National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for geophysical fluid dynamics

  1. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Steering Panel, NASA GRM mission University Corporation of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  2. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  3. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 56, OctoberDecember 2007, 469487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 5­6, October­December 2007, 469, USA zInstitute of Geophysics, University of Go¨ ttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Go¨ ttingen (though later work by Banka and *Corresponding author. Email: dpl@complex.umd.edu Geophysical

  4. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Dynamics EDUCATION: Ph.D. Geophysics, June 1977, University of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B.A. Geology, June 1972, University

  5. March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    differential equations bound together by integral transport laws. In particular, we show that this parcel formulation is the simplification of various calculations, in particular the derivation of the continuum the Hamiltonian dynamics of fluid parcels and the Hamiltonian system of partial differential equations. The parcel

  6. Charles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkeley and Princeton University 2005 Postdoctoral Investigator, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 1998-1999 2013-present Member of Research Council at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory 2013 Steering of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem: Key Research Needs and Future Directions", July 2013, Providence RI

  7. Analysis of snow in the 20th and 21st century Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled climate model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    Analysis of snow in the 20th and 21st century Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled climate Northern Hemisphere, North American, and Eurasian snow cover extent, frequency, and mass by the Geophysical cycle in Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent and produce a mean annual snow area of 25 Â 106 km2

  8. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I P.B. Rhines Problem Set 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . There is a density stratification, with = 0 exp(-z) + '(y,z) where '/0exp(H) is small; ' is due to the presence/)d/dz. Thermal wind equation: eliminate p from equations (2) by cross-differentiation. 2. Geostrophic Adjustment with stratification. Consider the development of flow in a layer of fluid, confined between upper and lower boundaries

  9. Flow networks: A characterization of geophysical fluid transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Ser-Giacomi; Vincent Rossi; Cristobal Lopez; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia

    2015-03-05

    We represent transport between different regions of a fluid domain by flow networks, constructed from the discrete representation of the Perron-Frobenius or transfer operator associated to the fluid advection dynamics. The procedure is useful to analyze fluid dynamics in geophysical contexts, as illustrated by the construction of a flow network associated to the surface circulation in the Mediterranean sea. We use network-theory tools to analyze the flow network and gain insights into transport processes. In particular we quantitatively relate dispersion and mixing characteristics, classically quantified by Lyapunov exponents, to the degree of the network nodes. A family of network entropies is defined from the network adjacency matrix, and related to the statistics of stretching in the fluid, in particular to the Lyapunov exponent field. Finally we use a network community detection algorithm, Infomap, to partition the Mediterranean network into coherent regions, i.e. areas internally well mixed, but with little fluid interchange between them.

  10. DownloadedBy:[UniversityofCaliforniaLosAngeles]At:16:419December2007 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at high heat transfer rates. Keywords: Core dynamics; Convection; Heat transfer; Planetary dynamos 1 and convective heat transfer scalingy J. M. AURNOU* Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University) In this article, analysis of a compilation of recent core dynamics models focuses on the properties of non-magnetic

  11. 2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics N.J. Balmforth1 and R.V. Craster2 1, London, SW7 2BZ, UK 2.1 Introduction Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is a vast subject that has several journals partly, or primarily, dedicated to its investigation (Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

  12. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  13. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  14. View dependent fluid dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barran, Brian Arthur

    2006-08-16

    physically based rendering method known as photon mapping is used in conjunction with ray tracing to generate realistic images of water with caustics. These methods were implemented as a C++ application framework capable of simulating and rendering fluid in a...

  15. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume 51. April 1986. Number 4. GEOPHYSICS. P-SV wave propagation in heterogeneous medla: Velocity-stress ?nite-difference method. Jean Virieux*.

  16. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |FinalIndustrial Technologies Industrial3 Fluid Dynamics

  17. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz Introduction to Computational Fluid to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz maj 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2 / 68 1.0 Course content / Time table #12;Introduction to Computational Fluid

  18. Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 169. Outcrop fracture mapping, drilling and monitoring well installation, borehole geophysical surveys, pumping in monitoring wells near the injection point. #12;Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718

  19. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 cfdroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications 3-D Combustion...

  20. Fracture Propagation, Fluid Flow, and Geomechanics of Water-Based Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Systems and Electromagnetic Geophysical Monitoring of Fluid Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Um, Evan; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fracture propagation induced by hydraulic fracturing with water injection, using numerical simulation. For rigorous, full 3D modeling, we employ a numerical method that can model failure resulting from tensile and shear stresses, dynamic nonlinear permeability, leak-off in all directions, and thermo-poro-mechanical effects with the double porosity approach. Our numerical results indicate that fracture propagation is not the same as propagation of the water front, because fracturing is governed by geomechanics, whereas water saturation is determined by fluid flow. At early times, the water saturation front is almost identical to the fracture tip, suggesting that the fracture is mostly filled with injected water. However, at late times, advance of the water front is retarded compared to fracture propagation, yielding a significant gap between the water front and the fracture top, which is filled with reservoir gas. We also find considerable leak-off of water to the reservoir. The inconsistency between the fracture volume and the volume of injected water cannot properly calculate the fracture length, when it is estimated based on the simple assumption that the fracture is fully saturated with injected water. As an example of flow-geomechanical responses, we identify pressure fluctuation under constant water injection, because hydraulic fracturing is itself a set of many failure processes, in which pressure consistently drops when failure occurs, but fluctuation decreases as the fracture length grows. We also study application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods, because these methods are highly sensitive to changes in porosity and pore-fluid properties due to water injection into gas reservoirs. Employing a 3D finite-element EM geophysical simulator, we evaluate the sensitivity of the crosswell EM method for monitoring fluid movements in shaly reservoirs. For this sensitivity evaluation, reservoir models are generated through the coupled flow-geomechanical simulator and are transformed via a rock-physics model into electrical conductivity models. It is shown that anomalous conductivity distribution in the resulting models is closely related to injected water saturation, but not closely related to newly created unsaturated fractures. Our numerical modeling experiments demonstrate that the crosswell EM method can be highly sensitive to conductivity changes that directly indicate the migration pathways of the injected fluid. Accordingly, the EM method can serve as an effective monitoring tool for distribution of injected fluids (i.e., migration pathways) during hydraulic fracturing operations

  1. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, How pore fluid pressurization influences crack tip processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, How pore fluid pressurization temperature and pore pressure rises along a steadily propagating shear crack, assuming a given shear stress profile along the crack (i.e., initially neglecting effects of pore pressure on shear stress

  3. Computational fluid dynamics improves liner cementing operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, N.A.; Archer, G.L. ); Seymour, D.A. )

    1994-09-26

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), an analytical tool for studying fluid mechanics, helped plan the successful cementing of a critical liner in a North Sea extended reach well. The results from CFD analysis increased the confidence in the primary cementing of the liner. CFD modeling was used to quantify the effects of increasing the displacement rate and of rotating the liner on the mud flow distribution in the annulus around the liner.

  4. Fluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are said to form the boundary of a vortex tube. We say that `stretching amplfies vorticity'. It is also as if they were material lines. Or, vortex tubes rotate and stretch just like the material line elementsFluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff §2.6 Vorticity Definition: Vorticity = × u. A vortex line

  5. Fluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . If an earthquake generates a tsunami or `tidal wave' near Japan, at one side of the Pacific, it is fairly simple) Example: ocean swell (small-amplitude, low-frequency waves generated by distant storms, the wavesFluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff §4 FLOWS WITH A FREE SURFACE Water waves, river flow including

  6. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a ``Berty`` autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  7. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a Berty'' autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  8. Fluid transport properties by equilibrium molecular dynamics. II. Multicomponent systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    Fluid transport properties by equilibrium molecular dynamics. II. Multicomponent systems D. K than 25 years molecular dynamics has been used to study fluid transport properties. Such MD studies and multicenter molecular models.8­16 d The study of transport properties of certain fluids and classes of fluids

  9. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review June 30 -July 2, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature (K) Precipitation (mm day1) AERO GAS BOTH SUM AERO GAS BOTH SUM Ming and Ramaswamy (2009

  10. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review May 20 May 22, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during big storms or on warm days Altered Effectiveness of Hydropower · Increased Fire Risk Altered Effectiveness of Hydropower Source: Westerling et al. 2006 (fire); Madani and Lund 2010 (hydropower); Dettinger et al. 2009 (flood risk) · Hydropower follows snowmelt runoff; a shift towards an earlier spring

  11. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review May 20 May 22, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 is a part of CFS2.0 ; MOM5 is currently being ported for use in NCEP/CFS3.0 ­ E.g., MOM4/MOM5 used

  12. Geophysical Disaster Computational Fluid Dynamics Center Our scientific advances.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    meteorology) · Increase efficiency of clean electric generation, transmission and use. (wind & hydro power

  13. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review May 20 May 22, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory Review May 20-22, 2014 AM3 (observed SST and Sea Ice) Captures Observations 3 Naik et al. JGR) @ 550 nm AM3 captures the observed zonal mean O3 to within ± 4 ppbv in much of the troposphere AM3 Nitrogen & Sulfur Deposition · Dominant atmospheric oxidizing agent abundance and lifetime of radiatively

  14. December 3, 2009 16:17 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics ruedigerfinal Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with A and the drift rate is close to - so that the magnetic pattern will rest in the laboratory system. For weaker parity and for typical values of the heat conductivity the resulting very small growth rates are almost magnetic fields with thermal diffusion G. R¨udiger1 and L.L. Kitchatinov1,2,3 1 Astrophysikalisches

  15. August 12, 2011 13:50 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics paper Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucklidge, Alastair

    Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK § Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory wedge geometry G. J. J. BOTHA, A. M. RUCKLIDGE and N. E. HURLBURT§ Centre for Fusion, Space

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102,NO. B8, PAGES 17,797-17,806,AUGUST 10, 1997 Mechanical effect of fluid migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamashita, Teruo

    faulting. As a typical mechan- ical effect,we can mention the loweringof fracture strength by fluidJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 102,NO. B8, PAGES 17,797-17,806,AUGUST 10, 1997 Mechanical effect of fluid migration on the complexity of seismicity Teruo Yamashita Earthquake Research Institute

  17. Fluid dynamic effects on precision cleaning with supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Silva, L.J.

    1994-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff have assembled a small supercritical fluids parts cleaning test stand to characterize how system dynamics affect the efficacy of precision cleaning with supercritical carbon dioxide. A soiled stainless steel coupon, loaded into a ``Berty`` autoclave, was used to investigate how changes in system turbulence and solvent temperature influenced the removal of test dopants. A pulsed laser beam through a fiber optic was used to investigate real-time contaminant removal. Test data show that cleaning efficiency is a function of system agitation, solvent density, and temperature. These data also show that high levels of cleaning efficiency can generally be achieved with high levels of system agitation at relatively low solvent densities and temperatures. Agitation levels, temperatures, and densities needed for optimal cleaning are largely contaminant dependent. Using proper system conditions, the levels of cleanliness achieved with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with conventional precision cleaning methods. Additional research is currently being conducted to generalize the relationship between cleaning performance and parameters such as contaminant solubilities, mass transfer rates, and solvent agitation. These correlations can be used to optimize cleaning performance, system design, and time and energy consumption for particular parts cleaning applications.

  18. Petascale Adap,ve Computa,onal Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Petascale Adap,ve Computa,onal Fluid Dynamics PI: Kenneth Jansen, University and weight · Reduce biggest expense, i.e. fuel consump,on Wind turbine industry

  19. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Wilhelm, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)); Goutagny, L. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Variational Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics Annee 2013 -2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alouges, François

    are only valid for laminar flow at low Reynolds number. 4. Compute the flow rate F (the quantity of fluid that a fluid is flowing (from left to right) obeying Navier-Syokes equation. 1. Show that there is a stationary1 Variational Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics Ann´ee 2013 - 2014. X2011. PC 1 Exercise 1

  1. Fluid Dynamic Models of Flagellar and Ciliary Beating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fauci, Lisa

    University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA ABSTRACT: We have developed a fluid­mechanical model of a eucaryotic mechanics of microtubules, and forces due to nexin links with a surrounding incompressible fluid. This model mechanisms, the passive elastic structure of the axoneme, and the external fluid dynamics. These flagellar

  2. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berthier, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)); Wilhelm, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Bohl, W.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report consists of three parts. First, for the standard Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM), heat-transfer coefficients between components are worked out, depending on the different possible topologies. Conduction, convection, and radiative heat-transfer mechanisms are modeled. For solid particles, discontinuous phases that obey a rigid'' model, and components lacking relative motion, heat transfer is by conduction. Convection is represented for fluids in motion inside circulating'' bubbles and/or droplets. Radiation is considered between droplets in vapor continuous flow. In addition, a film-boiling model has been formulated, where radiation provides the lower limit on the fuel-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficient. Second, the momentum-exchange coefficients are defined for the standard AFDM. Between a continuous and discontinuous phase, the model consists of both laminar and turbulent terms. The most important feature is the drag coefficient in the turbulent term. It is calculated by a drag similarity hypothesis with limits for large Reynolds numbers, distorted particles,'' and churn-turbulent flow. A unique hysteresis algorithm exists to treat the liquid continuous to vapor continuous transition. Two discontinuous components are coupled using a turbulent term with an input drag coefficient. Fluid- structure momentum exchange is represented with a standard friction-factor correlation. Third, the formulas used for the AFDM simplified Step 1 models are discussed. These include the heat-transfer coefficients, the momentum-exchange functions, and the manner in which interfacial areas are determined from input length scales. The simplified modeling uses steady-state engineering correlations, as in SIMMER-II.

  3. Optics and Fluid Dynamics ^>*myft Annual Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics ^>*myft Department Annual Progress Report 1 January - 31 December 1991;Abstract Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department covers quasi-elas.ic light scattering, optic association. A ? .mmary of activities in 1991 ii presented. Optical diagnostic methods based on quasi

  4. Ris-R-1453(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1453(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 2003 Edited by H May 2004 #12;Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  5. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Intellectual Capital Accounts 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Intellectual Capital Accounts 1998 Resources, production and results RISØ-R-1108(EN) Risø National Laboratory Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Building 128 P for optical information storage, · novel schemes for spatial cryptography, and · new models for surface

  6. Ris-P.-715(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-P.-715(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 1993 Edited by S Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two programme areas: optics and continuum physics. In optics the activities are within (a) optical materials, (b) quasi

  7. Ris-R-1314(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1314(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 2001 Edited by H March 2002 #12;Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  8. Ris-R-1399(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1399(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 2002 Edited by H May 2003 #12;Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  9. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #3 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    - Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 6/104 Large-scale structure in turbulent mixing layer N2 at 1000 cm/s over He. More small-scale structure, unaltered large-scale structure vD82 N2 He/Ar N2 He/Ar #12;Introduction,W93,BSL60) See lecture 1 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #3 - rz maj 2015 Åbo

  10. Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    of approximating functions for the differential cost. The first contribution of this paper is identifying new or piece-wise quadratic. Fluid cost has been used to initialize the value iteration algorithm [5Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction Michael H

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Fluid dynamics of self-propelled microorganisms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Fluid dynamics of self-propelled microorganisms, from individuals to concentrated non-pathogenic soil bacteria are rod-shaped (Fig. 1). Their length ranges from 2 to 8 lm, depending

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Fluid dynamics of self-propelled microorganisms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortez, Ricardo

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Fluid dynamics of self-propelled microorganisms, from individuals to concentrated00348-007-0387-y #12;Individual cells of these generally non-pathogenic soil bacteria are rod

  13. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006 P. Wesseling, E. O�nate and J realistic combustion phenomenae; see e.g [6]. However, numerical flame simulation is still a demanding task

  14. Dynamical ensembles equivalence in fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    1996-05-09

    Dissipative Euler and Navier Stokes equations are discussed with the aim of proposing several experiments apt to test the equivalence of dynamical ensembles and the chaotic hypothesis.

  15. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Source Properties of Dynamic Rupture Pulses with Off-Fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    at systematically quantifying the influ- ence of plastic energy dissipation on pulse properties, such 1SwissJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Source Properties of Dynamic Rupture Pulses with Off-Fault Plasticity A.-A. Gabriel1,2 , J.-P. Ampuero3 , L. A. Dalguer1 , and P. M. Mai4

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, SummerHill, Shimla - 171005 (India); Pathania, Y. [Chitkara University, Atal Shiksha Kunj, Atal Nagar, Barotiwala, Dist Solan, Himachal Pradesh - 174103 (India)

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  17. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  18. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  19. Nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics including dissipation and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Herold, Christoph; Bleicher, Marcus; Leupold, Stefan

    2011-08-15

    We present a consistent theoretical approach for the study of nonequilibrium effects in chiral fluid dynamics within the framework of the linear {sigma} model with constituent quarks. Treating the quarks as an equilibrated heat bath, we use the influence functional formalism to obtain a Langevin equation for the {sigma} field. This allows us to calculate the explicit form of the damping coefficient and the noise correlators. For a self-consistent derivation of both the dynamics of the {sigma} field and the quark fluid, we have to employ the 2PI (two-particle irreducible) effective action formalism. The energy dissipation from the field to the fluid is treated in the exact formalism of the 2PI effective action where a conserved energy-momentum tensor can be constructed. We derive its form and comment on approximations generating additional terms in the energy-momentum balance of the entire system.

  20. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Tieliang Zhai Professor by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission #12;2 Air Ingress Accident Objectives and Overall Strategy: Depresurization Pure Diffusion Natural Convection Challenging: Natural convection Multi-component Diffusion (air

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modelling on Soot Yield for Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modelling on Soot Yield for Fire Engineering Assessment Yong S (CFD) Modelling is now widely used by fire safety engineers throughout the world as a tool of the smoke control design as part of the performance based fire safety design in the current industry

  2. Bacteria, Biofilms and Fluid Dynamics: Elementary Flows and Unexpected Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Bacteria, Biofilms and Fluid Dynamics: Elementary Flows and Unexpected Phenomena Wednesday February the migration of bacteria along surfaces when exposed to a shear flow. In particular, we identify an unusual response where flow produces a directed motion of twitching bacteria in the upstream direction. (ii) We

  3. Revised: Thursday, February 25, 1999 Dynamics of osmotic fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oster, George

    Revised: Thursday, February 25, 1999 Dynamics of osmotic fluid flow George Oster Departments The classical thermodynamic treatment of osmotic pressure is quite sufficient to describe equilibrium situations can be quite useful when thinking about osmotic flow in unfamiliar situations. The equilibrium

  4. Fluids as Dynamic Templates for Cytoskeletal Proteins in Plant Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Lofthouse

    2008-07-12

    The Dynamic Template model of biological cell membranes and the cytoplasm as spatially organised fluid layers is extended to plant cells, and is shown to offer a feasible shear driven mechanism for the co-alignment of internal and external fibres observed during growth and tropic responses

  5. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller,Bernhard

    European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006 P. Wesseling, E. O~nate and J. P´eriaux (Eds) c TU Delft, The Netherlands, 2006 IMPLICIT-EXPLICIT RUNGE-KUTTA METHOD FOR COMBUSTION, combustion, deflagration-to-detonation transition Abstract. New high order implicit-explicit Runge

  6. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006 P. Wesseling, E. O~nate and J define this regime to be consistent with the map of turbulent combustion interaction regimes dis- cusssed combustion reactions. Notwithstanding, the local rate of fuel consumption often scales with the flame

  7. Dynamic Particle Coupling for GPU-based Fluid Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanz, Volker

    -vi ¯j 2 W( Pi -Pj ,h). Here pj = k( ¯j - 0) is the pressure with gas constant k and rest density 0 for modeling dynamic particle coupling solely based on individual particle contributions. This technique does and µ is the fluid viscosity constant. To model the surface tension, M¨uller et.al. [MCG03] use the so

  8. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS Ugur Pasaogullari and Chao-dimensional model has been developed to simulate solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The model fully couples current density operation. INTRODUCTION Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are among possible candidates

  9. Mesoscale Structures at Complex Fluid-Fluid Interfaces: a Novel Lattice Boltzmann / Molecular Dynamics Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Sega; Mauro Sbragaglia; Sofia Sergeevna Kantorovich; Alexey Olegovich Ivanov

    2014-02-19

    Complex fluid-fluid interfaces featuring mesoscale structures with adsorbed particles are key components of newly designed materials which are continuously enriching the field of soft matter. Simulation tools which are able to cope with the different scales characterizing these systems are fundamental requirements for efficient theoretical investigations. In this paper we present a novel simulation method, based on the approach of Ahlrichs and D\\"unweg [Ahlrichs and D\\"unweg, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 1998, 9, 1429], that couples the "Shan-Chen" multicomponent Lattice Boltzmann technique to off-lattice molecular dynamics to simulate efficiently complex fluid-fluid interfaces. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to study a wide class of challenging problems. Several examples are given, with an accent on bicontinuous phases formation in polyelectrolyte solutions and ferrofluid emulsions. We also show that the introduction of solvation free energies in the particle-fluid interaction unveils the hidden, multiscale nature of the particle-fluid coupling, allowing to treat symmetrically (and interchangeably) the on-lattice and off-lattice components of the system.

  10. Astronomy 202: Astrophysical Gas Dynamics LL = Fluid Mechanics by Landau & Lifshitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Astronomy 202: Astrophysical Gas Dynamics LL = Fluid Mechanics by Landau & Lifshitz PP = Plasma Fluid Dynamics by D. J. Tritton You should start by reading the Feynman Lectures Vol II, Ch 40 & 41 (Shu Ch. 1) 2. Equations of Gas Dynamics: neutral ideal fluids (LL Ch. 1; esp. §1,2,5,6,7,8,10; Shu Ch

  11. fjYTiYTvl/f^ Ris-R-674(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fjYTiYTvl/f^ Risø-R-674(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 1992 #12;Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department AnnualProgressReport for1992 Edited by L. Lading, JJ. Lynov in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within two sections- The Optics Section has activities

  12. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Attempting to Image EGS Fracture & Fluid Networks; Employing joint Geophysical Imaging Technologies.

  13. THE GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS LABORATORY OF CNRM-GAME The fluid dynamics laboratory of the French meteorological service research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studies include crosswind stability of a high-speed train, small-scale wind characterization on the Millau

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2008-05-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. A STUDY OF COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS APPLIED TO ROOM AIR FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for supplying me a copy of his three-dimensional, laminar, constant density fluid flow computer program, whichi A STUDY OF COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS APPLIED TO ROOM AIR FLOW By JAMES W. WEATHERS Bachelor of the requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1992 #12;ii A STUDY OF COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

  16. The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

  17. GG 711: Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Instructor: Janet Becker (janetbec@hawaii.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG 711: Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Fall 2015 Instructor: Janet Becker (janetbec and Reid · Additional References: 1. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics by Rick Salmon 2. Perturbation reference and (2) as a fluids course where advanced mathematical tech- inques are used to solve problems

  18. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-05

    hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production. Local variations in the fluid and solid matrix properties, fine layering,.

  19. EXPERIMENTING WITH FLUIDS OC-569a Winter 2010 GFD lab: Ocean Sciences Bldg. Rm 107; teaching lab: Ocean Teaching Building Rm 206

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    might want to experiment with turbulence, or with fluid energy devices, like hydrogen fuel cells1 1 EXPERIMENTING WITH FLUIDS ­ OC-569a Winter 2010 GFD lab: Ocean Sciences Bldg. Rm 107; teaching.ocean.washington.edu/research/gfd 1. INTRODUCTION For some this will be a GFD course...Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. GFD is fluid

  20. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  1. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  2. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 -rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ -Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .zevenhoven@abo.fi Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 - rz maj 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering Dynamics 424512 E #2 - rz maj 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 - rz maj 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering

  3. 1.5 References Batzle, M. and Wang, Z., 1992, Seismic properties of pore fluids: Geophysics, Vol.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , The volumetric properties of sodium chlo- ride solutions from 0 to 500 o C at pressures up to 2000 bars based, USA, 348 pp. Chen, C.T., Chen, L.S., and Millero, F.J., 1978, Speed of sound in NaCl, MgCl2, Na2SO4-situ conditions on the seismic proper- ties of rocks: Geophysics, Vol. 57, No. 7, p. 894-901. Craft, B.C

  4. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. B7, PAGES 11,301-11,315, JULY 10, 1990 Vertical Seismic Profile Synthetics by Dynamic Ray Tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Seismic Profile Synthetics by Dynamic Ray Tracing in Laterally Varying Layered Anisotropic StructuresJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. B7, PAGES 11,301-11,315, JULY 10, 1990 VerticalSciences,Prague, Czechdovakia Dynamic ray tracing (DRT) is important in evaluating high-frequency seismic

  5. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-11-02

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cold plasma carrier gas injected into a fluid using level set method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    , and water. Our objective was to develop a model to perform complete fluid dynamics and heat transfer cells. Specifically, the authors developed a three-phase-interaction model which was coupled with heat dynamics and heat transfer output variables, such as temperature, in three phases, i.e., air, helium gas

  7. Climate dynamics and fluid mechanics: Natural variability and related uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Ghil; Mickaël D. Chekroun; Eric Simonnet

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this review-and-research paper is twofold: (i) to review the role played in climate dynamics by fluid-dynamical models; and (ii) to contribute to the understanding and reduction of the uncertainties in future climate-change projections. To illustrate the first point, we focus on the large-scale, wind-driven flow of the mid-latitude oceans which contribute in a crucial way to Earth's climate, and to changes therein. We study the low-frequency variability (LFV) of the wind-driven, double-gyre circulation in mid-latitude ocean basins, via the bifurcation sequence that leads from steady states through periodic solutions and on to the chaotic, irregular flows documented in the observations. This sequence involves local, pitchfork and Hopf bifurcations, as well as global, homoclinic ones. The natural climate variability induced by the LFV of the ocean circulation is but one of the causes of uncertainties in climate projections. Another major cause of such uncertainties could reside in the structural instability in the topological sense, of the equations governing climate dynamics, including but not restricted to those of atmospheric and ocean dynamics. We propose a novel approach to understand, and possibly reduce, these uncertainties, based on the concepts and methods of random dynamical systems theory. As a very first step, we study the effect of noise on the topological classes of the Arnol'd family of circle maps, a paradigmatic model of frequency locking as occurring in the nonlinear interactions between the El Nino-Southern Oscillations (ENSO) and the seasonal cycle. It is shown that the maps' fine-grained resonant landscape is smoothed by the noise, thus permitting their coarse-grained classification. This result is consistent with stabilizing effects of stochastic parametrization obtained in modeling of ENSO phenomenon via some general circulation models.

  8. Dynamics of fluid-filled gelatin cracks www.math.utwente.nl/bokhoveo/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Dynamics of fluid-filled gelatin cracks www.math.utwente.nl/bokhoveo/ Koji Kiyosugi, Onno Bokhove analog experiment, wherein gelatin is the elastic solid and water the intruding fluid: #12;Fluid cavity new dikes. Sketch of observations: gelatin gelatin frontal view 1 2 side view top view 32 32 1 1 1 3 2

  9. Z .Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 28 1998 93105 Fluid transport by dipolar vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flór, Jan-Bert

    Z .Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 28 1998 93­105 Fluid transport by dipolar vortices I. Eames a forward, where C s1 for a Lamb's dipole. The results areM M applied to examine fluid transport by dipolar potential vorticity. q 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fluid transport; Dipoles

  10. Fluid dynamics of aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Espa, Stefania; Costantini, Martina; Sorgini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Aortic root dilation and propensity to dissection are typical manifestations of the Marfan Syndrome (MS), a genetic defect leading to the degeneration of the elastic fibres. Dilation affects the structure of the flow and, in turn, altered flow may play a role in vessel dilation, generation of aneurysms, and dissection. The aim of the present work is the investigation in-vitro of the fluid dynamic modifications occurring as a consequence of the morphological changes typically induced in the aortic root by MS. A mock-loop reproducing the left ventricle outflow tract and the aortic root was used to measure time resolved velocity maps on a longitudinal symmetry plane of the aortic root. Two dilated model aortas, designed to resemble morphological characteristics typically observed in MS patients, have been compared to a reference, healthy geometry. The aortic model was designed to quantitatively reproduce the change of aortic distensibility caused by MS. Results demonstrate that vorticity released from the valve ...

  11. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai; Bjoern Schenke

    2015-09-16

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that these coefficients provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations and the transport properties of the quark gluon plasma.

  12. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnai, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that these coefficients provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations and the transport properties of the quark gluon plasma.

  13. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    into helical magnetic islands. Such islands de- grade plasma confinement because heat and particles are ableTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity R Phys. Plasmas 12, 122308 (2005); 10.1063/1.2141928 Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry

  14. The fluid dynamics of river dunes: A review and some future research directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    The fluid dynamics of river dunes: A review and some future research directions Jim Best Earth; revised 14 October 2005; accepted 20 October 2005; published 21 December 2005. [1] Dunes are present, and deposition within many rivers. Progress in understanding the fluid dynamics associated with alluvial dunes

  15. Collapse dynamics and runout of dense granular materials in a fluid V. Topina,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    [3]. The dis- persion of fuel fragments in the coolant water during a hypothetic nuclear accidentCollapse dynamics and runout of dense granular materials in a fluid V. Topina,b , Y. Moneriea,b , F. (Dated: April 16, 2012) We investigate the effect of an ambient fluid on the dynamics of collapse

  16. Handbook of Mathematical Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2 Edited by S. Friedlander and D. Serre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renardy, Yuriko

    Handbook of Mathematical Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2 Edited by S. Friedlander and D. Serre) _______________________________________________________________________ YES! Please send me ______ copy(ies) of the Handbook of Mathematical Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2, edited Department, P.O. Box 103, 1000 AC Amsterdam, The Netherlands Email: a.deelen@elsevier.com #12;Handbook

  17. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Ris-R-1100(EN) Annual Progress Report for 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Risø-R-1100(EN) Department Annual Progress Report for 1998 Edited by S May 1999 #12;2 Risø-R-1100(EN) Abstract Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following three programme areas: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  18. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Ris-R-1227(EN) Annual Progress Report for 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Risø-R-1227(EN) Department Annual Progress Report for 2000 Edited by S;2 Risø-R-1227(EN) Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information

  19. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Ris-R-1157(EN) Annual Progress Report for 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Risø-R-1157(EN) Department Annual Progress Report for 1999 Edited by S;2 Risø-R-1157(EN) Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within the three programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing

  20. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/climate-modeling Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    importance, such as water resource management, agriculture, transportation, and urban planning system components (atmosphere, land surface, ocean, and sea ice), and their interactions. Earth's energy processes are larger than grid-scale and based on bedrock scientific principles (conservation of energy

  1. Daniel S. Ward Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Email: dsward@princeton.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodgers, Keith

    in the Community Earth System Model, with implications for the use of dust source functions. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14 climate change with Earth System models, Nature Education Knowledge, 4(5):4, 2013. (7) M. Migliavacca

  2. GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS -1 OC512/AS509 2009 LECTURE 1 Mon 5 i 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the climate system is the acceleration of the polar vortex in the southern stratosphere since about 1970. CFCs and running numerical models, with relatively few mathematical theoreticians. Yet if you look at observations and models creatively you will be using ideas from GFD. GFD is sometimes portrayed as applied classical

  3. Jasmin G. John Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory 609-452-5323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Stouffer and J. G. John: Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming. Nature

  4. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buren, Kendra L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Canfield, Jesse M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sauer, Jeremy A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  5. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: PART 2 – COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2011-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  6. THE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDS WITHIN THE SEAFLOORWITHIN THE SEAFLOORWITHIN THE SEAFLOORWI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    to exciting scientific discoveries through ocean drilling Essentially all studies of fluid flow within to recover from the disturbance due to drilling to produce high quality fluid samples and to evaluate large AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDS WITHIN

  7. On the dynamics of magnetic fluids in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

    2008-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of magnetic fluids, often termed ferrofluids, has been an active area of research since the mid 1960s. However, it is only in the past twenty years that these fluids have begun to be used in magnetic ...

  8. Structure and dynamics of mangetorheological fluids confined in microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghgooie, Ramin

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic devices and magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been two areas of intense research for several years. Traditionally, these two fields have remained separated from one another by scale. MR fluids are best known ...

  9. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 57, NO. 11 (NOVEMBER 1992); P. 13961408, 17 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Seismic properties of pore fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    depth, migration, biodegradation, and production his- tory. The schematic diagram in Figure 1 the goals of seismic exploration are the identification of the pore fluids at depth and the mapping of hydrocarbon generationwith depth showsthat we can expect a variety of oils and gasesas we drill

  10. On the role of wind driven ocean dynamics in tropical Atlantic variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Meyre Pereira

    2006-08-16

    The response of the tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind stress forcing on seasonal and interannual time scales is examined using an ocean data assimilation product from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and an ocean general circulation...

  11. Multiphase flow in the advanced fluid dynamics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Berthier, J.; Parker, F.P.; Ichikawa, S.; Goutagny, L.; Ninokata, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling used in the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM), a computer code to investigate new approaches to simulating severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, the dominant liquid, and the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas also are modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer generally is treated using engineering correlations. Liquid/vapor phase transitions are handled with a nonequililbrium heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. The Los Alamos SESAME equation of state (EOS) has been inplemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. A summary description of the AFDM numerical algorithm is provided. The AFDM code currently is being debugged and checked out. Two sample three-field calculations also are presented. The first is a three-phase bubble column mixing experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory; the second is a liquid-liquid mixing experiment performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, that resulted in rapid vapor production. We conclude that only qualitative comparisons currently are possible for complex multiphase situations. Many further model developments can be pursued, but there are limits because of the lack of a comprehensive theory, the lack of detailed multicomponent experimental data, and the difficulties in keeping the resulting model complexities tractable.

  12. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE FLUID DYNAMICS ASPECTS OF THIN LIQUID FILM PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE FLUID DYNAMICS ASPECTS OF THIN LIQUID FILM PROTECTION SCHEMES FOR INERTIAL Accepted for Publication October 7, 2003 Experimental and numerical studies of the fluid dy- namics of thin- ploding fuel pellets consists of energetic neutrons, pho- tons, and charged particles that eventually

  13. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #5-rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ -Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ://users.abo.fi/rzevenho/kursRZ.html#FPS Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #5- rz maj 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering - Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering - Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Turku 3/70 Fluid flow around 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering - Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Turku

  14. Vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid and Nambu Goto dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    1999-11-26

    By a weak deformation of the cylindrical symmetry of the potential vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid, we study the possible dynamics of the central line of this vortex. In "stiff" material the Nanbu-Goto equations are obtained

  15. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J. 02 PETROLEUM; FLOW MODELS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; OIL WELLS; PETROLEUM; ROD PUMPS; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES Sucker...

  16. Comparative Study and Improvements on Mesh-free Lagrangian Computational Fluid Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakti, Farid Putra

    2015-08-10

    Mesh-free Lagrangian Computational Fluid Dynamics is a numerical scheme where the computational points are represented by freely-moving finite particles that have a constant mass. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and Moving Particle Semi...

  17. Investigation into the discrepancies between computational fluid dynamics lift predictions and experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairman, Randall S. (Randall Scott), 1967-

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of current computational fluid dynamics capabilities in predicting mean lift forces for two dimensional foils is conducted. It is shown that both integral boundary layer theory and Reynolds Averaged Navier ...

  18. Developing an integrated building design tool by coupling building energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Zhiqiang, 1971-

    2003-01-01

    Building energy simulation (ES) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can play important roles in building design by providing essential information to help design energy-efficient, thermally comfortable and healthy ...

  19. Using the FLUENT computational fluid dynamics code to model the NACOK corrosion test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Benjamin T

    2004-01-01

    As a part of advancing nuclear technology, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis offers safer and lower-cost results relative to experimental work. Its use as a safety analysis tool is gaining much broader acceptance ...

  20. Dynamics of end to end loop formation for an isolated chain in viscoelastic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajarshi Chakrabarti

    2012-04-04

    We theoretically investigate the looping dynamics of a linear polymer immersed in a viscoelastic fluid. The dynamics of the chain is governed by a Rouse model with a fractional memory kernel recently proposed by Weber et al. (S. C. Weber, J. A. Theriot, and A. J. Spakowitz, Phys. Rev. E 82, 011913 (2010)). Using the Wilemski-Fixman (G. Wilemski and M. Fixman, J. Chem. Phys. 60, 866 (1974)) formalism we calculate the looping time for a chain in a viscoelastic fluid where the mean square displacement of the center of mass of the chain scales as t^(1/2). We observe that the looping time is faster for the chain in viscoelastic fluid than for a Rouse chain in Newtonian fluid up to a chain length and above this chain length the trend is reversed. Also no scaling of the looping time with the length of the chain seems to exist for the chain in viscoelastic fluid.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of three dimensional fluid flow separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surana, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Flow separation (the detachment of fluid from a no-slip boundary) is a major cause of performance loss in engineering devices, including diffusers, airfoils and jet engines. The systematic study of flow separation dates ...

  2. VOF-Simulation of Fluid Particle Dynamics Dieter Bothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothe, Dieter

    of bubble pairs as well as coales- cence of two bubbles rising side by side. Keywords. Volume of Fluid (VOF in Chemical Engineering include bubble columns, loop reactors, agitated stirred reactors, flotation

  3. Adaptive Multiscale Molecular Dynamics of Macromolecular Fluids Steven O. Nielsen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    diffusion in polymer electrolytes, signal transduction be- tween proteins, nanostructure formationAdaptive Multiscale Molecular Dynamics of Macromolecular Fluids Steven O. Nielsen,1 Preston B 2010; published 3 December 2010) Until now, adaptive atomistic­coarse-grain (A/CG) molecular dynamics

  4. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  5. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Piriz, A. R.; Lopez Cela, J. J. [E.T.S.I. Industriales and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas (INEI), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A previous theory on dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at interfaces between Newtonian fluids is reformulated in order to make evident the analogy of this problem with the related one on dynamic stabilization of ablation fronts in the framework of inertial confinement fusion. Explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the boundaries of the dynamically stable region which turns out to be completely analogue to the stability charts obtained for the case of ablation fronts. These results allow proposing experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for studying the case of ablation fronts. Experiments with Newtonian fluids are presented which demonstrate the validity of the theoretical approach and encourage to pursue experimental research on ablation fronts to settle the feasibility of dynamic stabilization in the inertial confinement fusion scenario.

  6. Dynamics of filaments and membranes in a viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Powers

    2009-12-08

    Motivated by the motion of biopolymers and membranes in solution, this article presents a formulation of the equations of motion for curves and surfaces in a viscous fluid. We focus on geometrical aspects and simple variational methods for calculating internal stresses and forces, and we derive the full nonlinear equations of motion. In the case of membranes, we pay particular attention to the formulation of the equations of hydrodynamics on a curved, deforming surface. The formalism is illustrated by two simple case studies: (1) the twirling instability of straight elastic rod rotating in a viscous fluid, and (2) the pearling and buckling instabilities of a tubular liposome or polymersome.

  7. Fluid dynamic studies of blood splatter mechanisms | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |FinalIndustrial Technologies Industrial3 FluidFluid

  8. D)TT(^!rf5\\\\ "bKtSOOO&i. Ris-R-793(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D)TT(^!rf5\\\\ "bKtSOOO&i. Risø-R-793(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report, Denmark January 1995 #12;Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 1994 Edited by S;Abstract Research in the Optics and Fiuid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two

  9. Numerical implication of Riemann problem theory for fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Riemann problem plays an important role in understanding the wave structure of fluid flow. It is also crucial step in some numerical algorithms for accurately and efficiently computing fluid flow; Godunov method, random choice method, and from tracking method. The standard wave structure consists of shock and rarefaction waves. Due to physical effects such as phase transitions, which often are indistinguishable from numerical errors in an equation of state, anomalkous waves may occur, ''rarefaction shocks'', split waves, and composites. The anomalous waves may appear in numerical calculations as waves smeared out by either too much artificial viscosity or insufficient resolution. In addition, the equation of state may lead to instabilities of fluid flow. Since these anomalous effects due to the equation of state occur for the continuum equations, they can be expected to occur for all computational algorithms. The equation of state may be characterized by three dimensionless variables: the adiabatic exponent ..gamma.., the Grueneisen coefficient GAMMA, and the fundamental derivative G. The fluid flow anomalies occur when inequalities relating these variables are violated. 18 refs.

  10. Dynamic stability of a spinning tube conveying a fluid through a symmetrical noncircular cross-section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    When a fluid flows inside a tube, the deformations of the tube can interact with the fluid flowing within it and these dynamic interactions can result in significant lateral motions of the tube and the flowing fluid. The purpose of this report is to examine the dynamic stability of a spinning tube through which an incompressible frictionless fluid is flowing. The tube can be considered as either a hollow beam or a hollow cable. The analytical results can be applied to spinning or stationary tubes through which fluids are transferred; e.g., liquid coolants, fuels and lubricants, slurry solutions, and high explosives in paste form. The coupled partial differential equations are determined for the lateral motion of a spinning Bernoulli-Euler beam or a spinning cable carrying an incompressible flowing fluid. The beam, which spins about an axis parallel to its longitudinal axis and which can also be loaded by a constant axial force, is straight, uniform, simply supported, and rests on a massless, uniform elastic foundation that spins with the beam. Damping for the beam and foundation is considered by using a combined uniform viscous damping coefficient. The fluid, in addition to being incompressible, is frictionless, has a constant density, and flows at a constant speed relative to the longitudinal beam axis. The Galerkin method is used to reduce the coupled partial differential equations for the lateral motion of the spinning beam to a coupled set of 2N, second order, ordinary differential equations for the generalized beam coordinates. By simplifying these equations and examining the roots of the characteristic equation, an analytical solution is obtained for the lateral dynamic instability of the beam (or cable). The analytical solutions determined the minimum critical fluid speed and the critical spin speeds, for a specified fluid speed, in terms of the physical parameters of the system.

  11. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutchko, R.

    2014-01-01

    emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamicsa computational ?uid dynamics (CFD) model of the systemthe computational domain. A Cartesian coordinate system was

  12. No-Go Theorems Face Fluid-Dynamical Theories for Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis Vervoort

    2014-06-16

    Recent experiments on fluid-dynamical systems have revealed a series of striking quantum-like features of these macroscopic systems, thus reviving the quest to describe quantum mechanics by classical, in particular fluid-dynamical, theories. However, it is generally admitted that such an endeavor is impossible, on the basis of the 'no-go' theorems of Bell and Kochen-Specker. Here we show that such theorems are inoperative for fluid-dynamical models, even if these are local. Such models appear to violate one of the premises of both theorems, and can reproduce the quantum correlation of the Bell experiment. Therefore the statement that 'local hidden-variable theories are impossible' appears to be untenable for theories just slightly more general than originally envisaged by Bell. We also discuss experimental implications.

  13. Fluid Dynamic and Performance Behavior of Multiphase Progressive Cavity Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Shankar Bhaskaran

    2012-10-19

    of the utilization temperature of this elastomer has been very critical as temperature fluctuations deform the stator altering the volumetric efficiency of the pump. Figure 1.1 : Fluid path in a progressive cavity pump. 3 With low life cycle costs... Phase-1 of the project focused on studying the pump at high gas volume fractions. The axial distribution of pressure and temperature for a range of GVFs was investigated. The volumetric flow rate and its dependence on suction pressure was studied...

  14. The GK Batchelor Laboratory of Fluid Dynamics Dr. S.B. Dalziel, Director of the Fluid Dynamics Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    flow from a volcanic eruption? What is the effect of wind conditions on buoyancy driven ventilation in a building, and how can we use this to our advantage? Can we control the hydrodynamic instabilities of a suspended second phase? Is mix- ing sensitive to how we put the energy into the system? How do fluids

  15. Multi-Particle Collision Dynamics Algorithm for Nematic Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler N. Shendruk; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-04-18

    Research on transport, self-assembly and defect dynamics within confined, flowing liquid crystals requires versatile and computationally efficient mesoscopic algorithms to account for fluctuating nematohydrodynamic interactions. We present a multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) based algorithm to simulate liquid-crystal hydrodynamic and director fields in two and three dimensions. The nematic-MPCD method is shown to successfully reproduce the features of a nematic liquid crystal, including a nematic-isotropic phase transition with hysteresis in 3D, defect dynamics, isotropic Frank elastic coefficients, tumbling and shear alignment regimes and boundary condition dependent order parameter fields.

  16. IOP PUBLISHING FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH Fluid Dyn. Res. 42 (2010) 025504 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0169-5983/42/2/025504

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    and spinning projectile applications. Here laminar­turbulent transition within the boundary-layer flow over of such boundary-layer flows and developing strategies to maintain laminar flow will lead to modificationsIOP PUBLISHING FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH Fluid Dyn. Res. 42 (2010) 025504 (12pp) doi:10

  17. IOP PUBLISHING FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH Fluid Dyn. Res. 41 (2009) 065001 (24pp) doi:10.1088/0169-5983/41/6/065001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    be encountered as a function of the Ohnesorge number. For large values, a laminar flow is encountered insideIOP PUBLISHING FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH Fluid Dyn. Res. 41 (2009) 065001 (24pp) doi:10 Abstract This work presents current advances in the numerical simulation of two- phase flows using a volume

  18. 2.13 HEAT TRANSFER & FLUID FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS 2.13.7-1 Molecular dynamics methods in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    2.13 HEAT TRANSFER & FLUID FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS 2.13.7-1 2.13.7 Molecular dynamics methods in microscale heat transfer Shigeo Maruyama A. Introduction In normal heat transfer and fluid flow calculations of molecules. This situation is approached in microscale heat transfer and fluid flow. Molecular level

  19. Anomalous dynamics of an elastic membrane in an active fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Mallory; C. Valeriani; A. Cacciuto

    2015-05-06

    Using numerical simulations, we characterized the behavior of an elastic membrane immersed in an active fluid. Our findings reveal a nontrivial folding and re-expansion of the membrane that is controlled by the interplay of its resistance to bending and the self-propulsion strength of the active components in solution. We show how flexible membranes tend to collapse into multi-folded states, whereas stiff membranes oscillates between an extended configuration and a singly folded state. This study provides a simple example of how to exploit the random motion of active particles to perform mechanical work at the micro-scale.

  20. Collective dynamics of molecular motors pulling on fluid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Campas; Y. Kafri; K. B. Zeldovich; J. Casademunt; J. -F. Joanny

    2005-12-08

    The collective dynamics of $N$ weakly coupled processive molecular motors are considered theoretically. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the velocity-force curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from a simple mean field prediction. They become essentially independent of $N$ if it is large enough. For strongly biased motors such as kinesin this occurs if $N\\gtrsim 5$. The study of a two-state model shows that the existence of internal states can induce effective interactions.

  1. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls or resonant magnetic perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. II. Islands interacting with resistive walls-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys. Plasmas 12

  2. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. I. Isolated islands Richard Fitzpatrick and Franois L. Waelbroeck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    magnetic islands. Such islands degrade plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travelTwo-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry. I. Isolated islands Richard Fitzpatrick.1063/1.4863498 Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: Determination of the island phase velocity Phys

  3. Dynamics of a confined dusty fluid in a sheared ion flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laishram, Modhuchandra; Sharma, Devendra; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Dynamics of an isothermally driven dust fluid is analyzed which is confined in an azimuthally symmetric cylindrical setup by an effective potential and is in equilibrium with an unconfined sheared flow of a streaming plasma. Cases are analyzed where the confining potential constitutes a barrier for the driven fluid, limiting its spatial extension and boundary velocity. The boundary effects entering the formulation are characterized by applying the appropriate boundary conditions and a range of solutions exhibiting single and multiple vortex are obtained. The equilibrium solutions considered in the cylindrical setup feature a transition from single to multiple vortex state of the driven flow. Effects of (i) the variation in dust viscosity, (ii) coupling between the driving and the driven fluid, and (iii) a friction determining the equilibrium dynamics of the driven system are characterized.

  4. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Al

    . Meiron California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 158-79, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA e-mail: ralf adaptation. As computational application, the induction of large plastic deformations and the rupture of thin The Center for Simulation of Dynamic Response of Materials at the California In- stitute of Technology has

  5. Transport coefficients of a mesoscopic fluid dynamics model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kikuchi; C. M. Pooley; J. F. Ryder; J. M. Yeomans

    2003-02-21

    We investigate the properties of stochastic rotation dynamics (Malevanets-Kapral method), a mesoscopic model used for simulating fluctuating hydrodynamics. Analytical results are given for the transport coefficients. We discuss the most efficient way of measuring the transport properties and obtain excellent agreement between the theoretical and numerical calculations.

  6. Chapter 17 in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids Finite Element Methods for Fluid Dynamics with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    Chapter 17 in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids Finite Element Methods surfaces, two-fluid interfaces, fluid­object and fluid­structure in- teractions, and moving mechanical in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids (eds. E. Stein, R. De Borst and T.J.R. Hughes), John

  7. Molecular to fluid dynamics: The consequences of stochastic molecular motion Stefan Heinz*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    to derive a hierarchy of algebraic expressions for the molecular stress tensor and heat flux. A scaling of ordinary irreversible thermodynamics [3]) transport equations for the molecular stress tensor and heat flux equations. The stochastic model is used to derive fluid dynamic equations where the molecular stress tensor

  8. Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 2. Effects of fluid saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 2. Effects of fluid saturation Robert C slip-weakening behavior is specified, and the off-fault material is described using an elastic-plastic poroelastoplastic materials with and without plastic dilation. During nondilatant undrained response near

  9. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Nonlinear dynamics over rough topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanneste, Jacques

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Nonlinear dynamics over rough topography-dimensional, pe- riodic or random, small-scale topography is investigated using an asymptotic approach. Averaged (or homogenised) evolution equations which account for the flow-topography in- teraction are derived

  10. Dynamic Simulation of Splashing Fluids James F. O'Brien and Jessica K. Hodgins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    with natural phenomena that are remarkable in their form and movements: a tree blow- ing in the wind, lightning us- ing dynamic models of the fluid and the impacting object. imaginary physical laws of the animated of the computational cost increases with the cube of the model's resolutio

  11. Fluid dynamical equations and transport coefficients of relativistic gases with non-extensive statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Biro; E. Molnar

    2012-01-28

    We derive equations for fluid dynamics from a non-extensive Boltzmann transport equation consistent with Tsallis' non-extensive entropy formula. We evaluate transport coefficients employing the relaxation time approximation and investigate non-extensive effects in leading order dissipative phenomena at relativistic energies, like heat conductivity, shear and bulk viscosity.

  12. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of chemical looping fuel reactors utilizing gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O'Brien, T.

    2011-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic(CFD) model for the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion technology has been developed,withspecialfocusonaccuratelyrepresentingtheheterogeneous chemicalreactions.Acontinuumtwo-fluidmodelwasusedtodescribeboththegasandsolidphases. Detailedsub-modelstoaccountforfluid–particleandparticle–particleinteractionforceswerealso incorporated.Twoexperimentalcaseswereanalyzedinthisstudy(Son andKim,2006; Mattisonetal., 2001). SimulationswerecarriedouttotestthecapabilityoftheCFDmodeltocapturechangesinoutletgas concentrationswithchangesinnumberofparameterssuchassuperficialvelocity,metaloxide concentration,reactortemperature,etc.Fortheexperimentsof Mattissonetal.(2001), detailedtime varyingoutletconcentrationvalueswerecompared,anditwasfoundthatCFDsimulationsprovideda reasonablematchwiththisdata.

  13. SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA R. Komm National Solar Observatory 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 komm@noao.edu ABSTRACT We analyze GONG and MDI observations closer to the surface. GONG and MDI data show the same results. Di#11;erences occur mainly at high

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow W-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a primary lithium/thionyl chloride battery. The model to the first task with important examples of lead-acid,1-3 nickel-metal hydride,4-8 and lithium-based batteries

  15. International Journal of Computational Fluid Dynamics Vol. 00, No. 00, February 2010, 143

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    pressure q total heat flux qref energy of fluid at a given reference state ReL Reynolds number based in the performance: reduced flow rates, lower pressure increases in pumps, load asymmetry, vibrations, noise and erosion. In most industrial applications, cavitating flows are turbulent and the dynamics of the formed

  16. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  17. Coupling remote sensing with computational fluid dynamics modelling to estimate lake chlorophyll-a concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling remote sensing with computational fluid dynamics modelling to estimate lake chlorophyll form 17 October 2000; accepted 1 June 2001 Abstract A remotely sensed image of Loch Leven, a shallow in the remotely sensed image. It is proposed that CFD modelling benefits the interpretation of remotely sensed

  18. FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    of the objective functions in tertiary oil recovery by polymer flooding is the "op- timal" viscous profileFLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Prabir Daripa are succinctly summarized including characteri- zation of the optimal flooding scheme that leads to maximum oil

  19. RELAXATION OF ENERGY AND APPROXIMATE RIEMANN SOLVERS FOR GENERAL PRESSURE LAWS IN FLUID DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coquel, Frédéric

    RELAXATION OF ENERGY AND APPROXIMATE RIEMANN SOLVERS FOR GENERAL PRESSURE LAWS IN FLUID DYNAMICS FR a relaxation of the nonlinear pressure law introducing an energy decomposition under the form = 1 + 2. The internal energy 1 is associated with a (simpler) pressure law p1(, 1); the energy 2 is advected by the flow

  20. On preparation of viscous pore fluids for dynamic centrifuge modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamidis, O.; Madabhushi, S. P. G.

    2014-11-21

    upon cooling. Gelation temperatures for METHOCEL F50 are well above the expected range of temperatures in dynamic centrifuge modelling [Dow, 2002]. As a result, the gelation process is not consid- ered in this study. Measurements of viscosity... + e e · ki (24) where k is the coefficient of permeability and i is the hydraulic gradient. Since an upper estimate for shearing rate is sought after, the critical hydraulic gradient, for which the seepage forces become equal to the submerged weight...

  1. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei, E-mail: jwchu@nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K. [Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99372 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ? in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ?-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ?-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ?-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ?-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  2. ERNEST LUTHER MAJER Ph.D., June 1978 Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    , and for tracking fluid injection fronts. Staff Scientist, Group Leader Geophysics/Geomechanics Group Earth Sciences/Subsurface Geosciences, Geophysics/ Geomechanics Earth Sciences Division, 1994 - 2002 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Recent

  3. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  4. Relativistic Dynamics of Non-ideal Fluids: Viscous and heat-conducting fluids II. Transport properties and microscopic description of relativistic nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azwinndini Muronga

    2007-07-31

    In the causal theory of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics, there are conditions on the equation of state and other thermodynamic properties such as the second-order coefficients of a fluid that need to be satisfied to guarantee that the fluid perturbations propagate causally and obey hyperbolic equations. The second-order coefficients in the causal theory, which are the relaxation times for the dissipative degrees of freedom and coupling constants between different forms of dissipation (relaxation lengths), are presented for partonic and hadronic systems. These coefficients involves relativistic thermodynamic integrals. The integrals are presented for general case and also for different regimes in the temperature--chemical potential plane. It is shown that for a given equation of state these second-order coefficients are not additional parameters but they are determined by the equation of state. We also present the prescription on the calculation of the freeze-out particle spectra from the dynamics of relativistic non-ideal fluids.

  5. Fluid dynamic propagation of initial baryon number perturbations on a Bjorken flow background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Baryon number density perturbations offer a possible route to experimentally measure baryon number susceptibilities and heat conductivity of the quark gluon plasma. We study the fluid dynamical evolution of local and event-by-event fluctuations of baryon number density, flow velocity and energy density on top of a (generalised) Bjorken expansion. To that end we use a background-fluctuation splitting and a Bessel-Fourier decomposition for the fluctuating part of the fluid dynamical fields with respect to the azimuthal angle, the radius in the transverse plane and rapidity. We examine how the time evolution of linear perturbations depends on the equation of state as well as on shear viscosity, bulk viscosity and heat conductivity for modes with different azimuthal, radial and rapidity wave numbers. Finally we discuss how this information is accessible to experiments in terms of the transverse and rapidity dependence of correlation functions for baryonic particles in high energy nuclear collisions.

  6. Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 1. Dry materials or neglect of fluid pressure changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 1. Dry materials or neglect of fluid pressure an explicit dynamic finite element procedure. A Mohr-Coulomb type elastic-plastic description describes-fault plasticity during dynamic rupture. Those include the angle with the fault of the maximum compressive

  7. J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 137 (2006) 103109 Charge screening effects on filament dynamics in xanthan gum solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolka, Linda B.

    2006-01-01

    J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 137 (2006) 103­109 Charge screening effects on filament dynamics January 2006 Abstract We experimentally investigate the filament dynamics of non-Newtonian drops falling as an order of magnitude with the addition of KCl. The qualitative dynamics of bead formation on the filament

  8. The Dynamics of a Two-Fluid Bianchi Type I Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikjyot Singh Kohli; Michael C. Haslam

    2015-07-19

    We use a dynamical systems approach based on the method of orthonormal frames to study the dynamics of a two-fluid, non-tilted Bianchi Type I cosmological model. In our model, one of the fluids is a fluid with bulk viscosity, while the other fluid assumes the role of a cosmological constant and represents nonnegative vacuum energy. We begin by completing a detailed fixed-points analysis of the system which gives information about the local sinks, sources and saddles. We then proceeded to analyze the global features of the dynamical system by using topological methods by finding the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-limit sets. The fixed points found are a flat FLRW universe, an Einstein-de Sitter universe, a de Sitter universe, a mixed FLRW universe with both vacuum and non-vacuum energy, and a Kasner universe. We then find conditions for which each equilibrium point was a saddle, sink, or source, and attempt to describe the global and past asymptotic behaviour of the model with respect to each fixed point. The flat FLRW universe solution we found with both vacuum and non-vacuum energy is clearly of primary importance with respect to modelling the present-day universe. In particular, we show that this equilibrium point is a local sink and a saddle of the dynamical system, so there are orbits that approach this equilibrium point in the future. Therefore, there exists a time period for which our cosmological model will isotropize and be compatible with present-day observations of a high degree of isotropy of the cosmic microwave background in addition to the existence of both vacuum and non-vacuum energy.

  9. The comparison of the 3-fluid dynamic model with experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kizka, V A

    2015-01-01

    The method of comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data had been developed.This method allows estimate the quality of theory. Published theoretical data of the three-fluid dynamic (3FD) model applied to the experimental data from heavy-ion collisions at the energy range $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\,=\\,2.7 - 63$ GeV were used as example of application of the developed methodology.

  10. The comparison of the 3-fluid dynamic model with experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Kizka

    2015-08-13

    The method of comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data had been developed.This method allows estimate the quality of theory. Published theoretical data of the three-fluid dynamic (3FD) model applied to the experimental data from heavy-ion collisions at the energy range $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\,=\\,2.7 - 63$ GeV were used as example of application of the developed methodology.

  11. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  12. Dynamics of a dielectric droplet suspended in a magnetic fluid in electric and magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Zakinyan; Elena Tkacheva; Yury Dikansky

    2012-03-24

    The behavior of a microdrop of dielectric liquid suspended in a magnetic fluid and exposed to the action of electric and magnetic fields is studied experimentally. With increasing electric field, the deformation of droplets into oblate ellipsoid, toroid and curved toroid was observed. At the further increase in the electric field, the bursting of droplets was also revealed. The electrorotation of deformed droplets was observed and investigated. The influence of an additional magnetic field on the droplet dynamics was studied. The main features of the droplet dynamics were interpreted and theoretically examined.

  13. Fluid dynamics of heart valves during atrial fibrillation: a lumped parameter-based approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Guala, Andrea; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) consequences on the heart valve dynamics are usually studied along with a valvular disfunction or disease, since in medical monitoring the two pathologies are often concomitant. Aim of the present work is to study, through a stochastic lumped-parameter approach, the basic fluid dynamics variations of heart valves, when only paroxysmal AF is present with respect to the normal sinus rhythm (NSR) in absence of any valvular pathology. Among the most common parameters interpreting the valvular function, the most useful turns out to be the regurgitant volume. During AF both atrial valves do not seem to worsen their performance, while the ventricular efficiency is remarkably reduced.

  14. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D.

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  16. GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS OF SQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goubau, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    W. M. , and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Zimmerman, J. : Second1976). Sims, W. K. :, Geophysics E. , physics~. and Ketchen,Geo- and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Gamble, T. D. , Goubau, W.

  17. Dynamically orthogonal field equations for stochastic fluid flows and particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P

    2011-01-01

    In the past decades an increasing number of problems in continuum theory have been treated using stochastic dynamical theories. This is because dynamical systems governing real processes always contain some elements ...

  18. RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics: Dimensional Analysis, the Coriolis force, and Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, James F.

    This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, 12.800, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The ...

  19. Low Speed Virtual Wind Tunnel Simulation For Educational Studies In Introducing Computational Fluid Dynamics And Flow Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Cher-Chiang

    2008-05-05

    imagine how the stall occurs over an airfoil or how the turbulent air looks like after separation happens. In this case, a (flow separation) picture will definitely speak more than a thousand words (or equations). Computational Fluid Dynamics offers...

  20. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid in Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Gel to Fluid Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Veerendra K [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Anunciado, Divina B [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULV as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, a sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The data analysis invariably shows the presence of two distinct motions: the whole lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, or lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the whole lipid molecule is found to be Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale, but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The localized translational diffusion of the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails is a manifestation of the flexibility of the chains acquired in the fluid phase. Because of this flexibility, both the local diffusivity and the confinement volume for the hydrogen atoms increase linearly from near the lipid s polar head group to the end of its hydrophobic tail. Our results present a quantitative and detailed picture of the effect of the gel-fluid phase transition on the nanoscopic lipid dynamics in ULV. The data analysis approach developed here has a potential for probing the dynamic response of lipids to the presence of additional cell membrane components.

  1. Wave radiation in simple geophysical models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Stuart William

    2013-07-01

    Wave radiation is an important process in many geophysical flows. In particular, it is by wave radiation that flows may adjust to a state for which the dynamics is slow. Such a state is described as “balanced”, meaning ...

  2. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03091929.2014.891023

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    .1080/03091929.2014.891023 Cross-equatorial flow of grounded abyssal ocean currents ALEXANDER KIM, GORDON E. SWATERS and BRUCE R: Cross-equatorial flows; Grounded abyssal ocean currents; Deep western boundary currents 1. Introduction important phenomena that take place in the world oceans are large-scale ocean currents, which are generated

  3. INTRODUCTION APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    GEOL 384.3 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS GEOL 384 unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know. And if one looks throughout the history of geophysics he didn't really say geophysics. He said, " ... our country and other free countries ...". But I am

  4. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  5. Flow of colloidal solids and fluids through constrictions: dynamical density functional theory versus simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urs Zimmermann; Frank Smallenburg; Hartmut Löwen

    2015-12-02

    Using both dynamical density functional theory and particle-resolved Brownian dynamics simulations, we explore the flow of two-dimensional colloidal solids and fluids driven through a linear channel with a geometric constriction. The flow is generated by a constant external force acting on all colloids. The initial configuration is equilibrated in the absence of flow and then the external force is switched on instantaneously. Upon starting the flow, we observe four different scenarios: a complete blockade, a monotonic decay to a constant particle flux (typical for a fluid), a damped oscillatory behaviour in the particle flux, and a long-lived stop-and-go behaviour in the flow (typical for a solid). The dynamical density functional theory describes all four situations but predicts infinitely long undamped oscillations in the flow which are always damped in the simulations. We attribute the mechanisms of the underlying stop-and-go flow to symmetry conditions on the flowing solid. Our predictions are verifiable in real-space experiments on magnetic colloidal monolayers which are driven through structured microchannels and can be exploited to steer the flow throughput in microfluidics.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 ºC to perhaps 1000 ºC. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made.

  7. Study of ebullated bed fluid dynamics. Final progress report, September 1980-July 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R.J.; Rundell, D.N.; Shou, J.K.

    1983-07-01

    The fluid dynamics occurring in HRI's H-coal process development unit coal liquefaction reactor during Run PDU-10 were measured and compared with Amoco Oil cold-flow fluidization results. It was found that catalyst bed expansions and gas holdups are higher in the PDU than those observed in the cold-flow tests for slurries having the same nominal viscosity. Comparison of PDU results with cold-flow results shows that the bulk of the operating reactor gas flow lies in the ideal bubbly regime. It also appears that the gas bubbles in these PDU tests are rising quite slowly. Only two of the operating points in our test program on the PDU were found to lie in the churn turbulent regime. Existence of churn turbulent behavior during these two experiments is consistent with trends observed in earlier cold-flow experiments. Two- and three-phase fluidization experiments were carried out in Amoco's cold-flow fluid dynamics unit. The data base now includes fluidization results for coal char/kerosene slurry concentrations of 4.0, 9.8, and 20.7 vol% in addition to the 15.5 and 17.8 vol% data from our earlier work. Both HDS-2A and Amocat-1A catalysts were used in the tests. Bed expansion is primarily a function of slurry velocity, with gas velocity having only a weak effect. Bed contractions have been observed in some cases at sufficiently high gas velocity. Gas and liquid holdups were found to be uniform across the cross-section of the Amoco cold-flow fluid dynamics pilot plant. A viscometer was adapted for measurement of the viscosity of coal slurries at high temperature and pressure. Based on experiments carried out in the Amoco cold-flow unit, a significant degree of backmixing was found to occur in the H-Coal system. 70 references, 93 figures, 32 tables.

  8. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  9. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P.; Ermak, Donald

    2006-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

  10. Application of biological design criteria and computational fluid dynamics to investigate fish survival in Kaplan turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Laura A.; Fisher, Jr., Richard K.; Sale, Michael J.; Cada, Glenn

    2002-07-01

    One of the contributing factors to fish injury in a turbine environment is shear stress. This paper presents the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to display and quantify areas of elevated shear stress in the Wanapum Kaplan turbine operating at four different flow conditions over its operating range. CFD observations will be compared to field test observations at the same four flow conditions. Methods developed here could be used to facilitate the design of turbines and related water passages with lower risks of fish injury.

  11. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST, 1999); P. 11811192, 10 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Azimuthal variation in P-wave signatures due to fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    the overburden using vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) (Horne and MacBeth, 1997) and in the labora- Published for attenuation in the upper crust at seismic frequencies is intracrack fluid flow. In cracked media period of the workshop on Azimuthal Variations in Seismic Signature (held in conjunction with the 1997

  12. Erosion Evaluation of a Slurry Mixer Tank with Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S

    2006-03-22

    This paper discusses the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to understand and characterize erosion of the floor and internal structures in the slurry mixing vessels in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. An initial literature survey helped identify the principal drivers of erosion for a solids laden fluid: the solids content of the working fluid, the regions of recirculation and particle impact with the walls, and the regions of high wall shear. A series of CFD analyses was performed to characterize slurry-flow profiles, wall shear, and particle impingement distributions in key components such as coil restraints and the vessel floor. The calculations showed that the primary locations of high erosion resulting from abrasion were at the leading edge of the coil guide, the tank floor below the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. These modeling results based on the calculated high shear regions were in excellent agreement with the observed erosion sites in both location and the degree of erosion. Loss of the leading edge of the coil guide due to the erosion damage during the slurry mixing operation did not affect the erosion patterns on the tank floor. Calculations for a lower impeller speed showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses.

  13. A covariant action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics: From formalism to fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Andersson; G. L. Comer

    2015-05-18

    We present a new variational framework for dissipative general relativistic fluid dynamics. The model extends the convective variational principle for multi-fluid systems to account for a range of dissipation channels. The key ingredients in the construction are i) the use of a lower dimensional matter space for each fluid component, and ii) an extended functional dependence for the associated volume forms. In an effort to make the concepts clear, the formalism is developed in steps with the model example of matter coupled to heat considered at each level. Thus we discuss a model for heat flow, derive the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations and discuss why the individual dissipative stress tensors need not be spacetime symmetric. We argue that the new formalism, which notably does not involve an expansion away from an assumed equilibrium state, provides a conceptual breakthrough in this area of research and provide an ambitious list of directions in which one may want to extend it in the future. This involves an exciting set of problems, relating to both applications and foundational issues.

  14. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  15. The fluid dynamics of a miniature dilution tunnel for internal-combustion engine aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kommer, Eric M.; Puzinauskas, Paulius V.; Buckley, Steven G.

    2007-11-15

    This paper investigates the fluid dynamics of a particular mini-dilution tunnel using LDV, flow visualization, a tracer sample technique and CFD. The mini-dilution tunnel studied had a 3.175 mm inside diameter tube discharging on the centerline of the tunnel where the diameter increases in a single step to 7.62 cm. The large diameter portion of the tunnel was 75 cm long. Most of the testing was performed at a flow rate of 15 l/min. The experimental investigation indicates that the flow field in the particular dilution tunnel tested has a persistent jet throughout its length, and this confined jet creates eddy recirculation zones which may cause the temperature and dilution histories of particles trapped in these eddies to be significantly different than particles which remain in the jet until extracted by the sample probe. Similarly, the location of the sample probe could also affect measured size distribution profiles, particularly if it were moved in or out of the path of the persistent jet. In addition to the simple tunnel geometry with a single abrupt expansion, a conical diffuser and a perforated plate were separately tested to investigate their effects on the tunnel fluid dynamics. The particular diffuser tested appeared to cause the jet to stall and therefore led to an even more unpredictable path for the fluid within. Limited testing with the perforated plate indicated that it increased the jet deceleration and laminarization, and therefore could lead to a more predictable flow path for aerosol sampled from the tunnel. (author)

  16. Transient Temperature Modeling For Wellbore Fluid Under Static and Dynamic Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Muhammad

    2014-04-22

    for geothermal wells and prediction of injection fluid temperatures. In this thesis, development and usage of three models for transient fluid temperature are presented. Two models predict transient temperature of flowing fluid under separate flow configurations...

  17. The Dynamics of Fluid Flow and Associated Chemical Fluxes at Active Continental Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan A

    2007-01-01

    mixture of fluids introduced during drilling and in situfluid and sediment Ba concentrations from Ocean Drillingof drilling indicators (IR imagery and pore fluid chemical

  18. The Dynamics of fluid flow and associated chemical fluxes at active continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan Alan

    2007-01-01

    mixture of fluids introduced during drilling and in situfluid and sediment Ba concentrations from Ocean Drillingof drilling indicators (IR imagery and pore fluid chemical

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  20. Binary-Fluid Turbulence: Signatures of Multifractal Droplet Dynamics and Dissipation Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Nairita; Gupta, Anupam; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    We present an extensive direct numerical simulation of statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in two-dimensional, binary-fluid mixtures with air-drag-induced friction by using the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations. We choose parameters, e.g., the surface tension, such that we have a droplet of the minority phase moving inside a turbulent background of the majority phase. We characterize the deformation of the droplet and show that it displays multifractal dynamics. The probability distribution functions of the components of the acceleration of the center of mass of the droplet exhibit wide, non-Gaussian tails. Our study reveals that the droplet enhances the energy spectrum $E(k)$ when the wavenumber $k$ is large; this enhancement leads to dissipation reduction.

  1. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  2. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  3. A numerical study of longtime dynamics and ergodic-nonergodic transitions in dense simple fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David D. McCowan

    2014-11-04

    For over 30 years, mode-coupling theory (MCT) has been the de facto theoretic description of dense fluids and the liquid-glass transition. MCT, however, is limited by its ad hoc construction and lacks a mechanism to institute corrections. We use recent results from a new theoretical framework--developed from first principles via a self-consistent perturbation expansion in terms of an effective two-body potential--to numerically explore the kinetics of systems of classical particles, specifically hard spheres obeying Smoluchowski dynamics. We present here a full solution to the kinetic equation governing the density-density time correlation function and show that the function exhibits the characteristic two-step decay of supercooled fluids and an ergodic-nonergodic transition to a dynamically-arrested state. Unlike many previous numerical studies and experiments, we have access to the full time and wavenumber range of the correlation function and can track the solution unprecedentedly close to the transition, covering nearly 15 decades of time. Using asymptotic approximation techniques developed for MCT, we fit the solution to predicted forms and extract critical parameters. Our solution shows a transition at packing fraction $\\eta^*=0.60149761(10)$--consistent with previous static solutions under this theory and with comparable colloidal suspension experiments--and the behavior in the $\\beta$-relaxation regime is fit to power-law decays with critical exponents $a=0.375(3)$ and $b=0.8887(4)$, and with $\\lambda=0.5587(18)$. For the $\\alpha$-relaxation of the ergodic phase, we find a power-law divergence of the time scale $\\tau_{\\alpha}$ as we approach the transition. Through these results, we establish that this new theory is able to reproduce the salient features of MCT, but has the advantages of a first principles derivation and a clear mechanism for making systematic improvements.

  4. Fluid Dynamics Research 40 (2008) 3444 A mixer design for the pigtail braid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2008-01-01

    , 2002) that even laminar fluid flows can stir a fluid effectively, provided that the Lagrangian particle baffles may be replaced by flow structures (such as periodic islands). © 2006 The Japan Society of Fluid Mechanics and Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Chaotic advection; Braid; Stokes flow; Fluid

  5. Dynamic fluid kinetic (DyFK) simulation of auroral ion transport: Synergistic effects of parallel potentials, transverse ion heating, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    by the soft electron precipitation to topside altitudes, where the wave-driven transverse ion heating pumps transport, wave heating, hybrid simulation Citation: Wu, X.-Y., J. L. Horwitz, and J.-N. Tu, Dynamic fluid potentials, transverse ion heating, and soft electron precipitation X.-Y. Wu, J. L. Horwitz, and J.-N. Tu

  6. Typeset with jpsj2.cls Full Paper Dynamics of Phase Separation in Confined Two-component Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sano, Masaki

    Typeset with jpsj2.cls Full Paper Dynamics of Phase Separation in Confined Two by the bending energy with small surface tension.1) The resulting fluid-like in-plane order with its high calculations of the bending and curvature rigidities of a bilayer membrane in copolymer-homopolymer mixture

  7. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

  8. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. D. Nichols; C. Müller; G. A. Necker; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; K. L. Lam; P. Royl; T. L. Wilson

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK.

  9. GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS-I OC512/AS509 2011 P.Rhines LECTUREs 20-28 (weeks 8-10) Ekman Layer dynamics, overturning circulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , of molecules in an ideal gas (more exactly, KE of molecules= 3/2 kT, k being Boltzmann's constant: these are not individual eddies. The entire surface is rotating. A drogue placed anywhere in the region would have the same

  10. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  11. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  12. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  13. Fluid Dynamic Aspects of the Porous Wetted Wall Protection Scheme for Inertial Fusion Energy Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.; Abdelall, F.; Juric, D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.; Sadowski, D. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-05-15

    A numerical and experimental investigation has been conducted to analyze the fluid dynamic aspects of the porous wetted wall protection scheme for inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls. A level contour reconstruction method has been used to track the three-dimensional evolution of the liquid film surface on porous downward-facing walls with different initial film thickness, liquid injection velocity through the porous wall, surface disturbance amplitude, configuration and mode number, liquid properties, and surface inclination angle. Generalized charts for the computed droplet detachment time, detached droplet equivalent diameter, and minimum film thickness during the transient for various design parameters and coolant properties are presented.In order to validate the numerical results over a wide range of parameters, an experimental test facility has been designed and constructed to simulate the hydrodynamics of downward-facing porous wetted walls. Nondimensionalization of the model shows that water can be adequately used as a simulant to validate the numerical results. Preliminary experimental results show good agreement with model predictions. The results of this investigation should allow designers of conceptual IFE reactors to identify appropriate 'windows' for successful operation of the porous wetted wall protection concept for different coolants.

  14. Simulation of spray drying in superheated steam using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frydman, A.; Vasseur, J.; Ducept, F.; Sionneau, M.; Moureh, J.

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation and experimental validation of a spray dryer using superheated steam instead of air as drying medium, modeled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The model describes momentum, heat and mass transfer between two phases--a discrete phase of droplets, and a continuous gas phase--through a finite volume method. For the simulation, droplet size distribution is represented by 6 discrete classes of diameter, fitting to the experimental distribution injected from the nozzle orifice, taking into account their peculiar shrinkage during drying. This model is able to predict the most important features of the dryer: fields of gas temperature and gas velocity inside the chamber, droplets trajectories and eventual deposits on to the wall. The results of simulation are compared to a pilot scale dryer, using water. In the absence of risk of power ignition in steam, the authors have tested rather high steam inlet temperature (973K), thus obtaining a high volumic efficiency. The model is validated by comparison between experimental and predicted values of temperature inside the chamber, verifying the coupling between the 3 different types of transfer without adjustment. This type of model can be used for chamber design, or scale up. Using superheated steam instead of air in a spray dryer can allow a high volumic evaporation rate (20 k.h.m{sup 3}), high energy recovery and better environment control.

  15. Marine Geophysics: A Navy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shor, Elizabeth N; Ebrahimi, Carolyn L

    1987-01-01

    electrical polarization. Geophysics 22:660-687. Vacquier,Raitt, R. W. 1964. Geophysics of the South Pacific.Research in Geophysics 2:223-241. Francis, T. J. G. , and R.

  16. GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook - 1 · Geology & Geophysics Core Values - 2 · A Message from the Graduate Advisor - 3 · Department Organizations - 60 · Departmental Executive Committee - 61 · Geology& Geophysics Development Advisory Council

  17. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONSite Characterization Geophysics SELF-POTENTIAL Referencesand Environmental Geophysics, S. H. Ward, ed. (Soc. Expl.

  18. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin to dominate. Beyond this threshold, higher heat fluxes lead to the boiling crisis and eventual burnout. This predictive capability is essential in determining the critical heat flux margin for the design of complex 3d components.

  19. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy production may be neglected entirely, and for one IOP, buoyancy production contributes approximately 25% of the total TKE at this location. For both nighttime releases, the contribution of buoyancy to the total TKE budget is always negligible though positive. Results from the simulations provide estimates of the average TKE values in the upwind, downtown, downtown shadow, and urban wake zones of the computational domain. These values suggest that building-induced turbulence can cause the average turbulence intensity in the urban area to increase by as much as much as seven times average 'upwind' values, explaining the minimal role of buoyant forcing in the downtown region. The downtown shadow exhibits an exponential decay in average TKE, while the distant downwind wake region approaches the average upwind values. For long-duration releases in downtown and downtown shadow areas, the assumption of neutral stability is valid because building-induced turbulence dominates the budget. However, further downwind in the urban wake region, which we find to be approximately 1500 m beyond the perimeter of downtown Oklahoma City, the levels of building-induced turbulence greatly subside, and therefore the assumption of neutral stability is less valid.

  20. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Soultz Boreholes The Soultz project is a geothermal Hot-Dry-geothermal field, 56 wells, including slim holes and production boreholes,of boreholes and cross-sections. The geothermal fluid flow

  1. Characterization of Filter Cake Buildup and Cleanup under Dynamic Fluid Loss Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yango, Takwe

    2011-10-21

    . The fracturing fluid gets dehydrated under pressure leaving behind a highly concentrated unbroken residue called filter cake which causes permeability impairment in the proppant pack, resulting in low fracture conductivity and decreased effective fracture length...

  2. Fluids migration and dynamics of a blocks-and-faults system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-70-11

    Keywords: earthquake catalog, block model, fault, tectonic structure, fluid, fil- ...... nal vertical fault near upper vertices of adjacent internal blocks, and formation of ... acts near the right external vertical fault: fractures filled in with water emerge ...

  3. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  4. validation and Enhancement of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer Predictive Capabilities for Generation IV Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert E. Spall; Barton Smith; Thomas Hauser

    2008-12-08

    Nationwide, the demand for electricity due to population and industrial growth is on the rise. However, climate change and air quality issues raise serious questions about the wisdom of addressing these shortages through the construction of additional fossil fueled power plants. In 1997, the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology Energy Research and Development Panel determined that restoring a viable nuclear energy option was essential and that the DOE should implement a R&D effort to address principal obstacles to achieving this option. This work has addressed the need for improved thermal/fluid analysis capabilities, through the use of computational fluid dynamics, which are necessary to support the design of generation IV gas-cooled and supercritical water reactors.

  5. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale Professor variations in the fluid and solid matrix properties, fine layering, frac- tures and craks at the mesoscale

  6. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between solvophilic and solvophobic walls: templating, molding and superdiffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Leoni; Giancarlo Franzese

    2014-06-08

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a general anomalous liquid, suitable for globular proteins, colloids or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect of a solvophilic structured and a solvophobic unstructured wall on the phases, the crystal nucleation and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the solvophilic wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer ("tempting" effect). In turn, the first layer induces a "molding" effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range effect thanks to a sequence of templating, molding and templating effects through the layers. We find dynamical slowing down of the solvent near the solvophilic wall but with largely heterogeneous dynamics near the wall due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of solvent. Hence, the partial freezing of the first hydration layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel section in terms of transport properties.

  7. A Fluid Dynamics Approach to Multi-Robot Chemical Plume Tracing Dimitri Zarzhitsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    computational fluid dy- namics (CFD) grid for calculating derivatives of flow-field variables, such as wind the conservation of mass, New- ton's Second Law, and conservation of energy [1]. For real- istic flows of interest. Our algorithm takes advantage of the lattice formations formed by our robotic agents to simulate

  8. Enhancement in the dynamic response of a viscoelastic fluid flowing through a longitudinally vibrating tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beresnev, Igor

    of oil reservoirs 2 . For example, it is known that natural pressure in an oil reservoir generally yields naturally low mobility, and the enhanced oil recovery operations are used to increase pro- duction of a Maxwell fluid in a tube, which oscillates longitudinally and is subject to an oscillatory pressure

  9. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  10. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 11 (Geophysics) On Original Copies Dr. Terence K. Young Professor and Head Department of Geophysics Approved

  11. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    to the atmosphere at patm For the Figure, with gravity g and densities g and l for gas and liquid: pC = g·h1·g + pB pD = l·h2·g + pC = l·h2·g + g·h1·g + pB and also, from the other side pD = l·(h3+h2)·g + pF = l·(h3°C after Torricelli: 1 torr = 1 mm Hg pressure 1 atm = 760 torr at 0°C A device for measuring

  12. Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry

  13. User's manual for PELE3D: a computer code for three-dimensional incompressible fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMaster, W H

    1982-05-07

    The PELE3D code is a three-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics computer program for the solution of incompressible fluid flow coupled to a structure. The fluid and coupling algorithms have been adapted from the previously developed two-dimensional code PELE-IC. The PELE3D code is written in both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is general enough to handle a variety of structural shapes. The free surface algorithm is able to accommodate a top surface and several independent bubbles. The code is in a developmental status since all the intended options have not been fully implemented and tested. Development of this code ended in 1980 upon termination of the contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  14. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  15. 2, 637671, 2005 Geophysics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor brines S. B. Joye et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Geophysical and geochemical signatures under a Creative Commons License. 637 #12;BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor

  16. Stokesian dynamic simulations and analyses of interfacial and bulk colloidal fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anekal, Samartha Guha

    2006-10-30

    , and hydrodynamic forces to model dynamics of colloidal dispersions. In addition, we develop theoretical expressions for quantifying self-diffusion in colloids interacting via different particle-particle and particle-wall potentials. Specifically, we have used...

  17. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (“templating” effect). In turn, the first layer induces a “molding” effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  18. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study microbial and geochemical phenomena.

  19. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., R-2, Ent. Block, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  20. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-? equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-? approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  1. Relaxation dynamics in a transient network fluid with competing gel and glass phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinaki Chaudhuri; Pablo I. Hurtado; Ludovic Berthier; Walter Kob

    2015-02-01

    We use computer simulations to study the relaxation dynamics of a model for oil-in-water microemulsion droplets linked with telechelic polymers. This system exhibits both gel and glass phases and we show that the competition between these two arrest mechanisms can result in a complex, three-step decay of the time correlation functions, controlled by two different localization lengthscales. For certain combinations of the parameters, this competition gives rise to an anomalous logarithmic decay of the correlation functions and a subdiffusive particle motion, which can be understood as a simple crossover effect between the two relaxation processes. We establish a simple criterion for this logarithmic decay to be observed. We also find a further logarithmically slow relaxation related to the relaxation of floppy clusters of particles in a crowded environment, in agreement with recent findings in other models for dense chemical gels. Finally, we characterize how the competition of gel and glass arrest mechanisms affects the dynamical heterogeneities and show that for certain combination of parameters these heterogeneities can be unusually large. By measuring the four-point dynamical susceptibility, we probe the cooperativity of the motion and find that with increasing coupling this cooperativity shows a maximum before it decreases again, indicating the change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics. Our results suggest that compressing gels to large densities produces novel arrested phases that have a new and complex dynamics.

  2. Joint Master Applied Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    , engineering geophysics Year 2, October to February: RWTH Aachen Univer- sity Geothermics, petrophysics, borehole logging Year 2, March to August: Master thesis at one of the three universities or other approved is in geothermal exploration and basin modelling Aachen is situated on the rim of the wooded Eifel and Hautes

  3. ESTIMATING UNCERTAINTIES FOR GEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    to directly measure the amount of oil in an area is to drill several wells, but drilling is a very expensive. These techniques are applied to the inversion of traveltime data collected in a cross well seismic experiment procedure, and the whole idea of geophysics is to predict the amount of oil without drilling in all possible

  4. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I 13 ii 2004 P.B. Rhines NOTES ON THERMODYNAMICS -1 (with corrections, 15 ii 04 and added equation of state notes)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of variables. The usual form is a relation between internal thermal energy change, heat input and work done (pressure x volume change): ' 1/E q p v v = - where E is internal thermal energy, is a small change. We variable that plays the role of `heat'. For slowing changing thermal processes, entropy, defined as 'Q

  5. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics-1 Winter 2011 OC 512/ ATM 509 lectures: MWF 10.30-11.20; 205 Ocean Teaching Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of state momentum balance Earth's rotation: angular momentum, Coriolis force, geopotential energy equations number; potential and kinetic energy synoptic quasi-geostrophic equations flow over mountains and weaker yet important meridional overturning circulation; stably stratified conservation principles solar

  6. A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alter the climate in fundamental ways. History of Study Modern aerosol science finds its root in the so at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England, at the turn of the 20th century. Aerosol science started of the classified Manhattan Project formed the basis of the field's first handbook. In the few decades that followed

  7. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, J.S.; Gross, E.A.; Joyner, D.R.; Godo, M.N.; Morgan, K.T. (Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann Method for Geophysical Plastic Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardi, Alessandro; Mendoza, Miller; Herrmann, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    We explore possible applications of the Lattice-Boltzmann Method for the simulation of geophysical flows. This fluid solver, while successful in other fields, is still rarely used for geotechnical applications. We show how the standard method can be modified to represent free-surface realization of mudflows, debris flows, and in general any plastic flow, through the implementation of a Bingham constitutive model. The chapter is completed by an example of a full-scale simulation of a plastic fluid flowing down an inclined channel and depositing on a flat surface. An application is given, where the fluid interacts with a vertical obstacle in the channel.

  9. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    Sciences, Loughborough University) 8 th Feb. Quantifying Solute Mixing and Transport Mechanims Prof. Ian

  10. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    Sciences, Loughborough University) 8th Feb. Quantifying Solute Mixing and Transport Mechanims Prof. Ian

  11. Advanced Fluid Dynamics 2014 Sheet 5 Stokes flow around spherical particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    with no body force, where µ denotes the dynamic viscosity. Show that the stress tensor is given by ij = -2µ Ak xk ij + 2µ 2 xixj + xk 2 Ak xixj . (2) (b) Now consider the flow past a stationary sphere of radius the drag on the particle. 2. (a) Axisymmetric flow may be expressed in terms of spherical polar coordinates

  12. Large-scale MR fluid dampers: modeling, and dynamic performance considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    , University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA b Lord Corporation, 110 Lord Drive, Cary, NC 27511, USA c of its mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity an attractive means of protecting civil infrastructure systems against severe earthquake and wind loading

  13. Submitted to 43rd AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit, 24-27 June 2013, San Diego, California Multi-Objective Design Optimization of a Transonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng

    -objective design optimization of a transonic compressor rotor blade row. The adjoint method requires about twice single-objective design optimizations. Firstly a set of blades with different gains of total pressure Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), many research papers on design optimization of com- pressor blades have been

  14. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 10 (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date May 15, 2006 Signed: on original copy Jeongmin Lee Signed: on original

  15. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: September fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date

  16. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date: April 14, 2005 Signed

  17. Exploring the effect of fluid dynamics and kinetic mechanisms on n-heptane autoignition in transient jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viggiano, Annarita [Department of Environmental Engineering and Physics, University of Basilicata, viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The influence of physical parameters and of flow patterns on the prediction of n-heptane ignition dynamic in transient reacting n-heptane jets, in high pressure environment under laminar conditions, has been explored by using different kinetic mechanisms. Some preliminary transient laminar flamelet computations have been performed, thus showing that the sensitivity of the ignition time to strain rate depends on the kinetic mechanism used. Therefore, the structure of the reacting jet, in particular the localization of ignition spots, is investigated. The results show that, if the initial temperature of the reacting mixture is out of the intermediate range (800-1000 K) towards lower values, the fluid dynamics has an essential role. In this case, the ignition delay time is almost insensitive to the specific kinetic mechanism adopted, conversely it is severely shortened by increasing the streamwise velocity. The burning spot is located in the core of fuel roll-up, where low values of scalar dissipation rate occur. Nevertheless, the most reactive mixture fraction conditions are well predicted by chemical kinetics, as they are in good agreement with those computed for the one-dimensional diffusion layer. When the initial temperature of fuel and air is increased in the intermediate range, ignition is strongly dependent on the kinetic mechanism used. In these cases, the choice of an accurate chemical scheme is fundamental in order to obtain reliable results. (author)

  18. The potential energy landscape and inherent dynamics of a hard-sphere fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qingqing Ma; Richard M. Stratt

    2014-08-13

    Hard-sphere models exhibit many of the same kinds of supercooled-liquid behavior as more realistic models of liquids, but the highly non-analytic character of their potentials makes it a challenge to think of that behavior in potential-energy-landscape terms. We show here that it is possible to calculate an important topological property of hard-sphere landscapes, the geodesic pathways through those landscapes, and to do so without artificially coarse-graining or softening the potential. We show, moreover, that the rapid growth of the lengths of those pathways with increasing packing fraction quantitatively predicts the precipitous decline in diffusion constants in a glass-forming hard-sphere mixture model. The geodesic paths themselves can be considered as defining the intrinsic dynamics of hard spheres, so it is also revealing to find that they (and therefore the features of the underlying potential-energy landscape) correctly predict the occurrence of dynamic heterogeneity and non-zero values of the non-Gaussian parameter. The success of these landscape predictions for the dynamics of such a singular model emphasizes that there is more to potential energy landscapes than is revealed by looking at the minima and saddle points.

  19. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 96, NO. C8, PAGES 14,885-14,907, AUGUST 15, 1991 Structure and Dynamics of a Coastal Filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    and Dynamics of a Coastal Filament RICHARD K. DEWEY, 1JAMESN. MOUM, CLAYTON A. PAULSON, DOUGLASR. CALDWELL transects across filaments in the coastal transition zone (CTZ) have

  20. Dynamical Instability of Laminar Axisymmetric Flow of Perfect Fluid with Stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Zhuravlev; N. I. Shakura

    2007-09-12

    The instability of non-homoentropic axisymmetric flow of perfect fluid with respect to non-axisymmetric infinitesimal perturbations was investigated by numerical integration of hydrodynamical differential equations in two-dimensional approximation. The non-trivial influence of entropy gradient on unstable sound and surface gravity waves was revealed. In particular, both decrease and growth of entropy against the direction of effective gravitational acceleration $g_{eff}$ give rise to growing surface gravity modes which are stable with the same parameters in the case of homoentropic flow. At the same time increment of sound modes either grows monotonically while the rate of entropy decrease against $g_{eff}$ gets higher or vanishes at some values of positive and negative entropy gradient in the basic flow. The calculations have showed also that growing internal gravity modes appear only in the flow unstable to axisymmetric perturbations. At last, the analysis of boundary problem with free boundaries uncovered that's incorrect to set the entropy distribution according to polytropic law with polytropic index different from adiabatic value, since in this case perturbations don't satisfy the free boundary conditions.

  1. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01

    duckling of environmental geophysics, Leading Edge, 21(5),Pure and Applied Geophysics, 157, 357-382. Pinder, G.F. ,sulfide self-potentials, Geophysics, 25, 226–249. Sauck, W.

  2. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  3. Comparing the first and second order theories of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics using the 1+1 dimensional relativistic flux corrected transport algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etele Molnar

    2009-02-15

    Focusing on the numerical aspects and accuracy we study a class of bulk viscosity driven expansion scenarios using the relativistic Navier-Stokes and truncated Israel-Stewart form of the equations of relativistic dissipative fluids in 1+1 dimensions. The numerical calculations of conservation and transport equations are performed using the numerical framework of flux corrected transport. We show that the results of the Israel-Stewart causal fluid dynamics are numerically much more stable and smoother than the results of the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Dispersion of White Oak Creek Contaminants in the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platfoot, J.H.; Wendel, M.W.; Williams, P.T.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the simulation of the dispersion and dilution of dissolved or finely suspended contaminants entering the Clinch river from White Oak Creek. The work is accomplished through the application of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. This study assumes that contaminants originating in the White Oak Creed watershed, which drains Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will eventually reach the mouth of White Oak Creek and be discharged into the clinch River. The numerical model was developed to support the analysis of the off-site consequences of releases from the ORNL liquid low-level waste system. The system contains storage tanks and transfer lines in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley. Under certain failure modes, liquid low-level waste could be released to White Oak Creek or Melton Branch to White Oak Creek and eventually be discharged to the Clinch River. Since the Clinch River has unrestricted access by the public and water usage from the Clinch River is not controlled by the Department of Energy, such a liquid low-level waste spill would create the possibility of public exposure to the contaminant. This study is limited to the dispersion of the contaminants downstream of the confluence of White Oak Creek.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of chemical looping combustion process with calcium sulphate oxygen carrier - article no. A19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhongyi Deng; Qilei Song [Southeast University (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2009-07-01

    To concentrate CO{sub 2} in combustion processes by efficient and energy-saving ways is a first and very important step for its sequestration. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) could easily achieve this goal. A chemical-looping combustion system consists of a fuel reactor and an air reactor. Two reactors in the form of interconnected fluidized beds are used in the process: (1) a fuel reactor where the oxygen carrier is reduced by reaction with the fuel, and (2) an air reactor where the reduced oxygen carrier from the fuel reactor is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the outlet gas stream from the air reactor contains only N{sub 2} and some unused O{sub 2}. The water in combustion products can be easily removed by condensation and pure carbon dioxide is obtained without any loss of energy for separation. Until now, there is little literature about mathematical modeling of chemical-looping combustion using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. In this work, the reaction kinetic model of the fuel reactor (CaSO{sub 4}+ H{sub 2}) is developed by means of the commercial code FLUENT and the effects of partial pressure of H{sub 2} (concentration of H{sub 2}) on chemical looping combustion performance are also studied. The results show that the concentration of H{sub 2} could enhance the CLC performance.

  6. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  7. Static and dynamic properties of a particle-based algorithm for non-ideal fluids and binary mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Ihle; Erkan Tuzel

    2006-10-12

    A recently introduced particle-based model for fluid dynamics with effective excluded volume interactions is analyzed in detail. The interactions are modeled by means of stochastic multiparticle collisions which are biased and depend on local velocities and densities. Momentum and energy are exactly conserved locally. The isotropy and relaxation to equilibrium are analyzed and measured. It is shown how a discrete-time projection operator technique can be used to obtain Green-Kubo relations for the transport coefficients. Because of a large viscosity no long-time tails in the velocity auto-correlation and stress correlation functions were seen. Strongly reduced self-diffusion due to caging and an order/disorder transition is found at high collision frequency, where clouds consisting of at least four particles form a cubic phase. These structures were analyzed by measuring the pair-correlation function above and below the transition. Finally, the algorithm is extended to binary mixtures which phase-separate above a critical collision rate.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  9. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2014-2015 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated January 2015 #12;INTRODUCTION 1 Geology OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS _ 2 Who We Are _ 2 Where To Get Help _ 2 POLICIES, PROCEDURES & REQUIREMENTS 3

  10. Estimation of dynamic petrophysical properties of water-bearing sands invaded with oil-base mud from multi-physics borehole geophysical measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Estimation of dynamic petrophysical properties of water-bearing sands invaded with oil-base mud, capillary pressure, and relative permeability of water-bearing sands invaded with oil-base mud (OBM) from-saturated sands are used for calibration of equivalent properties in hydrocarbon-bearing sands within the same

  11. Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study fluid flow in fractures using numerical simulation and address the challenging issue of hydraulic property characterization in fractures. The methodology is based on Computational Fluid Dynamics, ...

  12. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  13. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Alisa Marie Green #12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: November 06, 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li

  14. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Dongjie Cheng #12;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: December 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li (GP

  15. Open Journal of Fluid Dynamics, 2012, 2, 35-43 doi:10.4236/ojfd.2012.22004 Published Online June 2012 (http://www.SciRP.org/journal/ojfd)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Open Journal of Fluid Dynamics, 2012, 2, 35-43 doi:10.4236/ojfd.2012.22004 Published Online June; accepted May 25, 2012 ABSTRACT In many applications, a moving fluid carries a suspension of droplets of a second phase which may change in size due to evaporation or condensation. Examples include liquid fuel

  16. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Shape dynamics and scaling laws for a body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dissolving in fluid flow Jinzi Mac Huang1, M. Nicholas J. Moore1,2, Leif Ristroph1 1 Applied Math Lab November 2014) While fluid flows are known to promote dissolution of materials, such processes are poorly problem through experiments in which hard candy bodies dissolve in laminar, high-speed water flows. We

  17. APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE STORAGE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    letal Ore Deposits, 11 in Geophysics and Geochemistry in the11 Applications of Borehole Geophysics to Water-ResourcesAPPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE

  18. Lunar geophysics: The Moon's fundamental shape and paleomagnetism studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Viranga

    2014-01-01

    Tectonics.   Reviews  of  Geophysics  and  Space   Physics  SANTA CRUZ Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental shapeViranga Perera Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental

  19. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Pore pressure evolution in deforming granular1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Pore pressure evolution in deforming. Often deformation of the granular network leads to pore fluid8 pressure (PP) changes. If the PP rises coupling6 between two deforming phases: the solid granular network and the fluid-filled7 pore network

  20. The Effects of Fluid Flow On Shear Localization and Frictional Strength From Dynamic Models Of Fault Gouge During Earthquakes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianco, Ronald

    2013-12-02

    have an increased localization toward the boundaries of the gouge layer (type III), and no occurrence of distributed (type I) shear. Systems with lower N and k show liquefaction events. Liquefaction events originate from increases in fluid pressure...

  1. A Robust Four-Fluid Transient Flow Simulator as an Analysis and Decision Making Tool for Dynamic Kill Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghshenas, Arash

    2013-04-24

    The worst scenario of drilling operation is blowout which is uncontrolled flow of formation fluid into the wellbore. Blowouts result in environmental damage with potential risk of injuries and fatalities. Although not all blowouts result in disaster...

  2. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08

    concentrations under reservoirs conditions. The result of this study provides the basis to optimize the fracturing fluids and the polymer loading at different reservoir conditions, which may result in a clean and conductive fracture. Success in improving...

  3. USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    (GPR) geophysical methods have been used to study mine dumps. METHODS Resistivity measurements, at the same time as an infiltration test was carried out in order to map fluid flow within the mine dump out in July 2002, and in October 2002 before and after the infiltration test. Figure 3 shows a GPR

  4. COMPOUNDING EFFECTS OF FLUID CONFINEMENT AND SURFACE STRAIN ON THE WET-DRY TRANSITION AND DYNAMICS OF GRAPHENE-WATER SYSTEMS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. We found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as well as on themore »slowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.« less

  5. COMPOUNDING EFFECTS OF FLUID CONFINEMENT AND SURFACE STRAIN ON THE WET-DRY TRANSITION AND DYNAMICS OF GRAPHENE-WATER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. We found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as well as on the slowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.

  6. ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control Chapter 7: Fluid Systems and Thermal Systems ChapterChapterChapterChapter 7777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Qahtani, Hussain M.

    & Control Chapter 7: Fluid Systems and Thermal Systems 2/9 laminar flow and is characterized by a smooth is compressible. 7.2 MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF LIQUID LEVEL SYSTEMS Steady State Flow Laminar Turbulent D Figure 7.1 (a) Velocity profile for laminar flow Flow dominated by viscosity forces is called Figure 7.1 (b

  7. World Scientific Series Volume 3: Understanding Soft Condensed Matter via Modeling and Computations (November 2010) Drop Dynamics in Complex Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    for polymer solutions -- being stretched and oriented by flow and deformation. In technological applications of the components. Other examples of complex fluid mixtures include thermoplastic foam and oil-water emulsions of the interfaces between the components. With the advent of micro-engineering and nano-technology

  8. A boundary integral method for simulating the dynamics of inextensible vesicles suspended in a viscous fluid in 2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zorin, Denis

    , is the tension, B is the bending modulus, v is the far-field velocity of the bulk fluid, and S is the single hydrodynamic forces with the elastic forces due to bending and tension. Numerical simulations of such vesicle of biological cells. In this paper, our goal is to develop efficient numerical schemes for such flows

  9. J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 135 (2006) 97108 Impact dynamics of a solid sphere falling into a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in wormlike mi- cellar fluids [15] with a sensitive dependence on temperature and concentration [16 effects dominate (i.e. the Reynolds number Re 1), then the drag forces will come into balance with gravity aggregates of surfactant molecules [17]. In this paper we study sphere impact on the free surface

  10. INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY (LANL) FY11, 2010 1. INTRODUCTION The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National of California's Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Its science mission is to promote

  11. 2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Search Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2010), Title: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States AU: Ragunathan, S EM: srivatta@gi.alaska.edu AF: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United

  12. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  13. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. II. Confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-07-14

    In this work, a new classical density functional theory is developed for group-contribution equations of state (EOS). Details of implementation are demonstrated for the recently-developed SAFT-? WCA EOS and selective applications are studied for confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces. The acronym WCA (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) refers to the characterization of the reference part of the third-order thermodynamic perturbation theory applied in formulating the EOS. SAFT-? refers to the particular form of “statistical associating fluid theory” that is applied to the fused-sphere, heteronuclear, united-atom molecular models of interest. For the monomer term, the modified fundamental measure theory is extended to WCA-spheres. A new chain functional is also introduced for fused and soft heteronuclear chains. The attractive interactions are taken into account by considering the structure of the fluid, thus elevating the theory beyond the mean field approximation. The fluctuations of energy are also included via a non-local third-order perturbation theory. The theory includes resolution of the density profiles of individual groups such as CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} and satisfies stoichiometric constraints for the density profiles. New molecular simulations are conducted to demonstrate the accuracy of each Helmholtz free energy contribution in reproducing the microstructure of inhomogeneous systems at the united-atom level of coarse graining. At each stage, comparisons are made to assess where the present theory stands relative to the current state of the art for studying inhomogeneous fluids. Overall, it is shown that the characteristic features of real molecular fluids are captured both qualitatively and quantitatively. For example, the average pore density deviates ?2% from simulation data for attractive pentadecane in a 2-nm slit pore. Another example is the surface tension of ethane/heptane mixture, which deviates ?1% from simulation data while the theory reproduces the excess accumulation of ethane at the interface.

  14. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01

    a simulant fluid to match the dynamics of fuel pebbles andfuel pebbles through reactor cores with and without coupled fluid

  15. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While still over-parametrized, this choice of model space contains far fewer parameters than before, thus easing the computational burden, in some cases, of the optimization problem. And most importantly, the associated finite element discretization is aligned with the abrupt changes in material properties associated with lithologic boundaries as well as the interface between buried cultural artifacts and the surrounding Earth. In section 4, algorithms and tools are described that associate a smooth interface surface to a given triangulation. In particular, the tools support surface refinement and coarsening. Section 5 describes some preliminary results on the application of interface identification methods to some model problems in geophysical inversion. Due to time constraints, the results described here use the GNU Triangulated Surface Library for the manipulation of surface meshes and the TetGen software library for the generation of tetrahedral meshes.

  16. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  17. 2012 Fellow American Geophysical Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) are critical to the intensity of ocean currents, to long- and short-term climate variations, and the health2012 Fellow American Geophysical Union James Moum, professor in the College of Earth, Ocean contributions to our understanding of ocean mixing in coastal, abyssal and Equatorial regimes using innovative

  18. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  19. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  20. Department of Mathematics and Statistics Colloquium Modeling Geophysical Fluid Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    , caves, sinkholes, fissures, etc. Because of this, water can flow through conduits or pipes in addition

  1. Quantifying the stimuli of photorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Sarah Woodring

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model to predict the dynamics of photorheological fluids and, more generally, photoresponsive fluids for monochromatic and polychromatic light sources. Derived from first principles, the model relates the ...

  2. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  3. An Investigation of Surface and Crown Fire Dynamics in Shrub Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano, Jesse Sandoval

    2011-01-01

    fluid dynamic environment between two adjacent crown fuels andadjacent crown fuel matrices and to study any fluid dynamicbetween crown fuel matrices, and to study any fluid dynamic

  4. Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe An; Daniel Rey; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

    2014-05-11

    Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the analysis of a broad spectrum of complex systems where measurements are sparse. When the model of the complex system has errors, the method still enables accurate estimation of the state of the model and thus evaluation of the model errors in a manner separated from uncertainties in the data assimilation procedure.

  5. Typeset with jpsj2.cls Full Paper Dynamics of Phase Separation in Con ned Two-component Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sano, Masaki

    Typeset with jpsj2.cls Full Paper Dynamics of Phase Separation in Con#12;ned Two are mainly controlled by the bending energy with small surface tension. 1) The resulting uid-like in. For example, the detailed calculations of the bending and curvature rigidities of a bilayer membrane

  6. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    EXPEDITED ITE S CHARACTERIZATION EOPHYSICS G GEOPHYSICALM AND TOOLSFORSITE CHARACTERIZATION NORMAN E. GOLDSTEINExpedited Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS

  7. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION Environment Geophysics Other: GeoEng Earth Science Teaching Anticipated & Geophysics 115 S. 1460 E. Room 383, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0102 Phone 801

  8. Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebker, Howard

    Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 1995-2006 Associate Professor, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University

  9. Towards Real Earth Models --Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Towards Real Earth Models -- Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes? Colin tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Disadvantages, difficulties, challenges. Conclusions. #12;Outline: Geological models! Advantages of unstructured tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics

  10. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhance a student's knowledge by going beyond a standard classroom-based geophysics curriculum, and to encourage qualified students in related fields to consider careers in...

  11. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IGPPS Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures High quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience and...

  12. On the Quantum Aspects of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Darabi

    2004-10-10

    We introduce a simple quantum mechanical justification for the formation of folded mountains. It is very appealing to develop this idea to a theory of {\\it Quantum Geophysics}

  13. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the...

  14. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets. These surveys and the drilling process have been designed to severely limit the impact of the exploration. The geophysics...

  15. Using time-lapse seismics as a reservoir-monitoring tool, geophysics can help distinguish different reservoir pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reservoir pro- duction scenarios. For example, Eiken et al. (2000) success- fully detected fluid-saturation life, oil saturation usually decreases, reservoir pressure declines, and gas breakout may occurUsing time-lapse seismics as a reservoir-monitoring tool, geophysics can help distinguish different

  16. Supersymmetric Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jackiw; A. P. Polychronakos

    2000-07-17

    When anticommuting Grassmann variables are introduced into a fluid dynamical model with irrotational velocity and no vorticity, the velocity acquires a nonvanishing curl and the resultant vorticity is described by Gaussian potentials formed from the Grassmann variables. Upon adding a further specific interaction with the Grassmann degrees of freedom, the model becomes supersymmetric.

  17. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D...

  18. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Borehole geophysics...

  19. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Graduate Admissions 1680 East * Geophysics & Tectonics; Marine & Environmental Geology; Planetary Geosciences; Volcanology, Geochemistry

  20. Single-cell dynamics of mammalian gene regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolnik, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Given the laminar nature of fluid flow on the microscale,laminar flow regime that is characteristic of fluid dynamics

  1. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  2. Study on the effect of the operating condition on a pulverized coal-fired furnace using computational fluid dynamics commercial code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manish Kumar; Santi Gopal Sahu [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Combustion Section, Dhanbad (India)]. man_manna@yahoo.com

    2007-12-15

    Computer models for coal combustion are not sufficiently accurate to enable the design of pulverized coal fired furnaces or the selection of coal based on combustion behavior. Most comprehensive combustion models can predict with reasonable accuracy flow fields and heat transfer but usually with a much lesser degree of accuracy than the combustion of coal particles through char burnout. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is recognized widely to be a cost-effective, advanced tool for optimizing the design and operating condition of the pulverized coal-fired furnaces for achieving cleaner and efficient power generation. Technologists and researchers are paying remarkable attention to CFD because of its value in the pulverized fuel fired furnace technology and its nonintrusiveness, sophistication, and ability to significantly reduce the time and expense involved in the design, optimization, trouble-shooting, and repair of power generation equipment. An attempt to study the effect of one of the operating conditions, i.e., burner tilts on coal combustion mechanisms, furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT), and heat flux distribution pattern, within the furnace has been made in this paper by modeling a 210 MW boiler using commercial CFD code FLUENT. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS Lesparre N., Adler A., Gibert to adapt EIDORS for applications in geophysics. In geophysics, we apply EIT in order to image inner. The spatial resolution of the method in geophysics is of the order of meters and the penetration depth can

  4. Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency with Lab 4 COMPSCI 115 Introduction to C 2 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOPH 300 Physics of the Earth 3 GEOPH 305 Applied Geophysics 3 GEOPH 420 Geophysical Applications

  5. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  6. PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise on the GrIS. A solid background in field geophysics is preferred. The successful applicant will join the CryoGars group and Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface (CGISS) at Boise

  7. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy.dinter@utah.edu, office: 321 FASB, phone 801-581-7937) Faculty Advisor for Geophysics Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof

  8. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    19 800 sismi ues dans les milieux strati?és a deux et trois dimensions: contri ution a la construction et a lime relation des sismo- grammes synthetiques: These

  9. Geophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing RadiationSNACGeographyGeometry

  10. Variability of North Pacific Sea Ice and East AsiaNorth Pacific Winter Climate State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , accompanied by a weakening of the east Asian jet stream and trough. The associated anomalous southeasterlies by a strengthening of the east Asia jet stream and trough. The associated anomalous northerlies intensify the east. The intensified EAWM also strengthens the local Hadley cell, which in turn strengthens the east Asian jet stream

  11. Department of Geology & Geophysics University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geology & Geophysics University of Hawaii THE APPLICATION CHECKLIST SEND THESE ITEMS TO : University of Hawaii Graduate Division Admissions Office 2540 Maile Way, Spalding Hall 354 Honolulu, HI 96822 Original application and fees. http://www.hawaii

  12. Assessing Soil Strength From Geophysical Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Rehan

    2014-04-24

    A study is presented to develop framework for correlating sand strength (friction angle) to geophysical measurements, primarily shear wave and body wave velocities. Triaxial tests accompanied by wave velocity measurements was performed to generate a...

  13. Engineering and environmental geophysics at the millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steeples, Don W.

    2001-01-01

    Near?surface geophysics is being applied to a broader spectrum of problems than ever before, and new application areas are arising continually. Currently, the tools used to examine the near?surface environment include a variety of noninvasive...

  14. Experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of urea-based selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) in a pilot-scale flow reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanh D.B. Nguyen; Young-Il Lim; Seong-Joon Kim; Won-Hyeon Eom; Kyung-Seun Yoo [Hankyong National University, Jungangno (Republic of Korea). Laboratory of Functional Analysis of Complex Systems (FACS)

    2008-11-15

    A turbulent reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model involving a droplet size distribution function in the discrete droplet phase is first built for selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) processes using urea solution as a NOx removal reagent. The model is validated with the experimental data obtained from a pilot-scale urea-based SNCR reactor installed with a 150 kW gas burner. New kinetic parameters of seven chemical reactions for the urea-based NOx reduction are identified and incorporated into the three-dimensional turbulent flow CFD model. The two-phase droplet model with the non-uniform droplet size is also combined with the CFD model to predict the trajectory of the droplets and to examine the mixing between the flue gas and reagents. The maximum NO reduction efficiency of about 80%, experimentally measured at the reactor outlet, is obtained at 940{degree}C and a normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR) = 2.0 under the conditions of 11% excess air and low CO concentration (10-15 ppm). At the reaction temperature of 940{degree}C, the difference of a maximum of 10% between experiments and simulations of the NO reduction percentage is observed for NSR = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The ammonia slip is overestimated in CFD simulation at low temperatures, especially lower than 900{degree}C. However, the CFD simulation results above 900{degree}C show a reasonable agreement with the experimental data of NOx reduction and ammonia slip as a function of the NSR. 31 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. CFD [computational fluid dynamics] And Safety Factors. Computer modeling of complex processes needs old-fashioned experiments to stay in touch with reality.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Poirier, Michael R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Ervin, Robert C.; Giddings, Billy J.; Stefanko, David B.; Harp, Keith D.; Fowley, Mark D.; Van Pelt, William B.

    2012-10-07

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is recognized as a powerful engineering tool. That is, CFD has advanced over the years to the point where it can now give us deep insight into the analysis of very complex processes. There is a danger, though, that an engineer can place too much confidence in a simulation. If a user is not careful, it is easy to believe that if you plug in the numbers, the answer comes out, and you are done. This assumption can lead to significant errors. As we discovered in the course of a study on behalf of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, CFD models fail to capture some of the large variations inherent in complex processes. These variations, or scatter, in experimental data emerge from physical tests and are inadequately captured or expressed by calculated mean values for a process. This anomaly between experiment and theory can lead to serious errors in engineering analysis and design unless a correction factor, or safety factor, is experimentally validated. For this study, blending times for the mixing of salt solutions in large storage tanks were the process of concern under investigation. This study focused on the blending processes needed to mix salt solutions to ensure homogeneity within waste tanks, where homogeneity is required to control radioactivity levels during subsequent processing. Two of the requirements for this task were to determine the minimum number of submerged, centrifugal pumps required to blend the salt mixtures in a full-scale tank in half a day or less, and to recommend reasonable blending times to achieve nearly homogeneous salt mixtures. A full-scale, low-flow pump with a total discharge flow rate of 500 to 800 gpm was recommended with two opposing 2.27-inch diameter nozzles. To make this recommendation, both experimental and CFD modeling were performed. Lab researchers found that, although CFD provided good estimates of an average blending time, experimental blending times varied significantly from the average.

  16. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON FLUID DYNAMICS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Physics By TARUN SHARMA Department of Theoretical Physics Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Homi Bhabha Rd, Mumbai

  18. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the incorporation of absorption is the steady state concentration profile of the absorbed gas species in the bulk liquid phase. The second phase of the model incorporates a simplified macrokinetic model to the mass balance equation in the CMFD code. Initially, the model assumes that the catalyst particles are sufficiently small such that external and internal mass and heat transfer are not rate limiting. The model is developed utilizing the macrokinetic rate expression developed by Yates and Satterfield (1991). Initially, the model assumes that the only species formed other than water in the FT reaction is C27H56. Change in moles of the reacting species and the resulting temperature of the catalyst and fluid phases is solved simultaneously. The macrokinetic model is solved in conjunction with the species transport equations in a separate module which is incorporated into the CMFD code.

  19. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2011-09-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski spacetime become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  20. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Graduate Admissions 1680 East's admissibility into the Graduate Program in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Strongly

  1. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  2. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-09

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon explo- ration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  3. MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS DANIEL SCHERTZER LEESU, Que. H3A 2T8, Canada lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Received The complexity of geophysics has been with anisotropy, which is rather ubiquitous in geophysics. Keywrods: multifractals, generalized scale invariance

  4. Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights Daniel Schertzer Department, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Uncertainty and error growth are crosscutting geophysical extremes. The focus is now on time-space geophysical scaling behavior: their multifractality. It is found

  5. Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

  6. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 The DIGISOIL multi-sensor system: from geophysical measurements to soil properties. Gilles geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues

  7. Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics The University of Texas Pickle Research Campus@utig.ig.utexas.edu EDUCATION B.A. Williams College, 1983, Geology and Physics M.A. Columbia University, 1986, Marine Geophysics M. Phil. Columbia University, 1987, Marine Geophysics Ph.D. Columbia University, 1991, Marine

  8. Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits (Version 110824e) Instructor: Mark Grasmueck, Associate Professor Marine Geology and Geophysics RSMAS University of Miami Tel: The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with the fundamentals of near-surface geophysical site

  9. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  10. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author are known to be highly dependent on local site characteristics. Therefore combining geophysical meth- ods. In order to calibrate geophysical measurements, obser- vations of 130 boreholes (4 meters deep) were made

  11. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-11992, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-11992, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Contribution of the airborne geophysical survey to the study of the regolith : A case study of regolith properties: superficial studies combining geology, geochemistry and geophysics become essential

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Geophysical observations at cavity collapse Philippe Jousset, Behrooz Bazargan-Sabet, François relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals

  13. NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT Graig McHendrie Stuart M. Smith National Geophysical Data Center Boulder, Colorado September 1977 countries participated in a workshop at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) in Boulder, Colorado

  14. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  15. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2005) 12: 311320 SRef-ID: 1607-7946/npg/2005-12-311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005-01-01

    Processes in Geophysics Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction B. Knopf1, H, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the cur- rently preferred strategy for simulating. Such a simplifying tech- nique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources

  16. DECOUPLED TIME STEPPING METHODS FOR FLUID-FLUID INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    -fluid interaction, atmosphere-ocean, implicit-explicit method. 1. Introduction. The dynamic core in atmosphere-ocean to the coupled system using only (uncoupled) atmosphere and ocean solves, (see e.g. [4, 6, 17, 18, 19 their shared interface I by a rigid-lid coupling condition, i.e. no penetration and a slip with friction

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical viscoelastic flow Oleg V. Vasilyev,1 David A. Yuen,2 and Yuri Yu. Podladchikov3 Abstract. This paper introduces a newly developed wavelet technique for modeling of geophysical

  18. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 3615 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters Geoffrey Blewitt Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology is gener- alized here, to seek the network configuration that optimizes the precision of geophysical

  19. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  20. GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK Section Engineering Geology, Centre for Technical-mail: hack@itc.nl (Received 2 June, 2000; Accepted 4 September, 2000) Abstract. A pre-requisite in slope Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;424 ROBERT HACK the slope material with, for example, manganese

  1. Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Leasing and Exploration * Seismic geophysical surveys * Exploratory drilling using various of these incremental steps; leasing and exploration. Subsequent phases of OCS development (production, transportation) prepared by MMS, as well as pertinent research on the bowhead whale and matters related to oil exploration

  2. INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    velocity, electrical conductivity, or magnetic susceptibility. The appropriate geophysical survey. To obtain that information the data need to be inverted to generate a 3D subsurface distribution principles. Our goal is to present those principles, discuss in detail the essential elements of the inverse

  3. Geophysics of Chemical Heterogeneity in the Mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stixrude, Lars

    , transition zone Abstract Chemical heterogeneity, produced by the near-surface rock cycle and dom- inatedGeophysics of Chemical Heterogeneity in the Mantle Lars Stixrude and Carolina Lithgow. This lithologic-scale chemical het- erogeneity may survive in the mantle for as long as the age of Earth because

  4. Transdimensional Approaches to Geophysical Inverse Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodin, Thomas

    complicated and quantitative mechanisms with simple qualitative concepts. This research was supported underTransdimensional Approaches to Geophysical Inverse Problems Thomas Bodin October 2010 A thesis Except where otherwise indicated in the text, the research described in this thesis is my own original

  5. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER 10.1002/2014GL061661 Key Points: · The 1934 drought), The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, doi:10 North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934 Benjamin I. Cook1,2 , Richard Seager2

  6. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER 10.1002/2014GL061661 Key Points: · The 1934 drought), The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 7298­7305, doi Published online 18 OCT 2014 The worst North American drought year of the last millennium: 1934 Benjamin I

  7. Advanced signal processing in geophysical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witten, A.J.; King, W.C.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes advanced signal processing methods which have improved the capabilities to detect and image the subsurface environment with geophysical remote sensing techniques. Field results are presented showing target detection, subsurface characterizations, and imaging of insitu waste treatment processes, all previously unachievable with such tools as ground penetrating radar, magnetometry and seismic.

  8. Advanced signal processing in geophysical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witten, A.J. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes advanced signal processing methods which have improved the capabilities to detect and image the subsurface environment with geophysical remote sensing techniques. Field results are presented showing target detection, subsurface characterizations, and imaging of insitu waste treatment processes, all previously unachievable with such tools as ground penetrating radar, magnetometry and seismic.

  9. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  10. Euler's fluid equations: Optimal Control vs Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darryl D. Holm

    2009-09-28

    An optimization method used in image-processing (metamorphosis) is found to imply Euler's equations for incompressible flow of an inviscid fluid, without requiring that the Lagrangian particle labels exactly follow the flow lines of the Eulerian velocity vector field. Thus, an optimal control problem and an optimization problem for incompressible ideal fluid flow both yield the \\emph {same} Euler fluid equations, although their Lagrangian parcel dynamics are \\emph{different}. This is a result of the \\emph{gauge freedom} in the definition of the fluid pressure for an incompressible flow, in combination with the symmetry of fluid dynamics under relabeling of their Lagrangian coordinates. Similar ideas are also illustrated for SO(N) rigid body motion.

  11. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEophySicS College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 credits The geophysics program at UAF specializes in several broad areas of re- search and is closely connected with the Geophysical Institute. Although much of the research conducted by geophysics faculty

  12. Viscosity of a nucleonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2012-03-21

    The viscosity of nucleonic matter is studied both classically and in a quantum mechanical description. The collisions between particles are modeled as hard sphere scattering as a baseline for comparison and as scattering from an attractive square well potential. Properties associated with the unitary limit are developed which are shown to be approximately realized for a system of neutrons. The issue of near perfect fluid behavior of neutron matter is remarked on. Using some results from hard sphere molecular dynamics studies near perfect fluid behavior is discussed further.

  13. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  14. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2010; 63:231248

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noack, Bernd R.

    of Technology MB1, D-10623 Berlin, Germany 2Institute of Combustion Engines and Transportation, Pozna of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) consists of finding Correspondence to: Bernd R. Noack, Department of Fluid of turbulence models for the effect of unresolved scales on the resolved flow. Examples of CFD are large eddy

  15. Z .Fluid Phase Equilibria 161 1999 241256 Vaporliquid equilibrium, fluid state, and zero-pressure solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisal, Martin

    Z .Fluid Phase Equilibria 161 1999 241­256 Vapor­liquid equilibrium, fluid state, and zero-pressure but independent constant pressure­constant temperature Z .molecular dynamics simulations of the vapor and liquid. Keywords: Chlorine; Intermolecular potential; Molecular simulation; Vapor­liquid equilibria; Vapor pressure

  16. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  17. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  18. Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer Jerry the geophysically derived hydraulic conductivity representation in numerical simulations of the natural the effectiveness of geophysically derived and flowmeter based representations of the hydraulic conductivity field

  19. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study, is to a significant extent based on tomographic methods developed in geophysics. The proposed time-lapse seismic methods developed in petroleum geophysics offer the next

  20. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumley, D.

    2010-01-01

    on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” David Lumley (U. W.on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” was held August 23-27,sequestration: Model Studies: Geophysics, 73, WA105-WA112.

  1. Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM PERIODICALLY STRATIFIED from Periodically Stratified Media with Interfacial Slip, Geophysical Prospecting 31 phase propagation in some other direction. INTRODUCTION Geophysical media often exhibit anisotropic

  2. Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 141 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition, Eds. T. Spohn & G. Schubert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2014-01-01

    Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition Author manuscript, published in "Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd edition, G. Schubert, T. Spohn (Ed.) (2014) in press" #12;T. Guillot & D. Gautier / Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 2 Contents 1

  3. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the acquisition environment too challenging for seismic reflection to be routinely cost-effective. The geophysical parameter most commonly correlated with the overall...

  4. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5490655 Citation Applegate, J. K.; Moens, T. A. . 411980. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho. () : DOE Information Bridge. Related...

  5. Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  6. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2012-01-01

    We describe the ongoing development of joint geophysical imaging methodologies for geothermal site characterization and demonstrate their potential in two regions: Krafla volcano and associated geothermal fields in ...

  7. Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone...

  8. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  9. A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

    1999-06-15

    The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

  10. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2000 1 Sensing Volcanism, Remote Sensing of Active Volcanism, AGU Geophysical Monograph Series 116, Mouginis

  11. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal...

  12. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

  13. Point flow sensor study for electronic gas energy metering. Phase 1. Thermophysical and fluid-dynamic data. Final report, March 15, 1994-July 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonne, U.; Vesovic, V.; Wakeham, W.A.

    1996-07-15

    The set published properties of gases constituting natural gas, at pressures up to 300 basr (4500 psi) ad for -40 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 250 deg C, is not accurate or consistent enough for members of hte gas industry, research groups, NGV-automotive engineers, and meter manufacturers to nondestructively calibrate existing, affordable, combustionless, on-line and in situ microsensors for their applications. Therefore, this study was set up to (1) establish a consistent set of thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, viscosity, and isobaric heat capacity) of pure and mixed gas constituents of natural gases and (2) prove the validity and limitations of using one or more point sensors in suitable flow channels for the determination of total fluid flow.

  14. GEOPHYSICAL JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL, 133, 379389, 1998 1 A continuous plate-tectonic model using geophysical data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL, 133, 379­389, 1998 1 A continuous plate-tectonic model using and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, 96822, USA Summary A continuous kinematic model of present day of the standard plate model; the differences, however, are systematic and indicate the greater proportion of spin

  15. Washington State University Vancouver Mech 303 Fluid Mechanics Mechanical Engineering Fall 2013 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington State University Vancouver Mech 303 Fluid Mechanics Mechanical Engineering Fall 2013 Syllabus 1 Fluid Mechanics Course: Mech 303, Fluid Mechanics, 3 Credits Prerequisite: Dynamics (Mech 212: VECS 105 Textbook: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, 7 th Edition By Munson, Okiishi, Huebsch

  16. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  17. Relativistic Elasticity of Stationary Fluid Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Armas; Niels A. Obers

    2012-10-18

    Fluid mechanics can be formulated on dynamical surfaces of arbitrary co-dimension embedded in a background space-time. This has been the main object of study of the blackfold approach in which the emphasis has primarily been on stationary fluid configurations. Motivated by this approach we show under certain conditions that a given stationary fluid configuration living on a dynamical surface of vanishing thickness and satisfying locally the first law of thermodynamics will behave like an elastic brane when the surface is subject to small deformations. These results, which are independent of the number of space-time dimensions and of the fluid arising from a gravitational dual, reveal the (electro)elastic character of (charged) black branes when considering extrinsic perturbations.

  18. Relativistic Elasticity of Stationary Fluid Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armas, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Fluid mechanics can be formulated on dynamical surfaces of arbitrary co-dimension embedded in a background space-time. This has been the main object of study of the blackfold approach in which the emphasis has primarily been on stationary fluid configurations. Motivated by this approach we show under certain conditions that a given stationary fluid configuration living on a dynamical surface of vanishing thickness and satisfying locally the first law of thermodynamics will behave like an elastic brane when the surface is subject to small deformations. These results, which are independent of the number of space-time dimensions and of the fluid arising from a gravitational dual, reveal the (electro)elastic character of (charged) black branes when considering extrinsic perturbations.

  19. FOURIER TRANSFORM METHODS IN GEOPHYSICS David Sandwell, January, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 FOURIER TRANSFORM METHODS IN GEOPHYSICS David Sandwell, January, 2013 1. Fourier Transforms Fourier transform are use in many areas of geophysics such as image processing, time series analysis, and antenna design. Here we focus on the use of fourier transforms for solving linear partial differential

  20. DEVELOPING GIS VISUALIZATION WEB SERVICES FOR GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEVELOPING GIS VISUALIZATION WEB SERVICES FOR GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS A. Sayar a,b. *, M. Pierce Commission II, WG II/2 KEY WORDS: GIS, Geophysics, Visualization, Internet/Web, Interoperability, Networks Information System (GIS) community. In this paper we will describe our group's efforts to implement GIS

  1. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2015 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  2. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  3. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  4. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining's crust and induce attenuation, dispersion and anisotropy of the seismic waves observed at the macroscale process. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale ­ p. #12

  5. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics Graduate work in Geology are designed to provide you with an understanding of the fundamentals and principles of geology, geochemistry and Environmental Geochemistry · Mineralogy/Petrology/Economic Geology · Geophysics/Tectonics/Remote Sensing

  6. Dynamic Load Balancing in a Geophysics Application Using STAPL 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsy, Vincent S

    2015-08-03

    construction application which uses the recursive coordinate bisection method to find a near-optimal data distribution of the data. This algorithm leveraged the added redistribution features in STAPL to improve the running time of our application. We compared...

  7. Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation, searchGeophysical Techniques Jump to:

  8. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  9. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2012-05-28

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  10. Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is examined from a Hamiltonian perspective. The Hamiltonian point of view provides a unifying framework; by understanding the Hamiltonian perspective, one knows in advance (within bounds) what answers to expect and what kinds of procedures can be performed. The material is organized into five lectures, on the following topics: rudiments of few-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems illustrated by passive advection in two-dimensional fluids; functional differentiation, two action principles of mechanics, and the action principle and canonical Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid; noncanonical Hamiltonian dynamics with examples; tutorial on Lie groups and algebras, reduction-realization, and Clebsch variables; and stability and Hamiltonian systems.

  11. On the Hamiltonian Description of Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Antoniou; G. P. Pronko

    2002-03-14

    We suggest the Hamiltonian approach for fluid mechanics based on the dynamics, formulated in terms of Lagrangian variables. The construction of the canonical variables of the fluid sheds a light of the origin of Clebsh variables, introduced in the previous century. The developed formalism permits to relate the circulation conservation (Tompson theorem) with the invariance of the theory with respect to special diffiomorphisms and establish also the new conservation laws. We discuss also the difference of the Eulerian and Lagrangian description, pointing out the incompleteness of the first. The constructed formalism is also applicable for ideal plasma. We conclude with several remarks on the quantization of the fluid.

  12. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  13. A numerical framework for the direct simulation of solid-fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Benjamin Koger, 1965-

    2001-01-01

    Our understanding of solid-fluid dynamics has been severely limited by the nonexistence of a high-fidelity modeling capability for these multiphase systems. Continuum modeling approaches overlook the microscale solid-fluid ...

  14. Control of underactuated fluid-body systems with real-time particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, John W., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Controlling the interaction of a robot with a fluid, particularly when the desired behavior is intimately related to the dynamics of the fluid, is a difficult and important problem. High-performance aircraft cannot ignore ...

  15. CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics Sonneggstrasse 5: ++41 (0) 44 633 3154 fax: ++41 (0) 44 633 1065 AUGUST 5, 2010 Education 2007 Ph.D. Geophysics in field geology, mathematics, seismology, geodynamics, geophysics 2001 Diplom Geophysics (M

  16. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01

    Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelica 2003 Conference, Linköping,H. Tummescheit: The Modelica Fluid and Media Library forThermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, Modelica 2006 Conference, Vi-

  17. For more information contact: Sandee Hicks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Dynamics Earth Systems Models Introduction to Radiative Transfer Space Weather Courses: Geophysical Electro System Evolution Solar Terrestrial Relatons Earth System Analysis Atmospheric Thermodynamics Earth System or Instrumentation for Atmospheric & Space Sciences Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Earth System Interactions Introduction

  18. Expedited Site Characterization geophysics: Geophysical methods and tools for site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report covers five classes of geophysical technologies: Magnetics; Electrical/electromagnetic; Seismic reflection; Gamma-ray spectrometry; and Metal-specific spectrometry. Except for radiometry, no other classes of geophysical tedmologies are specific for direct detection of the types of contaminants present at the selected sites. For each of the five classes covered, the report gives a general description of the methodology, its field use, and its general applicability to the ESC Project. In addition, the report gives a sample of the most promising instruments available for each class, including the following information: Hardware/software attributes; Purchase and rental costs; Survey rate and operating costs; and Other applicable information based on case history and field evaluations.

  19. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  20. Additive for drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, G.T.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a product for use in the drilling of wells. It comprises a drilling fluid and peanut hulls ground to powder form added to the drilling fluid.

  1. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Richard A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; harkema, J. R.; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M. L.; Kinzell, John H.

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total air?ows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were cal-culated from computational ?uid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These air?ow calcula-tions, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, mon-keys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the ?ne structures of the nasal turbinates and air?ows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired air?ows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (air?ows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These di?erences in regional air?ows can have signi?cant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  3. Entropy production at freeze-out from dissipative fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Molnar

    2007-09-17

    Entropy production due to shear viscosity during the continuous freeze-out of a longitudinally expanding dissipative fluid is addressed. Assuming the validity of the fluid dynamical description during the continuous removal of interacting matter we estimated a small entropy production as function of the freeze-out duration and the ratio of dissipative to non-dissipative quantities in case of a relativistic massless pion fluid.

  4. A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  5. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  6. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Eddy-mediated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Andrew

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Eddy-mediated transport of warm, and over- turning circulation. 1 Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. 2 Environmental Sciences and Engineering, California

  7. Mike Batzle holds the Baker Hughes Distinguished Chair of Petrophysics and Borehole Geophysics, at the Colorado School of Mines, where he has been a member of the geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike Batzle holds the Baker Hughes Distinguished Chair of Petrophysics and Borehole Geophysics, at the Colorado School of Mines, where he has been a member of the geophysics department for the past 17 years from the University of California, Riverside, and a PhD in geophysics from MIT. His main interests have

  8. REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986 RecentResearchin SnowHydrology JEFF DOZIER Centerfor Remote thespectraldistri- butionof the incomingsolardirectanddiffuseirradianceand thespectralalbedo: Copyfight1987bytheAmericanGeophysical

  9. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  10. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  11. Effective field theory of dissipative fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, Michael; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We develop an effective field theory for dissipative fluids which governs the dynamics of gapless modes associated to conserved quantities. The system is put in a curved spacetime and coupled to external sources for charged currents. The invariance of the hydrodynamical action under gauge symmetries and diffeomorphisms suggests a natural set of dynamical variables which provide a mapping between an emergent "fluid spacetime" and the physical spacetime. An essential aspect of our formulation is to identify the appropriate symmetries in the fluid spacetime. Our theory applies to nonlinear disturbances around a general density matrix. For a thermal density matrix, we require an additional Z_2 symmetry, to which we refer as the local KMS condition. This leads to the standard constraints of hydrodynamics, as well as a nonlinear generalization of the Onsager relations. It also leads to an emergent supersymmetry in the classical statistical regime, with a higher derivative version required for the full quantum regim...

  12. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Gareth

    This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional ...

  13. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonin, A. A.

    Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. ...

  14. Nonlinear stability of ideal fluid equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holm, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Lyapunov method for establishing stability is related to well- known energy principles for nondissipative dynamical systems. A development of the Lyapunov method for Hamiltonian systems due to Arnold establishes sufficient conditions for Lyapunov stability by using the energy plus other conserved quantities, together with second variations and convexity estimates. When treating the stability of ideal fluid dynamics within the Hamiltonian framework, a useful class of these conserved quantities consists of the Casimir functionals, which Poisson-commute with all functionals of the dynamical fluid variables. Such conserved quantities, when added to the energy, help to provide convexity estimates that bound the growth of perturbations. These convexity estimates, in turn, provide norms necessary for establishing Lyapunov stability under the nonlinear evolution. In contrast, the commonly used second variation or spectral stability arguments only prove linearized stability. As ideal fluid examples, in these lectures we discuss planar barotropic compressible fluid dynamics, the three-dimensional hydrostatic Boussinesq model, and a new set of shallow water equations with nonlinear dispersion due to Basdenkov, Morosov, and Pogutse(1985). Remarkably, all three of these samples have the same Hamiltonian structure and, thus, possess the same Casimir functionals upon which their stability analyses are based. We also treat stability of modified quasigeostrophic flow, a problem whose Hamiltonian structure and Casimirs closely resemble Arnold's original example. Finally, we discuss some aspects of conditional stability and the applicability of Arnold's development of the Lyapunov technique. 100 refs.

  15. On the shear instability of fluid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Alexakis; Y. Young; R. Rosner

    2001-10-31

    We examine the linear stability of fluid interfaces subjected to a shear flow. Our main object is to generalize previous work to arbitrary Atwood number, and to allow for surface tension and weak compressibility. The motivation derives from instances in astrophysical systems where mixing across material interfaces driven by shear flows may significantly affect the dynamical evolution of these systems.

  16. The fluid mechanics of dissolution trapping in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage, the supercritical CO2 phase and the solid porous medium phase. This results in important dynamics associated). The density of supercritical CO2 is less than that of the resident fluid; thus buoyancy effects are important

  17. Effect of fluid-colloid interactions on the mobility of a thermophoretic microswimmer in non-ideal fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Janus colloids propelled by light, e.g., thermophoretic particles, offer promising prospects as artificial microswimmers. However, their swimming behavior and its dependence on fluid properties and fluid-colloid interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the behavior of a thermophoretic Janus colloid in its own temperature gradient using numerical simulations. The dissipative particle dynamics method with energy conservation is used to investigate the behavior in non-ideal and ideal-gas like fluids for different fluid-colloid interactions, boundary conditions, and temperature-controlling strategies. The fluid-colloid interactions appear to have a strong effect on the colloid behavior, since they directly affect heat exchange between the colloid surface and the fluid. The simulation results show that a reduction of the heat exchange at the fluid-colloid interface leads to an enhancement of colloid's thermophoretic mobility. The colloid behavior is found to be different in non-ideal and ideal f...

  18. Limitations on fluid grid sizing for using volume-averaged fluid equations in discrete element models of fluidized beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Christopher M.; Holland, Daniel; Dennis, John S.; Scott, Stuart A.

    2015-10-13

    Bubbling and slugging fluidization were simulated in 3D cylindrical fluidized beds using a discrete element model with computational fluid dynamics (DEM-CFD). A CFD grid was used in which the volume of all fluid cells was equal. Ninety simulations...

  19. The influence of pore fluids on the frictional properties of quartzose sandstone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, Michael Lloyd

    1973-01-01

    THE INFLUENCE OF PORE FLUIDS ON THE FRICTIONAL PROPERTIES OF QUARTZOSE SANDSTONE A Thesis by MICHAEL LLOYD BLACKWELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub)ect: Geophysics THE INFLUENCE OF PORE FLUIDS ON THE FRICTIONAL PROPERTIES OF QUARTZOSE SANDSTONE A Thesis by MICHAEL LLOYD BLACKHELL Approved as to style and content by: (Chai of Committee) (Head of De rtment) (Member...

  20. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non-uniform ambient noise on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. T. Nissen-Meyer, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. Olaf Schenk, Institute of Computational

  1. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S. Michael (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  2. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  3. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Sykora, Frank (Caledon, ON, CA); Dorbeck, Mark (Brighton, MI)

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  4. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

    2009-08-15

    Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

  5. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  6. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood, Mississippi: EnergyThermal Data And

  7. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Coupled Level-Set/Volume-of-Fluid Method for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Mark

    utilizing a coupled level-set/volume-of-fluid method to simulate liquid fuel atomization. The coupledAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Coupled Level-Set/Volume-of-Fluid Method, Canoga Park, Calif. 91309 This paper presents results of a multiphase computational fluid dynamics code

  8. 210 2015 Sinopec Geophysical Research Institute Printed in the UK Journal of Geophysics and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    horizontal layers. The anisotropic layer consists of a porous, fluid-saturated material containing vertically of applications including hydrocarbon exploration and production, subsurface storage of CO2, and geothermal energy

  9. Fluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    would usually be called a `hydraulic jump'. Turbulent energy loss in the transition region can be so and hydraulic jumps* [`bore' as in `drill', or `penetrate'. E.g. the famous `Severn bore'.] By far the biggest km. #12;Bores and hydraulic jumps are essentially the same thing viewed in different frames

  10. Barracuda® Computational Particle Fluid Dynamics (CPFD®) Software...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is inherently limited and not completely accurate. With assistance from AMO, a consortium of industrial partners led by CPFD Software, LLC, has developed and commercialized...

  11. Simulations of Particle Dynamics in Magnetorheological Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are accounted for via Stokes' drag while inter­particle repulsions are modeled through approximate hard­sphere­static and magnetostatic forces are de­ rived from the solution of (steady) Maxwell's equations, recomputed at each instant

  12. Morphing quantum mechanics and fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Curtright; David Fairlie

    2003-05-28

    We investigate the effects of given pressure gradients on hydrodynamic flow equations. We obtain results in terms of implicit solutions and also in the framework of an extra-dimensional formalism involving the diffusion/Schrodinger equation.

  13. Uncertainty Quantification for Chaotic Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    chaotic CFD. By definition, chaotic flows are ones which exhibit sensitive dependence on initial [13], flow in porous media [10], and turbulent combustion [12]. Here we consider a representative

  14. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulations, density, velocity, and orientational profiles of the confined film were accumulated along the Z (perpendicular to the walls) and Y (parallel to the walls...

  15. Fluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of integration from the volume conservation). 12. Waste water flows into a tank at 10-4 m3 s-1 and out of a short

  16. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996Technologies /June 2011June 2015Open-System→

  17. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996Technologies /June 2011June

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi

  19. Geophysical Investigations of the Mound City Borrow Pits, Ross County, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Blair

    2012-05-31

    Geophysical subsurface imaging is becoming a common practice in archaeology. Non-invasive geophysical methods provide efficient alternatives to costly and invasive excavations, allowing archaeologists to analyze sites before any excavation is done...

  20. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2003 1 volcanic collapse formation, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 4 (9), 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000483

  1. Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojahedi, Mohammad

    Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service · Find Similar Abstracts (with default | Query Form | Preferences | HELP | FAQ Physics/Geophysics arXiv e-prints Send Query Reset #12;

  2. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2005 1. 2 craters. Journal of Geophysical Research 110, E10001, doi: 10.1029/2004JE002338, 2005. 7. Blewett, D. T

  3. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data using Bayesian techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data velocity for hydraulic conductivity estimation at the South Oyster Site, using a Bayesian framework. Since site- specific relations between hydraulic conductivity and geophysical properties are often nonlinear

  4. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2013-12-31

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

  5. Fluid Fishbones Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W.M.

    , with the fluid sheet being the fish head and the tendrils its bones. Increasing the flow rate serves to broaden the fishbones. In the wake of the fluid fish, a regular array of drops obtains, the number and spacing of which

  6. Fluid delivery control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  7. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Krakoviack

    2010-12-05

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  8. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  9. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  10. GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL AS DEPOSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL ´AS DEPOSIT information to the explorationist. This thesis examines the role geophysical inversion can assume in an integrated explo- ration program, and the impact it can have on the results. As an example, geophysical data

  11. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2006 1 with an albedo feature near Airy crater in the lunar nearside highlands. Geophysical Research Letters. 9. Boyce viewed by the THEMIS instrument: Double-layered ejecta craters. J. Geophysical Research, 111, E10005, doi

  12. Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National for Geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin developing earthquake location techniques in support. Associate Program Director, Geophysics National Science Foundation 4201 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA 22230

  13. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt425

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nore, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt425 GJIGeomagnetismInstitute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8092, Switzerland. E-mail: ajackson@ethz.ch 2Institute of Geophysics, University of G¨ottingen, D-37077 G¨ottingen, Germany 3Solar Physics, Hansen Experimental Physics

  14. Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe to create the IRGGEA (International Group in Geophysics Europe Africa) in order to pursue the scientific: Scientific network, ethical rules, geophysics, sustainable research, Africa. 1. Introduction

  15. Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University, Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University of pos- sible applications in geophysics. It is elaborated how a description of the well log measurement to the mentioned elds. This paper is written in the hope of achieving the same in the area of geophysics. The idea

  16. Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty Boise State University conducted a geophysics field camp in northern Thailand in January, 2010 to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental and engineering challenges. Faculty, technicians

  17. GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    W HAT IS GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.] In applied geophysics we inject a signal into the ground and record how the ground changes that signal as it passes://duke.usask.ca~merriam/geo_phys/ Rewarding careers are possible in exploration and environmental geophysics. Graduates of the U of S qualify

  18. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2 , C attempt to characterize with geophysical methods the state of landfill covers to detect damages that can. The geophysical methods used were the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), cartography with an Automatic

  19. Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project [Extended for geophysical surveying. This paper describes the main features of the envisaged developments, with a focus.00. Figure 1: Conventional geophysical surveying using long lines of towed streamers team. Such teams

  20. Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree General Chemistry II with Lab 4 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOG 360 Physics I & II with Calculus & Labs Physics Option II: PHYS 111-112 General Physics 8-10 Geophysics

  1. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS GRADUATE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA · GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS GRADUATE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 1680 East-West Road, POST 701, Honolulu, HI 96822 For Semester/YEAR FALL ________ SPRING ________ Intended Graduate Program GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Degree

  2. Computer Vision in Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aminfar, AmirHessam

    2015-01-01

    layers," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 30, no. 04, pp.M. Princevac, "Fundamental fluid mechanics," 2014. C. W.Computer Vision in Fluid Mechanics A Thesis submitted in

  3. Computer Vision in Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aminfar, AmirHessam

    2015-01-01

    layers," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 30, no. 04, pp.Fundamental fluid mechanics," 2014. C. W. Enderlin, "MacroComputer Vision in Fluid Mechanics A Thesis submitted in

  4. Dynamic simulations of geologic materials using combined FEM/DEM/SPH analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J P; Johnson, S M

    2008-03-26

    An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC now includes implementations of Cosserat point theory and cohesive elements. This approach directly simulates the transition from continuum to discontinuum behavior, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture within a combined finite element/discrete element framework. In addition, there are many application involving geologic materials where fluid-structure interaction is important. To facilitate solution of this class of problems a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) capability has been incorporated into LDEC to simulate fully coupled systems involving geologic materials and a saturating fluid. We will present results from a study of a broad range of geomechanical problems that exercise the various components of LDEC in isolation and in tandem.

  5. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  6. Mechanism of destruction of transport barriers in geophysical jets with Rossby waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Uleysky; M. V. Budyansky; S. V. Prants

    2012-02-02

    The mechanism of destruction of a central transport barrier in a dynamical model of a geophysical zonal jet current in the ocean or the atmosphere with two propagating Rossby waves is studied. We develop a method for computing a central invariant curve which is an indicator of existence of the barrier. Breakdown of this curve under a variation of the Rossby wave amplitudes and onset of chaotic cross-jet transport happen due to specific resonances producing stochastic layers in the central jet. The main result is that there are resonances breaking the transport barrier at unexpectedly small values of the amplitudes that may have serious impact on mixing and transport in the ocean and the atmosphere. The effect can be found in laboratory experiments with azimuthal jets and Rossby waves in rotating tanks under specific values of the wave numbers that are predicted in the theory.

  7. Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    of oblique vortex shedding behind a heated circular cylinder in laminar wake regime Phys. Fluids 24, 011701 dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in R4 is studied. Most of the paper focuses of such work are in Refs. 31, 24, 12, 14, and 11. It is fair to say that, in general, classical fluid flows

  8. Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics -The University of Alabama Department of Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position ­ Geophysics - The University of Alabama invites applications for a three-year, non-tenure track visiting faculty position in geophysics geophysical sub-disciplines, preference will be given to candidates who will enhance our existing geophysics

  9. Effects of nanopore and fluid structure on anomalies and phase transitions of confined core-softened fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro B. Krott; José Rafael Bordin; Ney Marçal Barraz Jr; Marcia C. Barbosa

    2015-02-11

    We use Molecular Dynamics simulations to study how the nanopore and the fluid structures affects the dynamic, thermodynamic and structural properties of a confined anomalous fluid. The fluid is modeled using an effective pair potential derived from the ST4 atomistic model for water. This system exhibits density, structural and dynamical anomalies and the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points similar to the quantities observed in bulk water. The confinement is modeled both by smooth and structured walls. The temperatures of extremum density and diffusion for the confined fluid show a shift to lower values while the pressures move to higher amounts for both smooth and structured confinement. In the case of smooth walls, the critical points and the limit between fluid and amorphous phases show a non-monotonic change in the temperatures and pressures when the the nanopore size is increase. In the case of structured walls the pressures and temperatures of the critical points varies monotonicaly with the porous size. Our results are explained on basis of the competition between the different length scales of the fluid and the wall-fluid interaction.

  10. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wensink, Henricus H; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E; Löwen, Hartmut; Yeomans, Julia M

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis su...

  11. Basic fluid system trainer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semans, J.P.; Johnson, P.G.; LeBoeuf, R.F. Jr.; Kromka, J.A.; Goron, R.H.; Hay, G.D.

    1991-04-30

    This invention, a trainer mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  12. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  13. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  14. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-01-17

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  15. Valve for fluid control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  16. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  17. Book Series Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    ocean currents/fronts. Finally, various atmospheric and oceanic bridges that link different ocean basinsBook Title Book Series Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union 1 A Global Survey of Ocean, College Park, Maryland The interaction of the ocean and atmosphere plays an important role in shaping

  18. Marine Geophysical Research An International Journal for the Study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    1 23 Marine Geophysical Research An International Journal for the Study of the Earth Beneath just prior to full break-up. We identify a major continental block separated from the shelf margin by a basin of hyperextended crust. Oligocene-Early Miocene rifting was followed by mild compression

  19. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 429438 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01

    Geophysical Society 2001 Mesoscale predictability under various synoptic regimes W. A. Nuss and D. K. Miller slightly ro- tated terrain are compared to gauge the sentivity of mesoscale forecasts to small forecast errors on the mesoscale in both wind and precipitation. The largest mesoscale errors occur when

  20. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-PREVIEW, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (s) 2010 Overview of seismic imagery techniques applied to landslides characterization. Gilles Grandjean, geophysical methods based on seismic surveying appear to be well-adapted to investigate the morpho and non-intrusive measurements of acoustic (Vp) or shear (Vs) wave velocity, two important physical