.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Imaging algorithms for geophysical applications of impedance tomography  

SciTech Connect

The methods of impedance tomography may be employed to obtain images of subsurface electrical and conductivity variations. For practical reasons, voltages and currents are usually applied at locations on the ground surface or down a limited number of boreholes, but almost never over the entire surface of the region being investigated. The geophysical inversion process can be facilitated by constructing algorithms adopted to these particular geometries and to the lack of complete surface data. In this paper we assume that the fluctuations in conductivity are small compared to the background value. The imaging of these fluctuations is carried out exactly within the constraints imposed by the problem geometry. Several possible arrangements of injection and monitoring electrodes are considered. In two dimensions include: Cross-line geometry, current input along one line (borehole) and measurements along a separate parallel line. Single-line geometry, injection and monitoring using the same borehole. Surface reflection geometry, all input and measurement along the ground surface. Theoretical and practical limitations on the image quality produced by the algorithms are discussed. They are applied to several sets of simulated data, and the images produced are displayed and analyzed.

Witten, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Molyneux, J.E. (Widener Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chester, PA (United States))

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead Abstract During the last century, electrical geophysics has been transformed from a simple resistivity method to a modern technology that uses complex data-acquisition systems and high-performance computers for enhanced data modeling and interpretation. Not only the methods and equipment have changed but also our ideas about the geoelectrical models used for interpretation have been modified tremendously. This paper describes the evolution of the conceptual and technical foundations of EM methods. Author Michael S. Zhdanov Published Journal

243

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Numerous geophysical logs have been made in three deep wells and in several intermediate depth core holes in the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho. Laboratory analyses of cores from the intermediate depth holes were used to provide a qualitative and quantitative basis for a detailed interpretation of logs from the shallow part of the reservoir. A less detailed interpretation of logs from the deeper part of the reservoir

244

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

245

Mining geophysical parameters through decision-tree analysis to determine correlation with tropical cyclone development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlations between geophysical parameters and tropical cyclones are essential in understanding and predicting the formation of tropical cyclones. Previous studies show that sea surface temperature and vertical wind shear significantly influence the ... Keywords: Data mining, Hurricane, Natural disaster, Prediction

Wenwen Li; Chaowei Yang; Donglian Sun

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Geophysical applications of nuclear resonant spectroscopy Wolfgang Sturhahn and Jennifer M. Jackson*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical applications of nuclear resonant spectroscopy Wolfgang Sturhahn and Jennifer M. Jackson summarize recent developments of nuclear resonant spectroscopy methods like nuclear resonant inelastic x important information on valence, spin state, and magnetic ordering. Both methods use a nuclear resonant

Jackson, Jennifer M.

247

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Interactions between mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges : constraints from geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies interactions between mid-ocean ridges and mantle plumes using geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the Marion and Bouvet hotspots on the ultra-slow ...

Georgen, Jennifer E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

On the Use of Emulators with Extreme and Highly Nonlinear Geophysical Simulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaussian process emulators are a powerful tool for understanding complex geophysical simulators, including oceanic and atmospheric general circulation models. Concern has been raised about their ability to emulate complex nonlinear systems. For ...

Robin Tokmakian; Peter Challenor; Yiannis Andrianakis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Toward Optimal Choices of Control Space Representation for Geophysical Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In geophysical data assimilation, observations shed light on a control parameter space through a model, a statistical prior, and an optimal combination of these sources of information. This control space can be a set of discrete parameters, or, ...

Marc Bocquet

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Exploration strategy for high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin and Range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15-phase strategy of exploration for high-temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the Basin and Range province features a balanced mix of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, hydrologic, and drilling activities. The strategy, based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program, provides justification for inclusion or exclusion of all pertinent exploration methods. With continuing research on methods of exploration for, and modeling of, convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. The basic strategy may vary with the geology or hydrology. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy should be particularly useful; many of its elements may apply in other geologic settings.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

GRR/Section 4-TX-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-TX-a - State Exploration Process 4-TX-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-TX-a - State Exploration Process 04TXAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Railroad Commission of Texas Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.5: Application to Drill, Deepen, Reenter, or Plug Back 16 TAC 3.7: Strata to Be Sealed Off 16 TAC 3.79: Definitions 16 TAC 3.100: Seismic Holes and Core Holes 31 TAC 10.2: Prospect Permits on State Lands 31 TAC 155.40: Definitions 31 TAC 155.42: Mining Leases on Properties Subject to Prospect 31 TAC 9.11: Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration Permits Triggers None specified

256

Geophysical imaging method utilizing backpropagation and zeroth-order phase approximation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining, under field conditions and in near-real time, an image of a geophysical objective under the ground in a geophysical medium, utilizing a zeroth order phase approximation implemented with first signal-to-detector arrival times for a plurality of signal transmitters transmitting signals through the geologic medium and the geologic objective to a plurality of signal receivers, disposed adjacent to the geologic objective in a predetermined manner. 9 figs.

Witten, A.J.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Deconvolution of Three-Component Teleseismic Data from Southern Tibet Using the SVA Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distant Earth wavelet from the autocorrelation of the SV component and using this to deconvolve the data constructing an estimate of the incident source and distant Earth wavelet from the SV component of the P made for P to P scattering for predictive deconvolution in exploration geophysics. Systematic

Nowack, Robert L.

258

Resistivity, induced polarization, and self-potential methods in geothermal exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the literature is presented. This is followed by a statement of some elementary electromagnetic theory necessary to establish the MKS system of units and the fundamental physics governing electrical methods of exploration. Next there is presented a reasonably detailed discussion of the electrical properties of earth materials including normal mode of conduction, surface conduction, electrode polarization, membrane polarization, semiconduction, melt conduction, real and complex resistivity, and the origin of self-potentials in geothermal systems. To illustrate how electrical methods are used within the framework of integrated geological, geochemical, and geophysical exploration, the case history of the Monroe-Red Hill hot springs system is presented.

Ward, S.H.; Sill, W.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

DESCOMP: a new design space exploration approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a new approach in Design-Space-Exploration (DSE) for non-clustered VLIW architectures. It differs from existing techniques by using a bottom-up strategy. While other approaches start with the design of an architecture, ...

Mario Schlzel; Peter Bachmann

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seismic exploration for shallow magma bodies in the vicinity of Socorro, New Mexico. Final report, January 1, 1977-December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the following articles: Characteristics of Rio Grande rift in vicinity of Socorro, New Mexico, from geophysical studies; Exploration framework of the Socorro Geothermal Area, New Mexico; a study of Poisson's ratio in the upper crust in the Socorro, New Mexico, Area; and Microearthquake frequency attenuation of S phases in the Rio Grande rift near Socorro. (ACR)

Sanford, A.R.; Schlue, J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

VLF Technique and Science in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since IGY period (1957-58), natural and artificially produced Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiations are being recorded at large number of ground stations and on board satellites to study various wave-plasma interactive phenomena. The terrestrial propagation of these VLF radio waves are primarily enabled through the earth ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) system to long horizontal distances around the globe and ducted along the geomagnetic field lines into the conjugate hemisphere through the ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere routes. The time frequency spectra indicate presence of dispersion and various cut-off frequencies providing several types of received signals like whistlers, chorus, tweeks, hiss, hisslers etc., which can be heard on an earphone with distinguishing audio structures. While the VLF technique has been a very effective tool for studying middle and high latitude phenomena, the importance of various anomalous characteristics over the Indian low latitude stations provide potentially new challenges for their scientific interpretation and modelling. The ducted and non-ducted propagation, low latitude TRIMPI/TLE effects, D-region ionisation perturbations due to solar and stellar x- and {gamma} ray emissions and detecting precursors of seismic activities are a few problems which will gain from low latitude studies. Since the conjugate points of Indian stations lie over the Indian oceanic region, the VLF propagation effects would be relatively noise free to observe rare and new phenomena requiring better SNR to detect such changes. The VLF signals emanating from the active seismic zones would require high sensitivity of the system and suitable network of transmitting and receiving stations. Results obtained on whistlers and related studies from a number of Indian stations covering geomagnetic latitude range between 13-24 deg. N are mentioned and reviewed in the background of theoretical understanding of the lightning return stroke signal elements, VLF propagation through cold plasma, ionospheric wave guide mode, electron precipitation due to cyclotron resonance and production of ionisation in the D-region due to solar/stellar UV/X/{gamma}-rays. Further use of the VLF technique in terms of improving both observational data for real time monitoring/modelling of geophysical phenomena and exploring space weather conditions are considered as part of a future Indian programme.

Chakravarty, S. C. [Member, Governing Body, Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata (India)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the hydrogen-sensitive neutron imaging capabilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to image healthy and cancerous breast tissue specimens. Working with Hassina Bilheux,...

263

Exploration for Uranium Ore (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation describes permitting procedures and requirements for exploration activities. For the purpose of this legislation, exploration is defined as the drilling of test holes or...

264

Exploration Incentive Tax Credit (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mineral and Coal Exploration Incentive Tax Credit provides tax incentives to entities conducting exploration for minerals and coal. Expenditures related to the following activities are eligible...

265

Canadian incentives for oil and gas exploration. [Applicability to USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1970s a number of different exploration and production incentive programs were put in place in Canada, in particular in the Province of Alberta, Canada's principal oil- and gas-producing province. The DOE/RA is evaluating Canadian incentives for oil and gas exploration, and this study is intended to provide information that will help guide DOE/RA in determining the applicability of Canadian incentive programs in US energy policy. The study describes and documents the fiscal structure in which the Canadian oil industry operates. The incentive features of pricing policy, taxation policy, and provincial royalty systems are discussed. A principal focus of the study is on one of the most important of Canada's specific incentive programs, the Alberta Exploratory Drilling Incentive Credit Program (EDICP). The study describes and evaluates the effect of the EDICP on increased oil and gas exploration activity. Similarly, the study also reviews and evaluates other specific incentive programs such as the Alberta Geophysical Incentive Program, Frontier Exploration Allowances, and various tar sand and heavy oil development incentives. Finally the study evaluates the applicability of Canadian incentives to US energy policy.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geophysical remote sensing of water reservoirs suitable for desalinization.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many parts of the United States, as well as other regions of the world, competing demands for fresh water or water suitable for desalination are outstripping sustainable supplies. In these areas, new water supplies are necessary to sustain economic development and agricultural uses, as well as support expanding populations, particularly in the Southwestern United States. Increasing the supply of water will more than likely come through desalinization of water reservoirs that are not suitable for present use. Surface-deployed seismic and electromagnetic (EM) methods have the potential for addressing these critical issues within large volumes of an aquifer at a lower cost than drilling and sampling. However, for detailed analysis of the water quality, some sampling utilizing boreholes would be required with geophysical methods being employed to extrapolate these sampled results to non-sampled regions of the aquifer. The research in this report addresses using seismic and EM methods in two complimentary ways to aid in the identification of water reservoirs that are suitable for desalinization. The first method uses the seismic data to constrain the earth structure so that detailed EM modeling can estimate the pore water conductivity, and hence the salinity. The second method utilizes the coupling of seismic and EM waves through the seismo-electric (conversion of seismic energy to electrical energy) and the electro-seismic (conversion of electrical energy to seismic energy) to estimate the salinity of the target aquifer. Analytic 1D solutions to coupled pressure and electric wave propagation demonstrate the types of waves one expects when using a seismic or electric source. A 2D seismo-electric/electro-seismic is developed to demonstrate the coupled seismic and EM system. For finite-difference modeling, the seismic and EM wave propagation algorithms are on different spatial and temporal scales. We present a method to solve multiple, finite-difference physics problems that has application beyond the present use. A limited field experiment was conducted to assess the seismo-electric effect. Due to a variety of problems, the observation of the electric field due to a seismic source is not definitive.

Aldridge, David Franklin; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Bonal, Nedra; Engler, Bruce Phillip

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: As part of the resource evaluation and exploration program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for the national Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, a regional magnetotelluric (MT) survey of New Mexico and Arizona is being performed. The MT lines are being located in areas where the results of analysis of residual gravity anomaly maps of Arizona and New Mexico, integrated with other geologic and geophysical studies indicate the greatest potential for HDR resources. The residual

268

Strategy of exploration for high temperature hydrothermal systems in the basin and range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fifteen phase strategy of exploration for high temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the basin and range province, recommended herein, features a balanced mix of geological, geochemical, geophysical, hydrological, and drilling activities. The strategy is based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program. Justification for inclusion in or exclusion from the strategy of all pertinent geoscientific methods is given. With continuing research on methods of exploration for and modeling of convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. Variations on the basic strategy are to be expected where the geology or hydrology requires it. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy is expected to be particularly useful.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

RMOTC - Testing - Exploration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploration Helicopter flying over RMOTC testing facility for leak detection survey test Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC's extensive exploration-related data sets, including 3D and 2D seismic, wells and logging data, and cores - both physical core samples, stored in Casper, and core analysis data and reports - provide a great

270

Exploration for deep coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

NONE

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advances In Geothermal Resource Exploration Circa 2007 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Circa 2007 Exploration Circa 2007 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Advances In Geothermal Resource Exploration Circa 2007 Details Activities (8) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At the outset of the 21st centry, the geothermal community at-large is essentially attempting to use available exploration tools and techniques to find needles (geothermal occurrences) in very large haystacks (expanses of unexplored territory). Historically teh industry has relied on teh presence of surface manifestations of subsurface heat, such as hot springs, fumaroles, or geyers as a firt-order exploration tool., Regrettably, even when such surface manifestations are investigated more closely, there is no proven technique or techniques that can bve used with

272

A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (10) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The Baca location #1 geothermal field is located in north-central New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where downhole temperatures exceed 260°C at depths of less than 2 km. Stratigraphically the reservoir region can be described as a five-layer sequence that includes Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, and Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments overlying Precambrian granitic

273

EETD Researchers at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD Researchers at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco EETD Researchers at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco December 9-13 December 2013 A number of scientists from the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are presenting papers and posters at the American Geophysical Union Meeting next week in San Francisco. Here are brief descriptions of one talk and two posters by EETD scientists and their colleagues. For more information, go to the AGU meeting site at the link below, where you can look up presentations by scientists from EETD and other divisions of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Energy-Water Integrated Assessment of the Sacramento Area and a Demonstration of WEAP-LEAP Capability Poster Monday, December 9, 2013, 8 AM - 12 PM Hall A-C Moscone South Researchers from EETD and partner institutions report on a new basin-scale

274

Exploring colourful holographic superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a class of holographic superconductors built using non-abelian condensates on probe branes in conformal and non-conformal backgrounds. These are shown to exhibit behaviour of the specific heat which resembles that of heavy fermion compounds in the superconducting phase. Instead of showing BCS-like exponential behaviour, the specific heat is polynomial in the temperature. It exhibits a jump at the critical temperature, in agreement with real-world superconductors. We also analyse the behaviour of the energy gap and the AC and DC conductivities, and find that the systems can be either semi-conducting or metallic just above the critical temperature.

Kasper Peeters; Jonathan Powell; Marija Zamaklar

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Exploring colourful holographic superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a class of holographic superconductors built using non-abelian condensates on probe branes in conformal and non-conformal backgrounds. These are shown to exhibit behaviour of the specific heat which resembles that of heavy fermion compounds in the superconducting phase. Instead of showing BCS-like exponential behaviour, the specific heat is polynomial in the temperature. It exhibits a jump at the critical temperature, in agreement with real-world superconductors. We also analyse the behaviour of the energy gap and the AC and DC conductivities, and find that the systems can be either semi-conducting or metallic just above the critical temperature.

Peeters, Kasper; Zamaklar, Marija

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; Carpenter, P.J.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Carr, B.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mapping groundwater contamination using dc resistivity and VLF geophysical methods -- A case study  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical methods can be helpful in mapping areas of contaminated soil and groundwater. Electrical resistivity and very low-frequency electromagnetic induction (VLF) surveys were carried out at a site of shallow hydrocarbon contamination in Utah County, Utah. Previously installed monitoring wells facilitated analysis of water chemistry to enhance interpretation of the geophysical data. The electrical resistivity and VLF data correlate well, and vertical cross-sections and contour maps generated from these data helped map the contaminant plume, which was delineated as an area of high interpreted resistivities.

Benson, A.K.; Payne, K.L.; Stubben, M.A. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

Friedmann, S J

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

UWC geothermal resource exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program was developed to explore the strength of the geothermal and hot dry rock (HDR) resource at the Montezuma Hot Springs at the United World College (UWC). The purpose of the UWC {number_sign}1 well is to obtain hydrologic, geologic, and temperature information for ongoing geothermal evaluation of the Montezuma Hot Springs area. If sufficient fluids are encountered, the hole will be cased with a 4 1/2 inch production casing and re-permitted as a geothermal low-temperature well. If no fluid is encountered, the well will be abandoned per Oil Conservation Division regulation. The objectives of the exploration are to evaluate the resource potential to provide space heating for the entire campus of the United World College, determine the effect of a well on the Hot Springs outflow, accurately measure the UWC heating loads versus time, evaluate the potential to support local thermal industry development, assess the feasibility of HDR development, and create an educational program from the collection of data derived from the research effort.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Geophysics. · Caltech, Pasadena, CA. 2003-2007. Posdoc in Isotope geochemistry. Department of GeologicalHagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520 Plants: Physiological Role and Isotopic Composition. Adviser: Dan Yakir. Professional experience · Yale

282

EXPLORER: A Natural Language Processing System for Oil Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPLORER: A Natural Language Processing System for Oil Exploration Wendy G. Lehnert Department", whereas the second time "show" is used it has a technical meaning (i.e., an indicator of oil or gas Steven P. Shwartz Cognitive Systems Inc. 234 Church Street New Haven, Ct. 06510 EXPLORER (Lehnert

283

Success Stories: Carbon Explorer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL Device Monitors Ocean Carbon LBNL Device Monitors Ocean Carbon Imagine waking up each morning and discovering that twenty percent of all plants in your garden had disappeared over night. They had been eaten. Equally astonishing would be the discovery in the afternoon that new plants had taken their place. This is the norm of life in the ocean. Without the ability to accurately observe these daily changes in ocean life cycles, over vast spatial scales, we lack the ability to predict how the ocean will respond to rising CO2 levels, crippling our ability to develop accurate models of global warming or devise strategies to prevent it. The Carbon Explorer, conceived by Berkeley Lab's James K. Bishop in collaboration with Scripps Institution of Oceanography (La Jolla, California) and WET labs, Inc. (Philomath, Oregon), bridges this

284

DOE Data Explorer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DDE DDE Discovering data and non-text information in the Department of Energy DOE Data Explorer What's New About DDE DOE Data Centers OSTI's Data ID Service Featured Collection Featured Data Collection Visit CEDR View the archive Search Find Advanced Search Options × Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator/Author: Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Host Website: Research Org: Sponsor/Funding Org: Contributing Orgs: Type: Select Type Publication Date: from Date: to to Date: Sort: By Relevance By Title Limit to: Matches with DOI only Collections only (no DOIs) Clear Find Advanced Search Basic Search Browse DDE Content All Titles (alphabetically) Sponsor/Funding Organizations Types of Data and Non-text Other Related Organizations Subject Categories Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their

285

DOE Data Explorer - Create Account  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Data Explorer Create Account Create New Account To create a DataExplorer account, enter your email address and password below. You will be taken to your account management...

286

Autonomous Exploration: Driven by Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Exploration: Driven by Uncertainty Peter Whaite and Frank P. Ferrie TR-CIM-93-17 1993-6319 Telex: 05 268510 FAX: 514 398-7348 Email: cim@cim.mcgill.ca #12;Autonomous Exploration: Driven

Dudek, Gregory

287

Sun-Synchronous Planetary Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary planetary missions are characterized by favorable landing sites, communication, and duration. The ambition of planetary exploration is to discover the unknown: to explore regions, not just sites; to analyze, not just observe; and to operate effectively and reliably without excessive communication and ground support. New robotics technologies and mission concepts will revolutionize exploration systems and operations. This paper addresses the key enabling technologies for sun-synchronous planetary exploration: environmental modeling, temporal path planning, scaling, and robot configuration. 1.

William Red Whittaker; William red Whittaker; George Kantor; Ben Shamah; David Wettergreen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C the South Caspian Sea, offshore Azerbaijan, document for the ®rst time in the deep water (up to 650 m Caspian Sea. The Absheron block, named after the nearby Absheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan, is situated

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

289

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

290

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex Palaeontology & Stratigraphy B. Sc. 1982-1986 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Academia Sinica Calcareous Algae & carbonate sedimentology M.Sc. 1986-1989 Princeton University Stable isotope geochemistry

Bao, Huiming

291

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology, 2013, Oxygen isotope composition of meltwater from a Neoproterozoic glaciation in South China. Geology1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

292

Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geological and geophysical studies in Grass Valley, Nevada. Preliminary open file report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geologic setting, geochemistry, and heat flow of the Leach Hot Springs area are discussed. Geophysical data is presented under the following section headings: survey lines; presentation of data; gravity survey; magnetic survey; self-potential; bipole-dipole apparent resistivity and apparent conductance; electric field ratio tellurics; dipole-dipole resistivity; magnetotellurics; seismological methods; seismic data and preliminary interpretation. (JGB)

Beyer, H.; Dey, A.; Liaw, A.; Majer, E.; McEvilly, T.V.; Morrison, H.F.; Wollenberg, H.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1999); P. 13471348 Computers and creativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1999); P. 1347­1348 Computers and creativity John A. Scales and Roel Snieder "The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers."--Sydney J. Harris "Technical skill is mastery of complexity while

Scales, John

295

Category:Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electrical Techniques page? For detailed information on Electrical Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Electrical Techniques Add.png Add a new Electrical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. D [+] Direct-Current Resistivity Survey‎ (2 categories) 3 pages E [+] Electromagnetic Techniques‎ (1 categories) 2 pages Pages in category "Electrical Techniques"

296

A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The Mt-5-Ex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Five-Component Magneto-Telluric Method In Geothermal Exploration- The Mt-5-Ex Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The present paper describes a new method designed both at recording and processing levels for a practical solution of the overall problem of the Earth electromagnetism, in geophysics. Up to now, the random character of the natural signals prevented any measurement of reliable values of the phase shift between the various electromagnetic components at a given place. Hence it is impossible numerically to solve the general linear relations binding these components simply by using the processes of

297

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Property:ExplorationTimePerMetric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationTimePerMetric ExplorationTimePerMetric Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationTimePerMetric Property Type String Description the unit ratio denominator for exploration time Allows Values job;10 mile;10 stn;100 mile;sq. mile;foot Subproperties This property has the following 121 subproperties: A Active Seismic Methods Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Analytical Modeling B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Cation Geothermometers Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Conceptual Model Core Holes Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques

299

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP - REPORT ON GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING CO2 MOVEMENT DURING SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoir). Locations of injection wells are shown by blackis 1.2 %. Location of injection wells are shown by black2 injection with an injection well at (0,0) and a production

Gasperikova, Erika

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP - REPORT ON GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING CO2 MOVEMENT DURING SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. E. , 1942, The electrical resistivity log as an aid inV S , density and electrical resistivity). A description ofet al. (2003). Electrical resistivity as a function of

Gasperikova, Erika

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Property:ExplorationCostPerMetric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationCostPerMetric ExplorationCostPerMetric Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationCostPerMetric Property Type String Description the unit ratio denominator for exploration cost Allows Values 100 feet cut;30 foot core;compound;day;element;foot;hour;mile;point;process;sample;sq. mile;station;Subject;well Subproperties This property has the following 107 subproperties: A Active Seismic Methods Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Analytical Modeling B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Cation Geothermometers Chemical Logging Conceptual Model Core Holes Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array)

303

Data Mining for Seismic Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic exploration plays an important role in petroleum industry. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional data analysis ways in oil and gas industry. Traditional methods in petroleum engineering are knowledge-driven ... Keywords: seismic exploration, data mining, cluster analysis

Zhongbin Ouyang; Jing He; Keliang Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Introduction Optimal static exploration strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategy Optimal dynamic exploration strategy The project Find Oil The current work is part of the project strategy Optimal dynamic exploration strategy The project Find Oil The current work is part of the project components required for oil and gas to accumulate in sufficient quantities to be worth producing: source

Eidsvik, Jo

305

Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California.

Pickles, W L; Kasameyer, P W; Martini, B A; Potts, D C; Silver, E A

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Category:Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Techniques page? For detailed information on Field Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Techniques Add.png Add a new Field Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. D [×] Data Collection and Mapping‎ 5 pages F [+] Field Sampling‎ (2 categories) 4 pages Pages in category "Field Techniques" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. D Data Collection and Mapping F Field Sampling H Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) P Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Techniques&oldid=689815"

308

Compound Specific Stable Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids: What can this Novel Technique tell us about  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compound Specific Stable Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids: What can this Novel Technique, Jeff Seminoff2 1Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii 2Southwest Fisheries Science trophic models, but relationships often complex and dynamic #12;· Bulk tissue nitrogen isotope analysis

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

309

DOE Data Explorer - Sign In  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI Home DDE Home DDE FAQs Help Site Map Contact Us Save searches, create alerts and export data :Sign In orCreate Account DOE Data Explorer Search Find Advanced Search Options...

310

DOE Data Explorer - Forgot Password  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI Home DDE Home DDE FAQs Help Site Map Contact Us Save searches, create alerts and export data :Sign In orCreate Account DOE Data Explorer Search Find Advanced Search Options...

311

Electromagnetic exploration system. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design for a cost effective, highly flexible, and portable controlled source EM exploration system is presented. The design goals of the CMOS micro-processor based receiver and its companion transmitter are listed. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Fluid Imaging Project Description EGS has been defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success of EGS is the successful manipulation of fluids in the subsurface to enhance permeability. Knowledge in the change in volume and location of fluids in the rocks and fractures (both natural and induced) will be needed to manage injection strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been our inability to reliably predict their locations, movements and concentrations. We believe combining data from MEQ and electrical surveys has the potential to overcome these problems and can meet many of the above needs, economically. Induced seismicity is currently viewed as one of the essential methods for inferring the success of creating fracture permeability and fluid paths during large scale EGS injections. Fluids are obviously playing a critical role in inducing the seismicity, however, other effects such as thermal, geochemical and stress redistribution, etc. may also play a role.

313

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for magma: hydrothermal systems - geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a comparative assessment for the Continental Scientific Drilling Program, geophysical data were used, to characterize and evaluate potential magma-hydrothermal targets at five drill sites in the western United States. The sites include Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico, and The Geysers-Clear Lake, Long Valley, and Salton Trough areas, California. This summary discusses the size, depth, temperature, and setting of each potential target, as well as relvant scientific questions about their natures and the certainty of their existence.

Kasameyer, P.

1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Case study of the Wendel-Amedee Exploration Drilling Project, Lassen County, California, User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wendel-Amedee KGRA is located in Honey Lake basin in Lassen County, California, on the boundary between the Modoc Plateau and the Basin and Range geologic provinces. A variety of geophysical surveys was performed over the project property. Geophysical data helped in establishing the regional structural framework, however, none of the geophysical data is sufficiently refined to be considered suitable for the purpose of siting an exploration drill hole. Drilling of reservoir confirmation well WEN-1 took place from August 1 to September 22, 1981. Pulse and long-term flow testing subjected the reservoir to a maximum flow of 680 gpm for 75 hours. At that rate, the well exhibited a productivity index of 21.6 gpm/psi; the reservoir transmissivity was 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ md-ft/cp. The maximum bottom-hole temperature recorded during testing was 251/sup 0/F. The conceptual model of the geothermal resource at Wendel Hot Springs calls on ground water, originating in the neighboring volcanic highlands, descending through jointed and otherwise permeable rocks into the granitic basement. Once in the basement, the fluid is heated as it continues its descent, and lateral movement as dictated by the hydrologic gradient. It then rises to the discharge point along transmissive faults. 45 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

Zeisloft, J.; Sibbett, B.S.; Adams, M.C.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Genability Explorer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Genability Explorer Genability Explorer Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Genability Explorer Agency/Company /Organization: Genability Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.genability.com Country: United States Web Application Link: explorer.genability.com/explorer/index.jsp Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): Green Button Apps Northern America Coordinates: 37.790383°, -122.393054° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.790383,"lon":-122.393054,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Large Scale Computing Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Modeling and Imaging G. A. Newman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 9 - 10 , 2010 Talk Outline * SEAM Geophysical Modeling Project - Its Really Big! * Geophysical Imaging (Seismic & EM) - Its 10 to 100x Bigger! - Reverse Time Migration - Full Waveform Inversion - 3D Imaging & Large Scale Considerations - Offshore Brazil Imaging Example (EM Data Set) * Computational Bottlenecks * Computing Alternatives - GPU's & FPGA's - Issues Why ? So that the resource industry can tackle grand geophysical challenges (Subsalt imaging, land acquisition, 4-D, CO2, carbonates ......) SEAM Mission Advance the science and technology of applied

317

PROMETHEE II: A knowledge-driven method for copper exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of a well-known Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) technique called Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE II) to explore porphyry copper deposits. Various raster-based evidential ... Keywords: Knowledge-driven method, Mineral prospectivity mapping, Now Chun deposit, PROMETHEE II, Porphyry copper, Various geo-datasets

Maysam Abedi; S. Ali Torabi; Gholam-Hossain Norouzi; Mohammad Hamzeh; Gholam-Reza Elyasi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For Geothermal Exploration For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and

319

Comparison of Geophysical Model Functions for SAR Wind Speed Retrieval in Japanese Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This work discusses the accuracies of geophysical model functions (GMFs) for retrieval of sea surface wind speed from satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in Japanese coastal waters characterized by short fetches and variable atmospheric stability conditions. In situ observations from two validation sites, Hiratsuka and Shirahama, are used for comparison of the retrieved sea surface wind speeds using CMOD (C-band model)4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5.N. Of all the geophysical model functions (GMFs), the latest C-band GMF, CMOD5.N, has the smallest bias and root mean square error at both sites. All of the GMFs exhibit a negative bias in the retrieved wind speed. In order to understand the reason for this bias, all SAR-retrieved wind speeds are separated into two categories: onshore wind (blowing from sea to land) and offshore wind (blowing from land to sea). Only offshore winds were found to exhibit the large negative bias, and short fetches from the coastline may be a possible reason for this. Moreover, it is clarified that in both the unstable and stable conditions, CMOD5.N has atmospheric stability effectiveness, and can keep the same accuracy with CMOD5 in the neutral condition. In short, at the moment, CMOD5.N is thought to be the most promising GMF

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Katsutoshi Kozai; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Merete Badger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

J. Marvin Herndon

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radioactive Waste Isolation in Salt: Peer review of documents dealing with geophysical investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Salt Repository Project, a US Department of Energy program to develop a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste, is governed by a complex and sometimes inconsistent array of laws, administrative regulations, guidelines, and position papers. In conducting multidisciplinary peer reviews of contractor documents in support of this project, Argonne National Laboratory has needed to inform its expert reviewers of these governmental mandates, with particular emphasis on the relationship between issues and the technical work undertaken. This report acquaints peer review panelists with the regulatory framework as it affects their reviews of site characterization plans and related documents, including surface-based and underground test plans. Panelists will be asked to consider repository performance objectives and issues as they judge the adequacy of proposed geophysical testing. All site-specific discussions relate to the Deaf Smith County site in Texas, which was approved for site characterization by the President in May 1986. Natural processes active at the Deaf Smith County site and the status of geophysical testing near the site are reviewed briefly. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

McGinnis, L.D.; Bowen, R.H.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Compilation of geothermal information: exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Database for Geothermal Energy Exploration and Evaluation is a printout of selected references to publications covering the development of geothermal resources from the identification of an area to the production of elecric power. This annotated bibliography contains four sections: references, author index, author affiliation index, and descriptor index.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Mobile exploration of geotagged photographs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Columbus is a mobile application that lets users explore their surroundings through geotagged photographs, presented to them at the location they were taken. By moving around the physical world, the user unlocks photographs and gets to see and experience ... Keywords: Geotagging, Location, Locative media, Photographs

Mattias Rost; Henriette Cramer; Lars Erik Holmquist

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Query Explorativeness for Integrated Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider query systems which allow imprecise queries and define a new property called query explorativeness. This property characteri es the transf ormations perf ormed by a system in order to answer imprecise queries, i.e. the system's "work"f or mapping input queries into more precise target queries.

In Heterogeneous Data; Ra Domenig; Klaus R. Dittrich

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Palanquin post-shot exploration  

SciTech Connect

This report defines the plan and purpose for the Palanquin post-shot exploration program. This program is necessary to obtain data that is needed in the understanding of the Palanquin experiment, and related explosion phenomena, which can be obtained in no other way.

Meyer, L.; Hansen, S.; Toman, J.

1965-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Application of the SP technique over Lagadas low enthalpy geothermal field, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that in order to verify the applicability of the SP gradient method as a tool for geothermal exploration, Lagadas low enthalpy geothermal field was used as a test site. A total of 63 lines km was surveyed using SP gradient method along 10 profiles covering the main geothermal field area. The complied SP map correlates in a satisfactory was with other geological and geophysical information available. Detected SP anomalies were inverted to causative polarized planes and their relationship with existing deep fractures in the basement is investigated. As a result, two main fracture zones were detected, which were electrically polarized, and coincide with already known similar tectonic features identified by other geological and geophysical methods. Circulation of hot water in deep permeable fracture zones is considered to be the originating mechanism of the observed SP anomalies.

Thanassoulas, C.; Lazou, A. (Inst. of Geology and Mineral Exploration, Dept. of Geophysical Research, 57 Messoghion Avenue, Athens 115-26 (GR))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

328

NETL: Exploration Technologies - EOR Process Drawings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploration & Production Technologies Exploration Technologies - EOR Process Drawings Listed below are links to cross-sectional illustrations of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)...

329

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interviews were conducted with exploration experts with both geothermal and oil-and-gas industry experience to identify the exploration challenges and best practices for the...

330

Form:ExplorationActivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Form:ExplorationActivity Jump to: navigation, search Input a name below to add an "Exploration Activity'. If the activity already...

331

Coordinated exploration program for geothermal sources on the island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Staff members of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics carried out an exploration program for geothermal sources on the island of Hawaii by using all relevant geophysical and geochemical methods. Infrared scanning aerial surveys followed by reconnaissance-type electrical surveys and ground noise surveys narrowed down the promising area to the east rift of Kilauea. The surveys carried out over the east rift included magnetic, gravity, and electrical surveys by various methods: microearthquake, surveillance, temperature profiling of wells, and chemical analysis of water samples. Aeromagnetic, regional gravity, and crustal seismic refraction data were available in published literature. A model of the thermal structure of the east rift was put together to account for the data. The dike complex, through which magma from the central vent of Kilauea travels laterally occupies a zone 3-km wide extending from 1-km to 5-km depth. On the south side of the dike complex, there may be a self-sealing geothermal reservoir where groundwater heated by the dike complex is trapped. Not all of the dike complex is hot; hot sections seem to occur in patches.

Furumoto, A.S.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL  

SciTech Connect

Incomplete or sparse information on geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. Expert systems have been developed and used in several disciplines and industries, including medical diagnostics, with favorable results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized data base and computer maps generated by neural networks, is proposed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. This project will develop an Artificial Intelligence system that will draw upon a wide variety of information to provide realistic estimates of risk. ''Fuzzy logic,'' a system of integrating large amounts of inexact, incomplete information with modern computational methods to derive usable conclusions, has been demonstrated as a cost-effective computational technology in many industrial applications. During project year 1, 90% of geologic, geophysical, production and price data were assimilated for installation into the database. Logs provided geologic data consisting of formation tops of the Brushy Canyon, Lower Brushy Canyon, and Bone Springs zones of 700 wells used to construct regional cross sections. Regional structure and isopach maps were constructed using kriging to interpolate between the measured points. One of the structure derivative maps (azimuth of curvature) visually correlates with Brushy Canyon fields on the maximum change contours. Derivatives of the regional geophysical data also visually correlate with the location of the fields. The azimuth of maximum dip approximately locates fields on the maximum change contours. In a similar manner the second derivative in the x-direction of the gravity map visually correlates with the alignment of the known fields. The visual correlations strongly suggest that neural network architectures will be found to correlate regional attributes with individual well production. On a local scale, given open-hole log information, a neural network was trained to predict the product of porosity and oil saturation as reported in whole core analysis. Thus a direct indicator of an oil show is available from log information. This is important in the thin-bedded Delaware sand reservoirs. Fuzzy ranking was used to prioritize 3D seismic attributes that were then correlated to formation depth with a neural network. The results were superior to those obtained using linear interpolation or low order polynomial interpolation as time-to-depth conversion tools. A radial basis function neural network was developed and used as a log evaluation tool. This new technology gives an additional tool to the more commonly used multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network. An interactive web based MLP, PredictOnline, was coded in Java and made available to consortium members for beta testing. PredictOnline demonstrates the power of Java programming language for web-based applications. A draft design of the Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool system based on readily available software was completed. The recent development of a Java Expert System Shell, JESS, facilitates expert rule development.

William W. Weiss

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation  

SciTech Connect

Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is supported by interpreting the combined geological, geophysical, and thermal data. In the model, heat is transferred from an area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock.

Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4+ production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ExPLORATiON YGS Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Placer Mining Oil and Gas Yukon Mining incentives Program 2009 #12;Yukon Exploration and GEoloGY 2009 185YukON ExPLORATiON & GEOLOGY OVERViEW YGS Activities Hardrock Mining, development & Exploration composition of platinum group minerals and their inclusions from several Yukon placers. In: Yukon Exploration

Bodnar, Robert J.

337

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Previous interpretations of seismic data collected by the Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) experiments indicate the presence of crustal thickening within the rift valley area beneath the Kenya dome, an uplift centred on the southern part of the Kenya rift. North of the dome, these interpretations show thinning of the crust and an increase in crustal extension. To the south near the Kenya/Tanzania border, crustal thinning associated with the rift is modest. Our study was aimed at further investigating crustal structure from this dome southwards via a

338

Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone Hotspot Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone Hotspot Abstract The Blue Mountain geothermal field, located about 35 km northwest of Winnemucca, Nevada, is situated along a prominent crustal-scale fracture interpreted from total intensity aeromagnetic and gravity data. Aeromagnetic data indicate that this feature is related to the intrusion of mafic dikes, similar to the Northern Nevada Rift (Zoback et al.,1994), and

339

GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES AT THE POWELL STAGE STATION  

SciTech Connect

Within the boundaries of the Idaho National Laboratory, an ongoing archaeological investigation of a late 19th century stage station was expanded with the use of Electro-Magnetic and Magnetic geophysical surveying. The station known as the Powell Stage Station was a primary transportation hub on the Snake River Plain, bridging the gap between railroad supply depots in Blackfoot, Idaho and booming mining camps throughout Central Idaho. Initial investigations have shown a strong magnetic signature from a buried road and previously unknown features that were not detected by visual surface surveys. Data gained from this project aids in federally directed cultural resource and land management and use requirements and has contributed additional information for archeological interpretation and cultural resource preservation.

Hollie K. Gilbert; Julie B. Braun; Brenda R. Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Geophysical Study of Basin-Range Structure Dixie Valley Region, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Basin-Range Structure Dixie Valley Region, Nevada of Basin-Range Structure Dixie Valley Region, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical Study of Basin-Range Structure Dixie Valley Region, Nevada Abstract The study aims to determine the subsurface structure and origin ofa tectonically active part of the Basin and Range province, which hasstructural similarities to the ocean ridge system and to continental blockfaultstructure such_;s the Rift Valleys of East Africa. A variety oftechniques was utilized, including seismic refraction, gravity measurements,magnetic measurements, photogeologic mapping, strain analysis of existinggeodetic data, and elevation measurements on shorelines of ancient lakes.Dixie Valley contains more than 10,000 feet of Cenozoic deposits andis underlain by a complex fault trough concealed within the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tule Chek, Bc, Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A method is described to determine bounds characterizing axisymmetric bodies from a set of gravity data. Bounds on the density contrast as a function of depth to the top and thickness of the anomalous source are obtained by using Parker's ideal body theory and linear programming algorithms. Such bounds are given in terms of trade-off diagrams, where regions of feasible solutions compatible with the observed data can be assured. Gravity data from the Tule Chek, B.C., Mexico, geothermal area were used to compute such trade-off diagrams. Seismic

342

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya Rift Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Kenyan part of the East African rift is among the most studied rift zones in the world. It is characterized by: (1) a classic rift valley, (2) sheer escarpments along the faulted borders of the rift valley, (3) voluminous volcanics that flowed from faults and fissures along the rift, and (4) axial and flank volcanoes where magma flow was most intense. In northern Kenya, the rift faults formed in an area where the lithosphere was weakened and stretched by Cretaceous-Paleogene extension, and in central and southern Kenya, it formed along old zones of weakness at the

343

Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Category:Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Downhole Techniques page? For detailed information on Downhole Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Downhole Techniques Add.png Add a new Downhole Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B [×] Borehole Seismic Techniques‎ 2 pages F [×] Formation Testing Techniques‎ O [×] Open-Hole Techniques‎ W [×] Well Log Techniques‎ 17 pages [×] Well Testing Techniques‎ 8 pages

345

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error Paul E. Johnson and David G . Long  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error -Wind I Paul E. Johnson (which relates the wind to the normalized radar cross section, NRCS, of the ocean surface) is uncertainty in the NRCS for given wind conditions. When the estimated variability is in- cluded in the maximum likelihood

Long, David G.

347

Remote Sensing May Provide Unprecedented Hydrological Data http://www.agu.org/eos_elec, 1999 American Geophysical Union.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing May Provide Unprecedented Hydrological Data http://www.agu.org/eos_elec, © 1999 American Geophysical Union. Remote Sensing May Provide Unprecedented Hydrological Data -- Randal D. Koster, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, Md., USA Use of remote sensing

Houser, Paul R.

348

Geophysical methods applied to detection delineation and evaluation of geothermal resources, Snowbird, Utah, August 24--28, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is given on the geothermal workshop devoted to inventorying current knowledge, problems, controversies, and predicting future developments in the application of geophysical methods to the evaluation of geothermal resources. Separate abstracts were prepared for presentations and summaries of the group sessions. (LBS)

Not Available

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Ozone Ensemble Forecast with Machine Learning Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Ozone Ensemble Forecast with Machine learning algorithms to perform sequential aggregation of ozone forecasts. The latter rely on a multimodel ensemble built for ozone forecasting with the modeling system Polyphemus. The ensemble simulations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 22452248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Subsurface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS is based upon four waves will help check for underground, under­water and atmospheric nuclear tests. The fourth networkGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245­2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub­surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

351

GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Effect of a metallic core on transient geomagnetic induction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on transient geomagnetic induction J. Vel´imsk´y,1 , C. C. Finlay2 1 Department of Geophysics, Faculty, 2:01pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 VEL´IMSK ´Y AND FINLAY: EFFECT OF CORE ON GEOMAGNETIC INDUCTION Abstract be correctly taken into account when mod- elling the geomagnetic field using modern observatory and satellite

Velímsky, Jakub

352

Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Details Activities (7) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Extensive geological and geophysical studies were carried out during the summer of 1973 in a blind geothermal area near Marysville, Montana. Earlier studies of regional heat flow resulted in the discovery of the area (BLACKWELL 1969; BLACKWELL, BAAG 1973). The area is blind in the sense that there are no surface manifestations of high heat flow (recent volcanics, hot springs, etc.) within the area. The country rocks are Precambrian sedimentary rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. The most recent Tertiary igneous event took place approximately 37 M.Y.

353

Analog performance space exploration by Fourier-Motzkin elimination with application to hierarchical sizing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analog performance space exploration identifies the range of feasible performance values of a given circuit topology. It is an extremely challenging task of great importance to topology selection and hierarchical sizing. In this paper, a novel technique ...

G. Stehr; H. Graeb; K. Antreich

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits of sedimentary basins hosting unconformity-type uranium deposits. In addition, these techniques have great potential as a guide for exploration of uranium and other types of deposits in basins of any age. Isotope

Hiatt, Eric E.

355

Numerical Exploration of Soliton Creation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the classical production of solitons in the easy axis O(3) model in 1+1 dimensions, for a wide range of initial conditions that correspond to the scattering of small breathers. We characterize the fractal nature of the region in parameter space that leads to soliton production and find certain trends in the data. We identify a tension in the initial conditions required for soliton production - low velocity incoming breathers are more likely to produce solitons, while high velocity incoming breathers provide momentum to the final solitons and enable them to separate. We find new "counter-spinning" initial conditions that can alleviate some of this tension.

Lamm, Henry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Numerical Exploration of Soliton Creation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the classical production of solitons in the easy axis O(3) model in 1+1 dimensions, for a wide range of initial conditions that correspond to the scattering of small breathers. We characterize the fractal nature of the region in parameter space that leads to soliton production and find certain trends in the data. We identify a tension in the initial conditions required for soliton production - low velocity incoming breathers are more likely to produce solitons, while high velocity incoming breathers provide momentum to the final solitons and enable them to separate. We find new "counter-spinning" initial conditions that can alleviate some of this tension.

Henry Lamm; Tanmay Vachaspati

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The size and low resistivity of the clay cap associated with a geothermal system create a target well suited for electromagnetic (EM) methods and also make electrical detection of the underlying geothermal reservoir a challenge. Using 3-D numerical models, we evaluate four EM techniques for use in geothermal exploration: magnetotellurics (MT), controlled-source audio magnetotellurics (CSAMT), long-offset time-domain EM (LOTEM), and short-offset time-domain EM (TEM). Our results show that all of these techniques can delineate the clay cap, but none can be said to unequivocally detect the reservoir. We do find, however, that the EM

358

Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Borehole logging methods for exploration Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation o f uranium deposits . Philip H. O d d , Robert F. Bmullad and Carl P. Lathan rej~rinkttl fnlm Mining and Groundwater Geophysiall967 Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation of uranium deposits Philip H. Dodd, Robert F. Droullard and Carl P. Lathan US. Atomic Energy Commhwn GmrPd Jtinct&n, Colorado Abstract, M o l e 1 - i s thc geophysical methad mast exten&@ w r t i n the Udtrrd States for exploratio~ md edwtim of wanhi &pod&. dammow lop, C o r n r n d j suppkrnentd with a singbz-pobt msfstailee log, m t l y supply about 80 percent of the bask data for om regerve c W t i o R a d mu& of the w ~ k r 6 . p ~ &ngk inf~nnatio~ Tmck-mounted 'rotmy eqnipmcnt i s EMhmody emphy&& holes usually hwre a nominai b

359

Category:Data and Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Modeling Techniques and Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Data and Modeling Techniques page? For detailed information on Data and Modeling Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Data and Modeling Techniques Add.png Add a new Data and Modeling Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. D [×] Data Techniques‎ 3 pages M [×] Modeling Techniques‎ 5 pages Pages in category "Data and Modeling Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. D Data Techniques M Modeling Techniques Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Data_and_Modeling_Techniques&oldid=689801"

360

Lunar exploration rover program developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) design concept began at Sandia National Laboratories in late 1991 with a series of small, proof-of-principle, working scale models. The models proved the viability of the concept for high mobility through mechanical simplicity, and eventually received internal funding at Sandia National Laboratories for full scale, proof-of-concept prototype development. Whereas the proof-of-principle models demonstrated the mechanical design`s capabilities for mobility, the full scale proof-of-concept design currently under development is intended to support field operations for experiments in telerobotics, autonomous robotic operations, telerobotic field geology, and advanced man-machine interface concepts. The development program`s current status is described, including an outline of the program`s work over the past year, recent accomplishments, and plans for follow-on development work.

Klarer, P.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Power options for lunar exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the types of power systems available for providing power on the moon. Lunar missions of exploration, in situ resource utilization, and colonization will be constrained by availability of adequate power. The length of the lunar night places severe limitations on solar power system designs, because a large portion of the system mass is devoted to energy storage. The selection of the ideal power source hardware will require compatibility with not only the lunar base power requirements and environment, but also with the conversion, storage, and transmission equipment. In addition, further analysis to determine the optimum operating parameters for a given power system should be conducted so that critical technologies can be identified in the early stages of base development. This paper describes the various concepts proposed for providing power on the lunar surface and compare their ranges of applicability. The importance of a systems approach to the integration of these components will also be discussed.

Bamberger, J.A.; Gaustad, K.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Robust techniques for developing empirical models of fluidized bed combustors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is designed to provide a review of those data analysis techniques that are most useful for fitting m-dimensional empirical surfaces to very large sets of data. One issue explored is the improvement

Gruhl, Jim

363

Surface space : digital manufacturing techniques and emergent building material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores tectonic possibilities of new material and forming techniques. The design process is catalyzed by experimenting different configurations of the material.This project attempts to develop inventive ways ...

Ho, Joseph Chi-Chen, 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Natural gas exploration tax credit (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The refundable tax credit for expenses related to petroleum and natural gas exploration was established to ensure effective support for Qubec-based exploration. Up to 38.75% of eligible...

365

Geophysical study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the central Rio Grande rift and adjacent Great Plains and Colorado Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the national hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a regional deep magnetotelluric (MT) survey of Arizona and New Mexico was performed. The main objective of the MT project was to produce a regional geoelectric contour map of the pervasive deep electrical conductor within the crust and/or upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau, Basin and Range Province, and Rio Grande rift. Three MT profiles cross the Jemez lineament. Preliminary one-dimensional analysis of the data suggest the lineament is associated with anomalously high electrical conductivity very shallow in the crust. An MT/audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) study of a 161 km/sup 2/ HDR prospect was performed on the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico. Two-dimensional gravity modeling of a 700-km gravity profile at 34/sup 0/30'N latitude was used to study the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. Several models of each of three consecutive layers were produced using all available geologic and geophysical constraints. Two short-wavelength anomalies along the gravity profile were analyzed using linear optimization techniques.

Ander, M.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In...

367

Instrumentation for interstellar exploration Mike Gruntman *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding of the nature of the local interstellar medium and explore the distant frontier of the solar for the interstellar study will concentrate on exploring the distant frontier of the solar system and the galacticInstrumentation for interstellar exploration Mike Gruntman * Department of Aerospace and Mechanical

Gruntman, Mike

368

GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509  

SciTech Connect

Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the vadose zone (i.e., 79 m [260 ft] bgs) within the footprint of the Crib, and (b) 15 to 30 m (50 to 100 ft) east of the Crib footprint, where contaminants are inferred to have migrated through relatively permeable soils. Confirmation of the presence of contamination in historic boreholes correlates well with mapping from the 2010 survey, and serves as a basis to site future characterization boreholes that will likely intersect contamination both laterally and at depth.

GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Geological and Geophysical Study of the Geothermal Energy Potential of Pilgrim Springs, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located about 75 km north of Nome, was the subject of an intensive, reconnaissance-level geophysical and geological study during a 90-day period in the summer of 1979. The thermal springs are located in a northeast-oriented, oval area of thawed ground approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} in size, bordered on the north by the Pilgrim River. A second, much smaller, thermal anomaly was discovered about 3 km northeast of the main thawed area. Continuous permafrost in the surrounding region is on the order of 100 m thick. Present surface thermal spring discharge is {approx} 4.2 x 10{sup -3} m{sup 3} s{sup -1} (67 gallons/minute) of alkali-chloride-type water at a temperature of 81 C. The reason for its high salinity is not yet understood because of conflicting evidence for seawater vs. other possible water sources. Preliminary Na-K-Ca geothermometry suggests deep reservoir temperatures approaching 150 C, but interpretation of these results is difficult because of their dependence on an unknown water mixing history. Based on these estimates, and present surface and drill hole water temperatures, Pilgrim Springs would be classified as an intermediate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system.

Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, Robert B. [eds.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana  

SciTech Connect

The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165???????????????????????????????°F exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250???????????????¢???????????????????????????????? of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the ???????????????¢????????????????????????????????center???????????????¢??????????????????????????????? of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165???????????????????????????????°F or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Tweed, J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fall 2007 American Geophysical Union Meeting Student Travel Support for Environmental Nanomaterials Session (#B35) (December 10-14, 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of award no. DE-FG02-08ER15925 was to fund travel for students to present at the Fall 2007 American Geophysical Meeting. This was done successfully, and five students (Bin Xie, Qiaona Hu, Katie Schreiner, Daria Kibanova, and Frank-Andreas Weber) gave excellent oral and poster presentations at the meeting. Provided are the conference abstracts for their presentations.

Michael F. Hochella, Jr.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA_Appendix 4_Geophysical Survey Report  

SciTech Connect

CR Environmental, Inc. (CR) was contracted by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA) to perform hydrographic and geophysical surveys of an approximately 3.35 square mile area off the eastern shore of Hull, Massachusetts. Survey components included: Single-beam bathymetry; 100-kHz and 500-kHz side scan sonar; Magnetometry; and Low to mid-frequency sub-bottom profiling.

Adams, Christopher

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Solar Power Expert For Remote Robotic Explorers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic exploration of remote areas to assist or replace human exploration reduces the cost, hazard and tedium of such exploration. For remote explorers, power is the most critical resource, and the most common source of that power is solar energy. Information about the robot configuration, the planned path, the terrain and the position of the sun can be processed by a solar power expert software module to calculate the power provided by a given plan of action. Using this information to select the best plans will enable remote robotic explorers to extend their lifetimes. This paper presents the development of a solar power expert and its implementation on a simulator. Several patterned path plans are evaluated with various solar panel configurations, starting times and locations, concentrating on polar regions. 1. EXPLORATION ROBOTS Capable and adaptable robots are needed for exploring areas too dangerous or costly for humans to visit. Planets, moons, and remote earthly locations suc...

Kimberly Shillcutt Robotics; Kimberly Shillcutt; William Whittaker

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty members (from both UC and other institutions) on sabbatical leave. To focus attention on areas of topical interest i

Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

1998-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

AUTOMATED LEAK DETECTION OF BURIED TANKS USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State, the Department of Energy oversees the containment, treatment, and retrieval of liquid high-level radioactive waste. Much of the waste is stored in single-shelled tanks (SSTs) built between 1943 and 1964. Currently, the waste is being retrieved from the SSTs and transferred into newer double-shelled tanks (DSTs) for temporary storage before final treatment. Monitoring the tanks during the retrieval process is critical to identifying leaks. An electrically-based geophysics monitoring program for leak detection and monitoring (LDM) has been successfully deployed on several SSTs at the Hanford site since 2004. The monitoring program takes advantage of changes in contact resistance that will occur when conductive tank liquid leaks into the soil. During monitoring, electrical current is transmitted on a number of different electrode types (e.g., steel cased wells and surface electrodes) while voltages are measured on all other electrodes, including the tanks. Data acquisition hardware and software allow for continuous real-time monitoring of the received voltages and the leak assessment is conducted through a time-series data analysis. The specific hardware and software combination creates a highly sensitive method of leak detection, complementing existing drywell logging as a means to detect and quantify leaks. Working in an industrial environment such as the Hanford site presents many challenges for electrical monitoring: cathodic protection, grounded electrical infrastructure, lightning strikes, diurnal and seasonal temperature trends, and precipitation, all of which create a complex environment for leak detection. In this discussion we present examples of challenges and solutions to working in the tank farms of the Hanford site.

CALENDINE S; SCHOFIELD JS; LEVITT MT; FINK JB; RUCKER DF

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Tectonic controls on magmatism in The Geysers--Clear Lake region: Evidence from new geophysical models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to study magmatism and geothermal systems in the Geysers-Clear Lake region, the authors developed a detailed three-dimensional tomographic velocity model based on local earthquakes. This high-resolution model resolves the velocity structure of the crust in the region to depths of approximately 12 km. The most significant velocity contrasts in The Geysers-Clear Lake region occur in the steam production area, where high velocities are associated with a Quaternary granite pluton, and in the Mount Hannah region, where low velocities occur in a 5-km-thick section of Mesozoic argillites. In addition, a more regional tomographic model was developed using traveltimes from earthquakes covering most of northern California. This regional model sampled the whole crust, but at a lower resolution than the local model. No large silicic magma chamber is noted in either the local or regional tomographic models. A three-dimensional gravity model also has ben developed in the area of the tomographic imaging. The gravity model demonstrates that all density contrasts can be accounted for in the upper 5--7 km of the crust. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric models of data from a regional east-west profile indicate high resistivities associated with the granitic pluton in The Geysers production area and low resistivities in the low-velocity section of Mesozoic argillites near Mount Hannah. No indication of midcrustal magma bodies is present in the magnetotelluric data. The geophysical models, seismicity patterns, distribution of volcanic vents, heat flow, and other data indicate that small, young intrusive bodies that were injected along a northeast trend from The Geysers to Clear Lake probably control the thermal regime.

Stanley, W.D.; Benz, H.M.; Villasenor, A.; Rodriguez, B.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center; Walters, M.A. [CalEnergy Corp., Ridgecrest, CA (United States)] [CalEnergy Corp., Ridgecrest, CA (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation Treatments within the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foam is a promising vehicle for delivering amendments into the vadose zone for in situ remediation; it is an approach being considered for in situ treatment and stabilization of metals and radionuclides located within the deep vadose zone of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site, WA. A central aspect of evaluating the effectiveness of this approach is the ability to monitor foam distribution, its transformation, and the reactions that it induces in the subsurface, ideally in a non-invasive manner. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments to evaluate the potential of geophysical methods (complex resistivity and time domain reflectometry, TDR) as tools for monitoring foam assisted amendment delivery in the deep vadose zone. Our results indicated great sensitivity of electrical methods to foam transportation and evolution in unsaturated porous media that were related to foam bubble coalescence and drainage processes. Specifically, we observed (1) a decrease of electrical resistivity (increase of electrical conductivity) by over an order of magnitude in both silica sand and natural sediment matrices during foam transportation; (2) an increase of resistivity (decrease of conductivity) by over two fold during foam coalescence and drainage; (3) a distinct phase and imaginary conductivity signature related to the evolution of water films on sediment grains during foam injection and evolution processes. To assist with the interpretation of these data, TDR measurements were used to monitor moisture content, which provided complementary information about foam distribution and drainage. Our results clearly demonstrated the sensitivity of electrical and TDR signals to foam transportation and evolution in unsaturated porous media and suggested the potential of these methods for monitoring the response of a system to foam based remediation treatments at field scales.

Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Wellman, Dawn M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Improved Time to Publication in Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely publication of manuscripts is important to authors and readers. AGU has significantly accelerated both the review and production processes for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres (JGR-Atmospheres). Via a number of mechanisms (e.g., shortening the time allotted for reviewer selection, manuscript reviews, and revisions), the mean time to first decision has been decreased from 98 days in 2007 to 50 days in 2011, and the mean time to final decision has been decreased from 132 days in 2007 to 71 days in 2011. By implementing a new content management system, adjusting the workflow for improved efficiency, requesting authors to proofread their manuscripts quicker, and improving monitoring and follow-up to author and vendor queries, the mean production time from manuscript acceptance to publication has been decreased from 128 days in 2010 to only 56 days in 2012. Thus, in the past few years the mean time to publication of JGRAtmospheres has been cut in half. These milestones have been achieved with no loss of quality of presentation or content. In addition, online posting of "papers in press" on JGR-Atmospheres home page typically occurs within a few days after acceptance. JGR-Atmospheres editors thank manuscript reviewers, authors, and AGU staff who have greatly contributed to the more timely review and publication processes. This information will be updated periodically on the JGR-Atmospheres home page. A chart showing the average time from acceptance to publication for all of AGUs journals is available at http://www.agu.org/pubs/pdf/31May2012_Timeliness_Chart.pdf.

de Gouw, Joost A.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pryor, Sara; Rudich, Yinon; Zhang, Renyi

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

383

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. * teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates geophysical methods to solve real

384

Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and

385

Environmental Control in Oil & Gas Exploration & Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The goal of this study is to examine the environmental impacts of oil and gas exploration and production (E&P), the roles of legislation, and (more)

Ibem-Ezera, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Memory exploration for low power, embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: cache simulator, design automation, low power design, low power embedded systems, memory exploration and optimization, memory hierarchy, off-chip data assignment

Wen-Tsong Shiue; Chaitali Chakrabarti

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Validation of...

388

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through...

389

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through...

390

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC Physicist Explores...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC Physicist Explores Parallel Universes Sunday Night on Discovery Channel By Mike Ross September 1, 2011 Are parallel universes real? The answer to that intriguing question is...

391

Exploring HPSS bandwidth - NERSC production experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

54515 Exploring HPSS Bandwidth - NERSC Production Experienceific Computing Center (NERSC). These tools provide graphicallarge supercomputing sites. NERSC is a developer site within

Holmes, Harvard H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Careers to someone by E-mail Share Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal Careers on Facebook Tweet about Energy Education and Workforce...

393

Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that can help the geothermal industry in exploration, tracer analysis, infrastructure management, and the general distribution and use of data. GIS systems are highly...

394

Interactive Graphics Developments in Energy Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing world conditions have brought about new economic rules for energy explorationrules that are helping bring interactive computer graphics into the search for fossil fuels.

Thomas Gardner; H. Nelson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Geothermal Exploration At Akutan, Alaska- Favorable Indications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalExplorationAtAkutan,Alaska-FavorableIndicationsForAHigh-EnthalpyHydrothermalResourceNearARemoteMarket&oldid38813...

396

Category:Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the...

397

Annales Geophysicae (2002) 20: 619628 c European Geophysical Society 2002 Geophysicae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail mag- netopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4 The structure of the distant magnetotail plasma sheet (X

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Sandstone petrology: a survey for the exploration and production geologist  

SciTech Connect

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 and the new global tectonics of the late Sixties revitalized research on sandstone petrology during the Seventies. Research publications increased nearly twofold from the previous decade. Studies of sandstone composition and sandstone diagenesis using the petrographic microscope have high utility. The results of this research can be applied in exploring frontier regions and in developing proven petroleum provinces. However, time constraints and library facilities often preclude exploration and production geologists from access to the journal literature. Here annotated tables compiled from a survey of nine major journals encapsule 329 research publications. The survey focuses upon research using thin-section microscopy but incorporates some work with other analytical techniques.

Breyer, J.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Subtask 2.2 - Creating A Numerical Technique for Microseismic Data Inversion  

SciTech Connect

Geomechanical and geophysical monitoring are the techniques which can complement each other and provide enhancement in the solutions of many problems of geotechnical engineering. One of the most promising geophysical techniques is passive seismic monitoring. The essence of the technique is recording the acoustic signals produced in the subsurface, either naturally or in response to human activity. The acoustic signals are produced by mechanical displacements on the contacts of structural elements (e.g., faults, boundaries of rock blocks, natural and induced fractures). The process can be modeled by modern numerical techniques developed in geomechanics. The report discusses a study that was aimed at the unification of the passive seismic monitoring and numerical modeling for the monitoring of the hydraulic fracture propagation. The approach adopted in the study consisted of numerical modeling of the seismicity accompanying hydraulic fracture propagation and defining seismic attributes and patterns characterizing the process and fracture parameters. Numerical experiments indicated that the spatial distribution of seismic events is correlated to geometrical parameters of hydrofracture. Namely, the highest density of the events is observed along fracture contour, and projection of the events to the fracture plane makes this effect most pronounced. The numerical experiments also showed that dividing the totality of the events into groups corresponding to the steps of fracture propagation allows for reconstructing the geometry of the resulting fracture more accurately than has been done in the majority of commercial applications.

Anastasia Dobroskok; Yevhen Holubnyak; James Sorensen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: INPUT airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were conducted during 1979 in five Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's). AEM work has not been significantly utilized in the past for geothermal purposes because it was thought that a shallow exploration technique would not be effective. Extensive audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) work by the USGS in KGRA's showed that many geothermal systems do have a near-surface electrical signature which should be detectable by an AEM system. INPUT responses in the form of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Two decades of hydrocarbon exploration activity in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, hydrocarbon exploration activity within Indonesia has been based on the Indonesian Energy Policy, aims of which include intensifying and expanding hydrocarbon exploration programs. Expansion into the offshore regions of the nation has resulted in the discovery of petroliferous basins. The first offshore oil production came on stream in 1971. Since then, significant achievements have been made in developing these resources. Intensified onshore exploration has resulted in additional oil fields being discovered in these more mature areas. Among the significant gas fields discovered during the past 20 years, Arun and Badak both supply major LNG projects. Oil fields have been found in the onshore areas of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Java, and Irian Jaya, and in the offshore areas around West Java, Madura, Natuna, and East Kalimantan. The exploration drilling success during this time has been approximately 32%. In addition, the ratio of oil field development to these discoveries is about 54%. For technical and economic reasons, not all discoveries can be developed into oil fields. Recently, Pertamina's Research and Development Division organized the study of data contributed by Pertamina exploration, foreign contractors, and science institutes. This study reveals that 60 basins are spread throughout the onshore and offshore areas of the nation. Using PAUS (plan and analysis of uncertainty situation), a Monte Carolo simulation program, the hydrocarbon potential of each basin has been estimated. These estimates will be continually revised as more data are made available to the study, as the geology of Indonesia is better understood in terms of plate tectonic theory, and as computing techniques improve.

Suardy, A.; Taruno, J.; Simbolon, P.H.; Simbolon, B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Exploring the HR Function at Maersk Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the HR Function at Maersk Oil An Interview with: Stina Bjerg Nielsen Senior Vice President, Human Resources Maersk Oil Interviewed by: Alison Hill Queen's University IRC A QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY IRC INTERVIEW #12;Exploring the HR Function at Maersk Oil An Interview with: Stina Bjerg Nielsen

Graham, Nick

403

Electron Based Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Characterization of Materials through High Resolution Coherent Imaging: Electron Based Techniques Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials...

404

Milling Techniques - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

February 4-8 1996 TMS ANNUAL MEETING Anaheim, California. SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING OF NANOCRYSTALLINE POWDER III: Milling Techniques...

405

Category:Remote Sensing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Sensing Techniques Remote Sensing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Remote Sensing Techniques page? For detailed information on remote sensing techniques used as a geothermal exploration technique, click here. Category: Remote Sensing Techniques Add.png Add a new Remote Sensing Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A [+] Active Sensors‎ (1 categories) 2 pages P [×] Passive Sensors‎ 13 pages Pages in category "Remote Sensing Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. A Active Sensors L Long-Wave Infrared Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Remote_Sensing_Techniques&oldid=594055"

406

Property:ExplorationOutcome | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationOutcome ExplorationOutcome Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationOutcome Property Type String Description The outcome of an Exploration Activity. Allows Values could be useful with more improvements;useful;not indicated;not useful;useful regional reconnaissance Pages using the property "ExplorationOutcome" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) + not indicated + 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) + useful +

407

Techniques for Enhanced Physical-Layer Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information-theoretic security--widely accepted as the strictest notion of security--relies on channel coding techniques that exploit the inherent randomness of propagation channels to strengthen the security of communications systems. Within this paradigm, we explore strategies to improve secure connectivity in a wireless network. We first consider the intrinsically secure communications graph (iS-graph), a convenient representation of the links that can be established with information-theoretic security on a large-scale network. We then propose and characterize two techniques--sectorized transmission and eavesdropper neutralization--which are shown to dramatically enhance the connectivity of the iS-graph.

Pinto, Pedro C; Win, Moe Z

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.  

SciTech Connect

During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Report of the geophysical measurements in geothermal wells workshop, Airport Marina Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 17--19, 1975  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a Workshop on Geophysical Measurements in Geothermal Wells, hosted in Albuquerque, September 17-19, by Sandia Laboratories and jointly sponsored by the United States Geological Survey and the Energy Research and Development Administration. During the workshop, tutorial papers dealing with the geothermal resource, geothermal logging, and high temperature technology were followed by working panel sessions. Three panels deliberated, respectively, well and reservoir parameters, log interpretation, and high temperature technology. In a final session, the reports of the panels were heard and discussed by the full workshop. A summary of the workshop conclusions and recommendations, as well as the complete panel statements, are presented. (auth)

Baker, L.E.; Baker, R.P.; Hughen, R.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. The study includes a gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km, numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and inerpretation of 21.8 line-km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a qualitative inerpretation of 38 line-km of self-potential data along eight profiles. The primary purpose of the investigation is to try to determine the nature of the geologic controls of the thermal anomalies at the two areas.

Edquist, R.K.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Stephen Potter: Exploring rail futures using scenarios EXPLORING RAIL FUTURES USING SCENARIOS: EXPERIENCE AND POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other research outputs Exploring rail futures using scenarios: experience and potential Conference Item How to cite:

Stephen Potter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Software Techniques to Reduce the Energy Consumption of Low-Power Devices at the Limits of Digital Abstractions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My thesis explores the effectiveness of software techniques that bend digital abstractions in order to allow embedded systems to do more with less energy. Recent (more)

Salajegheh, Mastooreh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Snake_River_Plain_Region_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=600470" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

414

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

415

Category:Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Well Log Techniques page? For detailed information on Well Log Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Well Log Techniques Add.png Add a new Well Log Techniques Technique Pages in category "Well Log Techniques" The following 17 pages are in this category, out of 17 total. A Acoustic Logs C Caliper Log Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D Density Log F FMI Log G Gamma Log I Image Logs M Mud Logging N Neutron Log P Pressure Temperature Log R Resistivity Log Resistivity Tomography S Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Spontaneous Potential Well Log Stoneley Analysis

416

DOE Data Explorer enhancement adds more content  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

enhancement adds more content Since June of 2008, the DOE Data Explorer has been helping users find and link to DOE's vast collection of data and non-text information. The records...

417

Category:Exploration Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities Activities Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Category:Exploration Activities Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Exploration Activities page? For detailed information on Exploration Activities, click here. Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages in category "Exploration Activities" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 1,574 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) 2-M Probe At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)

418

Exploration of Climate Data Using Interactive Visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In atmospheric and climate research, the increasing amount of data available from climate models and observations provides new challenges for data analysis. The authors present interactive visual exploration as an innovative approach to handle ...

Florian Ladstdter; Andrea K. Steiner; Bettina C. Lackner; Barbara Pirscher; Gottfried Kirchengast; Johannes Kehrer; Helwig Hauser; Philipp Muigg; Helmut Doleisch

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Wind Power Integration: Exploring Impacts and Alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Integration: Exploring Impacts and Alternatives Assist. Prof. C sustainable sources of energy. The idea of harnessing wind energy has been there have been no less than fifteen in-depth wind integration studies

Walter, M.Todd

420

The Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (ALACE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autonomous Lagrangian circulation explorer (ALACE) is a subsurface float that cycles vertically from a depth where it is neutrally buoyant to the surface where it is located by, and relays data to, System Argos satellites. ALACEs are intended ...

R. E. Davis; L. A. Regier; J. Dufour; D. C. Webb

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Exploring the user experience through collage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the use of collage in requirements elicitation, as a tool to support potential end-users in expressing their impressions, understanding, and emotions regarding a system. Keywords: cultural probes, experience-centered design, phenomenology, requirements elicitation, thematic analysis

Dana McKay; Sally Jo Cunningham; Kirsten Thomson

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Autonomous Exploration and Mapping of Flooded Sinkholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the control, navigation, and mapping methods that were developed for a hovering autonomous underwater vehicle that explored flooded cenotes in Mexico. The cenotes of Sistema Zacatón in Tamaulipas, Mexico are flooded ...

Nathaniel Fairfield; George Kantor; Dominic Jonak; David Wettergreen

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

LLNL's Saturday lectures explore cutting edge science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| NR-13-01-02 LLNL's Saturday lectures explore cutting edge science Linda A Lucchetti, LLNL, (925) 422-5815, lucchetti1@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Lawrence Livermore National...

424

National forecast for geothermal resource exploration and development with techniques for policy analysis and resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The backgrund, structure and use of modern forecasting methods for estimating the future development of geothermal energy in the United States are documented. The forecasting instrument may be divided into two sequential submodels. The first predicts the timing and quality of future geothermal resource discoveries from an underlying resource base. This resource base represents an expansion of the widely-publicized USGS Circular 790. The second submodel forecasts the rate and extent of utilization of geothermal resource discoveries. It is based on the joint investment behavior of resource developers and potential users as statistically determined from extensive industry interviews. It is concluded that geothermal resource development, especially for electric power development, will play an increasingly significant role in meeting US energy demands over the next 2 decades. Depending on the extent of R and D achievements in related areas of geosciences and technology, expected geothermal power development will reach between 7700 and 17300 Mwe by the year 2000. This represents between 8 and 18% of the expected electric energy demand (GWh) in western and northwestern states.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Shimamoto, G.T.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.; Finan, W.F.; Smith, M.R.; Edeistein, R.H.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal strain and tilt field observations were carried out during the period February 1978 to December 1979 at the Klamath Graben and Newberry Caldera in Oregon and at Krafla in Northern Iceland. Moreover, tilt observations were made at Mt. St. Helens, Washington, during the summer of 1980. Two strainmeters of the same type as now in use by the US Geological Survey were applied in the strain work. Tilts were measured by two Kinemetrics model TM-1B biaxial tilt meters. The instruments were placed at depths of approximately one to two meters below the ground surface. Both strain and tilt fields turn out to be heavily contaminated by noise that is mostly of thermoelastic origin. In spite of considerable efforts, it has not been possible to process the strain field data to obtain sufficiently clear tidal signals. The tilt data are less contaminated and rather clear tidal signals were observed at Newberry in Oregon and Krafla in Iceland. A local magnification by a factor of about 3 of the EW component of the theoretical solid earth and ocean load tilt was observed at one station at Krafla. Moreover, the tidal tilt component across the ring fault at Newberry appears to be magnified by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9. The phenomena at the Krafla may possibly be due to a local magma chamber. These results are a clear indication of a tilt field modification by local structure and indicate the possibility of using tilt data to locate subsurface magma bodies.

Bodvarsson, G.; Axelsson, G.; Johnson, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Passive seismic techniques for geothermal exploration. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1977-May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts were concentrated on developing and applying various processing procedures to the seismic and gravity data and to the results of the forward modeling calculations. In parallel with the forward modeling efforts, an inversion scheme was formulated and developed for final modeling of the processed data sets for the Imperial Valley. A computer program was written to generate a regular grid of interpolated values of the gravity field based on a least square fit to a general quadratic surface of irregularly spaced observations. The resulting data set was subjected to extensive filtering and processing to produce a gravity data vector for input to the inversion scheme. Particular attention was paid to the baseline considerations encountered in the treatment of the gravity data and the impact of these considerations on the complexity of the inversion scheme.

Savino, J.M.; Goff, R.C.; Rodi, W.L.; Jordan, T.H.; Alexander, J.H.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Multicolor Underwater Imaging Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies were conducted on multispectral polarimetric subtraction imaging techniques for underwater imaging that use a broadband light source. The main objective of this study was (more)

Waggoner, Douglas Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An Exploration Perspective of Beamed Energy Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

The Vision for Exploration is currently focused on flying the Space Shuttle safely to complete our Space Station obligations, retiring the Shuttle in 2010, then returning humans to the Moon and learning how to proceed to Mars and beyond. The NASA budget still includes funds for science and aeronautics but the primary focus is on human exploration. Fiscal constraints have led to pursuing exploration vehicles that use heritage hardware, particularly existing boosters and engines, with the minimum modifications necessary to satisfy mission requirements. So, pursuit of immature technologies is not currently affordable by NASA. Beamed energy is one example of an immature technology, from a human exploration perspective, that may eventually provide significant benefits for human exploration of space, but likely not in the near future. Looking to the more distant future, this paper will examine some of the criteria that must be achieved by beamed energy propulsion to eventually contribute to human exploration of the solar system. The analysis focuses on some of the implications of increasing the payload fraction of a launch vehicle, with a quick look at trans-lunar injection. As one would expect, there is potential for benefit, and there are concerns. The analysis concludes with an assessment of the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for some beamed energy propulsion components, indicating that TRL 2 is close to being completed.

Cole, John [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Adventures in supercomputing: Scientific exploration in an era of change  

SciTech Connect

Students deserve the opportunity to explore the world of science surrounding them. Therefore it is important that scientific exploration and investigation be a part of each student`s educational career. The Department of Energy`s Adventures in Superconducting (AiS) takes students beyond mere scientific literacy to a rich embodiment of scientific exploration. AiS provides today`s science and math students with a greater opportunity to investigate science problems, propose solutions, explore different methods of solving the problem, organize their work into a technical paper, and present their results. Students learn at different rates in different ways. Science classes with students having varying learning styles and levels of achievement have always been a challenge for teachers. The AiS {open_quotes}hands-on, minds-on{close_quotes} project-based method of teaching science meets the challenge of this diversity heads on! AiS uses the development of student chosen projects as the means of achieving a lifelong enthusiasm for scientific proficiency. One goal of AiS is to emulate the research that takes place in the everyday environment of scientists. Students work in teams and often collaborate with students nationwide. With the help of mentors from the academic and scientific community, students pose a problem in science, investigate possible solutions, design a mathematical and computational model for the problem, exercise the model to achieve results, and evaluate the implications of the results. The students then have the opportunity to present the project to their peers, teachers, and scientists. Using this inquiry-based technique, students learn more than science skills, they learn to reason and think -- going well beyond the National Science Education Standard. The teacher becomes a resource person actively working together with the students in their quest for scientific knowledge.

Gentry, E. [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Helland, B. [Krell Institute, Ames, IA (United States); Summers, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Well Log Techniques At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Impact of long term testing on the well pressure Notes The downhole pressure monitoring equipment for each well included a stainless steel pressure chamber attached to a 0.25 inch stainless steel capillary tubing. The surface end of the capillary tubing was connected to a Paroscientific quartz pressure trandsducer. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R. (20 January 1987) Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=600462

431

NON-PARAMETRIC GEOPHYSICAL DATA INTEGRATION FOR REDUCING UNCERTAINTIES IN MULTIPLE POINT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but when X-ray transmission information is obtained from a multitude of radiographic images, scanned-traditional porous media variables such as interfacial areas and common lines, the latter being the contact points techniques capable of resolving these variables. The ability to quantify phase interfaces and common lines

432

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

434

Feisal Dirgantara is currently a graduate student (MSc) at the Colorado School of Mines in the Geophysics Department. He is coming from Indonesia. He joined Mines since Fall 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Geophysics Department. He is coming from Indonesia. He joined Mines since Fall 2009 and is advised by Michael. Dirgantara earned his B.Sc (2008) in Geophysics from Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia. During his Indonesian mining company. Second was at Volcanological Survey of Indonesia where he did his undergraduate

435

Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Exploration of the ultimate patterning potential achievable with focused ion beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present our work aiming to explore the nano-structuring potential of high resolution focused ion beams (FIB), a technology capable of overcoming some basic limitations of current nano-fabrication techniques and to propose new patterning ...

J. Gierak; E. Bourhis; M. N. Mrat Combes; Y. Chriqui; I. Sagnes; D. Mailly; P. Hawkes; R. Jede; L. Bruchhaus; L. Bardotti; B. Prvel; A. Hannour; P. Mlinon; A. Perez; J. Ferr; J. -P. Jamet; A. Mougin; C. Chappert; V. Mathet

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Characterize the rock using well log data. Notes Information is given on the following logs: dual-induction focused log, including resistivity, sp, and conductivity; acoustic log; compensated neutron; compensated densilog; and caliper. Lithologic breaks for a drill core to a depth of 2840 ft are illustrated. References Covington, H.R. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Raft River geothermal exploration well No. 4 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=6004

438

Using Structured Interviewing Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GAO assists congressional decisionmakers in their deliberative process by furnishing analytical information on issues and options under consideration. Many diverse methodologies are needed to develop sound and timely answers to the questions that are posed by the Congress. To provide GAO evaluators with basic information about the more commonly used methodologies, GAOs policy guidance includes documents such as methodology transfer papers and technical guidelines, This methodology transfer paper on using structured interviewing techniques discusses how GAO evaluators should incorporate structured interview techniques when appropriate to performing our work. It explains when these techniques should be

Gao/pemd-. Preface; Werner Grosshans

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Power beaming: Mission enabling for lunar exploration  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores several beam power concepts proposed for powering either lunar base or rover vehicles. At present, power requirements to support lunar exploration activity are met by integral self-contained power system designs. To provide requisite energy flexibility for human expansion into space, an innovative approach to replace on-board self-contained power systems is needed. Power beaming provides an alternative approach to supplying power that would ensure increased mission flexibility while reducing total mass launched into space. Providing power to the moon presents significant design challenges because of the duration of the lunar night. Power beaming provides an alternative to solar photovoltaic systems coupled with battery storage, radioisotope thermoelectric generation, and surface nuclear power. The Synthesis Group describes power beaming as a technology supporting lunar exploration. In this analysis beam power designs are compared to conventional power generation methods.

Bamberger, J.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Venezuelan ``apertura`` invites private exploration capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Congress of the Republic of Venezuela on July 4, 1995, approved the conditions for an Exploration Association Contract. This action opened Venezuela to exploration for light and medium crudes by private companies in association with a special-purpose affiliate of Petroleos de Venezuela (Pdvsa). The objective of the apertura, or opening, is to attract private capital to Venezuela`s petroleum sector and thereby accelerate exploration and development of light and medium crude oil. An important parallel objective is for this incremental investment into the country to stimulate the domestic economy and encourage development and growth across all sectors. The paper discusses the geology of the four primary sedimentary basins in Venezuela, source rocks and maturity, and the costs and terms of Venezuela`s contract.

Carnevali, J. [Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geophysical techniques exploration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Data Visualisation with IRIS Explorer - What's New?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of IRIS Explorer, a data visualisation toolkit, is described with reference to some examples from the fields of chemistry, computational fluid dynamics and finite element analysis. Some of the new features in the latest version of the toolkit are highlighted, and its relationship to other technologies such as the NAG Fortran 77 library, Open Inventor and VRML are discussed in detail. Keywords: IRIS Explorer; Open Inventor; software re-use; VRML 1 Introduction The important role which visualisation plays in the interpretation of data has been recognised for a long time. Much progress has been made in academic research and industrial development towards the goal of producing modern data display software that is powerful, and yet easy to invoke, modify and extend. In this paper we discuss the use of IRIS Explorer, a data visualisation toolkit, in the analysis of scientific data, and outline the way in which it makes use of complementary software technologies in its architecture...

Jeremy Walton

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports  

SciTech Connect

Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

Persinger, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z