National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for geology faults folds

  1. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  2. Folding associated with extensional faulting: Sheep Range detachment, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Sheep Range detachment is a major Miocene extensional fault system of the Great Basin. Its major faults have a scoop shape, with straight, N-S traces extending 15-30 km and then abruptly turning to strike E-W. Tertiary deformation involved simultaneous normal faulting, sedimentation, landsliding, and strike-slip faulting. Folds occur in two settings: landslide blocks and drag along major faults. Folds occur in landslide blocks and beneath them. Most folds within landslide blocks are tight anticlines, with limbs dipping 40-60 degrees. Brecciation of the folds and landslide blocks suggests brittle deformation. Near Quijinump Canyon in the Sheep Range, at least three landslide blocks (up to 500 by 1500 m) slid into a small Tertiary basin. Tertiary limestone beneath the Paleozoic blocks was isoclinally folded. Westward dips reveal drag folds along major normal faults, as regional dips are consistently to the east. The Chowderhead anticline is the largest drag fold, along an extensional fault that offsets Ordovician units 8 km. East-dipping Ordovician and Silurian rocks in the Desert Range form the hanging wall. East-dipping Cambrian and Ordovician units in the East Desert Range form the foot wall and east limb of the anticline. Caught along the fault plane, the anticline's west-dipping west limb contains mostly Cambrian units.

  3. Hawaii Faults

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Faults combined from USGS 2007 Geologic Map of the State of Hawaii and the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold database. This data is in shapefile format.

  4. Geometry and controls on fracturing in a natural fault-bend fold: Rosario field, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apotria, T.G.; Wilkerson, M.S.; Knewtson, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Rosario oil field lies between the Perija Mountain front and Lake Maracaibo and produces from fractured Cretaceous carbonates and Tertiary clastics. We interpret the structure as a detached fault-bend fold which ramps through Cretaceous Cogollo and La Luna carbonates and flattens into an upper detachment at the base of the Upper Cretaceous Colon Shale. The structural relief formed primarily during the Mid Miocene and younger. Seismic and well control on the three-dimensional geometry illustrates the effects of (1) lithology and displacement variation on fold geometry, (2) an oblique footwall ramp on hangingwall faulting, and (3) fold curvature on fracturing and hydrocarbon production. Fold geometry at different structural levels is strongly controlled by lithology. Stiff Cogollo and La Luna carbonates exhibit kink-style folding above the upper fault-bend. The weak Colon Shale decouples the faulted carbonates from the concentrically folded Tertiary clastics. Regions of enhanced faulting and fracturing of Cretaceous carbonates are a function of structural position. We observe normal faults in the hangingwall where the strike of the footwall ramp changes from N20{degrees}E to N65{degrees}E. Fold curvature highlights fold hinges, yet distributed faulting is seismically imaged in the forelimb, suggesting that rocks fracture as they migrate through the ramp-upper flat fault-bend. Production rates are higher near the forelimb relative to the flat crestal region.

  5. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.F. ); Swift, C.M. Jr. )

    1996-01-01

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  6. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.F.; Swift, C.M. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  7. Hydrologic characterization of faults and other potentially conductive geologic features in the unsaturated zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Javandel, I.; Shan, C.

    1990-01-01

    The capability of characterizing near-vertical faults and other potentially highly conductive geologic features in the vicinity of a high-level-waste repository is of great importance in site characterization of underground waste-isolation projects. The possibility of using transient air pressure data at depth for characterizing these features in the unsaturated zone are investigated. Analytical solutions for calculating the pressure response of such systems are presented. Solutions are given for two types of barometric pressure fluctuations, step function and sinusoidal. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Geology of oil and gas accumulations in the Papuan fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foo, W.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The high level of exploration interest in Papua New Guinea has developed in large part because of recent discoveries in the western Papuan fold and thrust belt and shows in the adjacent foreland region. Results from recent drilling in the Iagifu/Hedinia area by a Chevron-led joint venture have outlined several pools in culminations along a 50 km long structural axis. Oil and gas are sourced from a thick succession of Jurassic marine shales that were deposited along the rifted northern margin of the Australian plate. Generation and migration is interpreted to have peaked coincident with development of the fold and thrust belt during the Neogene. Trapping occurred as anticlines and thrust sheets developed sequentially from northeast to southwest. Several trends remain untested on lands held by various groups, primarily in the area west of the Juha gas condensate pool.

  9. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-10-31

    Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

  10. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross‐sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  11. Geologic Map and GID Data for the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hinz, Nick

    2011-10-31

    Salt Wells—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples.

  12. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hinz, Nick

    2013-09-30

    Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross‐section.

  13. Earthquake geology of the northern San Andreas Fault near Point Arena, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Excavations into a Holocene alluvial fan provided exposures of a record of prehistoric earthquakes near Point Arena, California. At least five earthquakes were recognized in the section. All of these occurred since the deposition of a unit that is approximately 2000 years old. Radiocarbon dating allows constraints to be placed on the dates of these earthquakes. A buried Holocene (2356-2709 years old) channel has been offset a maximum of 64 {plus minus} 2 meters. This implies a maximum slip rate of 25.5 {plus minus} 2.5 mm/yr. These data suggest that the average recurrence interval for great earthquakes on this segment of the San Andreas fault is long - between about 200 and 400 years. Offset marine terrace risers near Point Arena and an offset landslide near Fort Ross provide estimates of the average slip rate since Late Pleistocene time. Near Fort Ross, an offset landslide implies a slip rate of less than 39 mm/yr. Correlation and age estimates of two marine terrace risers across the San Andreas fault near Point Arena suggest slip rates of about 18-19 mm/yr since Late Pleistocene time. Tentative correlation of the Pliocene Ohlson Ranch Formation in northwestern Sonoma County with deposits 50 km to the northwest near Point Arean, provides piercing points to use in calculation of a Pliocene slip rate for the northern San Andreas fault. A fission-track age 3.3 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma was determined for zicrons separated from a tuff collected from the Ohlson Ranch Formation. The geomorphology of the region, especially of the two major river drainages, supports the proposed 50 km Pliocene offset. This implies a Pliocene slip rate of at least 12-20 mm/yr. These rates for different time periods imply that much of the Pacific-North American plate motion must be accommodated on other structures at this latitude.

  14. Geologic Map of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-03-31

    Neal Hot Springs—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Three cross‐sections. - Locations of production, injection, and exploration wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples. - Location of XRF geochemical samples. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  15. Restoration of geological surface-UNFOLD method-a validation of complex structural mapping interpretation in the Andean Thrust Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillier, B. ); Oller, J.; Mendez, E.; Leconte, J.C.; Letouzey, J.; Specht, M.; Gratier, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    One of the most important problems in petroleum structural geology is dependable interpretation of structural maps obtained by seismic and sub-surface data. One method for validating the geometry of geological structures is the balancing cross-section technique which allows verification of cross-section geometry by a return to its initial horizontal state. However, this can not be used for of 3D halokinesis, shale tectonics, structures formed by polyphased noncoaxial tectonic events, or strike-slip and wrench faulting. An alternative approach is to test the restoration of folded and faulted surfaces to verify 3D structures by balancing geological surfaces represented by a structural map. This method tests the geometry of studied horizon and faults and is based upon the fact that, initially, actual folded/faulted structures were continuous at deposition. The balancing surface program, UNFOLD, restores the actual geological surface to its initial state. Misfits along faults implied poor structural map drawings or strong internal deformation of the geological level. By trial and error method, we returned to the initial data interpretation modifications. This method has been applied to 2D and 3D seismic structural interpretation in different structural styles, environments, rift zones, salt basins, wrench faulting, thrust belt,etc. Some applications to oil field structures in the Andean Thrust Belt have been done to check and validate the complex structural mapping interpretation.

  16. Final Scientific/Technical Report – DE-EE0002960 Recovery Act. Detachment faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation of Pearl Hot Spring, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockli, Daniel F.

    2015-11-30

    The Pearl Host Spring Geothermal Project funded by the DoE Geothermal Program was a joint academic (KU/UT & OU) and industry collaboration (Sierra and Ram Power) to investigate structural controls and the importance of low-angle normal faults on geothermal fluid flow through a multifaceted geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigation in west-central Nevada. The study clearly showed that the geothermal resources in Clayton Valley are controlled by the interplay between low-angle normal faults and active deformation related to the Walker Lane. The study not only identified potentially feasible blind geothermal resource plays in eastern Clayton Valley, but also provide a transportable template for exploration in the area of west-central Nevada and other regional and actively-deforming releasing fault bends. The study showed that deep-seated low-angle normal faults likely act as crustal scale permeability boundaries and could play an important role in geothermal circulation and funneling geothermal fluid into active fault zones. Not unique to this study, active deformation is viewed as an important gradient to rejuvenated fracture permeability aiding the long-term viability of blind geothermal resources. The technical approach for Phase I included the following components, (1) Structural and geological analysis of Pearl Hot Spring Resource, (2) (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and geothermometry, (3) detailed gravity data and modeling (plus some magnetic and resistivity), (4) Reflection and Refraction Seismic (Active Source), (5) Integration with existing and new geological/geophysical data, and (6) 3-D Earth Model, combining all data in an innovative approach combining classic work with new geochemical and geophysical methodology to detect blind geothermal resources in a cost-effective fashion.

  17. Exploration in the Sub Andean thrust/fold belt of northwest Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, A.; Alarcon, M.; Aramayo, F.; Santiago, M.; Ashby, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    A significant portion of the 15,000 square kilometer Aguarague exploration permit is located with the Sub Andean zone of northwest Argentina bordering Bolivia. The Sub Andean sedimentary section is dominated by a succession of tectonostratigraphic cycles of Silurian to recent age. These cycles display a complex geological history prior to the onset of the Andean deformation of Upper Miocene age. As the structures are complex, several different exploration techniques were combined, including satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, geological mapping, geochemistry, microtectonic studies, magneto stratigraphy, seismic modeling and seismic with pre- and post-stack depth migration. The interpretation of these techniques produced three dimensional structural models, at regional and prospect scales, that demonstrated the deformation mechanism, sequence and timing of the structures; these were then linked to the timing of generation/expulsion of hydrocarbons. The physical properties of the sedimentary sequence produces three structural environs, each with distinct fold and fault mechanisms. 1. (Upper): A product of the cumulative deformation of the underlying environs; 2. (Middle): The presence of an incompetent shale, the principal source rock, within this unit produces {open_quotes}fold disharmony {close_quotes} (horizontally and vertically) between the overlying and underlying environs. 3. (Lower): Characterized by folds developed by Fault Bend Fold processes. Hydrocarbon fields and exploration prospects are present within all three environs. The work performed has permitted the successful evaluation of several structures within the Sub Andean of the UTE Aguarague.

  18. Geology of the Western Part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (TA-3 to TA-16), Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J.Lewis; A.Lavine; S.L.Reneau; J.N.Gardner; R.Channell; C.W.Criswell

    2002-12-01

    We present data that elucidate the stratigraphy, geomorphology, and structure in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory between Technical Areas 3 and 16 (TA-3 and TA-16). Data include those gathered by geologic mapping of surficial, post-Bandelier Tuff strata, conventional and high-precision geologic mapping and geochemical analysis of cooling units within the Bandelier Tuff, logging of boreholes and a gas pipeline trench, and structural analysis using profiles, cross sections, structure contour maps, and stereographic projections. This work contributes to an improved understanding of the paleoseismic and geomorphic history of the area, which will aid in future seismic hazard evaluations and other investigations. The study area lies at the base of the main, 120-m (400-ft) high escarpment formed by the Pajarito fault, an active fault of the Rio Grande rift that bounds Los Alamos National Laboratory on the west. Subsidiary fracturing, faulting, and folding associated with the Pajarito fault zone extends at least 1,500 m (5,000 ft) to the east of the main Pajarito fault escarpment. Stratigraphic units in the study area include upper units of the Tshirege Member of the early Pleistocene Bandelier Tuff, early Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits that predate incision of canyons on this part of the Pajarito Plateau, and younger Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and colluvium that postdate drainage incision. We discriminate four sets of structures in the area between TA-3 and TA-16: (a) north-striking faults and folds that mark the main zone of deformation, including a graben in the central part of the study area; (b) north-northwest-striking fractures and rare faults that bound the eastern side of the principal zone of deformation and may be the surface expression of deep-seated faulting; (c) rare northeast-striking structures near the northern limit of the area associated with the southern end of the Rendija Canyon fault; and (d) several small east

  19. Fault finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  20. Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by few or faults. The probable conditions are therefore inferred from study of geological environment, structure and stratigraphy, and the type and distribution of thermal springs...

  1. Deep drilling phase of the Pen Brand Fault Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    This deep drilling activity is one element of the Pen Branch Fault Program at Savannah River Site (SRS). The effort will consist of three tasks: the extension of wells PBF-7 and PBF-8 into crystalline basement, geologic and drilling oversight during drilling operations, and the lithologic description and analysis of the recovered core. The drilling program addresses the association of the Pen Branch fault with order fault systems such as the fault that formed the Bunbarton basin in the Triassic.

  2. Aerial photographic interpretation of lineaments and faults in late cenozoic deposits in the Eastern part of the Benton Range 1:100,000 quadrangle and the Goldfield, Last Chance Range, Beatty, and Death Valley Junction 1:100,000 quadrangles, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reheis, M.C.; Noller, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    Lineaments and faults in Quaternary and late Tertiary deposits in the southern part of the Walker Lane are potentially active and form patterns that are anomalous with respect to the typical fault patterns in most of the Great Basin. Little work has been done to identify and characterize these faults, with the exception of those in the Death Valley-Furnace Creek (DVFCFZ) fault system and those in and near the Nevada Test Site. Four maps at a scale of 1:100,000 summarize the existing knowledge about these lineaments and faults based on extensive aerial-photo interpretation, limited field investigations, and published geologic maps. The lineaments and faults in all four maps can be divided geographically into two groups. The first group includes west- to north-trending lineaments and faults associated with the DVFCFZ and with the Pahrump fault zone in the Death Valley Junction quadrangle. The second group consists of north- to east-northeast-trending lineaments and faults in a broad area that lies east of the DVFCFZ and north of the Pahrump fault zone. Preliminary observations of the orientations and sense of slip of the lineaments and faults suggest that the least principle stress direction is west-east in the area of the first group and northwest-southeast in the area of the second group. The DVFCFZ appears to be part of a regional right-lateral strike-slip system. The DVFCFZ steps right, accompanied by normal faulting in an extensional zone, to the northern part of the Walker Lane a the northern end of Fish Lake Valley (Goldfield quadrangle), and appears to step left, accompanied by faulting and folding in a compressional zone, to the Pahrump fault zone in the area of Ash Meadows (Death Valley Junction quadrangle). 25 refs.

  3. Geology of the lower Yellow Creek Area, Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hail, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The lower Yellow Creek area is located in Rio Blanco and Moffat Counties of northwestern Colorado, about midway between the towns of Rangely and Meeker. The study area is in the northwestern part of the Piceance Creek basin, a very deep structural and sedimentary basin that formed during the Laramide orogeny. Potentially important resources in the area are oil shale and related minerals, oil and gas, coal, and uranium. Topics discussed in the report include: Stratigraphy (Subsurface rocks, Cretaceous rocks, Tertiary rocks, and Quaternary deposits); Structure (Midland anticline, graben at Pinyon Ridge, and Crooked Wash syncline, Folds and faults in the vicinity of the White River, Red Wash syncline and central graben zone, Yellow Creek anticlinal nose); Economic geology (Oil shale and associated minerals, Coal, Oil and gas, Uranium, Gravel).

  4. Hydrologic and geologic aspects of low-level radioactive-waste site management. [Shallow land burial at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutshall, N.H.; Vaughan, N.D.; Haase, C.S.; Olsen, C.R.; Huff, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrologic and geologic site characterization is a critical phase in development of shallow land-burial sites for low-level radioactive-waste disposal, especially in humid environments. Structural features such as folds, faults, and bedding and textural features such as formation permeability, porosity, and mineralogy all affect the water balance and water movement and, in turn, radionuclide migration. Where these features vary over short distance scales, detailed mapping is required in order to enable accurate model predictions of site performance and to provide the basis for proper design and planning of site-disposal operations.

  5. Geometry and evolution of the frontal part of the Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt (Vicuna Area), Tierra del Fuego, southern Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; McClay, K.R. ); Harambour, S.; Rojas, L.; Skarmeta, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt is a thin-skinned foreland thrust and fold belt of Paleocene to Oligocene age that deforms Upper Jurassic through Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and siliciclastic strata of the Magallanes basin, southern Andean Cordillera, Chile. This paper is a detailed description and analysis of the geology and structural evolution of the thrust front (Vicuna area of southern Tierra del Fuego). Reflection seismic and well data, together with 1:50,000 scale geological mapping, have been used in the analysis. In the southern part of the Vicuna area, two different thrust systems have been found: an upper imbricate fan that deforms Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous strata, and a younger, lower duplex composed of Cretaceous and probably Upper Jurassic rocks. The imbricate fan is characterized by fault-propagation folding in which listric thrust faults merge downward into a sole thrust that probably is located within the Upper Jurassic stratigraphy. The sole thrust of the upper imbricates forms the roof thrust of the underlying duplex. In the northern part of the Vicuna area, the syntectonic sedimentary wedge of the foredeep consists of Late Cretaceous through Tertiary siliciclastics that have been deformed and uplifted by passive back thrusting at the triangle zone. The structural style in the foreland region shows three main subhorizontal detachment levels located within the sedimentary wedge as a result of the progressive transfer of slip from the thrust belt to the foreland. Minor blind thrusts produce stacked [open quotes]pop up[close quotes] and triangle structures that result in complex geometries in the cores of anticlines. A forward-breaking sequence of thrusting is interpreted. During deformation, the active foredeep wedge migrated at least 10 km northward. Balanced geological cross sections indicate approximately 60% (-30 km) shortening for this part of the Magallanes thrust belt.

  6. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Abstract NA Author V. J. S. Grauch Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2002 Report Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided...

  7. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  8. Colorado Regional Faults

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  10. Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

  11. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  12. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  13. Characterization of Quaternary and suspected Quaternary faults, regional studies, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bucknam, R.C.; Crone, A.J.; Haller, K.M.; Machette, M.N.; Personius, S.F.; Barnhard, T.P.; Cecil, M.J.; Dart, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    This report presents the results of geologic studies that help define the Quaternary history of selected faults in the region around Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These results are relevant to the seismic-design basis of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The relevancy is based, in part, on a need for additional geologic data that became apparent in ongoing studies that resulted in the identification of 51 relevant and potentially relevant individual and compound faults and fault zones in the 100-km-radius region around the Yucca Mountain site. Geologic data used to characterize the regional faults and fault zones as relevant or potentially relevant seismic sources includes age and displacement information, maximum fault lengths, and minimum distances between the fault and the Yucca Mountain site. For many of the regional faults, no paleoseismic field studies have previously been conducted, and age and displacement data are sparse to nonexistent. In November 1994, the Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards entered into two Memoranda of Agreement with the Yucca Mountain Project Branch to conduct field reconnaissance, analysis, and interpretation of six relevant and six potentially relevant regional faults. This report describes the results of study of those faults exclusive of those in the Pahrump-Stewart Valley-Ash Meadows-Amargosa Valley areas. We also include results of a cursory study of faults on the west flank of the Specter Range and in the northern part of the Last Chance Range. A four-phase strategy was implemented for the field study.

  14. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57?eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  15. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodson, S.A. (JHU)

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  16. Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Fold Belt, Cymric-McKittrick fields, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farley, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The Tulare fold belt is a series of asymmetric, generally northeast-verging anticlines and synclines in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Tulare Formation that trend northwestward through the Cymric-McKittrick fields. Anticlines within the deformed belt generally originated as fault propagation folds above decollements, the most important of which is the regional decollement on top of the Amnicola sand, the basal Tulare unit. The Amnicola decollement is the northeast subsurface extension of the McKittrick thrust, a low-angle fault that has displaced the Miocene Antelope shale over the Pliocene San Joaquin Formation and locally over the Tulare Formation. The Amnicola decollement is itself deformed by folding related to a younger, deeper decollement near the base of the San Joaquin Formation that merges westward with the Amnicola decollement and defines a zone of faulting associated with the McKittrick thrust Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Formation are currently undergoing active development by thermal recovery techniques. In general, the geometry of heavy oil reservoirs is determined by location within the Tulare fold belt combined with the position of a subhorizontal fluid level trap that forms the updip limit of fluid-saturated rock Reservoir geometry is complicated by complex local structure, discontinuous stratigraphy, and partial depletion of heavy oil reservoirs by fluid withdrawal due to gravity drainage. Proper resolution of fold geometry, fault geometry, and position of the fluid level trap is crucial to the design and monitoring of thermal recovery projects within the Tulare fold belt.

  17. Fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.; Callender, R.; Causgrove, T.; Dyer, R.; Williams, S.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a molecular understanding of how proteins achieve their native three-dimensional (folded) structures. This requires the identification and characterization of intermediates in the protein folding process on all relevant timescales, from picoseconds to seconds. The short timescale events in protein folding have been entirely unknown. Prior to this work, state-of-the-art experimental approaches were limited to milliseconds or longer, when much of the folding process is already over. The gap between theory and experiment is enormous: current theoretical and computational methods cannot realistically model folding processes with lifetimes longer than one nanosecond. This unique approach to employ laser pump-probe techniques that combine novel methods of laser flash photolysis with time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic probes of protein transients. In this scheme, a short (picosecond to nanosecond) laser photolysis pulse was used to produce an instantaneous pH or temperature jump, thereby initiating a protein folding or unfolding reaction. Structure-specific, time-resolved vibrational probes were then used to identify and characterize protein folding intermediates.

  18. Photovoltaic System Fault Detection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic System Fault Detection and Diagnostics using Laterally Primed Adaptive Resonance Theory Neural Network C. Birk Jones, Joshua S. Stein, Sigifredo Gonzalez, and Bruce H. King Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, U.S.A Abstract-Cost effective integration of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems requires increased reliability. This can be achieved with a robust fault detection and diagnostic (FDD) tool that auto- matically discovers faults. This paper introduces the Laterally

  19. Fault Current Limiters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other benefits include: &17; Enhanced system safety, stability, and efficiency of the power ... large fault current desaturates the iron core of the series AC coils and the increased ...

  20. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  1. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  2. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  3. Regional Geologic Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  4. Regional Geologic Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  5. SciTech Connect: "protein folding"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    protein folding" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "protein folding" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data:...

  6. Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faunt, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. OpenStudio - Fault Modeling

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-19

    This software record documents the OpenStudio fault model development portion of the Fault Detection and Diagnostics LDRD project.The software provides a suite of OpenStudio measures (scripts) for modeling typical HVAC system faults in commercial buildings and also included supporting materials: example projects and OpenStudio measures for reporting fault costs and energy impacts.

  8. Thrust faults of southern Diamond Mountains, central Nevada: Implications for hydrocarbons in Diamond Valley and at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, D.E.

    1993-04-01

    Overmature Mississippian hydrocarbon source rocks in the southern Diamond Mountains have been interpreted to be a klippe overlying less mature source rocks and represented as an analogy to similar conditions near Yucca Mountain (Chamberlain, 1991). Geologic evidence indicates an alternative interpretation. Paleogeologic mapping indicates the presence of a thrust fault, referred to here as the Moritz Nager Thrust Fault, with Devonian rocks emplaced over Permian to Mississippian strata folded into an upright to overturned syncline, and that the overmature rocks of the Diamond Mountains are in the footwall of this thrust. The upper plate has been eroded from most of the Diamond Mountains but remnants are present at the head of Moritz Nager Canyon and at Sentinel Mountain. Devonian rocks of the upper plate comprised the earliest landslide megabreccia. Later, megabreccias of Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks of the overturned syncline of the lower plate were deposited. By this interpretation the maturity of lower-plate source rocks in the southern Diamond Mountains, which have been increased by tectonic burial, is not indicative of conditions in Diamond Valley, adjacent to the west, where upper-plate source rocks might be present in generating conditions. The interpretation that overmature source rocks of the Diamond Mountains are in a lower plate rather than in a klippe means that this area is an inappropriate model for the Eleana Range near Yucca Mountain.

  9. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the

  10. Geologic investigation :an update of subsurface geology on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hart, Dirk

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to generate a revised geologic model of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) incorporating the geological and geophysical data produced since the Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project (SWHC) of 1994 and 1995. Although this report has certain stand-alone characteristics, it is intended to complement the previous work and to serve as a status report as of late 2002. In the eastern portion of KAFB (Lurance Canyon and the Hubbell bench), of primary interest is the elevation to which bedrock is buried under a thin cap of alluvium. Elevation maps of the bedrock top reveal the paleodrainage that allows for the interpretation of the area's erosional history. The western portion of KAFB consists of the eastern part of the Albuquerque basin where bedrock is deeply buried under Santa Fe Group alluvium. In this area, the configuration of the down-to-the-west, basin-bounding Sandia and West Sandia faults is of primary interest. New geological and geophysical data and the reinterpretation of old data help to redefine the location and magnitude of these elements. Additional interests in this area are the internal stratigraphy and structure of the Santa Fe Group. Recent data collected from new monitoring wells in the area have led to a geologic characterization of the perched Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater system and have refined the known limits of the Ancestral Rio Grande fluvial sediments within the Santa Fe Group. Both the reinterpretation of the existing data and a review of the regional geology have shown that a segment of the boundary between the eastern and western portions of KAFB is a complicated early Tertiary (Laramide) wrench-fault system, the Tijeras/Explosive Ordnance Disposal Area/Hubbell Spring system. A portion of this fault zone is occupied by a coeval ''pull-apart'' basin filled with early Tertiary conglomerates, whose exposures form the ''Travertine Hills''.

  11. Geologic map of the Ojo Caliente Quadrangle, Rio Arriba and Taos Counties, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stix, J.

    1986-11-01

    The Ojo Caliente area forms part of the western limb of the Espanola basin within the Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico (Manley, 1979; May, 1979). The geology consists of Miocene basin-fill sedimentary rocks that rest unconformably on, or are faulted against, Proterozoic crystalline metamorphic rocks. The Miocene rocks dip gently to the southeast, except where the attitudes are controlled by faulting or by the underlying basement topography. The Precambrian and Miocene rocks are unconformably overlain by Quaternary pediment and river gravels, loess, travertine, landslide debris, and alluvium. The Precambrian rocks are faulted into horsts in several areas by north - northeast - trending normal faults.

  12. The Wallula fault and tectonic framework of south-central Washington, as interpreted from magnetic and gravity anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian; Weaver, Craig; Wells, Ray E.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2014-06-11

    Magnetic and gravity data, collected in south-central Washington near the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt (YFTB) are used to model upper crustal structure, the extent of the late Columbia River Basalt flow named the Ice Harbor member, the vertical conduits (dikes) that the Ice Harbor erupted from, and whether the dikes are offset or affected by faulting on the Wallula Fault zone.

  13. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  14. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  15. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  16. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  17. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  18. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  19. Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mize, Jeffery J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The high frequency switching megawatt-class High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is now in operation. One of the major problems with the modulator systems is shoot-thru conditions that can occur in a IGBTs H-bridge topology resulting in large fault currents and device failure in a few microseconds. The Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis (DFDC) is a fault monitoring system; it monitors transformer flux saturation using a window comparator and dV/dt events on the cathode voltage caused by any abnormality such as capacitor breakdown, transformer primary turns shorts, or dielectric breakdown between the transformer primary and secondary. If faults are detected, the DFDC will inhibit the IGBT gate drives and shut the system down, significantly reducing the possibility of a shoot-thru condition or other equipment damaging events. In this paper, we will present system integration considerations, performance characteristics of the DFDC, and discuss its ability to significantly reduce costly down time for the entire facility.

  20. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

    2009-03-31

    This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as

  1. Thoughts Regarding the Dimensions of Faults at Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas, Nye County, Nevada, Based on Surface and Underground Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, S.L.; Prothro, L.B.; Townsend, M.J.; Townsend, D.R.

    2011-02-01

    The geologic setting and history, along with observations through 50 years of detailed geologic field work, show that large-displacement (i.e., greater than 30 meters of displacement) syn- to post-volcanic faults are rare in the Rainier Mesa area. Faults observed in tunnels and drill holes are mostly tight, with small displacements (most less than 1.5 meters) and small associated damage zones. Faults are much more abundant in the zeolitized tuffs than in the overlying vitric tuffs, and there is little evidence that faults extend downward from the tuff section through the argillic paleocolluvium into pre-Tertiary rocks. The differences in geomechanical characteristics of the various tuff lithologies at Rainier Mesa suggest that most faults on Rainer Mesa are limited to the zeolitic units sandwiched between the overlying vitric bedded tuffs and the underlying pre-Tertiary units (lower carbonate aquifer3, lower clastic confining unit1, and Mesozoic granite confining unit).

  2. Automatic Fault Classification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automatic Fault Classification of Photovoltaic Strings Based on an In Situ IV Characterization System and a Gaussian Process Algorithm. C. Birk Jones ∗ , Manel Mart´ ınez-Ram´ on ‡ , § Ryan Smith † , Craig K. Carmignani ∗ , Olga Lavrova ∗ , Charles Robinson ∗ , and Joshua S. Stein ∗ ∗ Sandia National Laboratories Solar PV & Grid Integration, Albuquerque, NM, USA. ‡ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA, §

  3. Aerial photographic interpretation of lineaments and faults in late Cenozoic deposits in the eastern parts of the Saline Valley 1:100, 000 quadrangle, Nevada and California, and the Darwin Hills 1:100, 000 quadrangle, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reheis, M.C.

    1991-09-01

    Faults and fault-related lineaments in Quaternary and late Tertiary deposits in the southern part of the Walker Lane are potentially active and form patterns that are anomalous compared to those in most other areas of the Great Basin. Two maps at a scale of 1:100,000 summarize information about lineaments and faults in the area around and southwest of the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system based on extensive aerial-photo interpretation, limited field interpretation, limited field investigations, and published geologic maps. There are three major fault zones and two principal faults in the Saline Valley and Darwin Hills 1:100,000 quadrangles. (1) The Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system and (2) the Hunter Mountain fault zone are northwest-trending right-lateral strike-slip fault zones. (3) The Panamint Valley fault zone and associated Towne Pass and Emigrant faults are north-trending normal faults. The intersection of the Hunter Mountain and Panamint Valley fault zones is marked by a large complex of faults and lineaments on the floor of Panamint Valley. Additional major faults include (4) the north-northwest-trending Ash Hill fault on the west side of Panamint Valley, and (5) the north-trending range-front Tin Mountain fault on the west side of the northern Cottonwood Mountains. The most active faults at present include those along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, the Tin Mountain fault, the northwest and southeast ends of the Hunter Mountain fault zone, the Ash Hill fault, and the fault bounding the west side of the Panamint Range south of Hall Canyon. Several large Quaternary landslides on the west sides of the Cottonwood Mountains and the Panamint Range apparently reflect slope instability due chiefly to rapid uplift of these ranges. 16 refs.

  4. The geological structure at Clearlake, California: A preliminary review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    The compilation of geologic exploration data from a complex Franciscan terrain near Clearlake, California, was systematized by dividing the geology into three constituent geometric systems, which are a fault system, a lithotope, and a structural vector field. It is inferred the high heat flow is due to a deepseated magma that fed a line of cinder cones and andesite flows. The country rock of the proposed Hot Dry Rock facility will be autochthonous Franciscan metagreywackes on the south limb of the High Valley antiform. The metagreywacke has a foliate texture resulting in a strong mechanical axial anisotropy that caused exceptional deviation of the Audrey A-1 well.

  5. Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2010-05-25

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

  6. Fault Detection Tool Project: Automatic Discovery of Faults using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems LaboratoryBrayton Lab Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory PV ... HomeEnergy, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, SolarFault ...

  7. The Influence of fold and fracture development on reservoir behavior of the Lisburne Group of northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen: Michael T. Whalen; Paul Atkinson; Joseph Brinton; Thang Bui; Margarete Jadamec; Alexandre Karpov; John Lorenz; Michelle M. McGee; T.M. Parris; Ryan Shackleton

    2004-07-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is folded and thrust faulted where it is exposed throughout the Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. Symmetrical detachment folds characterize the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range. In contrast, Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hangingwall anticlines and footwall synclines. The Continental Divide thrust front separates these different structural styles in the Lisburne and also marks the southern boundary of the northeastern Brooks Range. Field studies were conducted for this project during 1999 to 2001 in various locations in the northeastern Brooks Range and in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, immediately south of the Continental Divide thrust front. Results are summarized below for the four main subject areas of the study.

  8. Significance of recurrent fault movement at Grays Point quarry, southeast Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diehl, S.F.; Throckmorton, C.K. ); Clendenin, C.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Geologic relationships indicate recurrent movement on a fault exposed at Grays Point, MO. Faulting offsets Middle-Late Ordovician Plattin Group, Decorah Group, Kimmswick Limestone, and Maquoketa Group strata. In plan, the fault is characterized by a relatively narrow zone (30--70 m) of northeast-striking fault slices associated with a northwest-striking zone of right-stepping en echelon fractures. This systematic fracture-fault array identifies right-lateral strike-slip movement. A vertically offset basal Decorah Group contact shows 22 m of down-to-the-southeast dip slip, which indicates a component of oblique slip. Oldest recognizable movement on the fault is evidenced by Maquoketa Group strata that fill a northeast-striking, wedge-shaped synform. Post-Ordovician movement along an adjacent subvertical fault displaces part of this synform 300 m right laterally. In thin section, the northwest-striking fracture set shows a polyphase history of deformation indicated by cataclastic textures and intrusion of carbonate-rich fluids. Three periods of movement occurred: (1) initial fracturing sealed by authigenic mineral cements; (2) renewed fracturing associated with recrystallization of sub-rounded clasts; and (3) subsequent brecciation marked by angular clasts and filling of fractures and vugs. Each successive fluid intrusion is characterized by an increase in grain size of the authigenic cement. The fault is subparallel to the regional, northeast-striking English Hill fault system. Polyphase oblique-slip deformation suggests that the fault, like others in southeastern Missouri, is a reactivated Late Proterozoic-Cambrian zone of weakness. Initial fault reactivation occurred during Middle-Late Ordovician as opposed to Devonian, as commonly interpreted for southeast Missouri. Multiple authigenic mineral cements imply that fluids may have been an important factor influencing the fault's tendency to be reactivated.

  9. Fault Mapping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to help locate and identify geothermal systems that rely on faults as high permeability pathways for fluid circulation. There are many techniques that can be done to...

  10. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  11. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  12. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross‐sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill‐hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics.

  13. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen; Michael T. Whalen

    2002-01-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. The Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is characteristically deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hanging wall anticlines and footwall synclines. In contrast, the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range is characterized by symmetrical detachment folds. The focus of our 2000 field studies was at the boundary between these structural styles in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The northern edge of thrust-truncated folds in Lisburne is marked by a local range front that likely represents an eastward continuation of the central Brooks Range front. This is bounded to the north by a gently dipping panel of Lisburne with local asymmetrical folds. The leading edge of the flat panel is thrust over Permian to Cretaceous rocks in a synclinal depression. These younger rocks overlie symmetrically detachment-folded Lisburne, as is extensively exposed to the north. Six partial sections were measured in the Lisburne of the flat panel and local range front. The Lisburne here is about 700 m thick and is interpreted to consist primarily of the Wachsmuth and Alapah Limestones, with only a thin veneer of Wahoo Limestone. The Wachsmuth (200 m) is gradational between the underlying Missippian Kayak Shale and the overlying Mississippian Alapah, and

  15. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  16. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  17. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1996-06-11

    Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

  18. Anastomosing grabens, low-angle faults, and Tertiary thrust( ) faults, western Markagunt Plateau, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, F.; Sable, E.G. )

    1993-04-01

    A structurally complex terrane composed of grabens and horsts, low-angle faults, Tertiary thrust( ) faults, gravity-slide blocks, and debris deposits has been mapped along the western Markagunt Plateau, east of Parowan and Summit, southwestern Utah. This terrane, structurally situated within the transition between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau provinces, contains Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The structures are mostly Miocene to Oligocene but some are Pleistocene. The oldest structure is the Red Hills low-angle shear zone, interpreted as a shallow structure that decoupled an upper plate composed of a Miocene-Oligocene volcanic ash-flow tuff and volcaniclastic succession from a lower plate of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The period of deformation on the shear zone is bracketed from field relationships between 22.5 and 20 Ma. The graben-horst system trends northeast and formed after about 20 Ma (and probably much later) based on displacement of dated dikes and a laccolith. The central part of the system contains many grabens that merge toward its southerly end to become a single graben. Within these grabens, (1) older structures are preserved, (2) debris eroded from horst walls forms lobe-shaped deposits, (3) Pleistocene basaltic cinder cones have localized along graben-bounding faults, and (4) rock units are locally folded suggesting some component of lateral translation along graben-bounding faults. Megabreccia deposits and landslide debris are common. Megabreccia deposits are interpreted as gravity-slide blocks of Miocene-Oligocene( ) age resulting from formation of the Red Hills shear zone, although some may be related to volcanism, and still others to later deformation. The debris deposits are landslides of Pleistocene-Pliocene( ) age possibly caused by continued uplift of the Markagunt Plateau.

  19. The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

  20. Three-Dimensional Geologic Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siler, Drew L; Mayhew, Brett; Faulds, James E

    2012-09-30

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to geothermal circulation is crucial in order to both mitigate the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to identify blind geothermal systems (no surface expression). Astor Pass, Nevada, one such blind geothermal system, lies near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present at Astor Pass. Previous studies identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of northwest-striking dextral and north-northwest-striking normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94˚C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting significantly higher maximum temperatures. Additional data, including reprocessed 2D seismic data and petrologic analysis of well cuttings, were integrated with existing and reinterpreted geologic maps and cross-sections to aid construction of a 3D geologic model. This comprehensive 3D integration of multiple data sets allows characterization of the structural setting of the Astor Pass blind geothermal system at a level of detail beyond what independent data interpretation can provide. Our analysis indicates that the blind geothermal system is controlled by two north- to northwest-plunging fault intersections.

  1. Structural styles of subandean fold and thrust belt of Peru and Southern Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Along-strike variations in structural styles of the east-verging Subandean fold and thrust belt (SAFTB) in Peru and southern Ecuador are controlled by the presence or absence of thick Late Permian to Jurassic evaporite sequences rather than changes in subducting plate geometries as has been suggested previously for the Andes. Salt distribution and thickness have not only controlled the styles and segmentation along the SAFTB but also have been important factors in strike variations across the belt. The southern Ecuador SAFTB lacks significant evaporite units and is characterized by thick-skinned deformation that encompasses high-angle reverse faults, and broad, low-amplitude folds. The style changes to thin-skinned deformation near 2S lat. and it is well illustrated in the Santiago and Huallaga basins where thick evaporite units are present. This segment is characterized by a major decollement on the salt, grabens formed by salt withdrawal from reactivation of thrust faults as listric normal faults, salt piercement at or near synclinal axes, and periclines and asymmetric folds. The frontal thrust of this thin-skinned segment consists of box, overturned and upright folds above shallow salt domes, and by a major backthrust at the mountain front. This segment extends to 1030'S lat., near Oxapampa, Peru, where the thin-skinned SAFTB is narrow and changes across strike to a thick-skinned deformation as the evaporite units thin and disappear eastward. South of 1030'S lat., a new thick-skinned deformation segment is present in southern Peru and characterizes most of the deformation in the SAFTB of the Ucayali and Madre De Dios basins.

  2. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  3. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  4. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  5. Comparison of Cenozoic Faulting at the Savannah River Site to Fault Characteristics of the Atlantic Coast Fault Province: Implications for Fault Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumbest, R.J.

    2000-11-14

    This study compares the faulting observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity with the faults of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province and concludes that both sets of faults exhibit the same general characteristics and are closely associated. Based on the strength of this association it is concluded that the faults observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity are in fact part of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province. Inclusion in this group means that the historical precedent established by decades of previous studies on the seismic hazard potential for the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province is relevant to faulting at the Savannah River Site. That is, since these faults are genetically related the conclusion of ''not capable'' reached in past evaluations applies.In addition, this study establishes a set of criteria by which individual faults may be evaluated in order to assess their inclusion in the Atlantic Coast Fault Province and the related association of the ''not capable'' conclusion.

  6. Geologic evolution and aspects of the petroleum geology of the northern East China Sea shelf basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G.H.; Kim, B.Y.; Shin, K.S.; Sunwoo, D.

    2006-02-15

    Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles reveals that the northern East China Sea shelf basin experienced two phases of rifting, followed by regional subsidence. The initial rifting in the Late Cretaceous created a series of grabens and half grabens, filled by alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposits. Regional uplift and folding (Yuquan movement) in the late Eocene-early Oligocene terminated the initial rifting. Rifting resumed in the early Oligocene, while alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposition continued to prevail. A second phase of uplift in the early Miocene terminated the rifting, marking the transition to the postrift phase. The early postrift phase (early Miocene-late Miocene) is characterized by regional subsidence and westward and northwestward marine transgression. Inversion (Longjing movement) in the late Miocene interrupted the postrift subsidence, resulting in an extensive thrust-fold belt in the eastern part of the area. The entire area entered a stage of regional subsidence again and has become a broad continental shelf. Source rocks include synrift lacustrine facies, fluvial shales, and coal beds. Synrift fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic deposits, postrift littoral and/or shallow-marine sandstones, and fractured basement have the potential to provide reservoirs. Various types of hydrocarbon traps (e.g., faulted anticlines, overthrusts, rollover anticlines, faults, unconformity traps, combination structural-stratigraphic traps, weathered basement, and stratigraphic traps) are recognized, but many of these traps have not been tested.

  7. SOPAC marine geology atlases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, T.E.; Seekins, B.A.; Young, J.D.; Wahler, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    The US Geological Survey conducted a series of marine geologic and geophysical cruises in the southwest Pacific Ocean in 1982 and 1984 as part of a program with participation by Australia and New Zealand. These two SOPAC expeditions obtained various data, which have been compiled into a series of charts and thematic products for the offshore areas of Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, and Papua New Guinea. The maps and charts presently being compiled or revised combine previously collected data with information from the SOPAC expeditions. Regional charts at a scale of approximately 1:3 million are included, and more detailed coverage is available at 1:1 million. Additional geologic information-such as gravity, magnetics, and possibly sediment isopachs-is provided on overlays to the topographic base charts. Reproductions of the seismic reflection data are also included, and tracklines with both time marks and shotpoints will permit correlation with the analog and digital seismic records.

  8. The Owens Valley Fault Zone Eastern California and Surface Faulting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it steps 3 km to the left and continues northwest across Crater Mountain and through Big Pine. The fault has an overall strike of 340 and dip of 8015 ENE. Surface...

  9. Fault Detection Tool Project: Automatic Discovery of Faults using Machine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning Fault Detection Tool Project: Automatic Discovery of Faults using Machine Learning - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  10. Hot Pot Detail - Evidence of Quaternary Faulting

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Compilation of published data, field observations and photo interpretation relevant to Quaternary faulting at Hot Pot.

  11. Hot Pot Detail - Evidence of Quaternary Faulting

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-27

    Compilation of published data, field observations and photo interpretation relevant to Quaternary faulting at Hot Pot.

  12. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  13. Fault Controlled | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has been provided for this term. Add a Definition This classification is used if the literature describes the geothermal fluids as being controlled by faults, but not in detail....

  14. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  15. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  16. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2008-06-24

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  17. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-04-16

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  18. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-02-12

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  19. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-14

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  20. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and

  1. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Kumar, Navanit; Zhang, Yingqi; Jordan, Preston; Pan, Lehua; Granvold, Patrick; Chow, Fotini K.

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a framework for assessing the leakage risk of geologic carbon sequestration sites. This framework, known as the Certification Framework (CF), emphasizes wells and faults as the primary potential leakage conduits. Vulnerable resources are grouped into compartments, and impacts due to leakage are quantified by the leakage flux or concentrations that could potentially occur in compartments under various scenarios. The CF utilizes several model components to simulate leakage scenarios. One model component is a catalog of results of reservoir simulations that can be queried to estimate plume travel distances and times, rather than requiring CF users to run new reservoir simulations for each case. Other model components developed for the CF and described here include fault characterization using fault-population statistics; fault connection probability using fuzzy rules; well-flow modeling with a drift-flux model implemented in TOUGH2; and atmospheric dense-gas dispersion using a mesoscale weather prediction code.

  2. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  3. Solvent-induced forces in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Naim, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-08-23

    The solvent-induced forces between various groups on the protein are examined. It is found that the intramolecular hydrophilic forces are likely to be the strongest forces mediated through the solvent. It is argued that these are probably the most important solvent-induced driving forces in the process of protein folding.

  4. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  5. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-18

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  6. Simplified Protein Models: Predicting Folding Pathways and Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simplified Protein Models: Predicting Folding Pathways and Structure Using Amino Acid Sequences Title: Simplified Protein Models: Predicting Folding Pathways and Structure Using ...

  7. SMALL, GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX RESERVOIRS CAN BENEFIT FROM RESERVOIR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Bennett

    2002-06-24

    The Cascade Sand zone of the Mission-Visco Lease in the Cascade Oil field of Los Angeles County, California, has been under water flood since 1970. Increasing water injection to increase oil production rates was being considered as an opportunity to improve oil recovery. However, a secondary gas cap had formed in the up-dip portion of the reservoir with very low gas cap pressures, creating concern that oil could be displaced into the gas cap resulting in the loss of recoverable oil. Therefore, injecting gas into the gas cap to keep the gas cap pressurized and restrict the influx of oil during water injection was also being considered. Further, it was recognized that the reservoir geology in the gas cap area is very complex with numerous folding and faulting and thus there are potential pressure barriers in several locations throughout the reservoir. With these conditions in mind, there were concerns regarding well to well continuity in the gas cap, which could interfere with the intended repressurization impact. Concerns about the pattern of gas flow from well to well, the possibilities of cycling gas without the desired increased pressure, and the possible loss of oil displaced into the gas cap resulted in the decision to conduct a gas tracer survey in an attempt to better define inter-well communication. Following the gas tracer survey, a reservoir model would be developed to integrate the findings of the gas tracer survey, known geologic and reservoir data, and historic production data. The reservoir model would be used to better define the reservoir characteristics and provide information that could help optimize the waterflood-gas injection project under consideration for efficient water and gas injection management to increase oil production. However, due to inadequate gas sampling procedures in the field and insufficiently developed laboratory analytical techniques, the laboratory was unable to detect the tracer in the gas samples taken. At that point, focus

  8. Recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults, Palo Duro basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnik, R.T.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of Late Precambrian through Quaternary strata in the Palo Duro basin and surrounding uplifts documents recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults. Basement blocks have been uplifted with little tilting or folding of overlying strata along a system of northwest-southeast oriented faults, part of a regional trend extending from central Colorado to southwestern Oklahoma. The orientation of basement terranes in Colorado and that of a 50-mi (80-km) long mylonite zone in east-central New Mexico suggest a Precambrian age for the faults. An Arkosic sandstone overlies basement and underlies a Cambrian(.) quartzose sandstone in a few Palo Duro basin wells. It may represent debris shed from active fault blocks during the opening of the southern Oklahoma aulocogen in the Late Precambrian or Early Cambrian. Ordovician carbonates thin or are missing beneath Mississippian carbonates on some fault blocks, indicating a post-Ordovician-pre-Mississippian period of faulting. The greatest amount of deformation occurred during the Pennsylvanian. Thickness, distribution, and facies of sediments were controlled by the location of active faults. Lower Pennsylvanian strata thin by up to 50% across some structures. Fault blocks provided sources of arkosic debris and loci for carbonate buildups throughout the Pennsylvanian and Early Permian. Around the periphery of the basin, Late Pennsylvanian or Early Permian faulting caused a wedging out of older units beneath the Wolfcamp. Permian, Triassic, and Neogene units, along with present topography, all have been subtly affected by basement structures. The entire section thins over basement highs. Middle and Upper Permian evaporites are thicker in structural lows. The overlying Dockum Group (Triassic) and Ogallala Formation (Neogene), both nonmarine clastic units, become finer grained over basement highs. Present topographic highs coincide with some basement highs.

  9. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating the impacts of fracture zone on pressure build-up and ground surface uplift during geological CO? sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2015-06-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation and preexisting fault properties was developed to systematically evaluate the impacts of preexisting faults on pressure buildup and ground surface uplift during CO? injection. Numerical test cases were conducted using a coupled hydro-geomechanical simulator, eSTOMP (extreme-scale Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases). For efficient sensitivity analysis and reliable construction of a reduced-order model, a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to effectively sample a high-dimensional input parameter space to explore uncertainties associated with hydrologic, geologic, and geomechanical properties. The uncertainty quantification results show that the impacts on geomechanical response from the pre-existing faults mainly depend on reservoir and fault permeability. When the fault permeability is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the reservoir permeability, the fault can be considered as an impermeable block that resists fluid transport in the reservoir, which causes pressure increase near the fault. When the fault permeability is close to the reservoir permeability, or higher than 10?? m in this study, the fault can be considered as a conduit that penetrates the caprock, connecting the fluid flow between the reservoir and the upper rock.

  10. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Western Michigan University 58 GEOSCIENCES Geological carbon sequestration Enhanced oil recovery Characterization of oil, gas and saline reservoirs Geological carbon...

  11. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Markley, Finley W.

    1976-01-01

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  12. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  13. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  14. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  15. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  16. Arizona Geological Society Digest 22

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... on active northeast-striking faults (e.g., Meremonte et al., 1995; Smith et al., 2001). ... 05-9, scale 1:24,000. Faulds, J.E., Smith, E.I., and Gans, P., 1999, Spatial and ...

  17. Hydrocarbon exploration through remote sensing and field work in the onshore Eastern Papuan Fold Belt, Gulf province, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekker, F.; Balkwill, H.; Slater, A. ); Herner, R. ); Kampschuur, W. )

    1990-05-01

    Over the years several types of remote sensing surveys have been acquired of the Eastern Papuan Fold Belt, in the Gulf Province of Papua New Guinea. These include aerial photographs, Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Each has been used by Petro-Canada Inc. for interpreting the geologic structure and stratigraphy of onshore hydrocarbon prospects. Analysis of available remotely sensed imagery reveals greater structural complexity than is shown on published geologic maps. Foremost among the images is SAR because of its low, artificial sun angle. Hence, a comprehensive view of the area has been acquired revealing many structural elements previously not appreciated. A distinct difference in structural style is found between the northern and southern segment of the Eastern Papuan fold belt in the study area. The northern segment shows discontinuous, open folds with widely separated anticlines set in featureless valleys. The southern segment is tightly folded, possessing few anticlines and synclines clearly recognizable on the imagery. However, structural components can be traced easily for tens of miles. Recent field work supports an SAR structural interpretation suggesting most, if not all, anticlines in the northern segment are overturned. The combination of remote sensing and field work proved invaluable in understanding the fold belt tectonics and has aided considerably in the selection of drilling locations.

  18. Microsoft Word - RNA_folding_Herschlag.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2003 Exploring the Folding Landscape of a Structured RNA by SAXS Rick Russell, Ian S. Millett, Sebastian Doniach and Daniel Herschlag Stanford University One goal of genome projects is to systematically identify genes (1,2). The best current knowledge indicates that humans carry approximately 35000 genes. This number is an estimate that varies from expert to expert and range up to 100,000 (3-5). To anyone who has taken an elementary biology class, this ambiguity must seem strange. How hard

  19. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-02-18

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks providemore » the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. As a result, testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.« less

  20. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, Andy; Nelson, Austin; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chebahtah, Justin; Wang, Trudie; McCarty, Michael

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  1. CONTROL AND FAULT DETECTOR CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winningstad, C.N.

    1958-04-01

    A power control and fault detectcr circuit for a radiofrequency system is described. The operation of the circuit controls the power output of a radio- frequency power supply to automatically start the flow of energizing power to the radio-frequency power supply and to gradually increase the power to a predetermined level which is below the point where destruction occurs upon the happening of a fault. If the radio-frequency power supply output fails to increase during such period, the control does not further increase the power. On the other hand, if the output of the radio-frequency power supply properly increases, then the control continues to increase the power to a maximum value. After the maximumn value of radio-frequency output has been achieved. the control is responsive to a ''fault,'' such as a short circuit in the radio-frequency system being driven, so that the flow of power is interrupted for an interval before the cycle is repeated.

  2. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D.; Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  3. Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet Plugging America Into the Future of Power: Superconducting & Solid-state Power Equipment What are Fault Current Limiters Why do we need Fault Current Limiters What are the benefits to utilities Fault Current Limiter projects Fault Current Limiters (926.42 KB) More Documents & Publications An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements Superconductivity Program Overview Superconductivity for

  4. Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in an all-atom Go model Title: Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in an all-atom Go model ...

  5. Numerical Studies of Fluid Leakage from a Geologic DisposalReservoir for CO2 Show Self-Limiting Feedback between Fluid Flow and HeatTransfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-22

    Leakage of CO2 from a hypothetical geologic storage reservoir along an idealized fault zone has been simulated, including transitions between supercritical, liquid, and gaseous CO2. We find strong non-isothermal effects due to boiling and Joule-Thomson cooling of expanding CO2. Leakage fluxes are limited by limitations in conductive heat transfer to the fault zone. The interplay between multiphase flow and heat transfer effects produces non-monotonic leakage behavior.

  6. Global Sampling for Integrating Physics-Specific Subsystems and Quantifying Uncertainties of CO2 Geological Sequestration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Y.; Tong, C.; Trainor-Guitten, W. J.; Lu, C.; Mansoor, K.; Carroll, S. A.

    2012-12-20

    The risk of CO2 leakage from a deep storage reservoir into a shallow aquifer through a fault is assessed and studied using physics-specific computer models. The hypothetical CO2 geological sequestration system is composed of three subsystems: a deep storage reservoir, a fault in caprock, and a shallow aquifer, which are modeled respectively by considering sub-domain-specific physics. Supercritical CO2 is injected into the reservoir subsystem with uncertain permeabilities of reservoir, caprock, and aquifer, uncertain fault location, and injection rate (as a decision variable). The simulated pressure and CO2/brine saturation are connected to the fault-leakage model as a boundary condition. CO2 andmore » brine fluxes from the fault-leakage model at the fault outlet are then imposed in the aquifer model as a source term. Moreover, uncertainties are propagated from the deep reservoir model, to the fault-leakage model, and eventually to the geochemical model in the shallow aquifer, thus contributing to risk profiles. To quantify the uncertainties and assess leakage-relevant risk, we propose a global sampling-based method to allocate sub-dimensions of uncertain parameters to sub-models. The risk profiles are defined and related to CO2 plume development for pH value and total dissolved solids (TDS) below the EPA's Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) for drinking water quality. A global sensitivity analysis is conducted to select the most sensitive parameters to the risk profiles. The resulting uncertainty of pH- and TDS-defined aquifer volume, which is impacted by CO2 and brine leakage, mainly results from the uncertainty of fault permeability. Subsequently, high-resolution, reduced-order models of risk profiles are developed as functions of all the decision variables and uncertain parameters in all three subsystems.« less

  7. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these biomolecular nanomachines must first be folded into a dazzling variety of shapes and forms before they can perform the multitude of functions fundamental to life. However, the mechanisms behind the protein-folding process have remained a

  8. Fault-tolerant dynamic task graph scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt, Mehmet C.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Kunal; Agrawal, Gagan

    2014-11-16

    In this paper, we present an approach to fault tolerant execution of dynamic task graphs scheduled using work stealing. In particular, we focus on selective and localized recovery of tasks in the presence of soft faults. We elicit from the user the basic task graph structure in terms of successor and predecessor relationships. The work stealing-based algorithm to schedule such a task graph is augmented to enable recovery when the data and meta-data associated with a task get corrupted. We use this redundancy, and the knowledge of the task graph structure, to selectively recover from faults with low space and time overheads. We show that the fault tolerant design retains the essential properties of the underlying work stealing-based task scheduling algorithm, and that the fault tolerant execution is asymptotically optimal when task re-execution is taken into account. Experimental evaluation demonstrates the low cost of recovery under various fault scenarios.

  9. Sandia Energy - PV Arc-Fault and Ground Fault Detection and Mitigation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prescribe maintenance schedules, and warn of arc-fault events. Investigating the proscons of module-level, string-level, and array-level arc-fault detection schemes....

  10. Geological remote sensing for hydrocarbon exploration in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, G.L.; Phelps, J.C.; Eisenberg, L.L.

    1996-07-01

    One of the most active hydrocarbon exploration provinces of the last decade has been the fold and thrust belt of Papua New Guinea. Geologic remote sensing is an indispensable part of the exploration process in that remote and rugged area where usable seismic data are obtainable only locally, if at all. Photointerpretation of stereo synthetic aperture radar imagery has been especially useful in conventional lithostratigraphic mapping, both local and regional. Results of remote sensing imagery interpretation, integrated with surface geologic data, limited seismic, and balanced structural cross sections, facilitated the documentation of structural styles and provided the basis for a new, regional structural model. The role of remote sensing during various stages of the exploration process is summarized; imagery and map examples are presented.

  11. Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Idaho Geological Survey is located in Boise, Idaho. About Information on past oil and gas exploration wells in Idaho was transferred to the Idaho Geological Survey in...

  12. Chinese Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chinese Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chinese Geological Survey Place: China Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Chinese body which is involved in surveys of...

  13. Geologic interpretation of gravity anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, B.A.; Klushin, I.G.

    1990-04-19

    This Russian textbook provides a sufficiently complete and systematic illumination of physico-geologic and mathematical aspect of complex problem of interpretation of gravity anomalies. The rational methods of localization of anomalies are examined in detail. All methods of interpreting gravity anomalies are described which have found successful application in practice. Also given are ideas of some new methods of the interpretation of gravity anomalies, the prospects for further development and industrial testing. Numerous practical examples to interpretation are given. Partial Contents: Bases of gravitational field theory; Physico-geologic bases of gravitational prospecting; Principles of geologic interpretation of gravity anomalies; Conversions and calculations of anomalies; Interpretation of gravity anomalies for bodies of correct geometric form and for bodies of arbitrary form; Geologic interpretation of the results of regional gravitational photographing; Searches and prospecting of oil- and gas-bearing structures and of deposits of ore and nonmetalliferous useful minerals.

  14. Detailed Geophysical Fault Characterization in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore H. Asch; Donald Sweetkind; Bethany L. Burton; Erin L. Wallin

    2009-02-10

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Between the years 1951 and 1992, 659 underground nuclear tests took place in Yucca Flat; most were conducted in large, vertical excavations that penetrated alluvium and the underlying Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Radioactive and other potential chemical contaminants at the NTS are the subject of a long-term program of investigation and remediation by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, under its Environmental Restoration Program. As part of the program, the DOE seeks to assess the extent of contamination and to evaluate the potential risks to humans and the environment from byproducts of weapons testing. To accomplish this objective, the DOE Environmental Restoration Program is constructing and calibrating a ground-water flow model to predict hydrologic flow in Yucca Flat as part of an effort to quantify the subsurface hydrology of the Nevada Test Site. A necessary part of calibrating and evaluating a model of the flow system is an understanding of the location and characteristics of faults that may influence ground-water flow. In addition, knowledge of fault-zone architecture and physical properties is a fundamental component of the containment of the contamination from underground nuclear tests, should such testing ever resume at the Nevada Test Site. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a detailed understanding of the geometry and physical properties of fault zones in Yucca Flat. This study was designed to investigate faults in greater detail and to characterize fault geometry, the presence of fault splays, and the fault-zone width. Integrated geological and geophysical studies have been designed and implemented to work toward this goal. This report describes the geophysical surveys conducted near two drill holes in Yucca Flat, the data analyses performed, and the

  15. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic ...

  16. Efficient Synchronization Stability Metrics for Fault Clearing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Efficient Synchronization Stability Metrics for Fault Clearing Authors: Backhaus, Scott N. 1 ; Chertkov, Michael 1 ; Bent, Russell Whitford 1 ; Bienstock, Daniel 2...

  17. Reducing the Risk of Arc-Faults

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arc-fault detection algorithms by: 1. Performing arcing tests at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) with AFCI prototypes to verify their functionality on...

  18. Unconventional modelling of faulted reservoirs: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldthorpe, W.H.; Chow, Y.S.

    1985-02-01

    An example is presented of detailed unconventional gridding of the North Rankin Field, which is a large, structurally complex gas-condensate field offshore Western Australia. A non-Cartesian areal grid was used with corner point geometry to approximate a generalized curvilinear coordinate system for the surface and interior of each reservoir unit. Coordinate lines in the vertical plane at any node in the grid were tilted where necessary to define sloping edges and sides of grid blocks. Thus, any sloping twisted surface could be modelled. To investigate possible communication across faults between different geological units, transmissibilities at faults were automatically calculated for any over-lapping cells and sensitivities made of the effect of varying these transmissibilities on well production, recovery factors, pressure decline and water encroachment. The model was solved with a fully implicit simulator using a Newton-Raphson iteration method for the non-linear equations and a variant of the Conjugate Gradient procedure with a preconditioning matrix for the linear equations.

  19. Variscan fold belt and its foreland in western Europe from late Carboniferous to Permian time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascle, A.; Benard, F.; Cazes, M.; Le Gall, B.

    1988-08-01

    The Variscan front was emplaced in the Later Carboniferous with a south-to-north or southeast-to-northwest-trending vergence of thrusting. At the same time, folds were formed in the foreland. In England and southern Scotland, such structures were induced by an east-west direction of shortening, followed by a more subdued north-south compressive event. In Stephanian time, isolated basins developed on the Hercynian belt. In the Massif Central Marues Massif, they are closely related to transcurrent faults which developed in response to north-south-trending compressive stresses. The distribution of stresses completely changed in Early Permian time when extension dominated almost everywhere. Three kinds of basins developed at that time: those related to the relaxation of stresses on the Hercynian range, a north-south-trending rift system in the western United Kingdom and the North Sea, and a broad flexural evaporitic basin from eastern England to Poland.

  20. rzq8042.tmp

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... dip, an:i identification of stratigrathic contacts; ii) Structural geology: description of local and regional structural features (e.g., folding, faulting, tilting, jointing, ...

  1. Seismic Reflection Project Near the Southern Terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi Faults, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. M. Jackson; G. S. Carpenter; R. P. Smith; J. L. Casper

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen seismic reflection lines were processed and interpreted to determine the southern terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi faults along the northwest boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The southernmost terminations of the Arco and Howe segments were determined to support characterization of the Lost River and Lemhi fault sources, respectively, for the INL probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Keywords:Keywords are required forExternal Release Review*Keywords  Keywords *Contacts (Type and Name are required for each row) Type ofContactContact Name  POC Editor RecordFour commercial seismic reflection lines (Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2; Howe lines 81-3 and 82-2) were obtained from the Montana Power Company. The seismic data were collected in the early 1980’s using a Vibroseis source with station and shot point locations that resulted in 12-fold data. Arco lines 81?1 and 81?2 and Howe lines 81?3 and 82?2 are located within the basins adjacent to the Arco and Howe segments, respectively. Seven seismic lines (Arco lines A1, A2, A3, and A4 and Howe lines H1, H2, and H3) were acquired by EG&G Idaho, Inc. Geosciences for this study using multiple impacts with an accelerated weight drop source. Station and shot point locations yielded 12-fold data. The seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. Two seismic lines (Arco line S2 and Howe line S4) were obtained from Sierra Geophysics. In 1984, they acquired seismic reflection data using an accelerated weight drop source with station and shot point locations that yielded 6-fold data. The two seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. In 1992 for this study, Geotrace Technologies Inc. processed all of the seismic reflection data using industry standard processing techniques. The

  2. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  3. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, James

    2013-05-24

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  4. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing; Tekletsadik, Kasegn

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  5. Conversion of the Big Hill geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2003-02-01

    The Big Hill salt dome, located in southeastern Texas, is home to one of four underground oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Big Hill site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 14 oil storage caverns at the site. This work provides a realistic and internally consistent geologic model of the Big Hill site that can be used in support of future work.

  6. Conversion of the West Hackberry geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.

    2004-08-01

    The West Hackberry salt dome, in southwestern Louisiana, is one of four underground oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the West Hackberry site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary layers, mapped faults, and a portion of the oil storage caverns at the site. This work provides a realistic and internally consistent geologic model of the West Hackberry site that can be used in support of future work.

  7. Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2005-04-01

    The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

  8. Accordian-folded boot shield for flexible swivel connection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible swivel boot connector for connecting a first boot shield section to a second boot shield section, both first and second boot sections having openings therethrough, the second boot section having at least two adjacent accordian folds at the end having the opening, the second boot section being positioned through the opening of the first boot section such that a first of the accordian folds is within the first boot section and a second of the accordian folds is outside of the first boot, includes first and second annular discs, the first disc being positioned within and across the first accordian fold, the second disc being positioned within and across the second accordian fold, such that the first boot section is moveably and rigidly connected between the first and second accordian folds of the second boot section.

  9. Multi-fault Tolerance for Cartesian Data Distributions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fault-tolerant linear algebra (FTLA) algo- rithms employ additional processors that store parities along the dimensions of a matrix to tolerate multiple, simultaneous faults. ...

  10. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling of fault reactivation ...

  11. Termination of a Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sometimes split into multiple closely-spaced faults that result in increased permeability. Fault sets at these terminations sometimes appear as "horsetailing" splays that...

  12. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these biomolecular nanomachines must first be folded into a dazzling variety of shapes and forms before they can perform the multitude of functions fundamental to life. However, the mechanisms behind the protein-folding process have remained a foggy mystery. Now the fog is lifting: a team of researchers from Berkeley Lab,

  13. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kinetics (Conference) | SciTech Connect Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated

  14. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these biomolecular nanomachines must first be folded into a dazzling variety of shapes and forms before they can perform the multitude of functions fundamental to life. However, the mechanisms behind the protein-folding process have remained a foggy mystery. Now the fog is lifting: a team of researchers from Berkeley Lab,

  15. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these biomolecular nanomachines must first be folded into a dazzling variety of shapes and forms before they can perform the multitude of functions fundamental to life. However, the mechanisms behind the protein-folding process have remained a foggy mystery. Now the fog is lifting: a team of researchers from Berkeley Lab,

  16. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these biomolecular nanomachines must first be folded into a dazzling variety of shapes and forms before they can perform the multitude of functions fundamental to life. However, the mechanisms behind the protein-folding process have remained a foggy mystery. Now the fog is lifting: a team of researchers from Berkeley Lab,

  17. Geologic and tectonic characteristics of rockbursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushkin, V.V.; Charlamov, V.A.; Kondratyev, S.V.; Rybnov, Y.S.; Shemyakin, V.M.; Sisov, I.A.; Syrnikov, N.M.; Turuntaev, S.B.; Vasilyeva, T.V.

    1995-06-01

    The modern mining enterprises have attained such scales of engineering activity that their direct influence to a rock massif and in series of cases to the region seismic regime doesn`t provoke any doubts. Excavation and removal of large volumes of rock mass, industrial explosions and other technological factors during long time can lead to the accumulation of man-made changes in rock massifs capable to cause catastrophic consequences. The stress state changes in considerable domains of massif create dangerous concentration of stresses at large geological heterogeneities - faults localized in the mining works zone. External influence can lead in that case to such phenomena as tectonic rockbursts and man-made earthquakes. The rockbursts problem in world mining practice exists for more than two hundred years. So that its actuality not only doesn`t decrease but steadily mounts up as due to the mining works depth increase, enlargement of the useful minerals excavations volumes as due to the possibility of safe use of the rock massif potential energy for facilitating the mastering of the bowels of the Earth and for making that more cheap. The purpose of present work is to study the engineering activity influence to processes occurring in the upper part of Earth crust and in particular in a rock massif. The rock massif is treated in those studies as a geophysical medium - such approach takes into account the presence of block structure of medium and the continuous exchange of energy between parts of that structure. The idea ``geophysical medium`` is applied in geophysics sufficiently wide and stresses the difference of actual Earth crust and rock massifs from the continuous media models discussed in mechanics.

  18. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN ...

  19. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley,...

  20. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these...

  1. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE...

  2. A Fault Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKie, Jim

    2014-11-20

    The FOX project, funded under the ASCR X-stack I program, developed systems software and runtime libraries for a new approach to the data and work distribution for massively parallel, fault oblivious application execution. Our work was motivated by the premise that exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today’s machines. To deliver the capability of exascale hardware, the systems software must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. Our OS research has prototyped new methods to provide efficient resource sharing, synchronization, and protection in a many-core compute node. We have experimented with alternative task/dataflow programming models and shown scalability in some cases to hundreds of thousands of cores. Much of our software is in active development through open source projects. Concepts from FOX are being pursued in next generation exascale operating systems. Our OS work focused on adaptive, application tailored OS services optimized for multi → many core processors. We developed a new operating system NIX that supports role-based allocation of cores to processes which was released to open source. We contributed to the IBM FusedOS project, which promoted the concept of latency-optimized and throughput-optimized cores. We built a task queue library based on distributed, fault tolerant key-value store and identified scaling issues. A second fault tolerant task parallel library was developed, based on the Linda tuple space model, that used low level interconnect primitives for optimized communication. We designed fault tolerance mechanisms for task parallel computations

  3. Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of geomechanicsincluding the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operationshas recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  4. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  5. Method for fabricating fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  6. Method for fabricating fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1994-12-27

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figures.

  7. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavrova, Olga; Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  8. HVAC Fault Detection and Diagnosis Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-31

    This toolkit supports component-level model-based fault detection methods in commercial building HVAC systems. The toolbox consists of five basic modules: a parameter estimator for model calibration, a preprocessor, an AHU model simulator, a steady-state detector, and a comparator. Each of these modules and the fuzzy logic rules for fault diagnosis are described in detail. The toolbox is written in C++ and also invokes the SPARK simulation program.

  9. A connecting network with fault tolerance capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciminiera, L.; Serra, A.

    1986-06-01

    A new multistage interconnection network is presented in this paper. It is able to handle the communications between the connected devices correctly, even in the presence of fault(s) in the network. This goal is achieved by using redundant paths with a fast procedure able to dynamically reroute the message. It is also shown that the rerouting properties are still valid when broadcasting transmission is used.

  10. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-05-11

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of

  11. Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

  12. Geological input to reservoir simulation, Champion Field, offshore Brunei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.; Salahudin, S.; Ho, T.C.

    1994-07-01

    Brunei Shell Petroleum's giant Champion field is in a mature stage of development with about 23 yr of production history to date. The field comprises a complex sequence of Miocene shallow marine and deltaic layered clastic reservoirs cut by numerous growth faults. This study was aimed at providing a quantified estimate of the effect of lateral and vertical discontinuities within the I and J reservoirs on the recovery for both depletion drive and in a waterflood, with a view to identifying the optimal method of completing the development of the oil reserves in this area. Geological input to the ECLIPSE simulator was aimed at quantifying two key parameters: (1) STOIIP connected to the well bore and (2) permeability contrast. Connected STOIIP is a function of the domain size of interconnected sand bodies, and this parameter was quantified by the use of detailed sedimentology resulting in sand-body facies maps for each reservoir sublayer. Permeability contrast was quantified by using a wireline-log based algorithm, calibrated against core data, which improved the existing accuracy of permeability estimates in this part of the field. Results of simulation runs illustrate the importance of quantifying geologic heterogeneity and provide valuable information for future field development planning.

  13. Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologic map data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii geologic map data Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  14. Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: Utah Geological Survey Name: Utah Geological Survey Address: 1594 W. North Temple Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84114-6100 Phone Number: 801.537.3300 Website:...

  15. Development of Fault Models for Hybrid Fault Detection and Diagnostics Algorithm: October 1, 2014 -- May 5, 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Howard; Braun, James E.

    2015-12-31

    This report describes models of building faults created for OpenStudio to support the ongoing development of fault detection and diagnostic (FDD) algorithms at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Building faults are operating abnormalities that degrade building performance, such as using more energy than normal operation, failing to maintain building temperatures according to the thermostat set points, etc. Models of building faults in OpenStudio can be used to estimate fault impacts on building performance and to develop and evaluate FDD algorithms. The aim of the project is to develop fault models of typical heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment in the United States, and the fault models in this report are grouped as control faults, sensor faults, packaged and split air conditioner faults, water-cooled chiller faults, and other uncategorized faults. The control fault models simulate impacts of inappropriate thermostat control schemes such as an incorrect thermostat set point in unoccupied hours and manual changes of thermostat set point due to extreme outside temperature. Sensor fault models focus on the modeling of sensor biases including economizer relative humidity sensor bias, supply air temperature sensor bias, and water circuit temperature sensor bias. Packaged and split air conditioner fault models simulate refrigerant undercharging, condenser fouling, condenser fan motor efficiency degradation, non-condensable entrainment in refrigerant, and liquid line restriction. Other fault models that are uncategorized include duct fouling, excessive infiltration into the building, and blower and pump motor degradation.

  16. AASG State Geological Survey | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AASG State Geological Survey AASG State Geological Survey presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey aasg__geo_survey_peer2013.pdf (2.44 MB) More Documents & Publications State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance National Geothermal Data Systems Data Acquisition and Access

  17. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

    2005-09-26

    This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

  18. Global Sampling for Integrating Physics-Specific Subsystems and Quantifying Uncertainties of CO2 Geological Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Y.; Tong, C.; Trainor-Guitten, W. J.; Lu, C.; Mansoor, K.; Carroll, S. A.

    2012-12-20

    The risk of CO2 leakage from a deep storage reservoir into a shallow aquifer through a fault is assessed and studied using physics-specific computer models. The hypothetical CO2 geological sequestration system is composed of three subsystems: a deep storage reservoir, a fault in caprock, and a shallow aquifer, which are modeled respectively by considering sub-domain-specific physics. Supercritical CO2 is injected into the reservoir subsystem with uncertain permeabilities of reservoir, caprock, and aquifer, uncertain fault location, and injection rate (as a decision variable). The simulated pressure and CO2/brine saturation are connected to the fault-leakage model as a boundary condition. CO2 and brine fluxes from the fault-leakage model at the fault outlet are then imposed in the aquifer model as a source term. Moreover, uncertainties are propagated from the deep reservoir model, to the fault-leakage model, and eventually to the geochemical model in the shallow aquifer, thus contributing to risk profiles. To quantify the uncertainties and assess leakage-relevant risk, we propose a global sampling-based method to allocate sub-dimensions of uncertain parameters to sub-models. The risk profiles are defined and related to CO2 plume development for pH value and total dissolved solids (TDS) below the EPA's Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) for drinking water quality. A global sensitivity analysis is conducted to select the most sensitive parameters to the risk profiles. The resulting uncertainty of pH- and TDS-defined aquifer volume, which is impacted by CO2 and brine leakage, mainly results from the uncertainty of fault permeability. Subsequently, high-resolution, reduced-order models of risk profiles are developed as functions of all the decision variables and uncertain parameters in all three subsystems.

  19. Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Web Site: Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website Abstract Provides access to digital information on Montana's geology. Author Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology...

  20. CMI Education Course Inventory: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Inventory: Geology EngineeringGeochemistry Geology EngineeringGeochemistry Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, five offer courses in Geology....

  1. Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1- A Tool for informing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1- A Tool for informing Regional Evaluations of Alternative Geologic Media and Decision Making Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1- A Tool ...

  2. Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Name: Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries...

  3. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  4. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-02-23

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  5. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-04-24

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  6. Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Tri-Fold

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OSDBU has created a downloadable, print-on-demand tri-fold PDF that introduces the office, its role in the Department of Energy and its goals for supporting small business nationwide.

  7. UFO (UnFold Operator) computer program abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L.; Biggs, F.

    1982-11-01

    UFO (UnFold Operator) is an interactive user-oriented computer program designed to solve a wide range of problems commonly encountered in physical measurements. This document provides a summary of the capabilities of version 3A of UFO.

  8. Determining the role of hydration forces in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorenson, J.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Hura, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Soper, A.K. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot (United Kingdom). ISIS Facility] [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot (United Kingdom). ISIS Facility; Pertsemlidis, A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry] [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Head-Gordon, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    One of the primary issues in protein folding is determining what forces drive folding and eventually stabilize the native state. A delicate balance exists between electrostatic forces such as hydrogen bonding and salt bridges, and the hydrophobic effect, which are present for both intramolecular protein interactions and intermolecular contributions with the surrounding aqueous environment. This article describes a combined experimental, theoretical, and computational effort to show how the complexity of aqueous hydration can influence the structure, folding and aggregation, and stability of model protein systems. The unification of the theoretical and experimental work is the development or discovery of effective amino acid interactions that implicitly include the effects of aqueous solvent. The authors show that consideration of the full range of complexity of aqueous hydration forces such as many-body effects, long-ranged character of aqueous solvation, and the assumptions made about the degree of protein hydrophobicity can directly impact the observed structure, folding, and stability of model protein systems.

  9. In the OSTI Collections: Determining How Proteins Fold | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Some of the research into how proteins fold has been funded by the Department of Energy ... in terms of how the object's energy would change if a force acted to change the shape. ...

  10. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiwok, Vojt?ch Oborsk, Pavel; Krlov, Blanka; Pazrikov, Jana

    2015-03-21

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200?ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable.

  11. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have

  12. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30

    One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for

  13. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY (Conference) | SciTech Connect MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein

  14. Fault Detection and Load Distribution for the Wind Farm Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borchehrsen, Anders B.; Larsen, Jesper A.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-08-24

    In this paper a fault detection system and a fault tolerant controller for a wind farm model. The wind farm model used is the one proposed as a public challenge. In the model three types of faults are introduced to a wind farm consisting of nine turbines. A fault detection system designed, by taking advantage of the fact that within a wind farm several wind turbines will be operating under all most identical conditions. The turbines are then grouped, and then turbines within each group are used to generate residuals for turbines in the group. The generated residuals are then evaluated using dynamical cumulative sum. The designed fault detection system is cable of detecting all three fault types occurring in the model. But there is room for improving the fault detection in some areas. To take advantage of the fault detection system a fault tolerant controller for the wind farm has been designed. The fault tolerant controller is a dispatch controller which is estimating the possible power at each individual turbine and then setting the reference accordingly. The fault tolerant controller has been compared to a reference controller. And the comparison shows that the fault tolerant controller performance better in all measures. The fault detection and a fault tolerant controller has been designed, and based on the simulated results the overall performance of the wind farm is improved on all measures. Thereby this is a step towards improving the overall performance of current and future wind farms.

  15. Geological and geophysical evaluation of the Naricual Formation, Musipan-El Carito area, eastern Venezuela basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abud, J.; Oviedo, P.; Hernandex, J.; Garcia, E.; Escalona, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The recent giant oil discoveries in the lower Tertiary sedimentary sequence of the Monagas overthrust belt, Eastern Venezuela basin require short- and medium-term development plans based on technical production geological studies and models. The present study consists of a detailed geological and geophysical evaluation to define the reservoir in the producing Naricual Formation in the Musipan-El Carito areas, located west of El Furrial oil field. Due to its geological and reservoir characteristics, the northern Monagas area is considered as the top priority production alternative for the Venezuelan oil industry for the next 20 yr. The structural pattern of the area is related to major compressional stress applied northwest and from the northeast. Two fault systems are associated with this compression: (1) first-order, east-west-trending reverse faults dipping to the north, and (2) second-order, north-south-trending right-lateral strike-slip faults. The proposed sedimentological model is that of a paleodelta prograding from north to south. The depositional environment ranges from internal to continental shelf (barrier bars, tidal and distributary channels, lagoonal and associated facies). The STOIP in the Naricual Formation is 4.8 billion bbls, 52% of which is light-grade oil and 48% is medium-grade oil. The results of reservoir pressure analyses suggest lateral communication within the Naricual Formation between the Furrial and Musipan areas and give evidence of a permeability barrier between the Furrial-Musipan and El Carito areas. Depth vs. API gravity plots indicate a direct relationship between crude oil type and depth. The application of the results of the integrated reservoir studies gives precise answers to the production behavior of wells. An adjusted development plan is now under way to guarantee a rational, optimum recovery of the oil reserves.

  16. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, James R.; Garven, Grant

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  17. Buried pipelines in large fault movements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.J.; Wang, L.R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Responses of buried pipelines in large fault movements are examined based upon a non-linear cantilever beam analogy. This analogy assumes that the pipeline in a large deflection zone behaves like a cantilever beam under a transverse-concentrated shear at the inflection point with a uniformly distributed soil pressure along the entire span. The tangent modulus approach is adopted to analyze the coupled axial force-bending moment interaction on pipeline deformations in the inelastic range. The buckling load of compressive pipeline is computed by the modified Newmark`s numerical integration scheme. Parametric studies of both tensile and compressive pipeline responses to various fault movements, pipeline/fault crossing angles, soil/pipe friction angles, buried depths, pipe diameters and thickness are investigated. It is shown by the comparisons that previous findings were unconservative.

  18. VCSEL fault location apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeler, Gordon A.; Serkland, Darwin K.

    2007-05-15

    An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

  19. Solitons and protein folding: An In Silico experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilieva, N.; Dai, J.; Sieradzan, A.; Niemi, A.

    2015-10-28

    Protein folding [1] is the process of formation of a functional 3D structure from a random coil — the shape in which amino-acid chains leave the ribosome. Anfinsen’s dogma states that the native 3D shape of a protein is completely determined by protein’s amino acid sequence. Despite the progress in understanding the process rate and the success in folding prediction for some small proteins, with presently available physics-based methods it is not yet possible to reliably deduce the shape of a biologically active protein from its amino acid sequence. The protein-folding problem endures as one of the most important unresolved problems in science; it addresses the origin of life itself. Furthermore, a wrong fold is a common cause for a protein to lose its function or even endanger the living organism. Soliton solutions of a generalized discrete non-linear Schrödinger equation (GDNLSE) obtained from the energy function in terms of bond and torsion angles κ and τ provide a constructive theoretical framework for describing protein folds and folding patterns [2]. Here we study the dynamics of this process by means of molecular-dynamics simulations. The soliton manifestation is the pattern helix–loop–helix in the secondary structure of the protein, which explains the importance of understanding loop formation in helical proteins. We performed in silico experiments for unfolding one subunit of the core structure of gp41 from the HIV envelope glycoprotein (PDB ID: 1AIK [3]) by molecular-dynamics simulations with the MD package GROMACS. We analyzed 80 ns trajectories, obtained with one united-atom and two different all-atom force fields, to justify the side-chain orientation quantification scheme adopted in the studies and to eliminate force-field based artifacts. Our results are compatible with the soliton model of protein folding and provide first insight into soliton-formation dynamics.

  20. Fault-tolerant three-level inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-12-05

    A method for driving a neutral point clamped three-level inverter is provided. In one exemplary embodiment, DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped three-level inverter. The inverter has a plurality of nodes including first, second and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. Faults are checked for in the inverter and predetermined switches are automatically activated responsive to a detected fault such that three-phase electrical power is provided at the output nodes.

  1. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  2. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  3. Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This pulse was fed into the AFD circuit to better tune the arc-fault detector. Figure 4 shows the string current (Hall Effect), the arc-fault voltage (Arc V (TEK)), and the arcing ...

  4. Collective aspects of protein folding illustrated by a toy model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stillinger, F.H. [AT& T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [AT& T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Head-Gordon, T. [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A simple toy model for polypeptides serves as a testbed to illuminate some nonlocal, or collective, aspects of protein folding phenomena. The model is two dimensional and has only two amino acids, but involves a continuous range of backbone bend angles. Global potential energy minima and their folding structures have been determined for leading members of two special and contrasting polypeptide sequences, center doped and Fibonacci, named descriptively for their primary structures. The results display the presence of spontaneous symmetry breaking, elastic strain, and substantial conformational variation for specific embedded amino acid strings. We conclude that collective variables generated by the primary amino acid structure may be required for fully effective protein folding predictors, including those based on neural networks.

  5. Heteropolymer freezing and design: Towards physical models of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pande, Vijay S. [Chemistry Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5080 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5080 (United States); Grosberg, Alexander Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Tanaka, Toyoichi [Department of Physics and Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Protein folding has become one of the most actively studied problems in modern molecular biophysics. Approaches to the problem combine ideas from the physics of disordered systems, polymer physics, and molecular biology. Much can be learned from the statistical properties of model heteropolymers, the chain molecules having different monomers in irregular sequences. Even in highly evolved proteins, there is a strong random element in the sequences, which gives rise to a statistical ensemble of sequences for a given folded shape. Simple analytic models give rise to phase transitions between random, glassy, and folded states, depending on the temperature T and the design temperature T{sup des} of the ensemble of sequences. Besides considering the analytic results obtainable in a random-energy model and in the Flory mean-field model of polymers, the article reports on confirming numerical simulations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Adjustable direct current and pulsed circuit fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J.; Schillig, Josef B.

    2003-09-23

    A fault current limiting system for direct current circuits and for pulsed power circuit. In the circuits, a current source biases a diode that is in series with the circuits' transmission line. If fault current in a circuit exceeds current from the current source biasing the diode open, the diode will cease conducting and route the fault current through the current source and an inductor. This limits the rate of rise and the peak value of the fault current.

  7. Understanding Fault Characteristics of Inverter-Based Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2010-01-01

    This report discusses issues and provides solutions for dealing with fault current contributions from inverter-based distributed energy resources.

  8. Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... or greater, although a few samples with Hg concentrations below 100 ppm were also successfully analyzed using EXAFS spectroscopy. Effect of Geological Background on Hg Speciation ...

  9. Gable named Geological Society of America Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gable was a member of a large team that received a Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award for the Yucca Mountain Project. About the Geological Society of America Established in ...

  10. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Author G.P. Eaton Conference Basin and Range Symposium and Great Basin Field Conference; Denver,...

  11. Wyoming State Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Wyoming State Geological Survey Abbreviation: WSGS Address: P.O. Box 1347 Place: Laramie, Wyoming Zip: 82073 Year Founded: 1933 Phone Number:...

  12. All row, planar fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian Edward

    2013-07-23

    An apparatus, program product and method for detecting nodal faults may simultaneously cause designated nodes of a cell to communicate with all nodes adjacent to each of the designated nodes. Furthermore, all nodes along the axes of the designated nodes are made to communicate with their adjacent nodes, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  13. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-03-17

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  14. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  15. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-06-29

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  16. Sub-crop geologic map of pre-Tertiary rocks in the Yucca Flat and northern Frenchman Flat areas, Nevada Test Site, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, J.C.; Harris, A.G.; Wahl, R.R.

    1997-10-02

    This map displays interpreted structural and stratigraphic relations among the Paleozoic and older rocks of the Nevada Test Site region beneath the Miocene volcanic rocks and younger alluvium in the Yucca Flat and northern Frenchman Flat basins. These interpretations are based on a comprehensive examination and review of data for more than 77 drillholes that penetrated part of the pre-Tertiary basement beneath these post-middle Miocene structural basins. Biostratigraphic data from conodont fossils were newly obtained for 31 of these holes, and a thorough review of all prior microfossil paleontologic data is incorporated in the analysis. Subsurface relationships are interpreted in light of a revised regional geologic framework synthesized from detailed geologic mapping in the ranges surrounding Yucca Flat, from comprehensive stratigraphic studies in the region, and from additional detailed field studies on and around the Nevada Test Site. All available data indicate the subsurface geology of Yucca Flat is considerably more complicated than previous interpretations have suggested. The western part of the basin, in particular, is underlain by relics of the eastward-vergent Belted Range thrust system that are folded back toward the west and thrust by local, west-vergent contractional structures of the CP thrust system. Field evidence from the ranges surrounding the north end of Yucca Flat indicate that two significant strike-slip faults track southward beneath the post-middle Miocene basin fill, but their subsurface traces cannot be closely defined from the available evidence. In contrast, the eastern part of the Yucca Flat basin is interpreted to be underlain by a fairly simple north-trending, broad syncline in the pre-Tertiary units. Far fewer data are available for the northern Frenchman Flat basin, but regional analysis indicates the pre-Tertiary structure there should also be relatively simple and not affected by thrusting. This new interpretation has implications

  17. Folding model description of reactions with exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.; Farid, M. El-Azab

    2012-08-15

    Microscopic folding calculations based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclearmatter densities of the interacting nuclei have been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering cross section at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The extracted reaction cross sections are also considered.

  18. Coordinated Fault Tolerance for High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongarra, Jack; Bosilca, George; et al.

    2013-04-08

    Our work to meet our goal of end-to-end fault tolerance has focused on two areas: (1) improving fault tolerance in various software currently available and widely used throughout the HEC domain and (2) using fault information exchange and coordination to achieve holistic, systemwide fault tolerance and understanding how to design and implement interfaces for integrating fault tolerance features for multiple layers of the software stack—from the application, math libraries, and programming language runtime to other common system software such as jobs schedulers, resource managers, and monitoring tools.

  19. Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options (e.g., salt, shale, granite, deep borehole) in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW).

  20. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  1. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  2. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  3. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  4. Petroleum geology of principal sedimentary basins in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The principal petroliferous basins in eastern China are the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins of Mesozoic age, and the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins of Cenozoic age. These basins contain mostly continental fluvial and lacustrine detrital sediments. Four different geologic ages are responsible for the oil and gas in this region: (1) Mesozoic in the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins; (2) Tertiary in the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins; (3) Permian-Carboniferous in the southern North China basin and the northwestern Ordos basin; and (4) Sinian in the southern Sichuan basin. The most prolific oil and gas sources are the Mesozoic of the Songliao basin and the Tertiary of the North China basin. Although the major source rocks in these basins are lacustrine mudstone and shale, their tectonic settings and the resultant temperature gradients differ. For example, in the Songliao, North China, and associated basins, trapping conditions commonly are associated with block faulting of an extensional tectonic regime; the extensional tectonics in turn contribute to a high geothermal gradient (40/sup 0/-60/sup 0/C/km), which results in early maturation and migration for relatively shallow deposits. However, the Ordos and Sichuan basins formed under compressional conditions and are cooler. Hence, maturation and migration occurred late, relative to reservoir deposition and burial, the result being a poorer quality reservoir.

  5. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-15

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

  6. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION GUIDELINES FOR GEOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-08-31

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a key technology pathway to substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions for the state of California and the western region. Current estimates suggest that the sequestration resource of the state is large, and could safely and effectively accept all of the emissions from large CO2 point sources for many decades and store them indefinitely. This process requires suitable sites to sequester large volumes of CO2 for long periods of time. Site characterization is the first step in this process, and the state will ultimately face regulatory, legal, and technical questions as commercial CCS projects develop and commence operations. The most important aspects of site characterizations are injectivity, capacity, and effectiveness. A site can accept at a high rate a large volume of CO2 and store it for a long time is likely to serve as a good site for geological carbon sequestration. At present, there are many conventional technologies and approaches that can be used to estimate, quantify, calculate, and assess the viability of a sequestration site. Any regulatory framework would need to rely on conventional, easily executed, repeatable methods to inform the site selection and permitting process. The most important targets for long-term storage are deep saline formations and depleted oil and gas fields. The primary CO2 storage mechanisms for these targets are well understood enough to plan operations and simulate injection and long-term fate of CO2. There is also a strong understanding of potential geological and engineering hazards for CCS. These hazards are potential pathway to CO2 leakage, which could conceivably result in negative consequences to health and the environmental. The risks of these effects are difficult to quantify; however, the hazards themselves are sufficiently well understood to identify, delineate, and manage those risks effectively. The primary hazard elements are wells and faults, but may include other

  7. Statistical Fault Detection & Diagnosis Expert System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-12-18

    STATMON is an expert system that performs real-time fault detection and diagnosis of redundant sensors in any industrial process requiring high reliability. After a training period performed during normal operation, the expert system monitors the statistical properties of the incoming signals using a pattern recognition test. If the test determines that statistical properties of the signals have changed, the expert system performs a sequence of logical steps to determine which sensor or machine component hasmoredegraded.less

  8. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; ,

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  9. New approach to folding with the Coulomb wave function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blokhintsev, L. D.; Savin, D. A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2015-05-15

    Due to the long-range character of the Coulomb interaction theoretical description of low-energy nuclear reactions with charged particles still remains a formidable task. One way of dealing with the problem in an integral-equation approach is to employ a screened Coulomb potential. A general approach without screening requires folding of kernels of the integral equations with the Coulomb wave. A new method of folding a function with the Coulomb partial waves is presented. The partial-wave Coulomb function both in the configuration and momentum representations is written in the form of separable series. Each term of the series is represented as a product of a factor depending only on the Coulomb parameter and a function depending on the spatial variable in the configuration space and the momentum variable if the momentum representation is used. Using a trial function, the method is demonstrated to be efficient and reliable.

  10. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HART,WILLIAM E.; ISTRAIL,SORIN

    2000-06-01

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist invariants across lattices related to fundamental properties of the protein folding process. This paper considers whether performance-guaranteed approximability is such an invariant for HP lattice models. The authors define a master approximation algorithm that has provable performance guarantees provided that a specific sublattice exists within a given lattice. They describe a broad class of crystal lattices that are approximable, which further suggests that approximability is a general property of HP lattice models.

  11. Structure and geologic history of late Cenozoic Eel River basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, S.H. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    The Eel River basin formed as a late Cenozoic forearc basin floored by late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic allochthonous terranes (central and coastal belts of the Franciscan complex). Regionally, basement rocks are unconformably overlain on land by a sedimentary sequence as much as about 4200 m thick that comprises the Bear River Formation (early and middle Miocene) and the Wildcat Group (late Miocene to middle Pleistocene) and offshore by broadly coeval upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits as much as 3300 m thick. Offshore, the southern part of the basin is typified by the seaward extensions of youthful northeast-dipping thrust and reverse faults and northwest-trending anticlines. The latest period of deformation in this part of the basin began during the middle Pleistocene and probably reflects north-northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and encroachment of the Pacific plate. Farther north, the western basin margin and adjacent upper continental slope are separated from the axial part of the offshore basin by a narrow zone of north-northwest-trending, right-stepping en echelon folds. These folds indicate that northeast-southwest compression characteristic of the southern part of the basin is accompanied toward the north by right-lateral shear between the accretionary complex to the west and the basin to the east. The northeastern margin of the offshore basin is cut by north to north-northwest-trending high-angle reverse faults that vertically offset basement rocks as much as 1300 m, west side down. These faults, which may merge northward, coincide with older terrane boundaries and locally show evidence of late Cenozoic reactivation with possible right-lateral slip.

  12. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S.

    1995-12-11

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist ``invariants`` across lattices that define fundamental properties of protein folding process; an invariant defines a property that transcends particular lattice formulations. This paper identifies two classes of invariants, defined in terms of sublattices that are related to the design of algorithms for the structure prediction problem. The first class of invariants is, used to define a master approximation algorithm for which provable performance guarantees exist. This algorithm can be applied to generalizations of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic model that have lattices other than the cubic lattice, including most of the crystal lattices commonly used in protein folding lattice models. The second class of invariants applies to a related lattice model. Using these invariants, we show that for this model the structure prediction problem is intractable across a variety of three-dimensional lattices. It`` turns out that these two classes of invariants are respectively sublattices of the two- and three-dimensional square lattice. As the square lattices are the standard lattices used in empirical protein folding` studies, our results provide a rigorous confirmation of the ability of these lattices to provide insight into biological phenomenon. Our results are the first in the literature that identify algorithmic paradigms for the protein structure prediction problem which transcend particular lattice formulations.

  13. Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben A. Abagyan

    2000-06-01

    The main scientific contribution of the project ''Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem'' submitted in 1996 and funded by the Department of Energy in 1997 is the formulation and development of the idea of the multilink recognition method for identification of functional and structural homologues of newly discovered genes. This idea became very popular after they first announced it and used it in prediction of the threading targets for the CASP2 competition (Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction).

  14. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bereau, Tristan; Bennett, W. F. Drew; Pfaendtner, Jim; Deserno, Markus; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-12-28

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA){sub n} (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide’s insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum—in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  15. Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.

    2011-04-01

    One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

  16. Detachment faults: Evidence for a low-angle origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, R.J.; Lister, G.S. )

    1992-09-01

    The origin of low-angle normal faults or detachment faults mantling metamorphic core complexes in the southwestern United States remains controversial. If [sigma][sub 1] is vertical during extension, the formation of, or even slip along, such low-angle normal faults is mechanically implausible. No records exist of earthquakes on low-angle normal faults in areas currently undergoing continental extension, except from an area of actively forming core complexes in the Solomon Sea, Papua New Guinea. In light of such geophysical and mechanical arguments, W.R. Buck and B. Wernicke and G.J. Axen proposed models in which detachment faults originate as high-angle normal faults, but rotate to low angles and become inactive as extension proceeds. These models are inconsistent with critical field relations in several core complexes. The Rawhide fault, an areally extensive detachment fault in western Arizona, propagated at close to its present subhorizontal orientation late in the Tertiary extension of the region. Neither the Wernicke and Axen nor Buck models predict such behavior; in fact, both models preclude the operation of low-angle normal faults. The authors recommend that alternative explanations or modifications of existing models are needed to explain the evidence that detachment faults form and operate with gentle dips.

  17. Analysis of Potential Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James

    2013-05-01

    normal faults in the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone, southeastern Utah. These faults are characterized by a single slip surfaces and damage zones containing deformation bands, veins, and joints. Field observations include crosscutting relationships, permeability increase, rock strength decrease, and ultraviolet light induced mineral fluorescence within the damage zone. These field observations combined with the interpreted paragenetic sequence from petrographic analysis, suggests a deformation history of reactivation and several mineralization events in an otherwise low-permeability fault. All deformation bands and veins fluoresce under ultraviolet light, suggesting connectivity and a shared mineralization history. Pre-­existing deformation features act as loci for younger deformation and mineralization events, this fault and its damage zone illustrate the importance of the fault damage zone to subsurface fluid flow. We model a simplified stress history in order to understand the importance of rock properties and magnitude of tectonic stress on the deformation features within the damage zone. The moderate confining pressures, possible variations in pore pressure, and the porous, fine-­grained nature of the Cedar Mesa Sandstone results in a fault damage zone characterized by enhanced permeability, subsurface fluid flow, and mineralization. Structural setting greatly influences fracture spacing and orientation. Three structural settings were examined and include fault proximity, a fold limb of constant dip, and a setting proximal to the syncline hinge. Fracture spacing and dominant fracture orientation vary at each setting and distinctions between regional and local paleo-stress directions can be made. Joints on the fold limb strike normal to the fold axis/bedding and are interpreted to be sub-parallel to the maximum regional paleo-stress direction as there is no fold related strain. Joints proximal to faults and the syncline hinge may have formed under local stress

  18. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  19. Geology Report: Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-07-01

    Surficial geologic studies near the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) were conducted as part of a site characterization program. Studies included evaluation of the potential for future volcanism and Area 3 fault activity that could impact waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS. Future volcanic activity could lead to disruption of the Area 3 RWMS. Local and regional studies of volcanic risk indicate that major changes in regional volcanic activity within the next 1,000 years are not likely. Mapped basalts of Paiute Ridge, Nye Canyon, and nearby Scarp Canyon are Miocene in age. There is a lack of evidence for post-Miocene volcanism in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and the hazard of basaltic volcanism at the Area 3 RWMS, within the 1,000-year regulatory period, is very low and not a forseeable future event. Studies included a literature review and data analysis to evaluate unclassified published and unpublished information regarding the Area 3 and East Branch Area 3 faults mapped in Area 3 and southern Area 7. Two trenches were excavated along the Area 3 fault to search for evidence of near-surface movement prior to nuclear testing. Allostratigraphic units and fractures were mapped in Trenches ST02 and ST03. The Area 3 fault is a plane of weakness that has undergone strain resulting from stress imposed by natural events and underground nuclear testing. No major vertical displacement on the Area 3 fault since the Early Holocene, and probably since the Middle Pleistocene, can be demonstrated. The lack of major displacement within this time frame and minimal vertical extent of minor fractures suggest that waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS will not be impacted substantially by the Area 3 fault, within the regulatory compliance period. A geomorphic surface map of Yucca Flat utilizes the recent geomorphology and soil characterization work done in adjacent northern Frenchman Flat. The approach taken was to adopt the map unit boundaries (line

  20. Regional offshore geology of central and western Solomon Islands and Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vedder, J.G.; Colwell, J.B.; Bruns, T.R.; Cooper, A.K.

    1986-07-01

    The central and western Solomon Islands and the Bougainville regions are parts of a complex island-arc system that includes an intra-arc basin and remnants of both forearc and back-arc depositional wedges. These features formed in response to episodic Cenozoic tectonism along the convergent boundary between the Pacific and Australia-India plates. Presumed early Tertiary southwest-directed subduction of the Pacific plate and associated arc magmatism were curtailed by impingement of the leading edge of the Ontong Java Plateau. Aprons of back-arc and forearc sediment were derived from highstanding parts of the arc during the late Oligocene and early Miocene. Late Tertiary arc-polarity reversal and northeastward-directed subduction of the Woodlark spreading system caused a renewal of island-arc magmatism that completed the construction of the Central Solomons Trough as an enclosed intra-arc basin. Interpretations of multichannel profiles from 1982 and 1984 CCOP/SOPAC Tripartite Cruises of the research vessel R/V S.P. Lee indicate that the Central Solomons Trough is a composite intra-arc basin containing as much as 5.5 km of late Oligocene(.) and younger sedimentary rocks. As many as five lenticular seismic-stratigraphic units can be identified on the basis of unconformities and abrupt velocity changes. Late Miocene and younger folds and faults deform the northeast and southwest flanks of the basin. Profiles across the Kilinailau Trench show Ontong Java Plateau rocks covered by 2-4 km of trench sediment. The inner trench wall consists of folded, upfaulted, and rotated blocks of trench and forearc strata. The deep-water basin northwest of Bougainville is a southeastward extension of the New Ireland forearc basin, the southern margin of which is formed by a subsided part of the early Cenozoic arc. There, Oligocene(.) and younger basin strata, as much as 7 km thick, are deformed by pre-Pliocene faults and folds.

  1. Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy January 11, 2013 -...

  2. Geological Society of America selects Los Alamos scientist Claudia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    whose research spans the traditional fields of geology, soil science and climate science. ... whose research spans the traditional fields of geology, soil science and climate science. ...

  3. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage This report ...

  4. Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Journal Article: Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential Author L.T. Grose Published Journal Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin, 1974 DOI Not Provided...

  5. A Summary of Fault Recurrence and Strain Rates in the Vicinity of the Hanford Site--Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to fault recurrence and strain rates within the Yakima Fold Belt. Strain rates have met with contention in the expert community and may have a significant potential for impact on the seismic hazard estimate at the Hanford Site. This report identifies the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some prospective approaches to reducing uncertainties about earthquake recurrence rates for the Yakima Fold Belt.

  6. North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Address: 1612 Mail Service Center Place: North Carolina Zip: 27699-1612 Website: www.geology.enr.state.nc.us Coordinates: 35.67, -78.66 Show Map Loading map......

  7. Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training...

  8. Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems Computational studies of proteins have significantly improved our understanding of protein folding. These studies are normally carried out using chains in isolation. However, in many systems of practical interest, proteins fold in the presence of other molecules. To obtain insight into folding in such situations, we compare the

  9. Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2014-3954P Geologic Storage of Hydrogen Anna S. Lord Geologist Geotechnology & Engineering Department & Peter H. Kobos Principal Staff Economist, Ph.D. Earth Systems Department 2 Geologic Storage Why underground storage?

  10. Fault-Oblivious Exascale Computing Environment | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Fault-Oblivious Exascale Computing Environment PI Name: Maya B. Gokhale PI Email: gokhale2@llnl.gov Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 10,000,000 Year: 2012 Research Domain: Computer Science Two areas of concern that have emerged from several DOE meetings on exascale systems (machines with 100 million cores) are runtime systems which can function at that scale, and fault management. The Fault Oblivious Exascale (FOX) project aims to build a software stack

  11. An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on next-generation electricity delivery equipment including fault current limiters (FCLs). Prototype FCL devices are undergoing testing with the aim of market-ready devices making their debut in the transmission and distribution (T&D)

  12. Properties of the extra stage cube under multiple faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G.B., III; Siegel, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The extra stage cube (ESC) interconnection network, a fault tolerant structure, has been proposed for use in large-scale parallel and distributed systems. It has all of the interconnecting capabilities of the multistage cube-type networks that have been proposed for many systems, and the ESC provides fault tolerance for any single failure. The paper examines the ability of the ESC to operate with multiple faults. 9 references.

  13. Recency of Faulting and Neotectonic Framework in the Dixie Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by active geothermal springs. More specifically, our investigation shows that induced stress concentrations at the endpoints of normal fault ruptures appear to promote favorable...

  14. Error Estimation for Fault Tolerance in Numerical Integration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Error Estimation for Fault Tolerance in Numerical Integration Solvers Event Sponsor: ... In numerical integration solvers, approximation error can be estimated at a low cost. We ...

  15. Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - HPC - Resilience-Fault Injection Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Resilience ... FIT 32Gbit High FIT 32Gbit Low FIT Resilience Fault Injection Research ...

  17. Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  18. Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    model in which recently active (Holocene) faults are preferred conduits for migration of thermal water from deep crustal depths, and we infer that the detection of sites...

  19. Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  20. Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Geothermal Field, CA Abstract cap rock, permeability, fault, fracture, clay, Coso Authors Davatzes, N.C.; Hickman and S.H. Published...

  1. Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology-...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  2. Fault Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fault Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration...

  3. Asking the right questions: benchmarking fault-tolerant extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Asking the right questions: benchmarking fault-tolerant extreme-scale systems. Abstract not provided. Authors: Widener, Patrick ; Ferreira, Kurt Brian ; Levy, Scott N. ; ...

  4. Statistical Fault Detection & Diagnosis Expert System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-12-18

    STATMON is an expert system that performs real-time fault detection and diagnosis of redundant sensors in any industrial process requiring high reliability. After a training period performed during normal operation, the expert system monitors the statistical properties of the incoming signals using a pattern recognition test. If the test determines that statistical properties of the signals have changed, the expert system performs a sequence of logical steps to determine which sensor or machine component hasmore » degraded.« less

  5. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  6. Insights From Laboratory Experiments On Simulated Faults With Application To Fracture Evolution In Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-06-01

    Laboratory experiments provide a wealth of information related to mechanics of fracture initiation, fracture propagation processes, factors influencing fault strength, and spatio-temporal evolution of fracture properties. Much of the existing literature reports on laboratory studies involving a coupling of thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and/or chemical processes. As these processes operate within subsurface environments exploited for their energy resource, laboratory results provide insights into factors influencing the mechanical and hydraulic properties of geothermal systems. I report on laboratory observations of strength and fluid transport properties during deformation of simulated faults. The results show systematic trends that vary with stress state, deformation rate, thermal conditions, fluid content, and rock composition. When related to geophysical and geologic measurements obtained from engineered geothermal systems (e.g. microseismicity, wellbore studies, tracer analysis), laboratory results provide a means by which the evolving thermal reservoir can be interpreted in terms of physico-chemical processes. For example, estimates of energy release and microearthquake locations from seismic moment tensor analysis can be related to strength variations observed from friction experiments. Such correlations between laboratory and field data allow for better interpretations about the evolving mechanical and fluid transport properties in the geothermal reservoir ultimately leading to improvements in managing the resource.

  7. A vault ribonucleoprotein particle exhibiting 39-fold dihedral symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Koji; Tanaka, Hideaki; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshimura, Masato; Yamashita, Eiki; Iwasaki, Kenji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2008-05-01

    A vault from rat liver was crystallized in space group C2. Rotational symmetry searches indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry. Vault is a 12.9 MDa ribonucleoprotein particle with a barrel-like shape, two protruding caps and an invaginated waist structure that is highly conserved in a wide variety of eukaryotes. Multimerization of the major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to assemble the entire exterior shell of the barrel-shaped vault particle. Multiple copies of two additional proteins, vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), as well as a small vault RNA (vRNA), are also associated with vault. Here, the crystallization of vault particles is reported. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 708.0, b = 385.0, c = 602.9 Å, β = 124.8°. Rotational symmetry searches based on the R factor and correlation coefficient from noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) averaging indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry.

  8. Folding and Function of Proteorhodopsins in Photoenergy Transducing Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spudich, John L

    2012-08-10

    The overall research objectives are to develop proteorhodopsin (PR) proteins as a model system for {alpha}?-helical membrane protein insertion and folding, and to advance understanding of the diversity and mechanisms of PRs, a large family of photoenergy transducers (~4000 identified) abundant in the worlds oceans. Specific aims are: (1) To develop a highefficiency genetic selection procedure for light-driven proton-pumping in E. coli cells. Such a procedure would provide a positive selection method for proper folding and function of PRs in the E. coli membrane. (2) Characterize flash-induced absorption changes and photocurrents in PR variants in organisms from various environments, and their expression level and function when expressed in E. coli. Subaims are to: (a) elucidate the relationship of the transport mechanism to mechanisms of other microbial rhodopsins, some of which like PRs function as ion transporters and some of which use light energy to activate signaling pathways (sensory rhodopsins); and (b) identify important residues and chemical events in light-driven proton transport by PRs. In addition to their importance to the energy of the biosphere PRs have attracted interest for their potential for use in making photoenergy-transducing membranes for bioengineering applications.

  9. Environmental geological input into urban construction planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, W.B.N. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Environmental issues resulting from planning new construction in urban areas requires understanding of geological processes at many steps in project development. Steps include: assessments of geological characteristics of the proposed construction site, building design features in light of the geological characteristics, development of the geology component of the EIR as well as any mitigations required, and writing special environmental geological concerns into specifications required of the contractor. The latter step may be exemplified in planning a new underground library being constructed in the center of the Berkeley Campus. The site is within 50 yards of a creek that has been restored such that fish now live in it whereas none could three years ago. Runoff from paved parking lots and walkways around existing buildings goes into storm drains that empty directly into the creek. Because they do, creek water is monitored for chemical and solid wastes as well as turbidity. Based on geological input, special project procedures were written to which the contractor must adhere during site preparation and construction. These include: all liquid wastes must be contained in impermeable containers, all hazardous wastes must be removed under state waste removal guidelines, dewatering procedures were developed to remove groundwater that flows through permeable sands and gravels from the creek bed into the construction site and must be followed, and soil flux into the creek must be prevented. Mitigation of soil flux includes watering areas of the site as soil is excavated. Watering must be monitored because the contractor tends to overwater which flushes soil down nearby storm drains into the creek. As well, soil control monitoring includes preventing the contractor from sweeping soil into the storm drains and flushing it into the creek. Geological input has proven valuable in addressing different environmental concerns.

  10. Studies of the pattern and ages of post-metamorphic faults in the Piedmont of Virginia and North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, L. III; Costain, J.K.; Coruh, C.

    1988-04-01

    A geologic corridor from the Blue Ridge to the eastern Piedmont of Virginia is integrated into a tectonic model and extrapolated downward 10-15 km by means of seismic reflection and gravity studies. The Blue Ridge appears to be a hinge zone that faced a rift-generated Iapetus Ocean. An eastern continent with an Eocambrian and Cambrian magmatic arc and sediments of the same age, collided with the North American continental margin in the middle and late Ordovician. Subsequent Devono-Mississippian and Mississippian-Permian orogenesis continued to drive thin thrust nappes onto North America. Early Mesozoic rift basins record the beginning of the Atlantic basin and, from Middle Jurassic to Present, the margin of North America was covered by Coastal Plain sediments. Several constrained hypocenters of the central Virginia seismic zone, adjacent to a reflection profile, show an apparent relation to structure. We tentatively conclude that flat and ramp faults formed during Paleozoic nappe emplacement are currently being reactivated. The reactivation may be largely aseismic on the old thrust faults, but seismicity appears to be related to high angle transcurrent faults where new rock breakage may be occurring. 125 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. All-to-all sequenced fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-11-02

    An apparatus, program product and method enable nodal fault detection by sequencing communications between all system nodes. A master node may coordinate communications between two slave nodes before sequencing to and initiating communications between a new pair of slave nodes. The communications may be analyzed to determine the nodal fault.

  12. Fault current limiter with shield and adjacent cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony; Moriconi, Franco; Hodge, Eoin Patrick

    2013-10-22

    In a fault current limiter (FCL) of a saturated core type having at least one coil wound around a high permeability material, a method of suppressing the time derivative of the fault current at the zero current point includes the following step: utilizing an electromagnetic screen or shield around the AC coil to suppress the time derivative current levels during zero current conditions.

  13. Automated Proactive Fault Isolation: A Key to Automated Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.

    2007-07-31

    In this paper, we present a generic model for automated continuous commissioing and then delve in detail into one of the processes, proactive testing for fault isolation, which is key to automating commissioning. The automated commissioining process uses passive observation-based fault detction and diagnostic techniques, followed by automated proactive testing for fault isolation, automated fault evaluation, and automated reconfiguration of controls together to continuously keep equipment controlled and running as intended. Only when hard failures occur or a physical replacement is required does the process require human intervention, and then sufficient information is provided by the automated commissioning system to target manual maintenance where it is needed. We then focus on fault isolation by presenting detailed logic that can be used to automatically isolate faults in valves, a common component in HVAC systems, as an example of how automated proactive fault isolation can be accomplished. We conclude the paper with a discussion of how this approach to isolating faults can be applied to other common HVAC components and their automated commmissioning and a summary of key conclusions of the paper.

  14. Automatic Fault Characterization via Abnormality-Enhanced Classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronevetsky, G; Laguna, I; de Supinski, B R

    2010-12-20

    Enterprise and high-performance computing systems are growing extremely large and complex, employing hundreds to hundreds of thousands of processors and software/hardware stacks built by many people across many organizations. As the growing scale of these machines increases the frequency of faults, system complexity makes these faults difficult to detect and to diagnose. Current system management techniques, which focus primarily on efficient data access and query mechanisms, require system administrators to examine the behavior of various system services manually. Growing system complexity is making this manual process unmanageable: administrators require more effective management tools that can detect faults and help to identify their root causes. System administrators need timely notification when a fault is manifested that includes the type of fault, the time period in which it occurred and the processor on which it originated. Statistical modeling approaches can accurately characterize system behavior. However, the complex effects of system faults make these tools difficult to apply effectively. This paper investigates the application of classification and clustering algorithms to fault detection and characterization. We show experimentally that naively applying these methods achieves poor accuracy. Further, we design novel techniques that combine classification algorithms with information on the abnormality of application behavior to improve detection and characterization accuracy. Our experiments demonstrate that these techniques can detect and characterize faults with 65% accuracy, compared to just 5% accuracy for naive approaches.

  15. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  16. Exploration and mining geology. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Using the concepts and practices of applied geology as its central theme, here is a balanced and comprehensive treatment of the geological, geochemical, geophysical, and economic elements of exploration and mining. The author offers an overview of the methods and aims in mineral exploration and production and gives coverage of the geologic principles of ore deposits and the geomorphic environment. The text deals with ''hard'' minerals and the nonfluid sources of materials and energy in the continental masses and in ocean basins. This edition has been expanded to include recent advances in applications of satellite imagery, lithogeochemical surveys, isotope geochemistry, and other developments in the field. It also covers current uses of computers in mineral exploration programs and features case histories, a current references section, and financial data.

  17. Origin of Entropy Convergence in Hydrophobic Hydration and Protein Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garde, S.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Paulaitis, M.E.; Pratt, L.R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); [Center for Molecular and Engineering Thermodynamics, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); [Department of Chemical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    An information theory model of hydrophobic effects is used to construct a molecular explanation why hydrophobic solvation entropies of protein unfolding measured by high sensitivity calorimetry converge to zero at a common convergence temperature. The entropy convergence follows directly from the weak temperature dependence of occupancy fluctuations {l_angle}{delta}{ital n}{sup 2}{r_angle} for molecular-scale volumes in water. The macroscopic expression of the contrasting entropic behavior of water relative to common organic solvents is the {ital relative} temperature insensitivity of the water isothermal compressibility compared to hydrocarbon liquids. The information theory model used provides a quantitative description of small molecule hydration and, in addition, predicts that the value of the entropy at convergence is slightly {ital negative}. Interpretations of entropic contributions to protein folding should account for this result. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from aGeologic Storage Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-09

    The amounts of CO2 that would need to be injected intogeologic storage reservoirs to achieve a significant reduction ofatmospheric emissions are very large. A 1000 MWe coal-fired power plantemits approximately 30,000 tonnes of CO2 per day, 10 Mt per year(Hitchon, 1996). When injected underground over a typical lifetime of 30years of such a plant, the CO2 plume may occupy a large area of order 100km2 or more, and fluid pressure increase in excess of 1 bar(corresponding to 10 m water head) may extend over an area of more than2,500 km2 (Pruess, et al., 2003). The large areal extent expected for CO2plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered,such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape fromthe primary storage reservoir. Under most subsurface conditions oftemperature and pressure, CO2 is buoyant relative to groundwaters. If(sub-)vertical pathways are available, CO2 will tend to flow upward and,depending on geologic conditions, may eventually reach potablegroundwater aquifers or even the land surface. Leakage of CO2 could alsooccur along wellbores, including pre-existing and improperly abandonedwells, or wells drilled in connection with the CO2 storage operations.The pressure increases accompanying CO2 injection will give rise tochanges in effective stress that could cause movement along faults,increasing permeability and potential for leakage.Escape of CO2 from aprimary geologic storage reservoir and potential hazards associated withits discharge at the land surface raise a number of concerns, including(1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard whenleaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase inatmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy,eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In orderto gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address theseissues

  19. Discovering The Folding Rules That Proteins Obey FY08 LDRD Final...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discovering The Folding Rules That Proteins Obey FY08 LDRD Final Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovering The Folding Rules That Proteins Obey FY08 LDRD Final ...

  20. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in ...

  1. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  2. Principles of isotope geology. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faure, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text in isotope geology/geoscience that integrates material taught in various courses into a unified picture of the earth sciences. It presents an exposition of the principles used in the interpretation of isotopic data and shows how such interpretations apply to the solution of geological problems. References up to 1985 are included with chapters in this edition. New chapters on Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf Re-Os, and K-Ca decay schemes and cosmogenic radionuclides have been added. Data summaries and references have been expanded.

  3. Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying that the risks of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites are below agreed-upon thresholds. The CF is based on effective trapping of CO2, the proposed concept that takes into account both the probability and impact of CO2 leakage. The CF uses probability estimates of the intersection of conductive faults and wells with the CO2 plume along with modeled fluxes or concentrations of CO2 as proxies for impacts to compartments (such as potable groundwater) to calculate CO2 leakage risk. In order to test and refine the approach, we applied the CF to (1) a hypothetical large-scale GCS project in the Texas Gulf Coast, and (2) WESTCARB's Phase III GCS pilot in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California.

  4. Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    waves from microearthquake data Abstract Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems...

  5. Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KineticsFinal Report Cover Page (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page We designed and fabricated mixing devices that will help us elucidate the mechanisms of protein folding through measurements of folding reaction rates. These

  6. Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems Cellmer, Troy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; FREE ENERGY; MELTING; PROTEINS; THERMODYNAMICS; TOPOLOGY protein folding protein...

  7. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2008-02-19

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  8. Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-04-13

    Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer, including defining within a tree network of the parallel computer two or more sets of non-overlapping test levels of compute nodes of the network that together include all the data communications links of the network, each non-overlapping test level comprising two or more adjacent tiers of the tree; defining test cells within each non-overlapping test level, each test cell comprising a subtree of the tree including a subtree root compute node and all descendant compute nodes of the subtree root compute node within a non-overlapping test level; performing, separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, an uplink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels; and performing, separately from the uplink tests and separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, a downlink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels.

  9. Online Monitoring System for Performance Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gioiosa, Roberto; Kestor, Gokcen; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2014-05-19

    To achieve the exaFLOPS performance within a contain power budget, next supercomputers will feature hundreds of millions of components operating at low- and near-threshold voltage. As the probability that at least one of these components fails during the execution of an application approaches certainty, it seems unrealistic to expect that any run of a scientific application will not experience some performance faults. We believe that there is need of a new generation of light-weight performance and debugging tools that can be used online even during production runs of parallel applications and that can identify performance anomalies during the application execution. In this work we propose the design and implementation of a monitoring system that continuously inspects the evolution of run

  10. Geologic setting of the New Production Reactor within the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, V.; Fallaw, W.C.; McKinney, J.B.

    1991-12-31

    The geology and hydrology of the reference New Production Reactor (NPR) site at Savannah River Site (SRS) have been summarized using the available information from the NPR site and areas adjacent to the site, particularly the away from reactor spent fuel storage site (AFR site). Lithologic and geophysical logs from wells drilled near the NPR site do not indicate any faults in the upper several hundred feet of the Coastal Plain sediments. However, the Pen Branch Fault is located about 1 mile south of the site and extends into the upper 100 ft of the Coastal Plain sequence. Subsurface voids, resulting from the dissolution of calcareous portions of the sediments, may be present within 200 ft of the surface at the NPR site. The water table is located within 30 to 70 ft of the surface. The NPR site is located on a groundwater divide, and groundwater flow for the shallowest hydraulic zones is predominantly toward local streams. Groundwater flow in deeper Tertiary sediments is north to Upper Three Runs Creek or west to the Savannah River Swamp. Groundwater flow in the Cretaceous sediments is west to the Savannah River.

  11. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  12. Pre-Leonardian geology of Midland Farms field area, Andrews County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mear, C.E.; Dufurrena, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Midland Farms (Ellenburger) oil field was discovered on September 16, 1952, with the completion of Anderson-Pritchard's 1 Fasken-24 well, drilled on an indicated single-fold seismic structure. The field produces from vuggy, fractured Ellenburger dolomite with up to 310 ft (94 m) of gross and net pay. The Midland Farms (Ellenburger) field is part of a larger structure which incorporates not only Midland Farms field, but Midland Farms, West (Devonian), Inez (Ellenburger), and parts of the Fasken (Penn) and Block 41 (Wolfcamp) fields. The structure is a complex, uplifted block composed of two doubly plunging, asymmetric anticlines bisected by at least one wrench-type fault and several normal faults. Penecontemporaneous leaching produced oomoldic porosity in the limestones. Ellenburger oil production was established in the Midland Farms area in September 1952, and has amounted to 61.6 million bbl oil and 28.5 bcf of gas from 91 wells to January 1983. Major Fusselman and Wolfcamp oil accumulations were discovered during development of the Ellenburger field. Fusselman oil was first produced in June 1953, and has totaled 10.1 million bbl of oil and 5 bcf of gas from 33 wells to January 1983. Wolfcamp production was established in January 1954 and totals 10.7 million bbl of oil and 1 bcf of gas from 39 wells. Total production from all zones including post-Leonard beds in the Midland Farms field area to date has been 210 million bbl of oil and 84 bcf of gas.

  13. ORS 516 - Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 - Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS 516 - Department of Geology...

  14. FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D...

  15. Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River...

  16. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  17. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes and fault reactivation induced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coupled hydro-mechanical processes and fault reactivation induced by Co2 Injection in a three-layer storage formation Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become ...

  18. Recent earthquake sequences at Coso: Evidence for conjugate faulting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    earthquake sequences at Coso: Evidence for conjugate faulting and stress loading near a geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  19. STRESS AND FAULTING IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: UPDATE AND...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    STRESS AND FAULTING IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: UPDATE AND RECENT RESULTS FROM THE EAST FLANK AND COSO WASH Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF HOLOCENE FAULTING PROPOSED C-746-U LANDFILL EXPANSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettis, William

    2006-07-01

    This report presents the findings of a fault hazard investigation for the C-746-U landfill's proposed expansion located at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, Kentucky. The planned expansion is located directly north of the present-day C-746-U landfill. Previous geophysical studies within the PGDP site vicinity interpret possible northeast-striking faults beneath the proposed landfill expansion, although prior to this investigation the existence, locations, and ages of these inferred faults have not been confirmed through independent subsurface exploration. The purpose of this investigation is to assess whether or not Holocene-active fault displacement is present beneath the footprint of the proposed landfill expansion.

  1. Fault Tree Reliability Analysis and Design-for-reliability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    WinR provides a fault tree analysis capability for performing systems reliability and design-for-reliability analyses. The package includes capabilities for sensitivity and uncertainity analysis, field failure data analysis, and optimization.

  2. Fault and joint geometry at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    may be useful for locating the surface traces of faults in the reservoir. Authors Guth, L. R.; Bruhn, R. L.; Beck and S. L. Published DOE Information Bridge, 711981 DOI...

  3. Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

  4. Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico | Department of Energy Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico (5.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Application of Environmental Isotopes to the

  5. Exploiting data representation for fault tolerance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoemmen, Mark Frederick; Elliott, J.; Sandia National Lab.; Mueller, F.

    2015-01-06

    Incorrect computer hardware behavior may corrupt intermediate computations in numerical algorithms, possibly resulting in incorrect answers. Prior work models misbehaving hardware by randomly flipping bits in memory. We start by accepting this premise, and present an analytic model for the error introduced by a bit flip in an IEEE 754 floating-point number. We then relate this finding to the linear algebra concepts of normalization and matrix equilibration. In particular, we present a case study illustrating that normalizing both vector inputs of a dot product minimizes the probability of a single bit flip causing a large error in the dot product'smore » result. Moreover, the absolute error is either less than one or very large, which allows detection of large errors. Then, we apply this to the GMRES iterative solver. We count all possible errors that can be introduced through faults in arithmetic in the computationally intensive orthogonalization phase of GMRES, and show that when the matrix is equilibrated, the absolute error is bounded above by one.« less

  6. Exploiting data representation for fault tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoemmen, Mark Frederick; Elliott, J.; Mueller, F.

    2015-01-06

    Incorrect computer hardware behavior may corrupt intermediate computations in numerical algorithms, possibly resulting in incorrect answers. Prior work models misbehaving hardware by randomly flipping bits in memory. We start by accepting this premise, and present an analytic model for the error introduced by a bit flip in an IEEE 754 floating-point number. We then relate this finding to the linear algebra concepts of normalization and matrix equilibration. In particular, we present a case study illustrating that normalizing both vector inputs of a dot product minimizes the probability of a single bit flip causing a large error in the dot product's result. Moreover, the absolute error is either less than one or very large, which allows detection of large errors. Then, we apply this to the GMRES iterative solver. We count all possible errors that can be introduced through faults in arithmetic in the computationally intensive orthogonalization phase of GMRES, and show that when the matrix is equilibrated, the absolute error is bounded above by one.

  7. License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

    2003-02-24

    Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

  8. Contact order revisited: Influence of protein size on the folding rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivankov, Dmitry N.; Garbuzynskiy, Sergiy O.; Alm, Eric; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Baker, David; Finkelstein, Alexei V.

    2003-05-28

    Guided by the recent success of empirical model predicting the folding rates of small two-state folding proteins from the relative contact order (CO) of their native structures, by a theoretical model of protein folding that predicts that logarithm of the folding rate decreases with the protein chain length L as L2/3, and by the finding that the folding rates of multistate folding proteins strongly correlate with their sizes and have very bad correlation with CO, we reexamined the dependence of folding rate on CO and L in attempt to find a structural parameter that determines folding rates for the totality of proteins. We show that the Abs{sub CO} = CO x L, is able to predict rather accurately folding rates for both two-state and multistate folding proteins, as well as short peptides, and that this Abs{sub CO} scales with the protein chain length as L0.70 {+-} 0.07 for the totality of studied single-domain proteins and peptides.

  9. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. pearl_hot_springs_peer2013.pdf (1.5 MB) More Documents & Publications Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well

  10. Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada Colton Dudley, Alison Dorsey, Paul Opdyke, Dustin Naphan, Marlon Ramos, John Louie, Paul Schwering, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2013,

  11. geologic-sequestration | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL has partnered with Tuskegee University (TU) to provide fundamental research and hands-on training and networking opportunities to undergraduate students at TU in the area of CO2 capture and transport with a focus on the development of the most economical separation methods for pre-combustion CO2 capture. The bulk of

  12. Preliminary observations on Quaternary reverse faulting along the southern front of the Northern Range of Trinidad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltran, C. , Caracus )

    1993-02-01

    Several geomorphological evidences of Quaternary reverse faulting are observed along the southern front of the Northern Range in Trinidad between Port-of-Spain and Matura Point. Such a mountain front is associated to a reverse fault system showing an imbricated pattern southward. In the north, the system is limited by a structural feature showing an important vertical component. Southward this system progressively changes to low angle faults. This geometry is corroborated by seismic profiling in the continent shelf. The active faulting evidences consist in lateral drainage offsets, fault trenches, sag-ponds, triangular facets, and saddles. Some quaternary terraces show fault scarps and tilting. We postulate that these reverse fault systems as Arima Fault instead of El Pilar fault as it is not actually connected to the San Sebestian-El Pilar right-lateral slip system, due to the southward prolongation of the southern limit of the Caribbean Plate through the fault system of Los Bajos-El Soldado.

  13. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Feb. 2013 Interpret data in context of regional and local geology Initial interpretation completed - analysis ongoing Ongoing 12 | US DOE ...

  14. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. Adding Fault Tolerance to NPB Benchmarks Using ULFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parchman, Zachary W; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton III, Thomas J; Engelmann, Christian; Bernholdt, David E; Scott, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    In the world of high-performance computing, fault tolerance and application resilience are becoming some of the primary concerns because of increasing hardware failures and memory corruptions. While the research community has been investigating various options, from system-level solutions to application-level solutions, standards such as the Message Passing Interface (MPI) are also starting to include such capabilities. The current proposal for MPI fault tolerant is centered around the User-Level Failure Mitigation (ULFM) concept, which provides means for fault detection and recovery of the MPI layer. This approach does not address application-level recovery, which is currently left to application developers. In this work, we present a mod- ification of some of the benchmarks of the NAS parallel benchmark (NPB) to include support of the ULFM capabilities as well as application-level strategies and mechanisms for application-level failure recovery. As such, we present: (i) an application-level library to checkpoint and restore data, (ii) extensions of NPB benchmarks for fault tolerance based on different strategies, (iii) a fault injection tool, and (iv) some preliminary results that show the impact of such fault tolerant strategies on the application execution.

  16. Microcomputer applications of, and modifications to, the modular fault trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, T.L.; Graves, N.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1994-10-01

    The LaSalle Probabilistic Risk Assessment was the first major application of the modular logic fault trees after the IREP program. In the process of performing the analysis, many errors were discovered in the fault tree modules that led to difficulties in combining the modules to form the final system fault trees. These errors are corrected in the revised modules listed in this report. In addition, the application of the modules in terms of editing them and forming them into the system fault trees was inefficient. Originally, the editing had to be done line by line and no error checking was performed by the computer. This led to many typos and other logic errors in the construction of the modular fault tree files. Two programs were written to help alleviate this problem: (1) MODEDIT - This program allows an operator to retrieve a file for editing, edit the file for the plant specific application, perform some general error checking while the file is being modified, and store the file for later use, and (2) INDEX - This program checks that the modules that are supposed to form one fault tree all link up appropriately before the files are,loaded onto the mainframe computer. Lastly, the modules were not designed for relay type logic common in BWR designs but for solid state type logic. Some additional modules were defined for modeling relay logic, and an explanation and example of their use are included in this report.

  17. Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural geology of the CP Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; and regional implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, S.J.

    1991-08-01

    Detailed mapping and structural analysis of upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks in the CP Hills of the Nevada Test Site, together with analysis of published maps and cross sections and a reconnaissance of regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust of Barnes and Poole (1968) actually comprises two separate, oppositely verging Mesozoic thrust systems: (1) the west-vergent CP thrust which is well exposed in the CP Hills and at Mine Mountain, and (2) the east-vergent Belted Range thrust located northwest of Yucca Flat. West-vergence of the CP thrust is indicated by large scale west-vergent recumbent folds in both its hangingwall and footwall and by the fact that the CP thrust ramps up section through hangingwall strata toward the northwest. Regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust forms part of a narrow sigmoidal belt of west-vergent folding and thrusting traceable for over 180 km along strike. The Belted Range thrust represents earlier Mesozoic deformation that was probably related to the Last Chance thrust system in southeastern California, as suggested by earlier workers. A pre-Tertiary reconstruction of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in the region between the NTS and the Las Vegas Range bears a close resemblance to other regions of the Cordillera and has important implications for the development of hinterland-vergent deformation as well as for the probable magnitude of Tertiary extension north of Las Vegas Valley. Subsequent to Mesozoic deformation, the CP Hills were disrupted by at least two episodes of Tertiary extensional deformation: (1) an earlier episode represented by pre-middle Miocene low-angle normal faults, and (2) a later, post-11 Ma episode of high-angle normal faulting. Both episodes of extension were related to regional deformation, the latter of which has resulted in the present basin and range topography of the NTS region.

  18. Energy barriers, cooperativity, and hidden intermediates in the folding of small proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Building 37, Room 6114E, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)]. E-mail: yawen@helix.nih.gov

    2006-02-17

    Current theoretical views of the folding process of small proteins (<{approx}100 amino acids) postulate that the landscape of potential mean force (PMF) for the formation of the native state has a funnel shape and that the free energy barrier to folding arises from the chain configurational entropy only. However, recent theoretical studies on the formation of hydrophobic clusters with explicit water suggest that a barrier should exist on the PMF of folding, consistent with the fact that protein folding generally involves a large positive activation enthalpy at room temperature. In addition, high-resolution structural studies of the hidden partially unfolded intermediates have revealed the existence of non-native interactions, suggesting that the correction of the non-native interactions during folding should also lead to barriers on PMF. To explore the effect of a PMF barrier on the folding behavior of proteins, we modified Zwanzig's model for protein folding with an uphill landscape of PMF for the formation of transition states. We found that the modified model for short peptide segments can satisfy the thermodynamic and kinetic criteria for an apparently two-state folding. Since the Levinthal paradox can be solved by a stepwise folding of short peptide segments, a landscape of PMF with a locally uphill search for the transition state and cooperative stabilization of folding intermediates/native state is able to explain the available experimental results for small proteins. We speculate that the existence of cooperative hidden folding intermediates in small proteins could be the consequence of the highly specific structures of the native state, which are selected by evolution to perform specific functions and fold in a biologically meaningful time scale.

  19. Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

    2010-04-30

    A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

  20. Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    contacts, suggesting that native topology plays a role in early stages of aggregation. ... MELTING; PROTEINS; THERMODYNAMICS; TOPOLOGY protein folding protein aggregation ...

  1. Systematic characterization of protein folding pathways using diffusion maps: Application to Trp-cage miniprotein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang Beom; Dsilva, Carmeline J.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2015-02-28

    Understanding the mechanisms by which proteins fold from disordered amino-acid chains to spatially ordered structures remains an area of active inquiry. Molecular simulations can provide atomistic details of the folding dynamics which complement experimental findings. Conventional order parameters, such as root-mean-square deviation and radius of gyration, provide structural information but fail to capture the underlying dynamics of the protein folding process. It is therefore advantageous to adopt a method that can systematically analyze simulation data to extract relevant structural as well as dynamical information. The nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique known as diffusion maps automatically embeds the high-dimensional folding trajectories in a lower-dimensional space from which one can more easily visualize folding pathways, assuming the data lie approximately on a lower-dimensional manifold. The eigenvectors that parametrize the low-dimensional space, furthermore, are determined systematically, rather than chosen heuristically, as is done with phenomenological order parameters. We demonstrate that diffusion maps can effectively characterize the folding process of a Trp-cage miniprotein. By embedding molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of Trp-cage folding in diffusion maps space, we identify two folding pathways and intermediate structures that are consistent with the previous studies, demonstrating that this technique can be employed as an effective way of analyzing and constructing protein folding pathways from molecular simulations.

  2. Preclosure seismic design methodology for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. Topical report YMP/TR-003-NP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This topical report describes the methodology and criteria that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to use for preclosure seismic design of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of the proposed geologic repository operations area that are important to safety. Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60 (10 CFR 60), Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, states that for a license to be issued for operation of a high-level waste repository, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must find that the facility will not constitute an unreasonable risk to the health and safety of the public. Section 60.131 (b)(1) requires that SSCs important to safety be designed so that natural phenomena and environmental conditions anticipated at the geologic repository operations area will not interfere with necessary safety functions. Among the natural phenomena specifically identified in the regulation as requiring safety consideration are the hazards of ground shaking and fault displacement due to earthquakes.

  3. Geology of offshore southern Namibia: Evidence from tectonic and basin-fill modeling based on modern seismic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, M.L.; Peacock, D.N. )

    1993-09-01

    License 2815 is located offshore southern Namibia between Cape Dernberg and the South African border, approximately 50 km east of the 1974 Kudu gas discovery. Interactive workstation modeling of modern two-dimensional seismic data from the License area provides an improved understanding of the geology and tectonic history of this unexplored region. Although presently a broad submarine shelf influenced by late Cretaceous-Tertiary deltaic sedimentation from the Orange River, Interpretation based on modern seismic coverage has resulted in the recognition of a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rift complex associated with the initial opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Geologic modeling suggests that a seismically-identified elongate rift localized along a major westward-dipping bounding fault may contain significant thicknesses of Neocomian( ) clastic sediments. Barremian-Aptian marine flooding of this area followed the rifting episode. Mixed marine and deltaic sedimentation has dominated the region since the middle Aptian. Palinspastic restorations of depth-converted seismic lines have helped to unravel the episodic tectonic history of rifting in this area. Input of geologic parameters, including relative sea level changes and sedimentation rates, has yielded computer-derived basin-fill models, which have in turn been integrated with the local tectonic model to make lithology predictions.

  4. Factors affecting the recognition of faults exposed in exploratory trenches. Bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonilla, M.G.; Lienkaemper, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    During excavation of the reactor shaft at the proposed Bodega Head nuclear reactor in California, a fault was found in the sediments overlying bedrock. This apparent lack of a complete connection with the bedrock fault led to disagreement as to whether the fault in the sediments was of tectonic or landslide origin. The report provides information on some of the conditions under which fault strands in trench walls are either difficult to see or die out, and the frequency of occurrence of these phenomena. Information is also provided on the widths of fault zones, on the deformation of the hanging wall and footwall of dip-slip faults, and on the frequency of occurrence of pebble rotation, open fissures, gouge, slickensides, mixing, fault breccia, fault rubble, crushing, polishing, water barriers, and liquefaction effects. Short summaries of information relating to fault strands that are poorly expressed or that die out have already been published (Bonilla and Lienkaemper, 1988, 1990).

  5. Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

  6. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, William; Basso, Thomas; Coddington, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  7. Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrack, A.G.

    1999-06-22

    The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

  8. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

  9. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwala, R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Batzoglou, S. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Dancik, V. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  10. Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Appendix B, Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Burro Canyon site were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a disposal site for the tailings at two processing sites near the Slick Rock, Colorado, post office. The purposes of these studies are basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies (e.g., analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards) used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-km radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters.

  11. Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

  12. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  13. Impact of Installation Faults on Heat Pump Performance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hourahan, Glenn; Baxter, Van D.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies and surveys indicate that typically-installed HVAC equipment operate inefficiently and waste considerable energy due to varied installation errors (faults) such as improper refrigerant charge, incorrect airflow, oversized equipment, and leaky ducts. This article summarizes the results of a large United States (U.S.) experimental/analytical study (U.S. contribution to IEA HPP Annex 36) of the impact that different faults have on the performance of an air-source heat pump (ASHP) in a typical U.S. single-family house. It combines building effects, equipment effects, and climate effects in an evaluation of the faults impact on seasonal energy consumption through simulations of the house/ASHPmore » pump system.« less

  14. Network resilience; A measure of network fault tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najjar, W. . Dept. of Computer Science); Gaudoit, J.L. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-02-01

    The failure of a node in a multicomputer system will not only reduce the computational power but also alter the network's topology. Network fault tolerance is a measure of the number of failures the network can sustain before a disconnection occurs. It is expressed traditionally as the network's node degree. In this paper, the authors propose a probabilistic measure of network fault tolerance expressed as the probability f a disconnection. Qualitative evaluation of this measure is presented. As expected, the single-node disconnection probability is the dominant factor irrespective of the topology under consideration. They derive an analytical approximation of the disconnection probability and verify it with Monte Carlo simulation. Based on this model, the measures of network resilience and relative network resilience are proposed as probabilistic measures of network fault tolerance. These are then used to evaluate the effects of the disconnection probability on the reliability of the system.

  15. Impact of Installation Faults on Heat Pump Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hourahan, Glenn; Baxter, Van D.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies and surveys indicate that typically-installed HVAC equipment operate inefficiently and waste considerable energy due to varied installation errors (faults) such as improper refrigerant charge, incorrect airflow, oversized equipment, and leaky ducts. This article summarizes the results of a large United States (U.S.) experimental/analytical study (U.S. contribution to IEA HPP Annex 36) of the impact that different faults have on the performance of an air-source heat pump (ASHP) in a typical U.S. single-family house. It combines building effects, equipment effects, and climate effects in an evaluation of the faults impact on seasonal energy consumption through simulations of the house/ASHP pump system.

  16. Garbage collection: an exercise in distributed, fault-tolerant programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vestal, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Two garbage-collection algorithms are presented to reclaim unused storage in object-oriented systems implemented on local area networks. The algorithms are fault-tolerant and allowed parallel, incremental collection in an object address space distributed throughout the system. The two approaches allow multiple collectors, so some unused storage can be reclaimed in partitioned networks. The first method makes use of fault-tolerant reference counts together with an algorithm to collect cycles of objects that would otherwise remain unclaimed. The second method adapts a parallel collector so that it can be used to collect subspaces of the entire network address space. Throughout this work concern is with a methodology for developing distributed, parallel, fault-tolerant programs. Also, there is concern with the suitability of object-oriented systems for such applications.

  17. Multistage network with an additional stage for fault tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G.B. III; Siegel, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The extra stage cube (ESC) network, a fault tolerant structure, is proposed for use in large-scale parallel and distributed supercomputer systems. This network is derived from the generalised cube network by the addition of one stage of interchange boxes and a bypass capability for two stages. It is shown that the ESC provides fault tolerance for any single failure. Further, the network can be controlled even when it has a single failure, using a simple modification of a routing tag scheme proposed for the generalised cube. Both one-to-one and broadcast connections under routing tag control are performable by the faulted ESC. The effects of the extra stage on the partitioning and permuting abilities of the network are described. 19 references.

  18. Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault-controlled permeability and larger volumes of permeable rocks. Authors Richard P. Smith, Kenneth W. Wisianz and David D. BlackweIl Published GRC, 2001 DOI Not Provided Check...

  19. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siting Guidelines | Department of Energy Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting guidelines, both in the US and other countries. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign

  20. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    education center for Michigan, implemented through the Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research and education center for Michigan, implemented through the Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University Citation Details

  1. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System | Department of Energy State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System Project objectives: Deploy and populate the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) with state-specific data by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermal-relevant data that

  2. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift

  3. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Dvorkin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES This report covers the results of developing the rock...

  4. Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X-ray Computed Microtomography Citation Details In-Document ...

  5. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  6. Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Gutierrez, Marte 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  7. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology, Geochemistry, Hydrothermal Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  8. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Arnold, Bill W.; Brady, Patrick; Sutton, Mark; Travis, Karl; MacKinnon, Robert; Gibb, Fergus;...

  9. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal Research:...

  10. State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Geological Survey Awardee Website http:www.azgs.az.gov Partner 1 Microsoft Research Partner 2 Energy Industry Metadata Standards Working Group Partner 4 String...

  11. Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems Bau, Domenico 54 ENVIRONMENTAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multi-Objective Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems Bau, Domenico 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The main objective of this project is to...

  12. Paleomagnetism, Potassium-Argon Ages, and Geology of Rhyolites...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Dalrymple, 1966). Authors Richard R. Doell, G. Brent Dalrymple, Robert Leland Smith and Roy A. Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoirs, 1968 DOI...

  13. Geophysics, Geology and Geothermal Leasing Status of the Lightning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leasing Status of the Lightning Dock KGRA, Animas Valley, New Mexico Author C. Smith Published New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  14. United States Geological Survey, LSC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name United States Geological Survey, LSC Address Leetown Science Center, Conte Anadromous Fish Laboratory, 1 Migratory Way Place Turners Falls,...

  15. Comparison of methods for geologic storage of carbon dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    United States Geological Survey (Brennan et al., 2010); ... generated by multiple methods revealed that assessments ... Research Org: National Energy Technology Laboratory - ...

  16. Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history....

  17. Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ... The apparatus provides more efficient heat transfer than existing technologies for ...

  18. United States Geological Survey, HIF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HIF Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Geological Survey, HIF Address Building 2101 Stennis Space Center Place Mississippi Zip...

  19. Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Source Policies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  20. Research Portfolio Report Ultra-Deepwater: Geologic Uncertainty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... as the standard and to provide viscosity data at the ultra-deep reservoir conditions. ... They constructed a suite of geologic models and dynamic simulation models that synthesized ...

  1. Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep thermal fluid flow at Coso will be controlled entirely by structural permeability developed in otherwise tight and impermeable host rocks. Neither geologic mapping...

  2. Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal...

  3. Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada...

  4. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing...

  5. Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and geologic deposits are indicated on the map. (MHR) Cartographers Fraser E. Goff and J. N. Gardner Published Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, 1980 DOI Not Provided...

  6. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Landfill disposal site were conducted. The purpose of these studies was basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies, such as analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards, used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-kilometer (km) (40-mile) radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters. The scope of work performed included the following: Compilation and analysis of previous published and unpublished geologic literature and maps. Review of historical and instrumental earthquake data. Review of site-specific subsurface geologic data, including lithologic and geophysical logs of exploratory boreholes advanced in the site area. Photogeologic interpretations of existing conventional aerial photographs. Ground reconnaissance and mapping of the site region.

  7. A Survey of lamba Repressor Fragments from Two-State to to Downhill Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Gao, Y; Gruebele, M

    2010-01-01

    We survey the two-state to downhill folding transition by examining 20 {lambda}{sub 6-85}* mutants that cover a wide range of stabilities and folding rates. We investigated four new {lambda}{sub 6-85}* mutants designed to fold especially rapidly. Two were engineered using the core remodeling of Lim and Sauer, and two were engineered using Ferreiro et al.'s frustratometer. These proteins have probe-dependent melting temperatures as high as 80 C and exhibit a fast molecular phase with the characteristic temperature dependence of the amplitude expected for downhill folding. The survey reveals a correlation between melting temperature and downhill folding previously observed for the {beta}-sheet protein WW domain. A simple model explains this correlation and predicts the melting temperature at which downhill folding becomes possible. An X-ray crystal structure with a 1.64-{angstrom} resolution of a fast-folding mutant fragment shows regions of enhanced rigidity compared to the full wild-type protein.

  8. Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-02-01

    Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

  9. Observations on Faults and Associated Permeability Structures in Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prothro, Lance B.; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Haugstad, Dawn N.; Huckins-Gang, Heather E.; Townsend, Margaret J.

    2009-03-30

    Observational data on Nevada Test Site (NTS) faults were gathered from a variety of sources, including surface and tunnel exposures, core samples, geophysical logs, and down-hole cameras. These data show that NTS fault characteristics and fault zone permeability structures are similar to those of faults studied in other regions. Faults at the NTS form complex and heterogeneous fault zones with flow properties that vary in both space and time. Flow property variability within fault zones can be broken down into four major components that allow for the development of a simplified, first approximation model of NTS fault zones. This conceptual model can be used as a general guide during development and evaluation of groundwater flow and contaminate transport models at the NTS.

  10. Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, L.; Tate, M. W.; Finnefrock, A. C.; Kalidas, C.; Trotter, S.; Darnton, N. C.; Lurio, L.; Austin, R. H.; Batt, C. A.; Gruner, S. M. (and others)

    2001-05-21

    High-intensity, ''pink'' beam from an undulator was used in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding with time resolved small angle x-ray scattering. This Letter describes recent work on the protein bovine {beta} -lactoglobulin where collapse from an expanded to a compact set of states was directly observed on the millisecond time scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently understood. The characterization of transient, compact states is vital in assessing the validity of theories and models of the folding process.

  11. Faulted reservoirs characterization by an image processing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Angeles, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper has developed an image processing method for obtaining the discontinuous areal distribution of oil parameters (formation top, porosity, water saturation,...) of faulted heterogeneous oil reservoirs. For its application it requires the previous knowledge of a set of discrete values z(k,l) from well-logs and seismic profiles. Faulted structures were discretized into continuous structures or blocks bounded by faults. The theoretical fundamental assumption of the proposed method establishes that the natural distributions can be considered as the superposition of several elementary brownian distributions, represented by discrete values z(k,l), whose physical model is the diffusion differential equation and its solution associated. This is a technique that allows the representation of a composed brownian distribution as a linear combination of all elementary brownian functions. For illustrating the operational aspect of brownian analysis, two examples are studied. The results are presented as a digital images by means of an image processing software. This method can be applied in mapping, three dimensions interpolation and reserves calculation of faulted reservoirs.

  12. Experimental and computational studies on stacking faults in zinc titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, W.; Ageh, V.; Mohseni, H.; Scharf, T. W. E-mail: Jincheng.Du@unt.edu; Du, J. E-mail: Jincheng.Du@unt.edu

    2014-06-16

    Zinc titanate (ZnTiO{sub 3}) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition with ilmenite structure have recently been identified as an excellent solid lubricant, where low interfacial shear and friction are achieved due to intrafilm shear velocity accommodation in sliding contacts. In this Letter, high resolution transmission electron microscopy with electron diffraction revealed that extensive stacking faults are present on ZnTiO{sub 3} textured (104) planes. These growth stacking faults serve as a pathway for dislocations to glide parallel to the sliding direction and hence achieve low interfacial shear/friction. Generalized stacking fault energy plots also known as ?-surfaces were computed for the (104) surface of ZnTiO{sub 3} using energy minimization method with classical effective partial charge potential and verified by using density functional theory first principles calculations for stacking fault energies along certain directions. These two are in qualitative agreement but classical simulations generally overestimate the energies. In addition, the lowest energy path was determined to be along the [451{sup }] direction and the most favorable glide system is (104) ?451{sup }? that is responsible for the experimentally observed sliding-induced ductility.

  13. High voltage fault current limiter having immersed phase coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2014-04-22

    A fault current limiter including: a ferromagnetic circuit formed from a ferromagnetic material and including at least a first limb, and a second limb; a saturation mechanism surrounding a limb for magnetically saturating the ferromagnetic material; a phase coil wound around a second limb; a dielectric fluid surrounding the phase coil; a gaseous atmosphere surrounding the saturation mechanism.

  14. Crystal Structures of RMI1 and RMI2, Two OB-Fold Regulatory Subunits...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Crystal Structures of RMI1 and RMI2, Two OB-Fold Regulatory Subunits of the BLM Complex Mutations in BLM, a RecQ-like helicase, are linked to the autosomal recessive cancer-...

  15. A Route to Scale up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemie International Edition Year: 2010 Volume: 49 Pages: 1414-1417 ABSTRACT: A new strategy is presented to scale up DNA origami using multi-helical DNA tiles as folding...

  16. Crystallographic Structure of SurA, a Molecular Chaperone that Facilitates Folding of Outer Membrane Porins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitto, E.

    2002-01-01

    The SurA protein facilitates correct folding of outer membrane proteins in gram-negative bacteria. The sequence of Escherichia coli SurA presents four segments, two of which are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases); the crystal structure reveals an asymmetric dumbbell, in which the amino-terminal, carboxy-terminal, and first PPIase segments of the sequence form a core structural module, and the second PPIase segment is a satellite domain tethered approximately 30 A from this module. The core module, which is implicated in membrane protein folding, has a novel fold that includes an extended crevice. Crystal contacts show that peptides bind within the crevice, suggesting a model for chaperone activity whereby segments of polypeptide may be repetitively sequestered and released during the membrane protein-folding process.

  17. A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2005-08-01

    This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

  18. Behavior of REE in geological and biological systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.

    1981-05-01

    The REE abundances when normalized to primordial (chondritic) abundances behave as a smooth function of the REE ionic radii in both the geological and biological systems. The REE are hardly fractionated chemically through various stages of their transformation from soil-soil extract-plant-geological systems.

  19. Tri-fold - Agencies Assisting with EEOICPA and the Former worker Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Tri-fold - Agencies Assisting with EEOICPA and the Former worker Program Tri-fold - Agencies Assisting with EEOICPA and the Former worker Program March 2015 Agencies Assisting with EEOICPA and the Former Worker Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives from DOE, Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Offices of the Ombudsman for DOL and NIOSH, and the DOE-funded FWP projects. The JOTG

  20. DOE Science Showcase - Protein Folding | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Protein Folding Proteins are the main constitute of our bones, muscles, hair, skin and blood vessels, performing a vast array of functions such as catalyzing metabolic reactions, replicating DNA, response to stimuli, moving muscles, and protecting the immune system. These proteins consist of long chains of molecules called amino acids that interact with each other to produce a well-defined three-dimensional structure - the folded protein. The correct

  1. Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

    2011-03-03

    Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  2. Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Stephen P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-12-14

    This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The purpose of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  3. Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-01-01

    This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  4. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  5. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold W.

    2011-04-01

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  6. Seismicity Characterization and Monitoring at WESTCARB's Proposed Montezuma Hills Geologic Sequestration Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, T.M.; Haught, R.; Peterson, J.E.; Boyle, K.; Beyer, J.H.; Hutchings, L.R.

    2010-09-15

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), in collaboration with Shell Oil Co. performed site characterization for a potential small-scale pilot test of geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The site area, know as Montezuma Hills, is near the town of Rio Vista in northern California. During the process of injection at a CO2 storage site, there is a potential for seismic events due to slippage upon pre-existing discontinuities or due to creation of new fractures. Observations from many injection projects have shown that the energy from these events can be used for monitoring of processes in the reservoir. Typically, the events are of relatively high frequency and very low amplitude. However, there are also well documented (non-CO2-related) cases in which subsurface injection operations have resulted in ground motion felt by near-by communities. Because of the active tectonics in California (in particular the San Andreas Fault system), and the potential for public concern, WESTCARB developed and followed an induced seismicity protocol (Myer and Daley, 2010). This protocol called for assessing the natural seismicity in the area and deploying a monitoring array if necessary. In this report, we present the results of the natural seismicity assessment and the results of an initial temporary deployment of two seismometers at the Montezuma Hills site. Following the temporary array deployment, the project was suspended and the array removed in August of 2010.

  7. Geology of Ziliujing gas field - The gas field developed earliest in the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Chuanbai )

    1991-03-01

    Ziliujing gas field, located in Zigong municipality, Sichuan, is an asymmetric anticline, and well depth is generally less than 1,300 m. There are eight gas- and brine-producing intervals. Tc-3 of the Lower Triassic is the main gas-producing horizon, which is a carbonate with a combination of fracture and intergranular porosities. As early as 1,500 years ago, the production of brine and natural gas was started; over 13,000 wells were drilled of which over 1,000 wells were gas wells. The total area of different producing zones is about 22 km{sup 2}. The distribution and production of natural gas are controlled by structural faults. The gas sources supplied are beyond the limit of the structure. Tc-3 reservoir is a typical fissured reservoir, and most of the wells have the characteristics of (1) high initial production rate; (2) rapid depletion; and (3) long producing life. Owing to the favorable geological conditions; the great number of wells; outstanding ancient technologies in drilling, production, and transportation; comprehensive utilization; and very long production history, tremendous success is achieved in the development of gas fields. The total cumulative gas production by the end of 1985 was 33 billion cubic meters in which 17.2 billion cubic meters were contributed by Tc-3 reservoir; maximum gas and brine recoveries have been achieve. So far the gas reservoirs have not been depleted and new discoveries have been found in recent years. The brilliant achievements of the ancestors remain.

  8. Development of Asset Fault Signatures for Prognostic and Health Management in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Randall Bickford; Richard Rusaw

    2014-06-01

    Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using the Electric Power Research Institute’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. The FW-PHM Suite is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The FW-PHM Suite has four main modules: Diagnostic Advisor, Asset Fault Signature (AFS) Database, Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and Remaining Useful Life Database. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures to assess the health status of generator step-up generators and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. At the most basic level, fault signatures are comprised of an asset type, a fault type, and a set of one or more fault features (symptoms) that are indicative of the specified fault. The AFS Database is populated with asset fault signatures via a content development exercise that is based on the results of intensive technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The developed fault signatures capture this knowledge and implement it in a standardized approach, thereby streamlining the diagnostic and prognostic process. This will support the automation of proactive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  9. Folding chair

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornell, Howell N.

    1985-08-20

    A foldable chair of the lawn chair type has ground-engaging front and rear legs, attached to and carrying a back frame and seat frame, the back frame and seat frame being pivotally attached to a spreader rod which extends beyond the back and seat frames to bear against one of the leg members when the chair is unfolded. A contact pad mounted on the extending portion of the spreader rod is formed as an externally-contoured bushing fit over the spreader rod and adapted to engage the leg member to restrict side-to-side movement of the spreader rod, with respect to the leg member, when the chair is unfolded.

  10. RNA Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Rick Russell, Ian S. Millett, Sebastian Doniach and Daniel Herschlag Stanford University One goal of genome projects is to systematically identify genes (1,2). The best current knowledge indicates that humans carry approximately 35000 genes. This number is an estimate that varies from expert to expert and range up to 100,000 (3-5). To anyone who has taken an elementary biology class, this ambiguity must seem strange. How hard can it be to count genes? After all, don't cells translate genes

  11. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K., E-mail: sklai@coll.phy.ncu.edu.tw [Complex Liquids Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Central University, Chungli 320 Taiwan (China); Molecular Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Cheong, S. A. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with ? helix and ? hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  12. Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L.; Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young; Lietzke, D.A.; McMaster, W.M.

    1992-10-01

    This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

  13. Rule based decision support system for single-line fault detection in a delta-delta connected distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momoh, J.A.; Dias, L.G.; Thor, T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Laird, D. )

    1994-05-01

    Single-line fault detection, faulted feeder identification, fault type classification, fault location and fault impedance estimation, continue to pose a problem to delta-delta connected distribution systems such as the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) which has over 1,500 feeder circuits at the 4.8kV voltage level. This paper describes a rule based decision support (RBDS) system application to single-line fault detection in a delta-delta connected distribution system. The RBDS system is built from knowledge acquired through exhaustive simulation based on non-arcing type fault situations. It is primarily designed to detect the presence of a fault, identify the faulted feeder, the faulted phase and classify the fault type. It is also designed to gauge the proximity of the fault to the substation and to assess the fault impedance. A fault in the distribution system, upon identification, triggers an alarm with explanatory facility leading to the fault. The RBDS system was tested with different sets of simulated data and proved successful in most cases. Additional tests will be done using field data made available by LADWP. The RBDS system module is a prototype integrated fault detection scheme to be installed in a LADWP distribution substation.

  14. When did movement begin on the Furnace Creek fault zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reheis, M. )

    1993-04-01

    About 50 km of post-Jurassic right-lateral slip has occurred on the northern part of the Furnace Creek fault zone (FCFZ). The sedimentology, stratigraphy, and structure of Tertiary rocks suggest that movement on the fault began no earlier than 12--8 Ma and possibly as late as 5--4 Ma. Large remnants of erosion surfaces occur on both sides of the FCFZ in the southern White Mountains and Fish Lake Valley and are buried by rhyolite and basalt, mostly 12--10 Ma; the ash flows and welded tuffs were likely erupted from sources at least 40 km to the east. Thus, the area probably had gentle topography, suggesting a lengthy period of pre-late Miocene tectonic stability. On the west side of the FCFZ, Cambrian sedimentary rocks are buried by a fanglomerate with an [sup [minus

  15. Testing of 3-meter Prototype Fault Current Limiting Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouge, Michael J; Duckworth, Robert C; Demko, Jonathan A; Rey, Christopher M; Thompson, James R; Lindsay, David T; Tolbert, Jerry Carlton; Willen, Dag; Lentge, Heidi; Thidemann, Carsten; Carter, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Two 3-m long, single-phase cables have been fabricated by Ultera from second generation (2G) superconductor supplied by American Superconductor. The first cable was made with two layers of 2G tape conductor and had a critical current of 5,750 A while the second cable had four layers and a critical current of 8,500 A. AC loss was measured for both cables at ac currents of up to 4 kArms. Ultera performed initial fault current studies of both cables in Denmark with limited currents in the range from 9.1 to 44 kA. Results from these tests will provide a basis for a 25-m long, three-phase, prototype cable to be tested at ORNL early next year and a 300-m long, fault current limiting, superconducting cable to be installed in a ConEd substation in New York City.

  16. The French Geological Repository Project Cigeo - 12023

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harman, Alain; Labalette, Thibaud; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2012-07-01

    The French Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, ANDRA, was launched by law in 1991 to perform and develop the research programme for managing high level and intermediate level long-lived radioactive waste generated by the French nuclear fleet. After a 15-year intensive research programme, including the study of alternative solutions, an overall review and assessment of the results was organized, including a national public debate. As a result, the Parliament passed a Planning Act on radioactive waste management in 2006. Commissioning of a geological repository by 2025 was one of the most important decisions taken at that time. To reach this goal, a license application must be submitted and reviewed by the competent authorities by 2015. A detailed review and consultation process is, as well, defined in the Planning Act. Beside the legal framework the project needs to progress on two fronts. The first one is on siting. A significant milestone was reached in 2009 with the definition of a defined area to locate the underground repository facilities. This area was approved in March 2010 by the Government, after having collected the opinions and positions of all the interested parties, at both National and local levels. A new phase of dialogue with local players began to refine the implementation scenarios of surface facilities. The final site selection will be approved after a public debate planned for 2013. The second one is the industrial organization, planning and costing. The industrial project of this geological repository was called Cigeo (Centre Industriel de Stockage Geologique). Given the amount of work to be done to comply with the given time framework, a detailed organization with well-defined milestones must be set-up. Cigeo will be a specific nuclear facility, built and operated underground for over a hundred years. The consequence of this long duration is that the development of the repository facilities will take place in successive operational phases

  17. NREL Research Proves Wind Can Provide Ancillary Grid Fault Response |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Integration | NREL NREL Research Proves Wind Can Provide Ancillary Grid Fault Response April 1, 2016 Interior of the controllable grid interface test facility, showing a long hallway and shelves full of electronic equipment. The controllable grid interface test facility at the National Wind Technology Center makes it possible to research the effectiveness of wind energy in providing ancillary grid services such as frequency control. Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 27442 Image

  18. Characterization of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloy permanent mold castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bichler, L. [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M5B 2K3 (Canada); Ravindran, C., E-mail: rravindr@ryerson.ca [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Casting premium-quality magnesium alloy components for aerospace and automotive applications poses unique challenges. Magnesium alloys are known to freeze rapidly prior to filling a casting cavity, resulting in misruns and cold shuts. In addition, melt oxidation, solute segregation and turbulent metal flow during casting contribute to the formation of fold defects. In this research, formation of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloys cast via the permanent mold casting process was investigated. Computer simulations of the casting process predicted the development of a turbulent metal flow in a critical casting region with abrupt geometrical transitions. SEM and light optical microscopy examinations revealed the presence of folds in this region for both alloys. However, each alloy exhibited a unique mechanism responsible for fold formation. In the AZ91D alloy, melt oxidation and velocity gradients in the critical casting region prevented fusion of merging metal front streams. In the AE42 alloy, limited solubility of rare-earth intermetallic compounds in the {alpha}-Mg phase resulted in segregation of Al{sub 2}RE particles at the leading edge of a metal front and created microstructural inhomogeneity across the fold.

  19. Microsecond acquisition of heterogeneous structure in the folding of a TIM barrel protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ying; Kondrashkina, Elena; Kayatekin, Can; Matthews, C. Robert; Bilsel, Osman (NWU); (UMASS, Amherst)

    2008-09-29

    The earliest kinetic folding events for ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrels reflect the appearance of off-pathway intermediates. Continuous-flow microchannel mixing methods interfaced to small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), circular dichroism (CD), time-resolved Foerster resonant energy transfer (trFRET), and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (trFLAN) have been used to directly monitor global and specific dimensional properties of the partially folded state in the microsecond time range for a representative ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrel protein. Within 150 {micro}s, the {alpha}-subunit of Trp synthase ({alpha}TS) experiences a global collapse and the partial formation of secondary structure. The time resolution of the folding reaction was enhanced with trFRET and trFLAN to show that, within 30 {micro}s, a distinct and autonomous partially collapsed structure has already formed in the N-terminal and central regions but not in the C-terminal region. A distance distribution analysis of the trFRET data confirmed the presence of a heterogeneous ensemble that persists for several hundreds of microseconds. Ready access to locally folded, stable substructures may be a hallmark of repeat-module proteins and the source of early kinetic traps in these very common motifs. Their folding free-energy landscapes should be elaborated to capture this source of frustration.

  20. Superconducting fault current-limiter with variable shunt impedance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Llambes, Juan Carlos H; Xiong, Xuming

    2013-11-19

    A superconducting fault current-limiter is provided, including a superconducting element configured to resistively or inductively limit a fault current, and one or more variable-impedance shunts electrically coupled in parallel with the superconducting element. The variable-impedance shunt(s) is configured to present a first impedance during a superconducting state of the superconducting element and a second impedance during a normal resistive state of the superconducting element. The superconducting element transitions from the superconducting state to the normal resistive state responsive to the fault current, and responsive thereto, the variable-impedance shunt(s) transitions from the first to the second impedance. The second impedance of the variable-impedance shunt(s) is a lower impedance than the first impedance, which facilitates current flow through the variable-impedance shunt(s) during a recovery transition of the superconducting element from the normal resistive state to the superconducting state, and thus, facilitates recovery of the superconducting element under load.

  1. Parallel continuation-based global optimization for molecular conformation and protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, T.F.; Wu, Z. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the authors` recent work on developing parallel algorithms and software for solving the global minimization problem for molecular conformation, especially protein folding. Global minimization problems are difficult to solve when the objective functions have many local minimizers, such as the energy functions for protein folding. In their approach, to avoid directly minimizing a ``difficult`` function, a special integral transformation is introduced to transform the function into a class of gradually deformed, but ``smoother`` or ``easier`` functions. An optimization procedure is then applied to the new functions successively, to trace their solutions back to the original function. The method can be applied to a large class of nonlinear partially separable functions including energy functions for molecular conformation and protein folding. Mathematical theory for the method, as a special continuation approach to global optimization, is established. Algorithms with different solution tracing strategies are developed. Different levels of parallelism are exploited for the implementation of the algorithms on massively parallel architectures.

  2. Femtosecond spectroscopy probes the folding quality of antibody fragments expressed as GFP fusions in the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Didier, P. [Faculte de Pharmacie, UMR 7175, 74, route du Rhin, 67412 Illkirch (France); Weiss, E.; Sibler, A.-P. [Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7175, Boulevard Sebastien Brant, F-67412 Illkirch (France); Philibert, P.; Martineau, P. [Centre de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, UMR 5160, Val d'Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Bigot, J.-Y. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Guidoni, L. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, UMR 7162, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)], E-mail: luca.guidoni@univ-paris-diderot.fr

    2008-02-22

    Time-resolved femtosecond spectroscopy can improve the application of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) as protein-folding reporters. The study of ultrafast excited-state dynamics (ESD) of GFP fused to single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody fragments, allowed us to define and measure an empirical parameter that only depends on the folding quality (FQ) of the fusion. This method has been applied to the analysis of genetic fusions expressed in the bacterial cytoplasm and allowed us to distinguish folded and thus functional antibody fragments (high FQ) with respect to misfolded antibody fragments. Moreover, these findings were strongly correlated to the behavior of the same scFvs expressed in animal cells. This method is based on the sensitivity of the ESD to the modifications in the tertiary structure of the GFP induced by the aggregation state of the fusion partner. This approach may be applicable to the study of the FQ of polypeptides over-expressed under reducing conditions.

  3. Geometry of wrapped M5-branes in Calabi-Yau 2-folds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayyazuddin, Ansar; Husain, Tasneem Zehra; Pappa, Ioanna

    2006-06-15

    We study the geometry of M5-branes wrapping a 2-cycle which is special Lagrangian with respect to a specific complex structure in a Calabi-Yau 2-fold. Using methods recently applied to the 3-fold case, we are again able to find a characterization of the geometry, in terms of a nonintegrable almost complex structure and a (2,0) form. This time, however, due to the hyper-Kaehler nature of the underlying 2-fold, we also have the freedom of choosing a different almost complex structure with respect to which the wrapped 2-cycle is holomorphic. We show that this latter almost complex structure is integrable. We then relate our geometry to previously found geometries of M5-branes wrapping holomorphic cycles and go further to prove some previously unknown results for M5-branes on holomorphic cycles.

  4. A Geological and Geophysical Study of Chena Hot Springs, Alaksa...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaksa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library M.Sc. Thesis: A Geological and Geophysical Study of Chena Hot Springs, AlaksaThesisDissertation...

  5. Geologic Mapping of the Valles Caldera National Preserve, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Bland) are now complete and two others will be finished by 2006 (Valle Toledo and Valle San Antonio). Eventually, the geology of the Valles caldera will be published as a...

  6. Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process (discrete fracture network) models.

  7. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations...

  8. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RegGeolGISDatabaseDevelM2FT14LA0814012REV (24.44 MB) More Documents & Publications Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1- A Tool for informing Regional Evaluations of Alternative ...

  9. Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiInfo GraphicMapChart Authors Frank A. Trusdell and Richard B. Moore Published U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability:...

  10. Title Geology of the Great Basin. Copyright Issue Entire Book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fiero, B. 101084 Document Date 1186 Document Type Book ERC Index number 05.09.128 Box Number 1672-1 Recipients Unversity of Nevada Reno Press ADI " Geology of the Great...

  11. Geological aspects of the nuclear waste disposal problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laverov, N.P.; Omelianenko, B.L.; Velichkin, V.I.

    1994-06-01

    For the successful solution of the high-level waste (HLW) problem in Russia one must take into account such factors as the existence of the great volume of accumulated HLW, the large size and variety of geological conditions in the country, and the difficult economic conditions. The most efficient method of HLW disposal consists in the maximum use of protective capacities of the geological environment and in using inexpensive natural minerals for engineered barrier construction. In this paper, the principal trends of geological investigation directed toward the solution of HLW disposal are considered. One urgent practical aim is the selection of sites in deep wells in regions where the HLW is now held in temporary storage. The aim of long-term investigations into HLW disposal is to evaluate geological prerequisites for regional HLW repositories.

  12. Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eliason, Jay R.; Eliason, Valerie L. C.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

  13. Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MexicoInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Abstract unavailable Cartographers Robert Leland Smith, Roy A. Bailey and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1970 DOI Not...

  14. Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks Authors Williams, P.L.; Mabey, D.R.; Pierce, K.L.; Zohdy, A.A.R.; Ackermann, H.; Hoover and D.B. Published U....

  16. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

  17. Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pershing County, Nevada, in: Gold and Silver Deposits of Western Nevada Authors Hastings, J.S., Burkhart, T.H., and Richardson and R.E. Published Geological Society of Nevada 1993...

  18. Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida region, Colorado Authors J.E. Case and R.F. Sikora Published U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report, 1984 Report...

  19. DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  1. Geology of Southwestern New Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Conference Paper: Geology of Southwestern New Mexico Authors R.E. Clemons and G.H. Mack Conference 39th Field Conference; ConferencePlace"ConferencePlace"...

  2. COLLOQUIUM: Human Impacts on the Earth's Geologic Carbon Cycle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 15, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Human Impacts on ... Human Impacts on the Earth's Geologic Carbon Cycle Colloquium Committee: The Princeton ...

  3. The evolution and hydrocarbon habitat of the Papuan fold belt, PNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, D.G.; Smith, R.I.; Cawley, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    After over 70 years of hydrocarbon exploration in the Papuan fold belt of PNG (Papua New Guinea) there have been a number of hydrocarbon discoveries over recent years that have confirmed its potential as a significant producing province. The Papuan basin developed during the early Mesozoic as part of the northeast corner of the Australian passive margin. The basin's tertiary evolution and the development of the Papuan fold belt within the Papuan basin has evolved in response to oblique convergence between the northerly moving Australian plate and westerly moving Pacific plate. Restacking of the Mesozoic passive margin sequence within the Papuan Basin was initiated in the early miocene by southward abduction of the Solomon Sea plate and the subsequent collision, in the late Miocene, of the Melanesian Island arc along the northeastern margin of PNG. This later collision provided the driving mechanism for the development of the papuan thrust belt. To date, all the significant hydrocarbon discoveries made within the Papuan fold belt have been located within the frontal zone of the fold belt, which is characterized by relatively simple ramp anticlines and thick-skinned inversion structures. The primary proven reservoir fairway is the Jurassic Toro formation, which is a sequence of stacked submarine bars prograding out across a shallow-marine low-gradient shelf. Geochemical analysis of produced hydrocarbons and samples collected from the many surface seeps found in the fold belt indicate two main families of oil. A model explains the distribution of hydrocarbons discovered to date, which involves Jurassic and Cretaceous source intervals and a complex history of secondary migration and entrapment. The unique technical problems associated with exploration of the Papuan fold belt leave many elements of the proven play systems uncertain, but in so doing, they present many challenges and opportunities for the future.

  4. The earliest events in protein folding: Helix dynamics in proteins and model peptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, R.B.; Williams, S.; Woodruff, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The earliest events in protein folding are critically important in determining the folding pathway, but have proved difficult to study by conventional approaches. We have developed new rapid initiation methods and structure-specific probes to interrogate the earliest events of protein folding. Our focus is the pathways. Folding or unfolding reactions are initiated on a fast timescale (10 ns) using a laser induced temperature jump (15 C) and probed with time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. We obtained the kinetics of the helix-coil transition for a model 21-residue peptide. The observed rate constant k{sub obs} = k{sub f} + k{sub u} for reversible kinetics; from the observed rate (6 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and the equilibrium constant favoring folding of 7.5 at 27 C, we calculate a folding lifetime of 180 ns and an unfolding lifetime of 1.4 {mu}s. The {open_quotes}molten globule{close_quotes} form of apomyoglobin (horse, pH*3, 0.15M NaCl) shows similar kinetics for helix that is unconstrained by tertiary structure (helix with an unusually low Amide I frequency, near 1633 cm{sup -1}). In {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} apomyoglobin (horse, pH*5.3, 10 mM NaCl) two very different rates (45 ns and 70 {mu}s) are observed and we infer that a third occurs on a timescales inaccessible to our experiment (> 1 ms). We suggest that the slower processes are due to helix formation that is rate-limited by the formation of tertiary structure.

  5. Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the

  6. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sequestration Program | Department of Energy Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2

  7. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System Principal Investigator M. Lee Allison Arizona Geological Survey Analysis, Data System and Education May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. States providing data to NGDS 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Overview RDC & QA Vision Data Compilation, Checking, Automation Review SOW Establish Regional Technical Centers PHASE 1: Data

  8. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock's elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties

  9. Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory N. Boitnott; Gilles Y. Bussod; Paul N. Hagin; Stephen R. Brown

    2005-04-18

    to a different and more accurate description of a heterogeneous system, when compared to a more traditional upscaling approach that combines averaging and the application of core-based models. This may be of particular significance in bio-remediation studies where the link between microorganism activity and mesoscale flow through geologic structures, resides in the integration of multiscale processes.

  10. Deducing the Energetic Cost of Protein Folding in Zinc Finger Proteins Using Designed Metallopeptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddi,A.; Guzman, T.; Breece, r.; Tierney, D.; Gibney, B.

    2007-01-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors represent the largest single class of metalloproteins in the human genome. Binding of Zn(II) to their canonical Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 sites results in metal-induced protein folding events required to achieve their proper structure for biological activity. The thermodynamic contribution of Zn(II) in each of these coordination spheres toward protein folding is poorly understood because of the coupled nature of the metal-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Using an unstructured peptide scaffold, GGG, we have employed fluorimetry, potentiometry, and calorimetry to determine the thermodynamics of Zn(II) binding to the Cys4, Cys3His1, and Cys2His2 ligand sets with minimal interference from protein folding effects. The data show that Zn(II) complexation is entropy driven and modulated by proton release. The formation constants for Zn(II)-GGG with a Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 site are 5.6 x 1016, 1.5 x 1015, or 2.5 x 1013 M-1, respectively. Thus, the Zn(II)-Cys4, Zn(II)-Cys3His1, and Zn(II)-Cys2His2 interactions can provide up to 22.8, 20.7, and 18.3 kcal/mol, respectively, in driving force for protein stabilization, folding, and/or assembly at pH values above the ligand pKa values. While the contributions from the three coordination motifs differ by 4.5 kcal/mol in Zn(II) affinity at pH 9.0, they are equivalent at physiological pH, ?G = -16.8 kcal/mol or a Ka = 2.0 x 1012 M-1. Calorimetric data show that this is due to proton-based enthalpy-entropy compensation between the favorable entropic term from proton release and the unfavorable enthalpic term due to thiol deprotonation. Since protein folding effects have been minimized in the GGG scaffold, these peptides possess nearly the tightest Zn(II) affinities possible for their coordination motifs. The Zn(II) affinities in each coordination motif are compared between the GGG scaffold and natural zinc finger proteins to determine the free energy required to fold the latter

  11. Protein-folding via divide-and-conquer optimization (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Protein-folding via divide-and-conquer optimization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Protein-folding via divide-and-conquer optimization Authors: Oliva, Ricardo ; Crivelli, Silvia ; Meza, Juan Publication Date: 2004-07-11 OSTI Identifier: 882903 Report Number(s): LBNL--55869 R&D Project: 365969; BnR: YN0100000 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: SIAM Conference on the Life Sciences, Portland,OR, July 11-14,

  12. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  13. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  14. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources- Pearl Hot Spring, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: Integration of new thermochronometric, structural and geological analyses, reflection and refraction seismic surveys and existing geophysical data into a 3-D Earth Model to elucidate the tectonic and 4-D thermal evolution of southern Clayton Valley and the Weepah Hills (Pearl Hot Spring geothermal play).

  15. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in

  16. Long range correlations and folding angle with applications to ?-helical proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krokhotin, Andrey, E-mail: Andrei.Krokhotine@cern.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden); Nicolis, Stam, E-mail: Stam.Nicolis@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)] [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108, Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fdration Denis Poisson, Universit de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-03-07

    The conformational complexity of chain-like macromolecules such as proteins and other linear polymers is much larger than that of point-like atoms and molecules. Unlike particles, chains can bend, twist, and even become knotted. Thus chains might also display a much richer phase structure. Unfortunately, it is not very easy to characterize the phase of a long chain. Essentially, the only known attribute is the radius of gyration. The way how it changes when the degree of polymerization becomes different, and how it evolves when the ambient temperature and solvent properties change, is commonly used to disclose the phase. But in any finite length chain there are corrections to scaling that complicate the detailed analysis of the phase structure. Here we introduce a quantity that we call the folding angle to identify and scrutinize the phase structure, as a complement to the radius of gyration. We argue for a mean-field level relationship between the folding angle and the scaling exponent in the radius of gyration. We then estimate the value of the folding angle in the case of crystallographic ?-helical protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. We also show how the experimental value of the folding angle can be obtained computationally, using a semiclassical Born-Oppenheimer description of ?-helical chiral chains.

  17. Microscopic Description of the Exotic Nuclei Reactions by Using Folding model Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; El-Azab Farid, M.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.

    2011-10-27

    A microscopic folding approach based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclear matter densities of the interacting nuclei has been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering reaction at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The corresponding reaction cross sections are also considered.

  18. Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures Jay Johnson 1 and Jack Kang 2 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA 2 Sensata Technologies, Attleboro, MA, USA ABSTRACT Abstract - The 2011 National Electrical Code® Article 690.11 requires photovoltaic systems on or penetrating a building to include a DC arc-fault protection device. In order to satisfy this requirement, new Arc-Fault Detectors (AFDs) are being developed by multiple

  19. NEAR-SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A HOLOCENE FAULT CONDUCIVE TO

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GEOTHERMAL FLOW NEAR PYRAMID LAKE, NEVADA (Other) | SciTech Connect NEAR-SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A HOLOCENE FAULT CONDUCIVE TO GEOTHERMAL FLOW NEAR PYRAMID LAKE, NEVADA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NEAR-SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A HOLOCENE FAULT CONDUCIVE TO GEOTHERMAL FLOW NEAR PYRAMID LAKE, NEVADA Linear deposits of calcium carbonate tufa columns mark recent faults that cut 11 ka Lake Lahontan sediments at Astor Pass, north of Pyramid Lake,

  20. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein`s amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate.

  1. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilski, Miroslaw [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland); Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Zbransk, Helena [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Cooper, Seth; Popovi?, Zoran [University of Washington, Box 352350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David [University of Washington, Box 357350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Pichov, Iva [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Jaskolski, Mariusz, E-mail: mariuszj@amu.edu.pl [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-11-01

    The crystal structure of MasonPfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. MasonPfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C{sup ?} deviations are large and the active-site DTG loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 ) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections, including

  2. Isolation, folding and structural investigations of the amino acid transporter OEP16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Da Qun; Zook, James; Klewer, Douglas A.; Nieman, Ronald A.; Soll, J.; Fromme, Petra

    2011-12-01

    Membrane proteins compose more than 30% of all proteins in the living cell. However, many membrane proteins have low abundance in the cell and cannot be isolated from natural sources in concentrations suitable for structure analysis. The overexpression, reconstitution, and stabilization of membrane proteins are complex and remain a formidable challenge in membrane protein characterization. Here we describe a novel, in vitro folding procedure for a cation-selective channel protein, the outer envelope membrane protein 16 (OEP16) of pea chloroplast, overexpressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. The protein is purified and then folded with detergent on a Ni-NTA affinity column. Final concentrations of reconstituted OEP16 of up to 24 mg/ml have been achieved, which provides samples that are sufficient for structural studies by NMR and crystallography. Reconstitution of OEP16 in detergent micelles was monitored by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopy. Tryptophan fluorescence spectra of heterologous expressed OEP16 in micelles are similar to spectra of functionally active OEP16 in liposomes, which indicates folding of the membrane protein in detergent micelles. CD spectroscopy studies demonstrate a folded protein consisting primarily of a-helices. 15N-HSQC NMR spectra also provide evidence for a folded protein. We present here a convenient, effective and quantitative method to screen large numbers of conditions for optimal protein stability by using microdialysis chambers in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy. Recent collection of multidimensional NMR data at 500, 600 and 800 MHz demonstrated that the protein is suitable for structure determination by NMR and stable for weeks during data collection.

  3. Investigations of stacking fault density in perpendicular recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piramanayagam, S. N. Varghese, Binni; Yang, Yi; Kiat Lee, Wee; Khume Tan, Hang

    2014-06-28

    In magnetic recording media, the grains or clusters reverse their magnetization over a range of reversal field, resulting in a switching field distribution. In order to achieve high areal densities, it is desirable to understand and minimize such a distribution. Clusters of grains which contain stacking faults (SF) or fcc phase have lower anisotropy, an order lower than those without them. It is believed that such low anisotropy regions reverse their magnetization at a much lower reversal field than the rest of the material with a larger anisotropy. Such clusters/grains cause recording performance deterioration, such as adjacent track erasure and dc noise. Therefore, the observation of clusters that reverse at very low reversal fields (nucleation sites, NS) could give information on the noise and the adjacent track erasure. Potentially, the observed clusters could also provide information on the SF. In this paper, we study the reversal of nucleation sites in granular perpendicular media based on a magnetic force microscope (MFM) methodology and validate the observations with high resolution cross-section transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements. Samples, wherein a high anisotropy CoPt layer was introduced to control the NS or SF in a systematic way, were evaluated by MFM, TEM, and magnetometry. The magnetic properties indicated that the thickness of the CoPt layer results in an increase of nucleation sites. TEM measurements indicated a correlation between the thickness of CoPt layer and the stacking fault density. A clear correlation was also observed between the MFM results, TEM observations, and the coercivity and nucleation field of the samples, validating the effectiveness of the proposed method in evaluating the nucleation sites which potentially arise from stacking faults.

  4. Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant topological quantum computation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Non-abelian fractional quantum hall...

  5. Sandia Research on PV Arc-Fault Detection Submitted for US Patent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predictive Simulation of Engines Transportation Energy Consortiums Engine Combustion ... The 2011 National Electrical Code requires PV DC series arc-fault protection, but does ...

  6. Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of sinistral fault systems, resulting in localized crustal extension and enhanced permeability. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling...

  7. Wind Power Plant Enhancement with a Fault-Current Limiter: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; DeLaRosa, F.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the capability of a saturable core fault-current limiter to limit the short circuit current of different types of wind turbine generators.

  8. VOLTTRON Compatible Whole-Building Root-Fault Detection and Diagnosis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tool that integrates both statistical process control and machine learning techniques and rule-based methods to achieve a whole-building energy system "root-fault" diagnosis. ...

  9. Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    intersections between the overlapping fault strands results in increased fracture density that enhances hydrothermal fluid flow. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling...

  10. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards: November 2012 - October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, William

    2015-02-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  11. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  12. Geologic Storage of Greenhouse Gases: Multiphase andNon-isothermal Effects, and Implications for Leakage Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2005-08-05

    Storage of greenhouse gases, primarily CO2, in geologic formations has been proposed as a means by which atmospheric emissions of such gases may be reduced (Bachu et al., 1994; Orr, 2004). Possible storage reservoirs currently under consideration include saline aquifers, depleted or depleting oil and gas fields, and unmineable coal seams (Baines and Worden, 2004). The amount of CO2 emitted from fossil-fueled power plants is very large, of the order of 30,000 tons per day (10 million tons per year) for a large 1,000 MW coal-fired plant (Hitchon,1996). In order to make a significant impact on reducing emissions, very large amounts of CO2 would have to be injected into subsurface formations, resulting in CO2 disposal plumes with an areal extent of order 100 km2 or more (Pruess et al., 2003). It appears inevitable, then, that such plumes will encounter imperfections in caprocks, such as fracture zones or faults, that would allow CO2 to leak from the primary storage reservoir. At typical subsurface conditions of temperature and pressure, CO2 is always less dense than aqueous fluids; thus buoyancy forces will tend to drive CO2 upward, towards the land surface, whenever adequate (sub-)vertical permeability is available. Upward migration of CO2 could also occur along wells, including pre-existing wells in sedimentary basins where oil and gas exploration and production may have been conducted (Celia et al., 2004), or along wells drilled as part of a CO2 storage operation. Concerns with leakage of CO2 from a geologic storage reservoir include (1) keeping the CO2 contained and out of the atmosphere, (2) avoiding CO2 entering groundwater aquifers, (3)asphyxiation hazard if CO2 is released at the land surface, and (4) the possibility of a self-enhancing runaway discharge, that may culminate in a ''pneumatic eruption'' (Giggenbach et al., 1991). The manner in which CO2 may leak from storage reservoirs must be understood in order to avoid hazards and design monitoring systems.

  13. Coordinated Fault-Tolerance for High-Performance Computing Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar Kumar; Beckman, Pete

    2011-07-28

    With the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems (CIFTS, as the original project came to be called) project, our aim has been to understand and tackle the following broad research questions, the answers to which will help the HEC community analyze and shape the direction of research in the field of fault tolerance and resiliency on future high-end leadership systems. Will availability of global fault information, obtained by fault information exchange between the different HEC software on a system, allow individual system software to better detect, diagnose, and adaptively respond to faults? If fault-awareness is raised throughout the system through fault information exchange, is it possible to get all system software working together to provide a more comprehensive end-to-end fault management on the system? #15; What are the missing fault-tolerance features that widely used HEC system software lacks today that would inhibit such software from taking advantage of systemwide global fault information? #15; What are the practical limitations of a systemwide approach for end-to-end fault management based on fault awareness and coordination? #15; What mechanisms, tools, and technologies are needed to bring about fault awareness and coordination of responses on a leadership-class system? #15; What standards, outreach, and community interaction are needed for adoption of the concept of fault awareness and coordination for fault management on future systems? Keeping our overall objectives in mind, the CIFTS team has taken a parallel fourfold approach. #15; Our central goal was to design and implement a light-weight, scalable infrastructure with a simple, standardized interface to allow communication of fault-related information through the system and facilitate coordinated responses. This work led to the development of the Fault Tolerance Backplane (FTB) publish-subscribe API specification, together with a reference implementation and several experimental

  14. Comparison of seismic sources for imaging geologic structures on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1997-02-01

    In this study, five non-invasive swept sources, three non-invasive impulsive sources and one invasive impulsive source were compared. Previous shallow seismic source tests (Miller and others, 1986, 1992, 1994) have established that site characteristics should be considered in determining the optimal source. These studies evaluated a number of invasive sources along with a few non-invasive impulsive sources. Several sources (particularly the high frequency vibrators) that were included in the ORR test were not available or not practical during previous tests, cited above. This study differs from previous source comparisons in that it (1) includes many swept sources, (2) is designed for a greater target depth, (3) was conducted in a very different geologic environment, and (4) generated a larger and more diverse data set (including high fold CMP sections and walkaway vertical seismic profiles) for each source. The test site is centered around test injection well HF-2, between the southern end of Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG 5) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  15. Award ER25750: Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems Indiana University Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2013-03-08

    The main purpose of the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance in Systems initiative has been to conduct research with a goal of providing end-to-end fault tolerance on a systemwide basis for applications and other system software. While fault tolerance has been an integral part of most high-performance computing (HPC) system software developed over the past decade, it has been treated mostly as a collection of isolated stovepipes. Visibility and response to faults has typically been limited to the particular hardware and software subsystems in which they are initially observed. Little fault information is shared across subsystems, allowing little flexibility or control on a system-wide basis, making it practically impossible to provide cohesive end-to-end fault tolerance in support of scientific applications. As an example, consider faults such as communication link failures that can be seen by a network library but are not directly visible to the job scheduler, or consider faults related to node failures that can be detected by system monitoring software but are not inherently visible to the resource manager. If information about such faults could be shared by the network libraries or monitoring software, then other system software, such as a resource manager or job scheduler, could ensure that failed nodes or failed network links were excluded from further job allocations and that further diagnosis could be performed. As a founding member and one of the lead developers of the Open MPI project, our efforts over the course of this project have been focused on making Open MPI more robust to failures by supporting various fault tolerance techniques, and using fault information exchange and coordination between MPI and the HPC system software stack from the application, numeric libraries, and programming language runtime to other common system components such as jobs schedulers, resource managers, and monitoring tools.

  16. Mobility and coalescence of stacking fault tetrahedra in Cu

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-03-13

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are ubiquitous defects in face-centered cubic metals. They are produced during cold work plastic deformation, quenching experiments or under irradiation. From a dislocation point of view, the SFTs are comprised of a set of stair-rod dislocations at the (110) edges of a tetrahedron bounding triangular stacking faults. These defects are extremely stable, increasing their energetic stability as they grow in size. At the sizes visible within transmission electron microscope they appear nearly immobile. Contrary to common belief, we show in this report, using a combination of molecular dynamics and temperature accelerated dynamics, how small SFTs canmore » diffuse by temporarily disrupting their structure through activated thermal events. More over, we demonstrate that the diffusivity of defective SFTs is several orders of magnitude higher than perfect SFTs, and can be even higher than isolated vacancies. Finally, we show how SFTs can coalesce, forming a larger defect in what is a new mechanism for the growth of these omnipresent defects.« less

  17. Editorial: Mathematical Methods and Modeling in Machine Fault Diagnosis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Weihua; Sheng, Shuangwen

    2014-12-18

    Modern mathematics has commonly been utilized as an effective tool to model mechanical equipment so that their dynamic characteristics can be studied analytically. This will help identify potential failures of mechanical equipment by observing change in the equipment’s dynamic parameters. On the other hand, dynamic signals are also important and provide reliable information about the equipment’s working status. Modern mathematics has also provided us with a systematic way to design and implement various signal processing methods, which are used to analyze these dynamic signals, and to enhance intrinsic signal components that are directly related to machine failures. This special issuemore » is aimed at stimulating not only new insights on mathematical methods for modeling but also recently developed signal processing methods, such as sparse decomposition with potential applications in machine fault diagnosis. Finally, the papers included in this special issue provide a glimpse into some of the research and applications in the field of machine fault diagnosis through applications of the modern mathematical methods.« less

  18. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waynert, J. A.; Boenig, H.; Mielke, C. H.; Willis, J. O.; Burley, B. L.

    2002-01-01

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  19. Editorial: Mathematical Methods and Modeling in Machine Fault Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Weihua; Sheng, Shuangwen

    2014-12-18

    Modern mathematics has commonly been utilized as an effective tool to model mechanical equipment so that their dynamic characteristics can be studied analytically. This will help identify potential failures of mechanical equipment by observing change in the equipment’s dynamic parameters. On the other hand, dynamic signals are also important and provide reliable information about the equipment’s working status. Modern mathematics has also provided us with a systematic way to design and implement various signal processing methods, which are used to analyze these dynamic signals, and to enhance intrinsic signal components that are directly related to machine failures. This special issue is aimed at stimulating not only new insights on mathematical methods for modeling but also recently developed signal processing methods, such as sparse decomposition with potential applications in machine fault diagnosis. Finally, the papers included in this special issue provide a glimpse into some of the research and applications in the field of machine fault diagnosis through applications of the modern mathematical methods.

  20. Pipeline coating impedance effects on powerline fault current coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1989-12-01

    Prior research leading to the development of predictive electromagnetic coupling computer codes has shown that the coating conductance is the principal factor in determining the response of a pipeline to magnetic induction from an overhead power transmission line. Under power line fault conditions, a high voltage may stress the coating causing a significant change in its conductance, and hence, the coupling response. Based upon laboratory experimentation and analysis, a model has been developed which allows prediction of the modified coating characteristics when subjected to high voltage during fault situations. Another program objective was the investigation of a method to determine the high voltage behavior of an existing coating from low voltage in situ field measurements. Such a method appeared conceptually feasible for non-porous coatings whose conductance is primarily a result of current leakage through existing holidays. However, limited testing has shown that difficulties in determining the steel-electrolyte capacitance limit the application of the method Methods for field measurement of the pipeline coating conductance were also studied for both dc ad ac signal excitation. Ac techniques offer the advantage that cathodic protection current interruption is not required, thus eliminating depolarization effects. However, ac field measurement techniques need additional refinement before these methods can be generally applied. 53 figs.

  1. Fault current limiter and alternating current circuit breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J.

    1998-01-01

    A solid-state circuit breaker and current limiter for a load served by an alternating current source having a source impedance, the solid-state circuit breaker and current limiter comprising a thyristor bridge interposed between the alternating current source and the load, the thyristor bridge having four thyristor legs and four nodes, with a first node connected to the alternating current source, and a second node connected to the load. A coil is connected from a third node to a fourth node, the coil having an impedance of a value calculated to limit the current flowing therethrough to a predetermined value. Control means are connected to the thyristor legs for limiting the alternating current flow to the load under fault conditions to a predetermined level, and for gating the thyristor bridge under fault conditions to quickly reduce alternating current flowing therethrough to zero and thereafter to maintain the thyristor bridge in an electrically open condition preventing the alternating current from flowing therethrough for a predetermined period of time.

  2. Fault current limiter and alternating current circuit breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, H.J.

    1998-03-10

    A solid-state circuit breaker and current limiter are disclosed for a load served by an alternating current source having a source impedance, the solid-state circuit breaker and current limiter comprising a thyristor bridge interposed between the alternating current source and the load, the thyristor bridge having four thyristor legs and four nodes, with a first node connected to the alternating current source, and a second node connected to the load. A coil is connected from a third node to a fourth node, the coil having an impedance of a value calculated to limit the current flowing therethrough to a predetermined value. Control means are connected to the thyristor legs for limiting the alternating current flow to the load under fault conditions to a predetermined level, and for gating the thyristor bridge under fault conditions to quickly reduce alternating current flowing therethrough to zero and thereafter to maintain the thyristor bridge in an electrically open condition preventing the alternating current from flowing therethrough for a predetermined period of time. 9 figs.

  3. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the

  4. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Lewiston, New York: geologic report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report is one of a series of engineering and environmental reports planned for the US Department of Energy's properties at Niagara Falls, New York. It describes the essential geologic features of the Niagara Falls Storage Site. It is not intended to be a definitive statement of the engineering methods and designs required to obtain desired performance features for any permanent waste disposal at the site. Results are presented of a geological investigation that consisted of two phases. Phase 1 occurred during July 1982 and included geologic mapping, geophysical surveys, and a limited drilling program in the vicinity of the R-10 Dike, planned for interim storage of radioactive materials. Phase 2, initiated in December 1982, included excavation of test pits, geophysical surveys, drilling, observation well installation, and field permeability testing in the South Dike Area, the Northern Disposal Area, and the K-65 Tower Area.

  5. Use of seismic attributes in geological description of carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castrejon-Vacio, F.; Porres-Luna, A.A.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic attributes have been used widely in order to obtain geological description of petroleum reservoirs, especially as a support for the definition of horizontal continuity of strata, with special emphasis on terrigeneous formations. Nevertheless the application of seismic attributes to the study of carbonate and naturally fractured reservoirs has been limited. This paper shows the application of seismic attributes and seismic inversion to the geological and petrophysical characterization of a naturally fractured reservoir with complex lithology, which is characteristic of the most important producing formations in Mexico. The results from these techniques provide the basis for the definition of a realistic geological model, which is of prime concern for the reservoir`s characterization, numerical studies and EOR applications.

  6. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

    2013-08-30

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  7. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Eby, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO{sub 2}-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO{sub 2} miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  8. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Eby, D.E. )

    1996-01-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO[sub 2]-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO[sub 2] miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  9. Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

  10. Geology of the Source Physics Experiment Site, Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M., Prothro, L. B., Obi, C.

    2012-03-15

    A test bed for a series of chemical explosives tests known as Source Physics Experiments (SPE) was constructed in granitic rock of the Climax stock, in northern Yucca Flat at the Nevada National Security Site in 2010-2011. These tests are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's National Center for Nuclear Security. The test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves, and will provide data that will improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. Abundant geologic data are available for the area, primarily as a result of studies performed in conjunction with the three underground nuclear tests conducted in the Climax granite in the 1960s and a few later studies of various types. The SPE test bed was constructed at an elevation of approximately 1,524 meters (m), and consists of a 91.4-centimeter (cm) diameter source hole at its center, surrounded by two rings of three 20.3-cm diameter instrument holes. The inner ring of holes is positioned 10 m away from the source hole, and the outer ring of holes is positioned 20 m from the source hole. An initial 160-m deep core hole was drilled at the location of the source hole that provided information on the geology of the site and rock samples for later laboratory testing. A suite of geophysical logs was run in the core hole and all six instruments holes to obtain matrix and fracture properties. Detailed information on the character and density of fractures encountered was obtained from the borehole image logs run in the holes. A total of 2,488 fractures were identified in the seven boreholes, and these were ranked into six categories (0 through 5) on the basis of their degree of openness and continuity. The analysis presented here considered only the higher-ranked fractures (ranks 2 through 5), of which there were 1,215 (approximately 49 percent of all fractures identified from

  11. Application of micro-PIXE method to ore geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murao, S.; Hamasaki, S.; Sie, S. H.; Maglambayan, V. B.; Hu, X.

    1999-06-10

    Specific examples of ore mineral analysis by micro-PIXE are presented in this paper. For mineralogical usage it is essential to construct a specimen chamber which is designed exclusively for mineral analysis. In most of the analysis of natural minerals, selection of absorbers is essential in order to obtain optimum results. Trace element data reflect the crystallographic characteristics of each mineral and also geologic settings of sampling locality, and can be exploited in research spanning mineral exploration to beneficiation. Micro-PIXE thus serves as a bridge between small-scale mineralogical experiments and understanding of large-scale geological phenomenon on the globe.

  12. Single-Molecule Dynamics Reveals Cooperative Binding-Folding in Protein Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jin; Lu, Qiang N.; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-07-01

    The study of associations between two biomolecules is the key to understand molecular recognition and function. Molecular function is often thought to be determined by the underlying structures. Here, combining single molecule study of protein binding with an energy landscape inspired microscopic model, we found strong evidences that bio-molecular recognition is determined by flexibilities in addition to structures. Our model is based on coarse grained molecular dynamics performed on the residue level with the energy function biased towards the native binding structure (Go model). With our model, the underlying free energy landscape of the binding can be explored. Two distinct conformational states as free energy minimum, one with partially folding of CBD and significant binding of CBD to CDC42, and another with native folding of CBD and native binding of CBD to CDC42, are clearly seen. This shows the binding process proceeds with significant interface binding of CBD with CDC42 first without complete folding of CBD. Finally binding and folding are coupled with each other cooperatively to reach the native binding state. The single molecule experimental finding of the dynamic fluctuations between the loosely bound and closely bound conformational states can be identified with theoretically calculated free energy minimum and quantitatively explained in our model as a result of binding associated with large conformational changes. Theoretical predictions have identified certain key residues for binding which are consistent with mutational experiments. The combined study provides a test ground for fundamental mechanisms as well as insights into design and further explorations on biomolecular recognition with large conformational changes.

  13. MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stabilized by Diabetes Drugs MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized by Diabetes Drugs The rise in obesity in the United States parallels a dramatic increase in obesity-associated diseases, most notably type-2 diabetes. This disease is predicted to reach epidemic proportions in the next several decades (Zimmet et al 2001, Urek et al 2007). Thus, understanding the biochemical processes underlying type-2 diabetes and identifying new targets for therapeutic

  14. In the OSTI Collections: Determining How Proteins Fold | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Determining How Proteins Fold Article Acknowledgement: Dr. William N. Watson, Physicist DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information Investigations Focused on Direct Experiments Investigations Focused on Computation References Research Organizations Reports available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Additional References Proteins are the materials in living cells whose primary structures are specified by the cell's DNA. These primary

  15. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  16. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  17. The role of the digital fault recorder in the automated substation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    This paper addresses the role of the digital fault recorder in the automated substation. The topics of the paper include distributed architecture, the substation LAN and reduced installation costs, multiple functions, improved substation intelligence, record generation and record merging, fault summaries, master station software, and future considerations.

  18. Structural Analysis of Protein Folding by the Long-Chain Archaeal Chaperone FKBP26

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E Martinez-Hackert; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    In the cell, protein folding is mediated by folding catalysts and chaperones. The two functions are often linked, especially when the catalytic module forms part of a multidomain protein, as in Methanococcus jannaschii peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase FKBP26. Here, we show that FKBP26 chaperone activity requires both a 50-residue insertion in the catalytic FKBP domain, also called 'Insert-in-Flap' or IF domain, and an 80-residue C-terminal domain. We determined FKBP26 structures from four crystal forms and analyzed chaperone domains in light of their ability to mediate protein-protein interactions. FKBP26 is a crescent-shaped homodimer. We reason that folding proteins are bound inside the large crescent cleft, thus enabling their access to inward-facing peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase catalytic sites and ipsilateral chaperone domain surfaces. As these chaperone surfaces participate extensively in crystal lattice contacts, we speculate that the observed lattice contacts reflect a proclivity for protein associations and represent substrate interactions by FKBP26 chaperone domains. Finally, we find that FKBP26 is an exceptionally flexible molecule, suggesting a mechanism for nonspecific substrate recognition.

  19. Wang-Landau sampling of the interplay between surface adsorption and folding of HP lattice proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying Wai [ORNL] [ORNL; Wuest, Thomas [Swiss Federal Research Institute, Switzerland] [Swiss Federal Research Institute, Switzerland; Landau, David P [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2014-01-01

    Generic features associated with the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces are reviewed within the framework of the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice protein model. The thermodynamic behavior and structural properties of various HP protein sequences interacting with attractive surfaces have been studied using extensive Wang-Landau sampling with different types of surfaces, each of which attracts either: all monomers, only hydrophobic (H) monomers, or only polar (P) monomers, respectively. Consequently, different types of folding behavior occur for varied surface strengths. Analysis of the combined patterns of various structural observables, e.g., the derivatives of the numbers of interaction contacts, together with the specific heat, leads to the identification of fundamental categories of folding and transition hierarchies. We also inferred a connection between the transition categories and the relative surface strengths, i.e., the ratios of the surface attractive strengths to the intra-chain attraction among H monomers. We thus believe that the folding hierarchies and identification scheme are generic for different HP sequences interacting with attractive surfaces, regardless of the chain length, sequence, or surface attraction.

  20. System and method for motor fault detection using stator current noise cancellation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei; Lu, Bin; Nowak, Michael P.; Dimino, Steven A.

    2010-12-07

    A system and method for detecting incipient mechanical motor faults by way of current noise cancellation is disclosed. The system includes a controller configured to detect indicia of incipient mechanical motor faults. The controller further includes a processor programmed to receive a baseline set of current data from an operating motor and define a noise component in the baseline set of current data. The processor is also programmed to acquire at least on additional set of real-time operating current data from the motor during operation, redefine the noise component present in each additional set of real-time operating current data, and remove the noise component from the operating current data in real-time to isolate any fault components present in the operating current data. The processor is then programmed to generate a fault index for the operating current data based on any isolated fault components.

  1. A Framework For Evaluating Comprehensive Fault Resilience Mechanisms In Numerical Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.; Peng, L.; Bronevetsky, G.

    2015-01-09

    As HPC systems approach Exascale, their circuit feature will shrink, while their overall size will grow, all at a fixed power limit. These trends imply that soft faults in electronic circuits will become an increasingly significant problem for applications that run on these systems, causing them to occasionally crash or worse, silently return incorrect results. This is motivating extensive work on application resilience to such faults, ranging from generic techniques such as replication or checkpoint/restart to algorithm-specific error detection and resilience techniques. Effective use of such techniques requires a detailed understanding of (1) which vulnerable parts of the application are most worth protecting (2) the performance and resilience impact of fault resilience mechanisms on the application. This paper presents FaultTelescope, a tool that combines these two and generates actionable insights by presenting in an intuitive way application vulnerabilities and impact of fault resilience mechanisms on applications.

  2. System and method for bearing fault detection using stator current noise cancellation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei; Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.; Harley, Ronald G.; Theisen, Peter J.

    2010-08-17

    A system and method for detecting incipient mechanical motor faults by way of current noise cancellation is disclosed. The system includes a controller configured to detect indicia of incipient mechanical motor faults. The controller further includes a processor programmed to receive a baseline set of current data from an operating motor and define a noise component in the baseline set of current data. The processor is also programmed to repeatedly receive real-time operating current data from the operating motor and remove the noise component from the operating current data in real-time to isolate any fault components present in the operating current data. The processor is then programmed to generate a fault index for the operating current data based on any isolated fault components.

  3. Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Geologic mapping for groundwater resource protection and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Berg, R.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater is a vital natural resource in the US and around the world. In order to manage and protect this often threatened resource one must better understand its occurrence, extent, and susceptibility to contamination. Geologic mapping is a fundamental approach to developing more detailed and accurate assessments of groundwater resources. The stratigraphy and lithology of earth materials provide the framework for groundwater systems, whether they are deep confined aquifers or shallow, water table environments. These same earth materials control, in large part, the rates of migration of water and contaminants into and through groundwater systems thus establishing the potential yields of the systems and their vulnerability to contamination. Geologic mapping is used to delineate and display the vertical sequencing of earth materials either in cross-section or over lateral areas as in the stack-unit geologic map. These geologic maps, along with supportive hydrogeologic information, are used to identify the three-dimensional positioning and continuity of aquifer and non-aquifer earth materials. For example, detailed stack-unit mapping to a depth of 30 meters has been completed for a portion of a northern Illinois county. Groundwater contamination potentials were assigned to various vertical sequences of materials. Where aquifers are unconfined, groundwater contamination potentials are greatest. Conversely, other considerations being equal, the thicker the confining unit, the lower the contamination potential. This information is invaluable for land use decision-making; water supply assessment, development, and management; and environmental protection planning.

  5. UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR i ..- - - - . WA-5 PROJECT REPORT West A f r i c a n S t a t e s (ECOWAS) Region I n v e s t i g a t i o n (1R)WA-5 USGS-OFR--82-714 ...

  6. International safeguards concepts for the Yucca Mountain Geological Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    This paper reports that the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigns DOE the responsibility to develop a mined geological repository for the long-term storage and isolation from the biosphere of spent civilian nuclear fuel and high level waste from U.S. defense and civilian reprocessing activities. In fulfilling this Congressional mandate, DOE has performed preliminary site characterization on several possible repository sites over the last decade. Recently, Congress delimited site characterization to the site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for the US`s first mined geologic repository. Although the actual repository is not scheduled to begin operation until the first decade of the next century, planning ahead for international safeguards application to the site will allow resolution of issues which arise. This is especially true for geological repositories because of the large amount of material to be safeguarded and the materials` inaccessibility following repository closure. Further, these unique features of geological repositories may require the IAEA to reexamine its present safeguard philosophy with respect to the roles of Containment and Surveillance (C/S) and Material Control and Accountancy (MC and A). In light of these issues, a C/S based international safeguard concept for Yucca Mountain has been developed and is presented here, using the DOE`s baseline conceptual design of the Yucca Mountain site.

  7. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation - second worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The first world wide review of the geological problems in radioactive waste isolation was published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991. This review was a compilation of reports that had been submitted to a workshop held in conjunction with the 28th International Geological Congress that took place July 9-19, 1989 in Washington, D.C. Reports from 15 countries were presented at the workshop and four countries provided reports after the workshop, so that material from 19 different countries was included in the first review. It was apparent from the widespread interest in this first review that the problem of providing a permanent and reliable method of isolating radioactive waste from the biosphere is a topic of great concern among the more advanced, as well as the developing, nations of the world. This is especially the case in connection with high-level waste (HLW) after its removal from nuclear power plants. The general concensus is that an adequate isolation can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the underground system with its engineered barriers. This document contains the Second Worldwide Review of Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation, dated September 1996.

  8. Buffered coscheduling for parallel programming and enhanced fault tolerance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Feng, Wu-chun

    2006-01-31

    A computer implemented method schedules processor jobs on a network of parallel machine processors or distributed system processors. Control information communications generated by each process performed by each processor during a defined time interval is accumulated in buffers, where adjacent time intervals are separated by strobe intervals for a global exchange of control information. A global exchange of the control information communications at the end of each defined time interval is performed during an intervening strobe interval so that each processor is informed by all of the other processors of the number of incoming jobs to be received by each processor in a subsequent time interval. The buffered coscheduling method of this invention also enhances the fault tolerance of a network of parallel machine processors or distributed system processors

  9. Characterization and application of microearthquake clusters to problems of scaling, fault zone dynamics, and seismic monitoring at Parkfield, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeau, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    This document contains information about the characterization and application of microearthquake clusters and fault zone dynamics. Topics discussed include: Seismological studies; fault-zone dynamics; periodic recurrence; scaling of microearthquakes to large earthquakes; implications of fault mechanics and seismic hazards; and wave propagation and temporal changes.

  10. Predictive Modeling of Terrestrial Radiation Exposure from Geologic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Haber, Daniel University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela; Marsac, Kara; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are important for those working in nuclear security and industry for determining locations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radionuclides. During an aerial gamma ray survey, a low flying aircraft, such as a helicopter, flies in a linear pattern across the survey area while measuring the gamma emissions with a sodium iodide (NaI) detector. Currently, if a gamma ray survey is being flown in an area, the only way to correct for geologic sources of gamma rays is to have flown the area previously. This is prohibitively expensive and would require complete national coverage. This project’s goal is to model the geologic contribution to radiological backgrounds using published geochemical data, GIS software, remote sensing, calculations, and modeling software. K, U and Th are the three major gamma emitters in geologic material. U and Th are assumed to be in secular equilibrium with their daughter isotopes. If K, U, and Th abundance values are known for a given geologic unit the expected gamma ray exposure rate can be calculated using the Grasty equation or by modeling software. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport software (MCNP), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, is modeling software designed to simulate particles and their interactions with matter. Using this software, models have been created that represent various lithologies. These simulations randomly generate gamma ray photons at energy levels expected from natural radiologic sources. The photons take a random path through the simulated geologic media and deposit their energy at the end of their track. A series of nested spheres have been created and filled with simulated atmosphere to record energy deposition. Energies deposited are binned in the same manner as the NaI detectors used during an aerial survey. These models are used in place of the simplistic Grasty equation as they take into account absorption properties of the lithology which the

  11. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  12. The Southern Cone: A critical element in North American geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalziel, I.W.D. . Inst. for Geophysics)

    1993-02-01

    The Pacific and Atlantic-Gulf of Mexico continental margins converge towards southern Mexico, delimiting the Southern Cone of North American. The margins are controlled by late Precambrian to early Paleozoic rift systems. The Neoproterozoic rifts along the Pacific margin truncate the 1.3--1.0 Ga Grenville-Llano front and still older structural boundaries within the craton, such as the Snowbird line. The Atlantic margin originated by separation from another continent within the Grenville orogen near the time of the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. The Gulf of Mexico margin was initiated with rifting at that time, but appears to truncate the Ordovician Taconian orogen in Georgia. The continental margins of the Southern Cone may prove critical in understanding the origin of North America as a discrete continent. A possible continuation of the Grenville-Llano front has now been identified along the Pacific margin of the East Antarctic craton; the opposite side of the Grenville orogen may be present in South America and East Antarctic; a southern continuation of the Taconic Appalachians may have been identified in southern South American and Antarctica (L. Dalla Salda et al., Geology, 1992 a;b: I. Dalziel, Geology, 1991, and GSA Today, 1992; P. Hoffman, Science, 1991; E. Moores, Geology, 1991). Thus the geology of the Southern Cone of North America provides opportunities for critical testing of these globally important hypotheses, notably through geochronometry, isotope geochemistry, stratigraphy, and paleobiogeography. Conversely, East Antarctica, southern Africa, and the proto-Andean margin of South America may offer exciting opportunities to further understanding of pre-Pangea geology across southern North America.

  13. Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1: A Tool for Informing Regional Evaluations of Alternative Geologic Media and Decision Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Frank Vinton; Kelley, Richard E.; Birdsell, Suzanne M.; Lugo, Alexander Bryan; Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2014-11-12

    Reported is progress in the following areas: Phase 1 and 2 websites for the regional geology GIS database; terrane maps of crystalline basement rocks; inventory of shale formations in the US; and rock properties and in-situ conditions for shale estimated from sonic velocity measurements.

  14. Investigation of Ground-Fault Protection Devices for Photovoltaic Power Systems Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWER,WARD I.; WILES,JOHN

    2000-10-03

    Photovoltaic (PV) power systems, like other electrical systems, may be subject to unexpected ground faults. Installed PV systems always have invisible elements other than those indicated by their electrical schematics. Stray inductance, capacitance and resistance are distributed throughout the system. Leakage currents associated with the PV modules, the interconnected array, wires, surge protection devices and conduit add up and can become large enough to look like a ground-fault. PV systems are frequently connected to other sources of power or energy storage such as batteries, standby generators, and the utility grid. This complex arrangement of distributed power and energy sources, distributed impedance and proximity to other sources of power requires sensing of ground faults and proper reaction by the ground-fault protection devices. The different dc grounding requirements (country to country) often add more confusion to the situation. This paper discusses the ground-fault issues associated with both the dc and ac side of PV systems and presents test results and operational impacts of backfeeding commercially available ac ground-fault protection devices under various modes of operation. Further, the measured effects of backfeeding the tripped ground-fault devices for periods of time comparable to anti-islanding allowances for utility interconnection of PV inverters in the United States are reported.

  15. Pattern of extensional faulting in pelagic carbonates of the Unbria-Marche Apennines of central Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, W. )

    1990-05-01

    The Umbria-Marche Apennines provide a new region in which the nature passive-margin extensional faulting can be studied in outcrop. In these dominantly pelagic carbonate rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, horsts acted as shallow, nonvolcani seamounts, while tilted half grabens formed deeper basins. One well-exposed seamount-basin transition agrees in general with the model of listric normal faulting and tilted half grabens, but shows interesting and significant divergences when studied in detail. A small sedimentary wedge at the faulted margin of a horst-block seamount thickens unexpectedly toward the adjacent basin. This wedge developed because of local convex-upward curvature of the shallowest part of a fault which at depth must have concave-up, listric geometry. The local sedimentary wedge resulted from deposition on the hanging wall as it tilted, followed by differential compaction of younger limestones that lapped onto the gentle slope leading from the horst-block seamount toward the basin. The map pattern of listric normal faulting in the Umbria-Marche Apennines suggests that both principal strain axes were extensional, in contrast to the usual pattern of listric faults crossed by transfer faults.

  16. Temperature and length scale dependence of hydrophobic effects and their possible implications for protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, David M.; Chandler, David

    2000-04-01

    The Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory of hydrophobicity [J. Phys. Chem. 103, 4570 (1999)] is applied to treat the temperature dependence of hydrophobic solvation in water. The application illustrates how the temperature dependence for hydrophobic surfaces extending less than 1nm differs significantly from that for surfaces extending more than 1nm. The latter is the result of water depletion, a collective effect, that appears at length scales of 1nm and larger. Due to the contrasting behaviors at small and large length scales, hydrophobicity by itself can explain the variable behavior of protein folding.

  17. Protein folding and non-conventional drug design: a primer for nuclear structure physicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broglia, R.A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Tiana, G.; Provasi, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2004-02-27

    Some of the paradigms emerging from the study of the phenomena of phase transitions in finite many-body systems, like e.g. the atomic nucleus can be used at profit to solve the protein folding problem within the framework of simple (although not oversimplified) models. From this solution a paradigm emerges for the design of non-conventional drugs, which inhibit enzymatic action without inducing resistance (mutations). The application of these concepts to the design of an inhibitor to the HIV-protease central in the life cycle of the HIV virus is discussed.

  18. Integrated Geologic and Geophysical Approach for Establishing Geothermal Play Fairways and Discovering Blind Geothermal Systems in the Great Basin Region, Western USA: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F.; Shevenell, Lisa A.; Siler, Drew L.; dePolo, Craig M.; Hammond, William C.; Kreemer, Corne; Oppliger, G.; Wannamaker, P.; Queen, John H.; Visser, Charles

    2015-09-02

    We have undertaken an integrated geologic, geochemical, and geophysical study of a broad 240-km-wide, 400-km-long transect stretching from west-central to eastern Nevada in the Great Basin region of the western USA. The main goal of this study is to produce a comprehensive geothermal potential map that incorporates up to 11 parameters and identifies geothermal play fairways that represent potential blind or hidden geothermal systems. Our new geothermal potential map incorporates: 1) heat flow; 2) geochemistry from springs and wells; 3) structural setting; 4) recency of faulting; 5) slip rates on Quaternary faults; 6) regional strain rate; 7) slip and dilation tendency on Quaternary faults; 8) seismologic data; 9) gravity data; 10) magnetotelluric data (where available); and 11) seismic reflection data (primarily from the Carson Sink and Steptoe basins). The transect is respectively anchored on its western and eastern ends by regional 3D modeling of the Carson Sink and Steptoe basins, which will provide more detailed geothermal potential maps of these two promising areas. To date, geological, geochemical, and geophysical data sets have been assembled into an ArcGIS platform and combined into a preliminary predictive geothermal play fairway model using various statistical techniques. The fairway model consists of the following components, each of which are represented in grid-cell format in ArcGIS and combined using specified weights and mathematical operators: 1) structural component of permeability; 2) regional-scale component of permeability; 3) combined permeability, and 4) heat source model. The preliminary model demonstrates that the multiple data sets can be successfully combined into a comprehensive favorability map. An initial evaluation using known geothermal systems as benchmarks to test interpretations indicates that the preliminary modeling has done a good job assigning relative ranks of geothermal potential. However, a major challenge is defining

  19. Structural geology of the French Peak accommodation zone, Nevada Test Site, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    The French Peak accommodation zone (FPAZ) forms an east-trending bedrock structural high in the Nevada Test Site region of southwestern Nevada that formed during Cenozoic Basin and Range extension. The zone separates areas of opposing directions of tilt and downthrow on faults in the Yucca Flat and Frenchman Flat areas. Paleomagnetic data show that rocks within the accommodation zone adjacent to Yucca Flat were not strongly affected by vertical-axis rotation and thus that the transverse strikes of fault and strata formed near their present orientation. Both normal- and oblique strike-slip faulting in the FPAZ largely occurred under a normal-fault stress regime, with least principal stress oriented west-northwest. The normal and sinistral faults in the Puddle Peka segment transfers extension between the Plutonium Valley normal fault zone and the Cane Spring sinistral fault. Recognition of sinistral shear across the Puddle Peak segment allows the Frenchman Flat basin to be interpreted as an asymmetric pull-apart basin developed between the FPAZ and a zone of east-northeast-striking faults to the south that include the Rock Valley fault. The FPAZ has the potential to influence ground-water flow in the region in several ways. Fracture density and thus probably fracture conductivity is high within the FPAZ due to the abundant fault splays present. Moreover,, fractures oriented transversely to the general southward flow of ground water through Yucca Flat area are significant and have potential to laterally divert ground water. Finally, the FPAZ forms a faulted structural high whose northern and southern flanks may permit intermixing of ground waters from different aquifer levels, namely the lower carbonate, welded tuff, and alluvial aquifers. 42 refs.

  20. A practical approach to accurate fault location on extra high voltage teed feeders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, R.K.; Coury, D.V.; Johns, A.T. . School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering); Kalam, A. )

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes the basis of an alternative approach for accurately locating faults on teed feeders and the technique developed utilizes fault voltages and currents at all three ends. The method is virtually independent of fault resistance and largely insensitive to variations in source impedance, teed and line configurations, including line untransposition. The paper presents the basic theory of the technique which is then extensively tested using simulated primary system voltage and current waveforms which in turn include the transducer/hardware errors encountered in practice. The performance clearly shows a high degree of accuracy attained.