Sample records for geology faults folds

  1. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  2. Analysis of monoclinal folds associated with the Brittmore fault in northwest Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jayne Ann

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF MONOCLINAL FOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BRITTMORE FAULT IN NORTHWEST HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by JAYNE ANN JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August t988 Major Subject: Geology ANALYSIS OF MONOCUNAL FOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BRITTMORE FAULT IN NORTHWEST HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by JAYNE AhlN JONES Approved as to style and content by: Christ her C. Mathewson (Chairman...

  3. The effects of lithology and initial fault angle in physical models of fault-propagation folds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLain, Christopher Thomas

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally deformed physical rock models are used to examine the effects of changing mechanical stratigraphy and initial fault angle on the development of fault-propagation folds over a flat-ramp-flat thrust geometry. This study also...

  4. Boullier The fault zone geology 1 Fault zone geology: lessons from drilling through the Nojima and 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    drilling through the Nojima and 1 Chelungpu faults 2 3 Anne-Marie Boullier 4-Marie.Boullier@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr 8 9 Abstract 10 Several drilling projects have been conducted through was "fault zone drilling combined with surface-based 33 geophysical and geological

  5. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal...

  6. GEOLOGIC NOTE Fault linkage and graben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    . Schultz $ Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering/172 (1982), and his Ph.D. in geomechanics from Purdue University (1987). He worked at the Lunar

  7. Oak Ridge fault, Ventura fold belt, and the Sisar decollement, Ventura basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeats, R.S.; Huftile, G.J.; Grigsby, F.B. (Oregon State Univ. Corvallis (USA))

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rootless Ventura Avenue, San Miguelito, and Rincon anticlines (Ventura fold belt) in Pliocene -Pleistocene turbidites are fault-propagation folds related to south-dipping reverse faults rising from a decollement in Miocene shale. To the east, the Sulfur Mountain anticlinorium overlies and is cut by the Sisar, Big Canyon, and Lion south-dipping thrusts that merge downward into the Sisar decollement in lower Miocene shale. Shortening of the Miocene and younger sequence is {approximately} 3 km greater than that of underlying competent Paleogens strata in the Ventura fold belt and {approximately} 7 km greater farther east at Sulfur Mountain. Cross-section balancing requires that this difference be taken up by the Paleogene sequence at the Oak Ridge fault to the south. Convergence is northeast to north-northeast on the base of earthquake focal mechanisms, borehole breakouts, and piercing-point offest of the South Mountain seaknoll by the Oak Ridge fault. A northeast-trending line connecting the west end of Oak Ridge and the east end of Sisar fault separates an eastern domain where late Quaternary displacement is taken up entirely on the Oak Ridge fault and a western domain where displacement is transferred to the Sisar decollement and its overlying rootless folds. This implies that (1) the Oak Ridge fault near the coast presents as much seismic risk as it does farther east, despite negligible near-surface late Quaternary movement; (2) ground-rupture hazard is high for the Sisar fault set in the upper Ojai Valley; and (3) the decollement itself could produce an earthquake analogous to the 1987 Whittier Narrows event in Low Angeles.

  8. Characterizing fault-plume intersection probability for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage of CO{sub 2} out of the designated storage region via faults is a widely recognized concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The probability of such leakage can be separated into the probability of a plume encountering a fault and the probability of flow along such a fault. In the absence of deterministic fault location information, the first probability can be calculated from regional fault population statistics and modeling of the plume shape and size. In this study, fault statistical parameters were measured or estimated for WESTCARB's Phase III pilot test injection in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Combining CO{sub 2} plume model predictions with estimated fault characteristics resulted in a 3% probability that the CO{sub 2} plume will encounter a fault fully offsetting the 180 m (590 ft) thick seal. The probability of leakage is lower, likely much lower, as faults with this offset are probably low-permeability features in this area.

  9. Boullier The fault zone geology 1 Fault zone geology: lessons from drilling through the Nojima and 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    drilling through the Nojima and 1 Chelungpu faults 2 3 Anne-Marie Boullier 4-Marie.Boullier@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr 8 9 Abstract 10 Several drilling projects have been conducted through significant topics 32 for future research, one of which was "fault zone drilling

  10. Geometric analysis of faulted rollovers: Contrasting styles of extensional growth folding in the Gulf of Mexico and Offshore Trinidad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentham, P.A. (Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid sedimentation rates combined with the presences of seaward-dipping detachment levels in both the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and the Columbus Basin (Offshore Trinidad) have facilitated the development of large extensional growth faults and their associated hanging-wall rollover folds. While detachment in the GOM is often associated with salt and/or overpresurred shale, shale is believed to be responsible for detachment and translation of large structural blocks within the Columbus Basin. Although, gravity-driven extension seems to be the primary mechanism driving structural development in both regions, the detailed structural geometries and deformational mechanisms present seem to be quite different. In the Columbus Basin, extensional rollovers are generally dominated by the presence of pervasive synthetic faults. Restoration of these structures suggests that these synthetic faults are accomodating the bulk hanging-wall deformation as the hanging-wall slides basinwards above an underlying listric fault surface. This synthetic simple shear deformation is not typically observed in Gulf of Mexico rollovers. In contrast, although synthetic faults are present, often observed in Gulf of Mexico rollovers. In contrast, although synthetic faults are present, often spatially associated with the master growth fault, antithetic or mixed antithetic/synthetic faulting dominates the crest of the structures. An antithetic simple shear deformation is borne out by simple geometric modeling and restoration. The synthetic faulting seem in Trinidadian rollovers to be influenced by the presence of important vertical pressure seals (major unconformities) that may act as internal detachment levels within the larger folds. Synthetic faults are often observed to sole or die downwards into these intervals. Generally, lateral closure of rollover anticlines in the GOM is controlled by the underlying scoop-like shape of the major listric growth faults.

  11. Geometric analysis of faulted rollovers: Contrasting styles of extensional growth folding in the Gulf of Mexico and Offshore Trinidad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentham, P.A. [Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid sedimentation rates combined with the presences of seaward-dipping detachment levels in both the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and the Columbus Basin (Offshore Trinidad) have facilitated the development of large extensional growth faults and their associated hanging-wall rollover folds. While detachment in the GOM is often associated with salt and/or overpresurred shale, shale is believed to be responsible for detachment and translation of large structural blocks within the Columbus Basin. Although, gravity-driven extension seems to be the primary mechanism driving structural development in both regions, the detailed structural geometries and deformational mechanisms present seem to be quite different. In the Columbus Basin, extensional rollovers are generally dominated by the presence of pervasive synthetic faults. Restoration of these structures suggests that these synthetic faults are accomodating the bulk hanging-wall deformation as the hanging-wall slides basinwards above an underlying listric fault surface. This synthetic simple shear deformation is not typically observed in Gulf of Mexico rollovers. In contrast, although synthetic faults are present, often observed in Gulf of Mexico rollovers. In contrast, although synthetic faults are present, often spatially associated with the master growth fault, antithetic or mixed antithetic/synthetic faulting dominates the crest of the structures. An antithetic simple shear deformation is borne out by simple geometric modeling and restoration. The synthetic faulting seem in Trinidadian rollovers to be influenced by the presence of important vertical pressure seals (major unconformities) that may act as internal detachment levels within the larger folds. Synthetic faults are often observed to sole or die downwards into these intervals. Generally, lateral closure of rollover anticlines in the GOM is controlled by the underlying scoop-like shape of the major listric growth faults.

  12. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

  13. Relationship of compaction bands in Utah to Laramide fault-related folding Richard A. Schultz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geomechanics--Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering/172, University of Nevada localization in rock that can impede subsurface uid ow and thus are also important to groundwater and petroleum

  14. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  15. Geologic Map and GID Data for the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, Nick

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Salt Wells—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples.

  16. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, Nick

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross?section.

  17. Induced seismicity within geologic carbon sequestration projects: Maximum earthquake magnitude and leakage potential from undetected faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzoldi, A.P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data from reservoir and outcrop samples suggest a general decrease in fault-zone permeability with increasing shale

  18. Geologic and geomorphic analysis of the Organ Mountains fault, south-central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beehner, Terri S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . 21 . . . . . 21 21 METHODOLOGY . Page . . 23 Imagery Analysis. Topographic Map Analysis . . . Field Investigations Trenching . Surveys. . . . 24 . . . 24 . . . 28 . . . 28 . . . 28 RESULTS . . . . . 41 Imagery, Maps and Surveys... and the lines surveyed across the Cox Ranch (T = trench survey), Rock Springs (4, 5), and WSMR Reentrant (6) sectors of the Organ Mountains fault. . . . 12 Figure 8. Apollo VI photograph showing the locations of important physiographic features in south...

  19. Active folding of fluvial terraces across the Siwaliks Hills, Himalayas of central Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    Active folding of fluvial terraces across the Siwaliks Hills, Himalayas of central Nepal J. Lave´1 of central Nepal, south of the Kathmandu Basin. The Main Frontal Thrust fault (MFT), which marks the southern analysis, complemented by geological investiga- tions in central Nepal. Active deformation in the Himalaya

  20. Geologic Map of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Neal Hot Springs—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Three cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and exploration wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples. - Location of XRF geochemical samples. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  1. Oil springs and flat top anticlines, Carbon County Wyoming: An unusual fold pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackstone, D.L. Jr. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Springs Anticline, northwest of Medicine Bow, Wyoming, and located at the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin, lies near the junction of the Freezeout Hills Anticline, the Shirley thrust fault and the Flat Top Anticline. The surface fold as defined by the outcrop of the Wall Creek Sandstone Member of the Frontier Formation is disharmonic to deeper structure at the level of the Jurassic Sundance Formation. The fold is wedged between two major folds and is the result of a space problem between larger structural elements. The controlling Flat Top Anticline is an excellent example of a fold controlled by a well constrained fault in the Precambrian crystalline basement. The basement is bowed upward and outward to the northwest in the hanging wall of the Flat Top Anticline. The purpose of this paper is to describe the geologic structure of the Oil Springs and Flat Top anticlines and their relationship to the Freezeout Hills and the Hanna Basin. Commercial production of petroleum and natural gas occurs on the west flank of the Laramie-Cooper Lake Basin as far north as the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin. Stone reviewed the producing formations in the Laramie and eastern Hanna basins and noted that 11 commercial accumulations of petroleum and natural gas are directly related to anticlinal structures. Production derived from the Permian-Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in this region has a special geologic framework. Fields that produce from the Tensleep Sandstone are well defined anticlines bounded by faults or fault systems, a situation also reported by Biggs and Espach, Blackstone and in the Wyoming Geological Association Symposium. The Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in these faulted anticlines are in juxtaposition to potential source rocks of either Jurassic or Cretaceous age in the footwalls of the faults. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Geologic evidence for the prolongation of active normal faults of the Mona Rift into northwestern Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Puerto Rico J.-C. Hippolyte1 , P. Mann2 and N. Grindlay3 1 UMR CNRS 5025 Laboratoire de Géodynamique des (eastern Hispaniola) from a subducting area (northwestern Puerto Rico). Near the city of Aguadilla in northwestern Puerto Rico, paleostress reconstruction through fault slip analysis demonstrates that the Mona

  3. Geologic Maps Geology 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Geologic Maps Geology 200 Geology for Environmental Scientists #12;Geologic Map of the US #12;Symbols found on geologic maps #12;Horizontal Strata #12;Geologic map of part of the Grand Canyon. Each color represents a different formation. #12;Inclined Strata #12;Dome #12;Geologic map of the Black Hills

  4. Geology of the McMillan Ranch in Mason, Texas: An Assessment of the Nature of Normal Faults in the Mason Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Rebecca Anne

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Mason, Texas and the surrounding areas have been previously studied and mapped at small scales, showing the large normal faults that cut through the area. Many secondary faults exist close to the large faults, and are not mapped in previous studies...

  5. Geologic provinces of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northcutt, R.A.; Campbell, J.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The location of most of Oklahoma`s oil and gas resources are either influenced by, or are the direct result of Pennsylvanian tectonics and sedimentation patterns. Therefore, the present study also defines provinces in the subsurface on the basis of geological criteria. The authors have attempted to use the originally published names for the recognized provinces. However, we have also used the most geologically correct names, i.e., Nemaha Uplift, Nemaha Fault Zone, and Central Oklahoma Fault, in lieu of Nemaha {open_quotes}Ridge.{close_quotes} Oklahoma is separated into five major uplifts and five major basins. The Gulf Coastal Plain is not included in this study because it is a veneer of Cretaceous cover that masks significant structures. Faults are the most common boundary element. Although their precise age commonly is known only approximately, their geographic location is less controversial, except in detail. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries are based on less precise geological information. The major example of a surface stratigraphic/structural boundary is the southwestern limit of the Ozark Uplift in eastern Oklahoma. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries in the subsurface are commonly based on structural or isopachous contours from well or geophysical data, or on a structural trend, as well as the experience of the authors. Basement structure is preferred. An example is the boundary that separates the Marietta Basin from adjacent geologic elements.

  6. Structure and evolution of the active fold and thrust belt of southwestern Taiwan using GPS geodesy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, John Bibb

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) from north to south, a dramatic change in the width of the deformation front of the fold and thrust belt which is accentuated across the Michih fault, and 4) the Tulungwan fault, a bounding fault between the Western Foothills and the Slate Belt, appears...

  7. Estimating maximum sustainable injection pressure during geological sequestration of CO2 using coupled fluid flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallée, Martin

    coupled fluid flow and geomechanical fault-slip analysis J. Rutqvist *, J. Birkholzer, F. Cappa, C demonstrates the use of coupled fluid flow and geomechanical fault slip (fault reactivation) analysis: Geological CO2 sequestration; geomechanics; Fault slip; Stress; Caprock integrity; CO2 injection 1

  8. YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    YOUNG GEOLOGY UNIVERSITY May, 1962 GEOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN WASATCH MOUNTAINS AND VICIN~IM,UTAH C O ....................J. Keith Rigby 80 Economic Geology of North-Central Utah ...,............... Kcnneth C.Bdodc 85 Rod Log ........................Lehi F. Hintze, J. Ka# Ri&, & ClydeT. Hardy 95 Geologic Map of Southern

  9. Shallow faults mapped with seismic reflections: Lost River Fault, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubarik, Ali; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stations 132 and 160. Total bedrock dis?lace- ment interpreted along this seismic survey line is approxa- mately 6 m, representing 4 to 6 times more displacement than is observed on either the common offset refraction section or at the surface..., vol. A, U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report 85-290, 182-194, 1985. Crone, A. J., and M. N. Macbette, Surface faulting accompa- nying the Borah Peak earthquake, central Idaho, Geology, 12, 664-667, 1984. Crone, A. J., M. N. Macbette, M. G...

  10. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle, Juab and Utah Counties, Utah of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle, Juab and Utah Counties, Utah* MARK E. JENSEN UtahGeological and Mineral orogeny, Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle were folded and thrust

  11. Petrofabric analysis of experimentally folded multilithologic, layered rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattison, Linda Jean

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of shortening and elongation parallel to the layering and normal to the fold axis and regions of relatively small differen- tial stress are located from the study of the orientations and positions of small thrust and normal faults, macro- and microfrac... to the bottom layer of the fold in the central anticline or to the top layer of the syncline. Movement on type G fractures creates a 0 thrust fault, and the displacement is at 20 to the direction of 25 loading (F'igure 6, p. 27 ). Type G fractures do...

  12. Protein folding tames chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Kelin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein folding produces characteristic and functional three-dimensional structures from unfolded polypeptides or disordered coils. The emergence of extraordinary complexity in the protein folding process poses astonishing challenges to theoretical modeling and computer simulations. The present work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND), or molecular chaotic dynamics, as a theoretical framework for describing and analyzing protein folding. We unveil the existence of intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs) in the chaotic dynamics of folded proteins. Additionally, we reveal that the transition from disordered to ordered conformations in protein folding increases the transverse stability of the ILDM. Stated differently, protein folding reduces the chaoticity of the nonlinear dynamical system, and a folded protein has the best ability to tame chaos. Additionally, we bring to light the connection between the ILDM stability and the thermodynamic stability, which enables us to quantify the disorderli...

  13. andreas fault system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system Sontag, Eduardo 23 The San Andreas Fault In The San Francisco Bay Area, California: A Geology Fieldtrip Guidebook To Selected Stops On Public Lands CiteSeer Summary:...

  14. Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

  15. The San Andreas Fault System Paul Withers Wallace RE, The San Andreas Fault System, California, USGS Professional Paper 1515,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    mainland Mexico. The San Andreas fault is commonly referred to as the boundary between the Pacific is correlated with the local geological setting. CO2 lubrication, #12;increased pore pressure, and decreased

  16. Analysis of faults using gravity methods in Mason County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milligan, Michael Glen

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. D. A. Fahlquist Dr. B. Johnson The objective of this study is to determine the applicability of gravity profiling methods for determining the location and throw of a series of faults related to a structural graben in northern Mason County... profiles. For two faults with the best geologic control, the best-fit gravity models compared favorably with the the geologic model constructed by Randolph (1991) on the basis of surface mapping, structural control and well control. The gravity models...

  17. Tertiary strike-slip faulting in southeastern Mongolia and implications for Asian tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Tertiary strike-slip faulting in southeastern Mongolia and implications for Asian tectonics L Geologic maps have long portrayed the Late Cretaceous­Recent geologic history of southeastern Mongolia of the East Gobi basin in southeastern Mongolia (Figs. 1 and 2). This corridor, the East Gobi Fault Zone (EGFZ

  18. Detection and extraction of fault surfaces in 3D seismic data Israel Cohen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Israel

    for seismic interpretation. INTRODUCTION Fault surfaces are common subterranean structures that are asso that are unrelated to faults. Furthermore, creating a consistent geological interpretation from large 3D-seismicDetection and extraction of fault surfaces in 3D seismic data Israel Cohen1 , Nicholas Coult2

  19. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  20. Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html Revised: 03/2013 Geology is a scientific discipline that aims to understand every aspect of modern and ancient Earth. A degree in geology the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees. A master

  1. Geologic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orkild, P.P. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Baldwin, M.J.; Townsend, D.R. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (USA)

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Climax stock is a composite granitic intrusive of Cretaceous age, composed of quartz monzonite and granodiorite, which intrudes rocks of Paleozoic and Precambrian age. Tertiary volcanic rocks, consisting of ash-flow and ash-fall tuffs, and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks overlie the sedimentary rocks and the stock. Erosion has removed much of the Tertiary volcanic rocks. Hydrothermal alteration of quartz monzonite and granodiorite is found mainly along joints and faults and varies from location to location. The Paleozoic carbonate rocks have been thermally and metasomatically altered to marble and tactite as much as 457 m (1500 ft) from the contact with the stock, although minor discontinuous metasomatic effects are noted in all rocks out to 914 m (3000 ft). Three major faults which define the Climax area structurally are the Tippinip, Boundary and Yucca faults. North of the junction of the Boundary and Yucca faults, the faults are collectively referred to as the Butte fault. The dominant joint sets and their average attitudes are N 32{degrees} W, 22{degrees} NE; N 60{degrees} W, vertical and N 35{degrees} E, vertical. Joints in outcrop are weathered and generally open, but in subsurface, the joints are commonly filled and healed with secondary minerals. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Algorithmic folding complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinal, Jean

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we most quickly fold a paper strip (modeled as a line) to obtain a desired mountain-valley pattern of equidistant creases (viewed as a binary string)? Define the folding complexity of a mountain-valley string as the ...

  3. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Selected growth and interaction characteristics of seafloor faults in the central Mississippi Canyon Offshore Continental Shelf (OCS) area, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegner, Scott Ashley

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of some shallow faults in the Gulf of Mexico interpreted to be active are poorly understood. A better understanding of these faults will increase our understanding of formerly and presently active geologic processes in the Gulf...

  5. Frictional characteristics of serpentinite from the Motagua fault zone in Guatemala: an experimental study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dengo, Carlos Arturo

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Mad or Subjec' . " Geology FRICTIONAL CHARACTERISTIC OF SERPENTINITF. FRON THE I", OTAGUA FAULT ZONE Ili GUATENALA: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY A Thesis by CARLOS ARTURO DFNGO App", oved... strike-slip, seismogenic faults warrants a systematic i nvesti ga tion to determine ho v it". frictional characteristics may afreet slip along the fault. Five locations aiong the fault zone were sampled to investigate the sliding !rode as a function...

  6. ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Fold interaction and wavelength selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    simulations the lateral growth of folds is studied, in particular with respect to fold segments interactions; folding modes; fold interactions; 3D folding; numerical modelling 1 Introduction Buckling or folding

  7. For permission to copy, contact editing@geosociety.org 2006 Geological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, Kate

    the kinematics of fold growth. Where rivers cut through growing anticlines, flights of abandoned fluvial terraces across much of the fold. The Kashi-Atushi terraces show clear evidence of abandoned axial surfaces, con the development of hydrocarbon reservoirs, potential seismic haz- ards related to faulting or folding

  8. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, Wesley K.; Hanks, Catherine L.; Whalen, Michael T.; Jensen1, Jerry; Shackleton, J. Ryan; Jadamec, Margarete A.; McGee, Michelle M.; Karpov1, Alexandre V.

    2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively underformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns, (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow, and (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics.

  9. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  10. INVERSE PROTEIN FOLDING, HIERARCHICAL OPTIMISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halligan, Daniel

    INVERSE PROTEIN FOLDING, HIERARCHICAL OPTIMISATION AND TIE KNOTS Thomas M. A. Fink st. john Introduction 3 1.1 Inverse Protein Folding 3 1.2 Hierarchical Optimisation 5 1.3 Tie Knots 6 1.4 Schematic Organisation 6 1.5 Publications 9 2 Protein Folding, Inverse Protein Folding and Energy Landscapes 10 2

  11. Characterization of Quaternary and suspected Quaternary faults, regional studies, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bucknam, R.C.; Crone, A.J.; Haller, K.M.; Machette, M.N.; Personius, S.F.; Barnhard, T.P.; Cecil, M.J.; Dart, R.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of geologic studies that help define the Quaternary history of selected faults in the region around Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These results are relevant to the seismic-design basis of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The relevancy is based, in part, on a need for additional geologic data that became apparent in ongoing studies that resulted in the identification of 51 relevant and potentially relevant individual and compound faults and fault zones in the 100-km-radius region around the Yucca Mountain site. Geologic data used to characterize the regional faults and fault zones as relevant or potentially relevant seismic sources includes age and displacement information, maximum fault lengths, and minimum distances between the fault and the Yucca Mountain site. For many of the regional faults, no paleoseismic field studies have previously been conducted, and age and displacement data are sparse to nonexistent. In November 1994, the Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards entered into two Memoranda of Agreement with the Yucca Mountain Project Branch to conduct field reconnaissance, analysis, and interpretation of six relevant and six potentially relevant regional faults. This report describes the results of study of those faults exclusive of those in the Pahrump-Stewart Valley-Ash Meadows-Amargosa Valley areas. We also include results of a cursory study of faults on the west flank of the Specter Range and in the northern part of the Last Chance Range. A four-phase strategy was implemented for the field study.

  12. Simulations of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Cahill; Mark Fleharty; Kevin Cahill

    1999-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folds both proteins to within 5 A rms of their native structures.

  13. Protein folding and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz; C. L. Siguenza

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  14. Protein folding and heteropolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Garel; H. Orland; E. Pitard

    1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a statistical mechanics approach to the protein folding problem. We first review some of the basic properties of proteins, and introduce some physical models to describe their thermodynamics. These models rely on a random heteropolymeric description of these non random biomolecules. Various kinds of randomness are investigated, and the connection with disordered systems is discussed. We conclude by a brief study of the dynamics of proteins.

  15. Ab initio RNA folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Cragnolini; Philippe Derreumaux; Samuela Pasquali

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, experimental determination of RNA structures through X-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  16. Petroleum geology of Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burollet, P.F. (CIFEG, Paris (France)); Ferjami, A.B.; Mejri, F. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discoveries and important oil shows have proven the existence of hydrocarbons in newly identified depocenters and reservoirs. In general, except for some areas around the producing fields, Tunisia is largely underdrilled. The national company ETAP has decided to release data and to publish a synthesis on the petroleum geology of Tunisia. The geology of Tunisia provides a fine example of the contrast between Alpine folding, which typifies northern Tunisia and the African craton area of the Saharan part. Eastern Tunisia corresponds to an unstable platform forming plains or low hills and extending eastwards to the shallow Pelagian Sea. There are a wide variety of basins: central and northern Tunisia represents a front basin the Saharan Ghadames basin or the Chott trough are sag basins; the Gulf of Gabes was formed as a distension margin the Gulf of Hammamet is a composite basin and several transversal grabens cut across the country, including offshore, and are rift-type basins. All these features are known to be oil prolific throughout the world. Two large fields and many modest-size pools are known in Tunisia. Oil and gas fields in the surrounding countries, namely the Saharan fields of Algeria and Libya the large Bouri field offshore Tripolitania and discoveries in the Italian part of the Straits of Sicily, suggest a corresponding potential in Tunisia. Exposed paleogeographic and structural maps, balanced sections, and examples of fields and traps will support an optimistic evaluation of the future oil exploration in Tunisia.

  17. Mechanical properties and fabric of the Punchbowl fault zone, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Frederick Michael

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MECHANICAL PROPERIIES AND FABRIC OF THE PUiVCHBOlv'L FAULT ZONE, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by FREDERICK MICHAEL CHESTER Subm-', tted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geology MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND FABRIC OF THE PUNCHBOWL FAULT ZONE, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by FREDERICK MICHAEL CHESTER Approved as to sty1e and content by: on . . an airman o ommittee) Me1vin edman...

  18. Folding and binding Editorial overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is on the study of how protein folding, unfolding and aggregation reactions commence, and on the study of California, Berkeley. Her lab focuses on studies of protein folding and dynamics. Currently she­based kinetics. Much of the progress that has been made in the past fifty years in the study of protein folding

  19. Theoretical Perspectives on Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    Theoretical Perspectives on Protein Folding D. Thirumalai,1 Edward P. O'Brien,2 Greg Morrison,3 Understanding how monomeric proteins fold under in vitro conditions is crucial to describing their functions remains to be done to solve the protein folding problem in the broadest sense. 159 Annu.Rev.Biophys.2010

  20. Computer Simulations of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    CHAPTER 8 Computer Simulations of Protein Folding VIJAY S. PANDE , ERIC J. SORIN , CHRISTOPHER D, CA 94305, USA 8.1 Introduction: Goals and Challenges of Simulating Protein Folding Computer as well as recent applications of this methodology. 8.1.1 Simulating Protein Folding Proteins play

  1. Petaflop Computing for Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izaguirre, Jesús A.

    "SIAM01p 2000/12/4 page 1 Petaflop Computing for Protein Folding Shannon K. Kuntz, Richard C. Murphy, Michael T. Niemier, Jesus Izaguirre, and Peter M. Kogge 1 Introduction Protein Folding the protein folding problem, while Silicon Graphics has been continually working to produce more powerful

  2. A Handbook for Geology Students Why study Geology?.............................................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    1 A Handbook for Geology Students #12;2 Contents Why study Geology ..................................................................................7 Why Appalachian Geology?................................................................................10 Geology Faculty and Staff

  3. Structural relations along the western end of the Arrowhead Fault, Muddy Mountains, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Vernon James Jay

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , resembling "drag" effects related to horizontal movement on the Arrowhead fault, are interpreted as the re- sult of a drape-folded fold. The Summit thrust, a local northwesterly trending fault at the eastern end of the study area, is interpreted... Bonanza King Formation Dunderb erg Shale Buffington Formation Ordovician System Monocline Valley Formation Devonian System Muddy Peak Limestone Mississippian Series Rogers Spring Limestone vii xiii 12 12 12 12 13 1) 23 25 25 26 26 26...

  4. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and thrust belts for example, thrust faults commonly occur along specific stratigraphic horizons, and folding and faulting within thrust sheets often involves slip along bedding planes (e. g. , Rich, 1934; Douglas, 1950; Dahl str om, 1970; Price, 1981...). With the regional framework of many fold and thrust belts well estab- lished, the current emphasis of many studies has turned to defining the geometries, kinematics, and deformation mechanisms of individual thrust belt structures, and the intrinsic and extrinsic...

  5. Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

  6. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  7. Multilayered folding with voids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy Dodwell; Giles Hunt; Mark Peletier; Chris Budd

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the deformation of layered materials such as geological strata, or stacks of paper, mechanical properties compete with the geometry of layering. Smooth, rounded corners lead to voids between the layers, while close packing of the layers results in geometrically-induced curvature singularities. When voids are penalized by external pressure, the system is forced to trade off these competing effects, leading to sometimes striking periodic patterns. In this paper we construct a simple model of geometrically nonlinear multi-layered structures under axial loading and pressure confinement, with non-interpenetration conditions separating the layers. Energy minimizers are characterized as solutions of a set of fourth-order nonlinear differential equations with contact-force Lagrange multipliers, or equivalently of a fourth-order free-boundary problem. We numerically investigate the solutions of this free boundary problem, and compare them with the periodic solutions observed experimentally.

  8. Multilayered folding with voids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodwell, Timothy; Peletier, Mark; Budd, Chris

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the deformation of layered materials such as geological strata, or stacks of paper, mechanical properties compete with the geometry of layering. Smooth, rounded corners lead to voids between the layers, while close packing of the layers results in geometrically-induced curvature singularities. When voids are penalized by external pressure, the system is forced to trade off these competing effects, leading to sometimes striking periodic patterns. In this paper we construct a simple model of geometrically nonlinear multi-layered structures under axial loading and pressure confinement, with non-interpenetration conditions separating the layers. Energy minimizers are characterized as solutions of a set of fourth-order nonlinear differential equations with contact-force Lagrange multipliers, or equivalently of a fourth-order free-boundary problem. We numerically investigate the solutions of this free boundary problem, and compare them with the periodic solutions observed experimentally.

  9. Uncovering Allostery in a Uniquely Folded Metalloprotein /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxter, Elizabeth Leigh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M (2005) Downhill protein folding: evolution meets physics.based models for protein folding and function. Proteins:48-51). This is because protein folding and protein function

  10. Theoretical Perspectives on Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thirumalai; Edward P. O'Brien; Greg Morrison; Changbong Hyeon

    2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how monomeric proteins fold under in vitro conditions is crucial to describing their functions in the cellular context. Significant advances both in theory and experiments have resulted in a conceptual framework for describing the folding mechanisms of globular proteins. The experimental data and theoretical methods have revealed the multifaceted character of proteins. Proteins exhibit universal features that can be determined using only the number of amino acid residues (N) and polymer concepts. The sizes of proteins in the denatured and folded states, cooperativity of the folding transition, dispersions in the melting temperatures at the residue level, and time scales of folding are to a large extent determined by N. The consequences of finite N especially on how individual residues order upon folding depends on the topology of the folded states. Such intricate details can be predicted using the Molecular Transfer Model that combines simulations with measured transfer free energies of protein building blocks from water to the desired concentration of the denaturant. By watching one molecule fold at a time, using single molecule methods, the validity of the theoretically anticipated heterogeneity in the folding routes, and the N-dependent time scales for the three stages in the approach to the native state have been established. Despite the successes of theory, of which only a few examples are documented here, we conclude that much remains to be done to solve the "protein folding problem" in the broadest sense.

  11. Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the Mre Trndelag Fault Complex, central Norway: constraints from new apatite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the Møre Trøndelag Fault Complex, central Norway: constraints.H. Gabrielsen c,2 a Geological Survey of Norway, Leiv Erikssons vei 39, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway b Faculty Geological Institute, University of Bergen, Allegt. 41, N-5007, Bergen, Norway Available online 17 April 2004

  12. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57?eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  13. Mesoscale Folding: A Physical Realization of an Abstract, 2D Lattice Model for Molecular Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    . Protein Folding: Theoretical Studies of Thermodynamics and Dynamics. In Protein Folding; Creighton, T. E

  14. Fault tolerant pulse synchronization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deconda, Keerthi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    FFC n=4 orig alg n=4 ft alg n=7 orig alg n=7 ft alg n=10 orig alg n=10 ft alg 24 (a) n=4, f=1. (b) n=7, f=2. Fig. 5: Convergence Time with No Jump faults. 0 50 100 150 200 250 70 100 250 500 Tim e to co nv erg e FFC orig alg: no faults... orig alg: NoJump faults ft alg:NoJump faults 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 70 100 250 500 Tim e to co nv erg e FFC orig alg: no faults orig alg: NoJump faults ft alg:NoJump faults 25 (c) n=10, f=3. Fig. 5 (Continued) Fig. 5(a...

  15. Regional Geologic Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  16. Regional Geologic Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  17. GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    177Geology GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE A major in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology 160, 185, 211, 311, 330, 350

  18. spe436-11 page 1 The Geological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najman, Yani

    , reflecting its dynamic environ- ments and involving subduction, folding, and thrusting. Deposi- tional ages reserved. #12;2 Allen et al. spe436-11 page INTRODUCTION The Andaman-Nicobar Islands are part of east-dipping fault slices and folds that young to the west (Fig. 2), linked to a westward-shifting sub

  19. Fault simulation and test generation for small delay faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Wangqi

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Delay faults are an increasingly important test challenge. Traditional delay fault models are incomplete in that they model only a subset of delay defect behaviors. To solve this problem, a more realistic delay fault model has been developed which...

  20. Optimal fault location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezev, Maja

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    are triggered. Protection system consisting of protection relays and circuit breakers (CBs) will operate in order to de-energize faulted line. Different Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) located in substations for the purpose of monitoring... in the control center by an operator who will mark fault event in a spreadsheet and inform other staff responsible for dealing with fault analysis and repair such as protection group or maintenance respectively. Protective relaying staff will be ready...

  1. Optimal fault location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezev, Maja

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    are triggered. Protection system consisting of protection relays and circuit breakers (CBs) will operate in order to de-energize faulted line. Different Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) located in substations for the purpose of monitoring... in the control center by an operator who will mark fault event in a spreadsheet and inform other staff responsible for dealing with fault analysis and repair such as protection group or maintenance respectively. Protective relaying staff will be ready...

  2. Fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.; Callender, R.; Causgrove, T.; Dyer, R.; Williams, S.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a molecular understanding of how proteins achieve their native three-dimensional (folded) structures. This requires the identification and characterization of intermediates in the protein folding process on all relevant timescales, from picoseconds to seconds. The short timescale events in protein folding have been entirely unknown. Prior to this work, state-of-the-art experimental approaches were limited to milliseconds or longer, when much of the folding process is already over. The gap between theory and experiment is enormous: current theoretical and computational methods cannot realistically model folding processes with lifetimes longer than one nanosecond. This unique approach to employ laser pump-probe techniques that combine novel methods of laser flash photolysis with time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic probes of protein transients. In this scheme, a short (picosecond to nanosecond) laser photolysis pulse was used to produce an instantaneous pH or temperature jump, thereby initiating a protein folding or unfolding reaction. Structure-specific, time-resolved vibrational probes were then used to identify and characterize protein folding intermediates.

  3. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled cross section through a wave trai. n of these folds, The citations on these pages follow the style of the U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin. other field observations, laboratory analysis of collected samples, and theoretical considerations...MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  4. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Introduction to Grid computing Protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyar, Joan

    Introduction to Grid computing Protein folding Protein folding is an extremely hot topic in medical research these days, unfortunately protein folding is extremely computationally demanding and requires a huge supercomputer to fold even the simplest proteins. Luckily the task of calculating protein foldings

  7. Protein Folding Sculpting Evolutionary Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Susan

    Our work suggests that the forces that govern protein folding exert a profound effect on how genotypes are translated into phenotypes and that this in turn has strong effects on evolutionary processes. Molecular chaperones, ...

  8. Structural geometry, strain distribution, and mechanical evolution of eastern Umtanum Ridge and a comparison with other selected localities within Yakima fold structures, south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, E.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima fold system of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon is a series of megascopic anticlinal ridge of multilayered basalt. Cross-sectional strain analyses were performed at five localities within three anticlines. The analyses show that the strain is consistent both laterally along a fold and within different folds. Folding strain is localized layer-internal faulting, extensive shattering, and limited layer-parallel faulting. Most strain is cataclastic, but glassy flow tops appear to have been more ductile. The strain distributions and structural geometries accord well with a flexural flow buckle model; however, the internal cataclastic flow is not inherently penetrative and limited flexural slip has occurred. This fold model suggests that most strain in the fold is by simple shear and it took place above the topographic surface of adjacent synclinal valleys. Large reverse faults associated with the anticlines are interpreted to be folding strain required by the concentric folding and their displacement is interpreted to have reached the surface late in the folding process. Therefore, the observed strain and its distribution are interpreted to be not directly the result of regional plateau shortening, but of local stresses and resultant strains related to fold geometry. A mechanical analysis of the Umtanum structure termination geometry, combined with slickenside striae movement directions from the study areas suggests that the Palouse slope has behaved as a rigid buttress around which the basalt has rotated clockwise into the folds from the southeast. Compression-box clay modeling of the Yakima fold system within the Pasco Basin shows that the buttress edge orientations control the localization and orientations of buckle folds. Fold orientations and three-dimensional shapes remarkably resembling the Yakima fold system in the Pasco Basin were produced under north-south compression.

  9. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  10. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  11. Geologic Study of the Coso Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

  12. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  13. A motion planning approach to protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Guang

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein folding is considered to be one of the grand challenge problems in biology. Protein folding refers to how a protein's amino acid sequence, under certain physiological conditions, folds into a stable close-packed three-dimensional structure...

  14. A motion planning approach to protein folding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Guang

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein folding is considered to be one of the grand challenge problems in biology. Protein folding refers to how a protein's amino acid sequence, under certain physiological conditions, folds into a stable close-packed ...

  15. Biophysical characterization of protein folding and misfolding. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittschmitt, Jason Peter

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The HPr proteins were characterized as folding by a two-state folding mechanism. Here, we present a comparison of the equilibrium and kinetic folding for the HPr protein from Bacillus subtilis, E coli and a key variant ...

  16. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part

  17. Search for: "protein folding" | DOE PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protein folding" Find + Advanced Search Advanced Search All Fields: "protein folding" Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author: Name Name ORCID Search Authors...

  18. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern zone of fractures is within Quaternary alluvial sediments, but no bedrock was encountered in trenches and soil pits in this part of the prospective surface facilities site; thus, the direct association of this zone with one or more bedrock faults is uncertain. No displacement of lithologic contacts and soil horizons could be detected in the fractured Quaternary deposits. The results of these investigations imply the absence of any appreciable late Quaternary faulting activity at the prospective surface-facilities site.

  19. Characteristics of displacement transfer zones associated with thrust faults / by Arthur Francis Xavier O'Keefe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Arthur Francis Xavier

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARAC 'ERZSTZCS OF DZSPLACENENT TRANSFER 'ZONES ASSOCIATED WI H THRUST FAULTS A Thesis by ARTHUR FRANCIS XAVIER O&HEEFE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of NASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Idaho or Subrent: Geology CHARACTERISTICS QF DISPLACEMENT TRANSFER ZONES ASSOCIATED NITS THRUST FAULTS A Thesis by ARTHUR FRANCIS XAVIER 0 'KEEFE Approved ss to style and content by: (Co-chairman of' Commi. tee...

  20. Palinspastic fault reconstruction in the central part of the Corsair Trend, offshore Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrientos, Jaime

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Jaime Barrientos, B. S. , Instituto Tecnologico de Costa Rica Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joel S. Watkins This thesis reports the palinspastic reconstruction of growth fault movement in the central part of the Corsair Trend, offshore Texas... Petroleo, S. A. for their support during my studies. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION A Objective B Geologic Setting C Stratigraphic History D Salt Mobilization and Faulting E Previous Work F Data Base and Procedure PALINSPASTIC...

  1. Thoughts Regarding the Dimensions of Faults at Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas, Nye County, Nevada, Based on Surface and Underground Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, S.L.; Prothro, L.B.; Townsend, M.J.; Townsend, D.R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic setting and history, along with observations through 50 years of detailed geologic field work, show that large-displacement (i.e., greater than 30 meters of displacement) syn- to post-volcanic faults are rare in the Rainier Mesa area. Faults observed in tunnels and drill holes are mostly tight, with small displacements (most less than 1.5 meters) and small associated damage zones. Faults are much more abundant in the zeolitized tuffs than in the overlying vitric tuffs, and there is little evidence that faults extend downward from the tuff section through the argillic paleocolluvium into pre-Tertiary rocks. The differences in geomechanical characteristics of the various tuff lithologies at Rainier Mesa suggest that most faults on Rainer Mesa are limited to the zeolitic units sandwiched between the overlying vitric bedded tuffs and the underlying pre-Tertiary units (lower carbonate aquifer–3, lower clastic confining unit–1, and Mesozoic granite confining unit).

  2. Disulfide-Linked Protein Folding Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardwell, James

    Disulfide-Linked Protein Folding Pathways Bharath S. Mamathambika1,3 and James C. Bardwell2,3, 1 of protein folding is difficult because it involves the identification and characterization of folding to protein folding in vitro and in vivo. 211 Click here for quick links to Annual Reviews content online

  3. Dominant Pathways in Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Faccioli; M. Sega; F. Pederiva; H. Orland

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to investigate the kinetics of protein folding on a long time-scale and the dynamics underlying the formation of secondary and tertiary structures during the entire reaction. The approach is based on the formal analogy between thermal and quantum diffusion: by writing the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the time-evolution of a protein in a viscous heat-bath in terms of a path integral, we derive a Hamilton-Jacobi variational principle from which we are able to compute the most probable pathway of folding. The method is applied to the folding of the Villin Headpiece Subdomain, in the framework of a Go-model. We have found that, in this model, the transition occurs through an initial collapsing phase driven by the starting coil configuration and a later rearrangement phase, in which secondary structures are formed and all computed paths display strong similarities. This method is completely general, does not require the prior knowledge of any reaction coordinate and represents an efficient tool to perfom ab-initio simulations of the entire folding process with available computers.

  4. Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces Krista Pursuing a degree within the Geology & Geological Engineering department Record of financial need the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in geological engineering in 1982. After earning

  5. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section Read Ch. 7 before you begin. The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic

  6. Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html Revised: 04/2004 Environmental geology in environmental geology provides the diverse skills required to work in many different employment settings issues. Within the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees

  7. RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well characterized with much of its data being non-proprietary...

  8. Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Steven S.

    Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways Ali induce dominant pathway mechanisms in protein folding. Citation: Mohazab AR, Plotkin SS (2013) Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways. PLoS ONE 8(1): e53642

  9. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  10. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen; Michael T. Whalen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. The Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is characteristically deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hanging wall anticlines and footwall synclines. In contrast, the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range is characterized by symmetrical detachment folds. The focus of our 2000 field studies was at the boundary between these structural styles in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The northern edge of thrust-truncated folds in Lisburne is marked by a local range front that likely represents an eastward continuation of the central Brooks Range front. This is bounded to the north by a gently dipping panel of Lisburne with local asymmetrical folds. The leading edge of the flat panel is thrust over Permian to Cretaceous rocks in a synclinal depression. These younger rocks overlie symmetrically detachment-folded Lisburne, as is extensively exposed to the north. Six partial sections were measured in the Lisburne of the flat panel and local range front. The Lisburne here is about 700 m thick and is interpreted to consist primarily of the Wachsmuth and Alapah Limestones, with only a thin veneer of Wahoo Limestone. The Wachsmuth (200 m) is gradational between the underlying Missippian Kayak Shale and the overlying Mississippian Alapah, and increases in resistance upward. The Alapah consists of a lower resistant member (100 m) of alternating limestone and chert, a middle recessive member (100 m), and an upper resistant member (260 m) that is similar to Wahoo in the northeastern Brooks Range. The Wahoo is recessive and is thin (30 m) due either to non-deposition or erosion beneath the sub-Permian unconformity. The Lisburne of the area records two major episodes of transgression and shallowing-upward on a carbonate ramp. Thicknesses and facies vary along depositional strike. Asymmetrical folds, mostly truncated by thrust faults, were studied in and south of the local range front. Fold geometry was documented by surveys of four thrust-truncated folds and two folds not visibly cut by thrusts. A portion of the local range front was mapped to document changes in fold geometry along strike in three dimensions. The folds typically display a long, non-folded gently to moderately dipping backlimbs and steep to overturned forelimbs, commonly including parasitic anticline-syncline pairs. Thrusts commonly cut through the anticlinal forelimb or the forward synclinal hinge. These folds probably originated as detachment folds based on their mechanical stratigraphy and the transition to detachment folds to the north. Their geometry indicates that they were asymmetrical prior to thrust truncation. This asymmetry may have favored accommodation of increasing shortening by thrust breakthrough rather than continued folding. Fracture patterns were documented in the gently dipping panel of Lisburne and the asymmetrical folds within it. Four sets of steeply dipping extension fractures were identified, with strikes to the (1) N, (2) E, (3) N to NW, and (4) NE. The relative timing of these fracture sets is complex and unclear. En echelon sets of fractures are common, and display normal or strike-slip sense. Mesoscopic and penetrative structures are locally well developed, and indicate bed-parallel shear within the flat panel and strain within folds. Three sets of normal faults are well developed in the area, and are unusual

  12. Protein folding using contact maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Vendruscolo; Eytan Domany

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the development of the idea to use dynamics in the space of contact maps as a computational approach to the protein folding problem. We first introduce two important technical ingredients, the reconstruction of a three dimensional conformation from a contact map and the Monte Carlo dynamics in contact map space. We then discuss two approximations to the free energy of the contact maps and a method to derive energy parameters based on perceptron learning. Finally we present results, first for predictions based on threading and then for energy minimization of crambin and of a set of 6 immunoglobulins. The main result is that we proved that the two simple approximations we studied for the free energy are not suitable for protein folding. Perspectives are discussed in the last section.

  13. Investigating Protein Folding and Function by Manipulating Rare and Partially-Folded Conformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horner, Geoffrey Ashworth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z. Zhou, and Y. Bai, A protein folding pathway with multipleintermediate state in protein folding by a hydrophobicAre there pathways for protein folding. J Chim Phys, 1968.

  14. Folding pathway of a lattice model for protein folding Vijay S. Pande1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croquette, Vincent

    Folding pathway of a lattice model for protein folding Vijay S. Pande1 and Daniel S. Rokhsar1 principles that describe protein folding, then one might expect them to apply to simplified models

  15. The Influence of fold and fracture development on reservoir behavior of the Lisburne Group of northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen: Michael T. Whalen; Paul Atkinson; Joseph Brinton; Thang Bui; Margarete Jadamec; Alexandre Karpov; John Lorenz; Michelle M. McGee; T.M. Parris; Ryan Shackleton

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is folded and thrust faulted where it is exposed throughout the Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. Symmetrical detachment folds characterize the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range. In contrast, Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hangingwall anticlines and footwall synclines. The Continental Divide thrust front separates these different structural styles in the Lisburne and also marks the southern boundary of the northeastern Brooks Range. Field studies were conducted for this project during 1999 to 2001 in various locations in the northeastern Brooks Range and in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, immediately south of the Continental Divide thrust front. Results are summarized below for the four main subject areas of the study.

  16. Transition-fault test generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Bradley Douglas

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . One way to detect these timing defects is to apply test patterns to the integrated circuit that are generated using the transition-fault model. Unfortunately, industry's current transition-fault test generation schemes produce test sets that are too...

  17. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  18. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Megerian, Mark G. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  19. Influence of faults on groundwater flow and transport at YuccaMountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Andrew J.B.; Sitar, Nicholas

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are used to investigate how faults influence groundwater flow pathways and regional-scale macrodispersion. The 3-D model has a unique grid block discretization that facilitates the accurate representation of the complex geologic structure present in faulted formations. Each hydrogeologic layer is discretized into a single layer of irregular and dipping grid blocks, and faults are discretized such that they are laterally continuous and varied in displacement varies along strike. In addition, the presence of altered fault zones is explicitly modeled, as appropriate. Simulations show that upward head gradients can be readily explained by the geometry of hydrogeologic layers, the variability of layer permeabilities, and the presence of permeable fault zones or faults with displacement only, not necessarily by upwelling from a deep aquifer. Large-scale macrodispersion results from the vertical and lateral diversion of flow near the contact of high- and low-permeability layers at faults, and from upward flow within high-permeability fault zones. Conversely, large-scale channeling can occur as a result of groundwater flow into areas with minimal fault displacement. Contaminants originating at the water table can flow in a direction significantly different from that of the water table gradient, and isolated zones of contaminants can occur at the water table downgradient. By conducting both 2-D and 3-D simulations, we show that the 2-D cross-sectional models traditionally used to examine flow in faulted formations may not be appropriate. In addition, the influence of a particular type of fault cannot be generalized; depending on the location where contaminants enter the saturated zone, faults may either enhance or inhibit vertical dispersion.

  20. Topology to geometry in protein folding: -Lactoglobulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Topology to geometry in protein folding: -Lactoglobulin Ariel Ferna´ndez* , Andre´s Colubri , and R angles and at the -carbon atoms of the peptide backbone dominate protein folding. Next in importance

  1. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  2. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  3. Parametric analysis of RNA folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hower, Valerie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend recent methods for parametric sequence alignment to the parameter space for scoring RNA folds. This involves the construction of an RNA polytope. A vertex of this polytope corresponds to RNA secondary structures with common branching. We use this polytope and its normal fan to study the effect of varying three parameters in the free energy model that are not determined experimentally. Our results indicate that variation of these specific parameters does not have a dramatic effect on the structures predicted by the free energy model. We additionally map a collection of known RNA secondary structures to the RNA polytope.

  4. Approximate Inference and Protein-Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Yair

    Approximate Inference and Protein-Folding Chen Yanover and Yair Weiss School of Computer Science Side-chain prediction is an important subtask in the protein-folding problem. We show that #12;nding algorithms, including a widely used protein-folding software (SCWRL). 1 Introduction Inference in graphical

  5. EXPLORING PROTEIN FOLDING TRAJECTORIES USING GEOMETRIC SPANNERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guibas, Leonidas J.

    EXPLORING PROTEIN FOLDING TRAJECTORIES USING GEOMETRIC SPANNERS D. RUSSEL and L. GUIBAS Computer of secondary and tertiary structures as the protein folds. 1 Introduction There has been extensive work understanding of protein folding by studying their ensemble behaviors. Most currently used methods

  6. UNCORRECTED 3 Protein folding: Then and now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Review 3 Protein folding: Then and now 4 Yiwen Chen 1 , Feng Ding 1 , Huifen 8 9 Abstract 10 Over the past three decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how 11 a protein folds has now become vital

  7. Protein folding: not just another optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    Protein folding: not just another optimization problem Kevin Karplus karplus of California, Santa Cruz protein-folding: not just opt ­ p.1/68 #12;Outline of Talk What is Bioinformatics initio" methods Contact prediction protein-folding: not just opt ­ p.2/68 #12;What is Bioinformatics

  8. Atomistic Protein Folding Simulations on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Christopher

    Atomistic Protein Folding Simulations on the Submillisecond Time Scale Using Worldwide Distributed Abstract: Atomistic simulations of protein folding have the potential to be a great complement. Biopolymers 68: 91­109, 2003 Keywords: atomistic protein folding; microsecond time scale; computer hardware

  9. 272 Dispatch Protein folding: Chaperones get Hip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Elizabeth A

    272 Dispatch Protein folding: Chaperones get Hip Thomas Ziegelhoffer, Jill L. Johnson and Elizabeth the complexity of the Hsp70 `chaperone machine' that mediates early steps of protein folding in cells. Address of protein folding and translocation through their ability to recognize non-native conformations of proteins

  10. Thermodynamics of Protein Folding Erik Sandelin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandelin, Erik

    Thermodynamics of Protein Folding and Design Erik Sandelin Department of Theoretical Physics Lund Sölvegatan 14A 223 62 LUND September 2000 Erik Sandelin Thermodynamics of Protein Folding and Design The protein folding and protein design problems are addressed, using coarse-grained models with only two types

  11. Fault Tolerant Quantum Filtering and Fault Detection for Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing Gao; Daoyi Dong; Ian R. Petersen

    2015-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to determine the fault tolerant quantum filter and fault detection equation for a class of open quantum systems coupled to laser fields and subject to stochastic faults. In order to analyze open quantum systems where the system dynamics involve both classical and quantum random variables, a quantum-classical probability space model is developed. Using a reference probability approach, a fault tolerant quantum filter and a fault detection equation are simultaneously derived for this class of open quantum systems. An example of two-level open quantum systems subject to Poisson-type faults is presented to illustrate the proposed method. These results have the potential to lead to a new fault tolerant control theory for quantum systems.

  12. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  13. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  14. BS in GEOLOGY (694022) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    351 Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology

  15. Characteristics of displacement transfer zones associated with thrust faults / by Arthur Francis Xavier O'Keefe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Arthur Francis Xavier

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    back limb fault and then develops into s. drag fold on the underlying plate. The lower thrust dies by losing displacement until it becomes a fore-limb . hrust in a mino" anticline which plunges out under . he higher thrust (Figure 2). drag olo... is compared with two physical models developed by Gardner and Spang (1973). Their fi. st model involves a conical fold in the upper plate of the lowez- thzust with the point of the cone at the termination of the higher thrust . The fold then opens along...

  16. Introducing Protein Folding Using Simple Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thirumalai; D. K. Klimov

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent theoretical developments in the study of simple lattice models of proteins. Such models are designed to understand general features of protein structures and mechanism of folding. Among the topics covered are (i) the use of lattice models to understand the selection of the limited set of viable protein folds; (ii) the relationship between structure and sequence spaces; (iii) the application of lattice models for studying folding mechanisms (topological frustration, kinetic partitioning mechanism). Classification of folding scenarios based on the intrinsic thermodynamic properties of a sequence (namely, the collapse and folding transition temperatures) is outlined. A brief discussion of random heteropolymer model is also presented.

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fault Tolerance in Replicated Database Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Olaf.Hvasshovd@idi.ntnu.no Abstract Database management systems (DBMS) achieve high availabilityand faulttolerance usuallyby of this study is two-fold. It eval- uates the effectiveness of DBMS fault tolerance in the pres- ence on database integrity, performance, and availability on a replicated DBMS, ClustRa[6], in the presence

  18. A review of recent advances in ab initio protein folding by the Folding@home project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A review of recent advances in ab initio protein folding by the Folding@home project William Ito molecular simulations of protein folding. Thanks to engineering innovations like a Graphical Processing Unit power, allowing it to simulate longer and more complex protein folding mechanisms than ever before

  19. Protein Folding Trajectories Analysis: Summarization, Event Detection and Consensus Partial Folding Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hui

    Protein Folding Trajectories Analysis: Summarization, Event Detection and Consensus Partial Folding in protein folding trajectories. We pro- pose an approach that employs the simplicity of contact maps and po- tentially cure diseases caused by misfolding. The protein folding problem is therefore one

  20. Computational investigations of folded self-avoiding walks related to protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Computational investigations of folded self-avoiding walks related to protein folding Jacques M, protein folding, protein structure prediction 1. Introduction Self-avoiding walks (SAWs) have been studied, 9], authors of this manuscript have investigated some dynamic protein folding models. They have

  1. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for geologic carbon sequestration in the Midcontinent Rift System in Minnesota, Minnesota Geological Survey IN THE MIDCONTINENT RIFT SYSTEM OF MINNESOTA : ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL FOR DEEP GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION OF CARBONMINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director POTENTIAL CAPACITY FOR GEOLOGIC CARBON

  2. Structural and Energetic Heterogeneity in Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven S. Plotkin; Jose N. Onuchic

    2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A general theoretical framework is developed using free energy functional methods to understand the effects of heterogeneity in the folding of a well-designed protein. Native energetic heterogeneity arising from non-uniformity in native stability, as well as entropic heterogeneity intrinsic to the topology of the native structure are both investigated as to their impact on the folding free energy landscape and resulting folding mechanism. Given a minimally frustrated protein, both structural and energetic heterogeneity lower the thermodynamic barrier to folding, and designing in sufficient heterogeneity can eliminate the barrier at the folding transition temperature. Sequences with different distributions of stability throughout the protein and correspondingly different folding mechanisms may still be good folders to the same structure. This theoretical framework allows for a systematic study of the coupled effects of energetics and topology in protein folding, and provides interpretations and predictions for future experiments which may investigate these effects.

  3. REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ASTER that operate in visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum and Reflection Radiometer) Imagery Collection in CPRM Examples of sensors used in the CPRM geologic projects #12

  4. The Gulf of California rift forms a geologically young and active plate boundary that links the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Andreas strike-slip fault system in California to the oceanic spreading system of the East Pacific Rise and surround- ing regions is complex and poorly understood due to a lack of geological and geophysical data research community, the data collected from the stations will be made available immediately following

  5. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermediates can accelerate protein folding. Proceedings ofunifying mechanism for protein folding? [Review]. Trends incoordinate for protein folding. Journal of Chemical Physics

  6. Folding amphipathic helices into membranes: Amphiphilicity trumps hydrophobicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; Jayasinghe, Sajith; Ladokhin, Alexey S; White, Stephen H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. (1999). Membrane protein folding and stability: PhysicalA. S. & Hristova, K. (1998). Protein folding in membranes:Mutational analysis of protein folding and stability. In

  7. On the rough folding landscape of green fluorescent protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Benjamin Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. (2008). Understanding protein folding: small proteins inG. (1997). Theory of protein folding: the energy landscapeenergy landscape of protein folding: a synthesis. Proteins

  8. Extending the theoretical framework of protein folding dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Sichun

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic Dynamics on a Protein Folding Energy Landscape .and J. N. Onuchic. Protein folding funnels: kinetic pathwaysthe energy landscape of protein folding. Proteins: Struct.

  9. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

  10. BS in GEOLOGY: Environmental Geology Emphasis (694029) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology Geol 410

  11. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability....

  12. Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

  13. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1982-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nonsteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  14. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Kumar, Navanit; Zhang, Yingqi; Jordan, Preston; Pan, Lehua; Granvold, Patrick; Chow, Fotini K.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a framework for assessing the leakage risk of geologic carbon sequestration sites. This framework, known as the Certification Framework (CF), emphasizes wells and faults as the primary potential leakage conduits. Vulnerable resources are grouped into compartments, and impacts due to leakage are quantified by the leakage flux or concentrations that could potentially occur in compartments under various scenarios. The CF utilizes several model components to simulate leakage scenarios. One model component is a catalog of results of reservoir simulations that can be queried to estimate plume travel distances and times, rather than requiring CF users to run new reservoir simulations for each case. Other model components developed for the CF and described here include fault characterization using fault-population statistics; fault connection probability using fuzzy rules; well-flow modeling with a drift-flux model implemented in TOUGH2; and atmospheric dense-gas dispersion using a mesoscale weather prediction code.

  15. Geological evaluation of the proposed Rocky Mountain 1 underground coal gasification test site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, R.L.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize the proposed Rocky Mountain 1 underground coal gasification test site near Hanna, Wyoming, 30 drill and/or core holes were completed and downhole geophysically logged during the summer of 1986. Core testing was conducted to identify coal quality and predict behavior during gasification. Data were then interpreted to provide information on process parameters and restoration to be used by process and environmental engineers. The coal seam at the Rocky Mountain 1 site dips to the northeast at 7/sup 0/ and shows only minor folding of strata. A fault with 30 feet of stratigraphic displacement is located approximately 300 feet northeast of the northern boundary of the proposed burn area. From core and outcrop observations, tectonic fracturing is predicted to be minor, although local areas of fracturing may exist. Overburden stratigraphy consists of interbedded sandstone, siltstone, and shale with minor coal. The Hanna No. 1 coal (target of the experiments) is approximately 30 feet thick. It contains an upper bench approximately 3 to 4 feet thick of lower quality (higher ash, lower Btu), a central bench about 20 feet thick of higher quality (lower ash, higher Btu), and a lower bench approximately 3 to 4 feet thick also of lower quality. The benches are separated by shaley zones approximately 1 to 2 feet thick, which are correlative across the site. Another shaley zone exists near the base of the central bench. The coal varies vertically and somewhat laterally across the site but averages at a high volatile C bituminous rank. Average-as-received proximate analysis values for the coal are 8.8 wt % moisture, 27.3 wt % ash, 32.0 wt % volatile matter, 31.9 wt % fixed carbon, and approximately 8600 Btu/lb heating value. Average-as-received sulfur content is 0.7 wt %. Site characteristics are very amenable to underground coal gasification, and no hindrances to the test due to geologic conditions are expected. 9 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  17. Fault Current Limiters

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVID GEISEREnergy1DNVDOE'sUAfter 12Fault

  18. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS AARON R. DINNER New Chemistry Laboratory for Protein Folding: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 120. Edited by Richard A. Friesner. Series Editors Experimental and theoretical studies have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein

  19. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  20. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

  1. Using Stochastic Roadmap Simulation to Predict Experimental Quantities in Protein Folding Kinetics: Folding Rates and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Using Stochastic Roadmap Simulation to Predict Experimental Quantities in Protein Folding Kinetics for studying protein folding kinetics. It uses the recently intro- duced Stochastic Roadmap Simulation (SRS validate the SRS method and indicate its potential as a general tool for studying protein folding kinetics

  2. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.; Jordan, P.; Zhang, Y.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a simple and transparent approach for assessing CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk associated with CO{sub 2} injection at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. The approach, called the Certification Framework (CF), is based on the concept of effective trapping, which takes into account both the probability of leakage from the storage formation and impacts of leakage. The effective trapping concept acknowledges that GCS can be safe and effective even if some CO{sub 2} and brine were to escape from the storage formation provided the impact of such leakage is below agreed-upon limits. The CF uses deterministic process models to calculate expected well- and fault-related leakage fluxes and concentrations. These in turn quantify the impacts under a given leakage scenario to so-called 'compartments,' which comprise collections of vulnerable entities. The probabilistic part of the calculated risk comes from the likelihood of (1) the intersections of injected CO{sub 2} and related pressure perturbations with well or fault leakage pathways, and (2) intersections of leakage pathways with compartments. Two innovative approaches for predicting leakage likelihood, namely (1) fault statistics, and (2) fuzzy rules for fault and fracture intersection probability, are highlighted here.

  3. GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION Deformations around transpressive plate boundaries numerical models constrained by global positioning system (GPS) observations and Geology, September 2010; v. 38; no. 9; p. 823­826; doi: 10.1130/G30963.1; 3 figures; 1 table. © 2010 Geological Society

  4. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

  5. The Lapworth Museum of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    The Lapworth Museum of Geology www.lapworth.bham.ac.uk www.bham.ac.uk Events The Lapworth Lectures take place on evenings during University term time. These lectures are on a wide range of geological geological topics, usually based around collections in the museum. These provide an opportunity to see

  6. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  7. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kezunovic, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Perunicic, B. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  8. Structural analysis of the western Llano uplift with emphasis on the Mason fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Ernest

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE WESTERN LLANO UPLIFT WITH EMPHASIS ON THE MASON FAULT A Thesis by JOSEPH ERNEST BECKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 19BS Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE WESTERN LLANO UPLIFT WITH EMPHASIS ON THE MASON FAULT A Thesis by JOSEPH ERNEST BECKER Approved as to style and content by: Brann Jo son (Chairman of ommittee) R. C. Fletcher...

  9. Protein Folding as a Physical Stochastic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerson Huang

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We model protein folding as a physical stochastic process as follows. The unfolded protein chain is treated as a random coil described by SAW (self-avoiding walk). Folding is induced by hydrophobic forces and other interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, which can be taken into account by imposing conditions on SAW. The resulting model is termed CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk. Conceptually, the mathematical basis is a generalized Langevin equation. In practice, the model is implemented on a computer by combining SAW and Monte Carlo. To illustrate the flexibility and capabilities of the model, we consider a number of examples, including folding pathways, elastic properties, helix formation, and collective modes.

  10. Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotfifard, Saeed

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................................................ 88 x LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Multiple possible fault location estimation for a fault at node A ........................ 7 Figure 2 Simple faulted network model [1] © [2011] IEEE ............................................ 40 Figure 3... Types C and D voltage sags for different phases [51] © [2003] IEEE .............. 42 Figure 4 Rf estimation procedure [1] © [2011] IEEE ...................................................... 45 Figure 5 Flow chart of the fault location algorithm [1...

  11. Hot Pot Detail - Evidence of Quaternary Faulting

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Compilation of published data, field observations and photo interpretation relevant to Quaternary faulting at Hot Pot.

  12. Hot Pot Detail - Evidence of Quaternary Faulting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Compilation of published data, field observations and photo interpretation relevant to Quaternary faulting at Hot Pot.

  13. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  14. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  15. Application of an inverse method for calculating three-dimensional fault geometries and clip vectors, Nun River Field, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, H.G.; White, N. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general, automatic method for determining the three-dimensional geometry of a normal fault of any shape and size is applied to a three-dimensional seismic reflection data set from the Nun River field, Nigeria. In addition to calculating fault geometry, the method also automatically retrieves the extension direction without requiring any previous information about either the fault shape or the extension direction. Solutions are found by minimizing the misfit between sets of faults that are calculated from the observed geometries of two or more hanging-wall beds. In the example discussed here, the predicted fault surface is in excellent agreement with the shape of the seismically imaged fault. Although the calculated extension direction is oblique to the average strike of the fault, the value of this parameter is not well resolved. Our approach differs markedly from standard section-balancing models in two important ways. First, we do not assume that the extension direction is known, and second, the use of inverse theory ensures that formal confidence bounds can be determined for calculated fault geometries. This ability has important implications for a range of geological problems encountered at both exploration and production scales. In particular, once the three-dimensional displacement field has been constrained, the difficult but important problem of three-dimensional palinspastic restoration of hanging-wall structures becomes tractable.

  16. GEOLOGY, June 2009 515 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, Yann

    , at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Seismo- logical data indicate that the rupture initiated Tarim Basin INDIA ATF KF XF XJF RRF SagaingF JLF HF HFT Fig.1 I II III NCB SCB LTB CDSN USGS Harvard 08, NCB--North China block, RRF--Red River fault, SCB--South China block, XF--Xianshuihe fault, XJF

  17. Data Analysis of Villin Headpiece Subdomain Folding Simulations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seeks to understand the process of protein folding by analyzing the vast amount of data generated while simulating the folding of the villin headpiece. Introduction Protein folding has been called one proteins unlike homology or threading based approaches. Protein folding studies the folding trajectory

  18. DYNAMIC INVARIANTS IN PROTEIN FOLDING PATHWAYS REVEALED BY TENSOR ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmead, Christopher James

    DYNAMIC INVARIANTS IN PROTEIN FOLDING PATHWAYS REVEALED BY TENSOR ANALYSIS Arvind Ramanathan Lane a spatio-temporal analysis of protein folding pathways. We applied our method to folding simulations of how a protein folds into its functionally relevant conformations. Protein folding pathways span over

  19. Hierarchical Protein Folding Pathways: A Computational Study of Protein Fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haspel, Nurit

    Hierarchical Protein Folding Pathways: A Computational Study of Protein Fragments Nurit Haspel,1 folding model. The model postulates that protein folding is a hierarchical top-down pro- cess. The basic words: protein folding; building blocks; pro- tein structure prediction; hierarchical folding; protein

  20. Predicting Protein Folding Mohammed J. Zaki, Vinay Nadimpally, Deb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaki, Mohammed Javeed

    Predicting Protein Folding Pathways Mohammed J. Zaki, Vinay Nadimpally, Deb Bardhan, Chris Bystroff 1. Predicting Protein Folding Pathways Summary. A structured folding pathway, which is a time ordered sequence of folding events, plays an important role in the protein folding process and hence

  1. FROM GENETIC CODING TO PROTEIN FOLDING Jean-Luc Jestin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FROM GENETIC CODING TO PROTEIN FOLDING Jean-Luc Jestin ABSTRACT A discrete classical mechanics (DCM of the genetic code. A DCM model for protein folding allows a set of folding nuclei to be derived for each. A PROTEIN FOLDING MODEL Let us consider the following protein folding model. A chemical group of mass m

  2. DMBC: Web Planning & Layouts Above the Fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    DMBC: Web Planning & Layouts Above the Fold · · Website Heig Website width ht Important content - lipsum.com) Media Placeholders g & Organization · · Triad C C S· hades · Custom F Web Layouts Photosho

  3. Mutagenic effects on protein folding and stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas Anthony, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing how sequence information dictates the formation of protein structure is critical for accurate prediction of structure, for de novo protein design, and for understanding protein folding and misfolding. Based on ...

  4. Cooperativity and Contact Order in Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Cieplak

    2004-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of cooperativity are studied within Go-Lennard-Jones models of proteins by making the contact interactions dependent on the proximity to the native conformation. The kinetic universality classes are found to remain the same as in the absence of cooperativity. For a fixed native geometry, small changes in the effective contact map may affect the folding times in a chance way and to the extent that is comparable to the shift in the folding times due to cooperativity. The contact order controlls folding scenarios: the average times necessary to bring pairs of amino acids into their near native separations depend on the sequential distances within the pairs. This dependence is largely monotonic, regardless of the cooperativity, and the dominant trend could be described by a single parameter like the average contact order. However, it is the deviations from the trend which are usually found to set the net folding times.

  5. Self-folding with shape memory composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felton, Samuel M.

    Origami-inspired manufacturing can produce complex structures and machines by folding two-dimensional composites into three-dimensional structures. This fabrication technique is potentially less expensive, faster, and ...

  6. Toward a Theory on the Stability of Protein Folding: Challenges for Folding Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Simmons; Joel L. Weiner

    2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We adopt the point of view that analysis of the stability of the protein folding process is central to understanding the underlying physics of folding. Stability of the folding process means that many perturbations do not disrupt the progress from the random coil to the native state. In this paper we explore the stability of folding using established methods from physics and mathematics. Our result is a preliminary theory of the physics of folding. We suggest some tests of these ideas using folding simulations. We begin by supposing that folding events are related in some way to mechanical waves on the molecule. We adopt an analytical approach to the physics which was pioneered by M.V. Berry, (in another context), based upon mathematics developed mainly by R. Thom and V.I. Arnold. We find that the stability of the folding process can be understood in terms of structures known as caustics, which occur in many kinds of wave phenomena. The picture that emerges is that natural selection has given us a set of protein molecules which have mechanical waves that propagate according to several mathematically specific restrictions. Successful simulations of folding can be used to test and constrain these wave motions. With some additional assumptions the theory explains or is consistent with a number of experimental facts about folding. We emphasize that this wave-based approach is fundamentally different from energy-based approaches.

  7. A phenomenological model of protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielsson, Ulf H; Niemi, Antti J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a phenomenological effective field theory model that describes the universality class of biologically active single-strand proteins. The model allows both for an explicit construction of native state protein conformations, and a dynamical description of protein folding and unfolding processes. The model reveals a connection between homochirality and protein collapse, and enables the theoretical investigation of various other aspects of protein folding even in the case of very long polypeptide chains where other methods are not available.

  8. Protein Folding: A Perspective From Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinzhi Lei; Kerson Huang

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce an approach to the protein folding problem from the point of view of statistical physics. Protein folding is a stochastic process by which a polypeptide folds into its characteristic and functional 3D structure from random coil. The process involves an intricate interplay between global geometry and local structure, and each protein seems to present special problems. We introduce CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk), a model of protein folding that combines the features of self-avoiding walk (SAW) and the Monte Carlo method. In this model, the unfolded protein chain is treated as a random coil described by SAW. Folding is induced by hydrophobic forces and other interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, which can be taken into account by imposing conditions on SAW. Conceptually, the mathematical basis is a generalized Langevin equation. To illustrate the flexibility and capabilities of the model, we consider several examples, including helix formation, elastic properties, and the transition in the folding of myoglobin. From the CSAW simulation and physical arguments, we find a universal elastic energy for proteins, which depends only on the radius of gyration $R_{g}$ and the residue number $N$. The elastic energy gives rise to scaling laws $R_{g}\\sim N^{\

  9. Three-dimensional numerical modeling of the influence of faults on groundwater flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Andrew J.B.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are used to investigate how the faulted hydrogeologic structure influences groundwater flow from a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. Simulations are performed using a 3-D model that has a unique grid block discretization to accurately represent the faulted geologic units, which have variable thicknesses and orientations. Irregular grid blocks enable explicit representation of these features. Each hydrogeologic layer is discretized into a single layer of irregular and dipping grid blocks, and faults are discretized such that they are laterally continuous and displacement varies along strike. In addition, the presence of altered fault zones is explicitly modeled, as appropriate. The model has 23 layers and 11 faults, and approximately 57,000 grid blocks and 200,000 grid block connections. In the past, field measurement of upward vertical head gradients and high water table temperatures near faults were interpreted as indicators of upwelling from a deep carbonate aquifer. Simulations show, however, that these features can be readily explained by the geometry of hydrogeologic layers, the variability of layer permeabilities and thermal conductivities, and by the presence of permeable fault zones or faults with displacement only. In addition, a moderate water table gradient can result from fault displacement or a laterally continuous low permeability fault zone, but not from a high permeability fault zone, as others postulated earlier. Large-scale macrodispersion results from the vertical and lateral diversion of flow near the contact of high and low permeability layers at faults, and from upward flow within high permeability fault zones. Conversely, large-scale channeling can occur due to groundwater flow into areas with minimal fault displacement. Contaminants originating at the water table can flow in a direction significantly different than that of the water table gradient, and isolated zones of contaminants will occur at the water table downgradient. This behavior is not predicted by traditional models of contaminant transport. In addition, the influence of a particular type of fault cannot be generalized; depending on the location where contaminants enter the saturated zone, faults may either enhance of inhibit vertical dispersion.

  10. Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Leslie Ann

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation and mineral alteration adjacent to a 2 km long segment of the Kern Canyon fault near Lake Isabella, California are studied to characterize the internal structure of the fault zone and to understand the development of fault structure...

  11. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  12. Exploring zipping and assembly as a protein folding principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelz, Vince A; Dill, Ken A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. Are there pathways for protein folding? Journal de Chimieand the mechanism of protein folding. Ann Rev Biochem 1982;Baldwin RL. How does protein folding get started? TRENDS in

  13. Increasing Stability Reduces Conformational Heterogeneity in a Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increasing Stability Reduces Conformational Heterogeneity in a Protein Folding Intermediate, the results show that protein folding intermediates are ensembles of different structural forms direct experi- mental evidence in support of a basic tenet of energy landscape theory for protein folding

  14. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING INTERMEDIATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnick, Tobin R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING INTERMEDIATES FOR DELINEATION ............................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Why study protein folding .............................................................................. 3 1.2.1 How fast should a protein fold ........................................................... 3

  15. Protein folding using contact maps Michele Vendruscolo and Eytan Domany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domany, Eytan

    Protein folding using contact maps Michele Vendruscolo and Eytan Domany Department of Physics 26 I. INTRODUCTION Computational approaches to protein folding are divided into two main categories protein fold prediction. Contact maps are a particularly manageable representation of protein structure

  16. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECHNOLOGY FOR FAULT ZONE HYDROLOGY Kenzi Karasaki Lawrencefor characterizing the hydrology of fault zones, recognizingstructure of faults to hydrology, that it still may be

  17. active fault diagnosis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Harrold, Mary Jean 453 Fault Tolerant Control with Additive Compensation for Faults in an Automotive Damper Physics Websites Summary: Fault Tolerant Control with Additive...

  18. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  19. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  20. Structure and kinematics of the Suzume fault, Okitsu melange, Shimanto accretionary complex, Japan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanaya, Takamasa

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , Frederick M. Chester Judith S. Chester Adam Klaus Richard L. Carlson December 2006 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Structure and Kinematics of the Suzume Fault, Okitsu Mélange, Shimanto Accretionary Complex, Japan. (December 2006.... I also thank him for his patience with my stubbornness. I express my appreciation to Drs. Judith Chester and Adam Klaus for their constructive criticism and sincere efforts to improve this thesis. I am grateful to Dr. Brann Johnson...

  1. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  2. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  3. Topologies to geometries in protein folding: Hierarchical and nonhierarchical scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Topologies to geometries in protein folding: Hierarchical and nonhierarchical scenarios Ariel Ferna presents a method to portray protein folding dynamics at a coarse resolution, based on a pattern

  4. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  5. Protein Folding: A New Geometric Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter A. Simmons; Joel L. Weiner

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric analysis of protein folding, which complements many of the models in the literature, is presented. We examine the process from unfolded strand to the point where the strand becomes self-interacting. A central question is how it is possible that so many initial configurations proceed to fold to a unique final configuration. We put energy and dynamical considerations temporarily aside and focus upon the geometry alone. We parameterize the structure of an idealized protein using the concept of a ribbon from differential geometry. The deformation of the ribbon is described by introducing a generic twisting Ansatz. The folding process in this picture entails a change in shape guided by the local amino acid geometry. The theory is reparamaterization invariant from the start, so the final shape is independent of folding time. We develop differential equations for the changing shape. For some parameter ranges, a sine-Gordon torsion soliton is found. This purely geometric waveform has properties similar to dynamical solitons. Namely: A threshold distortion of the molecule is required to initiate the soliton, after which, small additional distortions do not change the waveform. In this analysis, the soliton twists the molecule until bonds form. The analysis reveals a quantitative relationship between the geometry of the amino acids and the folded form.

  6. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W PROGRAMME Geological characterization prior to repositoryShort-term Characterization Program Geological Formations toexisting geological information, site characterization and

  7. WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum (structural)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum Geology GEL 3300 (structural) GEL 3400 (sed/strat) Geology Elective 1 Geology Elective 2 Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 PHY 2130/31 MAT 2010 PHY 2140/41 CHEM 1220/30 MAT 1800 Cognates GEL 5593 (writing intensive) GEL 3160 (petrology) GEL 3650 (field camp) Geology Elective 3 GEL 2130

  8. Exploring the mechanisms of protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ji; Ren, Ying; Li, Jinghai

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neither of the two prevalent theories, namely thermodynamic stability and kinetic stability, provides a comprehensive understanding of protein folding. The thermodynamic theory is misleading because it assumes that free energy is the exclusive dominant mechanism of protein folding, and attributes the structural transition from one characteristic state to another to energy barriers. Conversely, the concept of kinetic stability overemphasizes dominant mechanisms that are related to kinetic factors. This article explores the stability condition of protein structures from the viewpoint of meso-science, paying attention to the compromise in the competition between minimum free energy and other dominant mechanisms. Based on our study of complex systems, we propose that protein folding is a meso-scale, dissipative, nonlinear and non-equilibrium process that is dominated by the compromise between free energy and other dominant mechanisms such as environmental factors. Consequently, a protein shows dynamic structures,...

  9. What Makes a Protein Fold Amenable to Functional Innovation? Fold Polarity and Stability Trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tawfik, Dan S.

    What Makes a Protein Fold Amenable to Functional Innovation? Fold Polarity and Stability Trade not trading off, but instead promoting the acquisition of new activities. Indeed, computational analysis. It is often the case that activity and stability trade off.10,22 Many enzymes were, however, dramatically

  10. Toward a Theory on the Stability of Protein Folding: Challenges for Folding Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Walter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We adopt the point of view that analysis of the stability of the protein folding process is central to understanding the underlying physics of folding. Stability of the folding process means that many perturbations do not disrupt the progress from the random coil to the native state. In this paper we explore the stability of folding using established methods from physics and mathematics. Our result is a preliminary theory of the physics of folding. We suggest some tests of these ideas using folding simulations. We begin by supposing that folding events are related in some way to mechanical waves on the molecule. We adopt an analytical approach to the physics which was pioneered by M.V. Berry, (in another context), based upon mathematics developed mainly by R. Thom and V.I. Arnold. We find that the stability of the folding process can be understood in terms of structures known as caustics, which occur in many kinds of wave phenomena. The picture that emerges is that natural selection has given us a set of prot...

  11. Fast Gravitational Wave Radiometry using Data Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Ain; Prathamesh Dalvi; Sanjit Mitra

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational Waves (GWs) from the early universe and unresolved astrophysical sources are expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). The GW radiometer algorithm is well suited to probe such a background using data from ground based laser interferometric detectors. Radiometer analysis can be performed in different bases, e.g., isotropic, pixel or spherical harmonic. Each of these analyses possesses a common temporal symmetry which we exploit here to fold the whole dataset for every detector pair, typically a few hundred to a thousand days of data, to only one sidereal day, without any compromise in precision. We develop the algebra and a software pipeline needed to fold data, accounting for the effect of overlapping windows and non-stationary noise. We implement this on LIGO's fifth science run data and validate it by performing a standard anisotropic SGWB search on both folded and unfolded data. Folded data not only leads to orders of magnitude reduction in computation cost, but it results in a conveniently small data volume of few gigabytes, making it possible to perform an actual analysis on a personal computer, as well as easy movement of data. A few important analyses, yet unaccomplished due to computational limitations, will now become feasible. Folded data, being independent of the radiometer basis, will also be useful in reducing processing redundancies in multiple searches and provide a common ground for mutual consistency checks. Most importantly, folded data will allow vast amount of experimentation with existing searches and provide substantial help in developing new strategies to find unknown sources.

  12. Complex Faulting in the Yuha Desert: Implications for Fault Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kayla Ann

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological Sciences by Kayla Ann Kroll September 2012 ThesisKeith B. Richards-Dinger Copyright by Kayla Ann Kroll TheThesis of Kayla Ann Kroll is approved: Committee Chairperson

  13. Energetic Components of Cooperative Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huseyin Kaya; Hue Sun Chan

    2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A new lattice protein model with a four-helix bundle ground state is analyzed by a parameter-space Monte Carlo histogram technique to evaluate the effects of an extensive variety of model potentials on folding thermodynamics. Cooperative helical formation and contact energies based on a 5-letter alphabet are found to be insufficient to satisfy calorimetric and other experimental criteria for two-state folding. Such proteinlike behaviors are predicted, however, by models with polypeptide-like local conformational restrictions and environment-dependent hydrogen bonding-like interactions.

  14. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  15. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Cabantous, Stephanie (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  16. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  17. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Cabantous, Stephanie (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  18. Nonlinear conformation of secondary protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Januar, M; Handoko, L T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model to describe the mechanism of conformational dynamics in secondary protein based on matter interactions is proposed. The approach deploys the lagrangian method by imposing certain symmetry breaking. The protein backbone is initially assumed to be nonlinear and represented by the Sine-Gordon equation, while the nonlinear external bosonic sources is represented by $\\phi^4$ interaction. It is argued that the nonlinear source induces the folding pathway in a different way than the previous work with initially linear backbone. Also, the nonlinearity of protein backbone decreases the folding speed.

  19. CSAW: a dynamical model of protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerson Huang

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk) is a model of protein folding that combines SAW (self-avoiding walk) with Monte-Carlo. It simulates the Brownian motion of a chain molecule in the presence of interactions, both among chain residues, and with the environment. In a first model that includes the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding, a chain of 30 residues folds into a native state with stable secondary and tertiary structures. The process starts with a rapid collapse into an intermediate "molten globule", which slowly decays into the native state afer a relatively long quiescent period. The behavior of the radius of gyration mimics experimental data.

  20. Condition Assessment and Fault Prognostics of Microelectromechanical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    monitoring, Condition assessment, Fault detection, Fault diagnostics, Fault prognostics. Corresponding, batteries, etc.) to complete machines (wind turbines, electrical motors, machining tools, etc.). SeveralCondition Assessment and Fault Prognostics of Microelectromechanical Systems K. Medjaher , H. Skima

  1. Natural gas seeps in the northern Gulf of Mexico: A geological investigation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinkle, Anthony Robert

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ruptured by faulting and folding. 4) Oil Seeps along unconformi. ties 5) Seeps associated with intrusions, such as mud volcanoes, igneous intrusions and piercement salt domes. L-'nk also noted that seepages are most numerous . 'n areas of young... attention more and more towards offshore explor- ation, as the present census of major oil fields in the United States today is generally believed to be close to the probable maximum. At the same time, tho para, llel growth '. n ecological consciousness...

  2. GRADUATE PROGRAM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5342 Geological Engineering: Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 EOSC 535 Transport Processes in Porous Media 3 2 Site Investigation and Management 3 2 CIVL 574 Experimental Soil Mechanics 3 2 CIVL 579 Geosynthetics 2 Geological Engineering Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 CIVL 408 Geo-Environmental Engineering 3 2 CIVL 410

  3. Automated Discovery of Structural Signatures of Protein Fold and Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muggleton, Stephen H.

    Automated Discovery of Structural Signatures of Protein Fold and Function Marcel Turcotte1 sys- tematically for protein fold signatures, we have explored the use of Inductive Logic Programming fold. The work showed that signatures of protein folds exist, about half of rules discov- ered

  4. Optimization of a Microfluidic Mixer for Studying Protein Folding Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    Optimization of a Microfluidic Mixer for Studying Protein Folding Kinetics David E. Hertzog with numerical simulations to minimize the mixing time of a microfluidic mixer developed for protein folding reported continuous flow mixer for protein folding. Fast events in protein folding often occur

  5. Polypeptide chain collapse and protein folding Jayant B. Udgaonkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Polypeptide chain collapse and protein folding Jayant B. Udgaonkar National Centre is an integral component of a protein folding reaction. In this review, exper- imental characterization solvent [2]. A distinctive physical feature of any protein folding reaction is the greater than 3-fold

  6. Early Events in Protein Folding Explored by Rapid Mixing Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Heinrich

    15 Early Events in Protein Folding Explored by Rapid Mixing Methods Heinrich Roder, Kosuke Maki for Understanding Protein Folding As with any complex reaction, time-resolved data are essential for elucidating the mechanism of protein folding. Even in cases where the whole process of folding occurs in a single step

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of secondary protein folding Natalia G. Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear dynamics of secondary protein folding Natalia G. Berloff Department of Applied field varies. Pacs: 87.15.-v, 87.15By, 05.45.-a, 41.20Jb Keywords: Folding pathway, protein folding interaction and hydrophobic effects. The most common shapes of the protein folding are alpha () and beta

  8. Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding William R Skach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding William R Skach The membrane protein­folding. This Perspective will focus on emerging evidence that the RTC functions as a protein-folding machine that restricts. The process of polytopic (multispanning) membrane protein folding can be viewed as a series of sequential

  9. Protein folding by zipping and assembly S. Banu Ozkan*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Protein folding by zipping and assembly S. Banu Ozkan* , G. Albert Wu* , John D. Chodera, CA, May 2, 2007 (received for review April 13, 2006) How do proteins fold so quickly? Some denatured proteins fold to their native structures in only microseconds, on average, implying that there is a folding

  10. COMMUNICATION First Principles Prediction of Protein Folding Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    COMMUNICATION First Principles Prediction of Protein Folding Rates Derek A. Debe and William A studies have demonstrated that many small, single-domain proteins fold via simple two-state kinetics. We. # 1999 Academic Press Keywords: protein folding; kinetics; diffusion; fold topology; nucleation

  11. GEOLOGY AND FRACTURE SYSTEM AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkiewicz, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of underground test site •• 1.5 Regional bedrock geology.Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine area.Fig. 2.1 Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine

  12. Sensor Fault Detection and Isolation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Cheng-Ken

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to develop a Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) system which is capable to diagnosis multiple sensor faults in nonlinear cases. In order to lead this study closer to real world applications in oil industries...

  13. Critical aspects of hierarchical protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Hansen; Mogens H. Jensen; Kim Sneppen; Giovanni Zocchi

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the first order folding transitions of proteins observed at physiological chemical conditions end in a critical point for a given temperature and chemical potential of the surrounding water. We investigate this critical point using a hierarchical Hamiltonian and determine its universality class. This class differs qualitatively from those of other known models.

  14. On the Complexity of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierluigi Crescenzi; Deborah Goldman; Christos Papadimitriou; Antonio Piccolboni; Mihalis Yannakakis

    We show that the protein folding problem in the two-dimensional H-P model is NP-complete. 1 Introduction Proteins are polymer chains consisting of monomers of twenty different kinds. Much of the genetic information in the DNA contains the sequence information of proteins, with three nucleotides

  15. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  16. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  17. Fast Gravitational Wave Radiometry using Data Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ain, Anirban; Mitra, Sanjit

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational Waves (GWs) from the early universe and unresolved astrophysical sources are expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). The GW radiometer algorithm is well suited to probe such a background using data from ground based laser interferometric detectors. Radiometer analysis can be performed in different bases, e.g., isotropic, pixel or spherical harmonic. Each of these analyses possesses a common temporal symmetry which we exploit here to fold the whole dataset for every detector pair, typically a few hundred to a thousand days of data, to only one sidereal day, without any compromise in precision. We develop the algebra and a software pipeline needed to fold data, accounting for the effect of overlapping windows and non-stationary noise. We implement this on LIGO's fifth science run data and validate it by performing a standard anisotropic SGWB search on both folded and unfolded data. Folded data not only leads to orders of magnitude reduction in computation cost, but it results in a co...

  18. Solvent-induced forces in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Naim, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The solvent-induced forces between various groups on the protein are examined. It is found that the intramolecular hydrophilic forces are likely to be the strongest forces mediated through the solvent. It is argued that these are probably the most important solvent-induced driving forces in the process of protein folding.

  19. A Rectilinear-Monotone Polygonal Fault Block Model for Fault-Tolerant Minimal Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dajin

    ]. In rectangular model, all faulty nodes are grouped in dis- jointed, rectangular areas, called fault blocksA Rectilinear-Monotone Polygonal Fault Block Model for Fault-Tolerant Minimal Routing in Mesh Dajin Wang, Member, IEEE Abstract--We propose a new fault block model, Minimal-Connected-Component (MCC

  20. Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

  1. RNAiFold: A web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin, Peter Clote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clote, Peter

    RNAiFold: A web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design Juan Antonio Garcia title: RNAiFold web server Key words: RNA, inverse folding, molecular design, synthetic biology, RNA to the 21st century. In this paper, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design

  2. Heteropolymer Folding 9 1. C. Gh'elis and J. Yon, Protein Folding (Academic, New York, 1982).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Heteropolymer Folding 9 References 1. C. Gh'elis and J. Yon, Protein Folding (Academic, New York, editor, The Protein Folding Problem (Westview, Boulder, 1984).. 5. N. Gâ??o, Annu. Rev. Biophys. Bioeng. 12 for Protein Folding, Europhys. Lett. 6, 307 (1988). 14. G. Iori, E. Marinari, G. Parisi and M. V. Struglia

  3. FAULT & COORDINATION STUDY FOR T PLANT COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD, G.P.; BOYD-BODIAU, E.A.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short circuit study is performed to determine the maximum fault current that the system protective devices, transformers, and interconnections would he subject to in event of a three phase, phase-to-phase, or phase-to-ground fault. Generally, the short circuit study provides the worst case fault current levels at each bus or connection point of the system.

  4. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  5. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  6. Using Fault Model Enforcement to Improve Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instead that a new approach, called fault model enforcement, that maps actual faults to expected faults on a constellation of interconnected systems--a typical example is cluster-based systems [4]. Traditional database centers around a set of closely guarded racks and data closets woven together by intricate networks

  7. Using Fault Model Enforcement to Improve Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Richard P.

    that a new approach, called fault model enforcement, that maps actual faults to expected faults on a constellation of interconnected systems--a typical example is cluster-based systems [4]. Traditional database centers around a set of closely guarded racks and data closets woven together by intricate networks

  8. Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

  9. Conversion of the Bayou Choctaw geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic model implicit in the original site characterization report for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been converted to a numerical, computer-based three-dimensional model. The original site characterization model was successfully converted with minimal modifications and use of new information. The geometries of the salt diapir, selected adjacent sedimentary horizons, and a number of faults have been modeled. Models of a partial set of the several storage caverns that have been solution-mined within the salt mass are also included. Collectively, the converted model appears to be a relatively realistic representation of the geology of the Bayou Choctaw site as known from existing data. A small number of geometric inconsistencies and other problems inherent in 2-D vs. 3-D modeling have been noted. Most of the major inconsistencies involve faults inferred from drill hole data only. Modem computer software allows visualization of the resulting site model and its component submodels with a degree of detail and flexibility that was not possible with conventional, two-dimensional and paper-based geologic maps and cross sections. The enhanced visualizations may be of particular value in conveying geologic concepts involved in the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site to a lay audience. A Microsoft WindowsTM PC-based viewer and user-manipulable model files illustrating selected features of the converted model are included in this report.

  10. Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

  11. Conversion of the Big Hill geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Hill salt dome, located in southeastern Texas, is home to one of four underground oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Big Hill site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 14 oil storage caverns at the site. This work provides a realistic and internally consistent geologic model of the Big Hill site that can be used in support of future work.

  12. Conversion of the West Hackberry geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Hackberry salt dome, in southwestern Louisiana, is one of four underground oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the West Hackberry site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary layers, mapped faults, and a portion of the oil storage caverns at the site. This work provides a realistic and internally consistent geologic model of the West Hackberry site that can be used in support of future work.

  13. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  14. Software Fault Diagnosis Peter Zoeteweij

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoeteweij, Peter

    Lab, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics, and Computer Science, Delft University-to-day basis is constantly growing. Combined with a practically constant rate of faults per line of code in the software development cycle, which aim at exposing such discrepancies. In this context, automated diagnosis

  15. Development of a bridge fault extractor tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Nandan D.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    as interlayer faults. An example of an intralayer fault is a bridge between two adjacent metal1 lines. An example of an interlayer fault is a short between overlapping polysilicon and metal1 lines. The rest of this thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 2... between two adjacent 6 metal1 lines. An example of an interlayer fault is a short between overlapping polysilicon and metal1 lines. A recent survey of fault extractors describes their different features [15]. Some tools such as VLASIC [16] attempt...

  16. A simple theory of protein folding kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple model of protein folding dynamics that captures key qualitative elements recently seen in all-atom simulations. The goals of this theory are to serve as a simple formalism for gaining deeper insight into the physical properties seen in detailed simulations as well as to serve as a model to easily compare why these simulations suggest a different kinetic mechanism than previous simple models. Specifically, we find that non-native contacts play a key role in determining the mechanism, which can shift dramatically as the energetic strength of non-native interactions is changed. For protein-like non-native interactions, our model finds that the native state is a kinetic hub, connecting the strength of relevant interactions directly to the nature of folding kinetics.

  17. Effects of interlayer slip on multilayered folds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casarta, Lawrence Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composed of Coconino Sandstone (brittle) or Indiana Limestone (ductile) interlayered with lead (very ductile) are folded by layer parallel compression at a confining pressure of 100 MPa, temperature of 24 C and axial displacement rate of 10 3 cm... differential stress-axial shortening curves. a, and b, specimens composed of Coconino Sandstone and lead. c, specimens composed of Indiana Limestone and lead. Each curve is for a different specimen a and b. Schematic illustration of double hinged...

  18. Degradation(%) Bureau of Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and geomechanical modeling Randy Marrett, DGS; quantitative analysis and structural geology Julia Gale, BEG; Develop the capability to accurately predict reservoir-scale deformation using geomechanical, structural, diagenetic, and linked geomechanical/diagenetic models; Improve the usefulness of seismic response

  19. Geological Characterization of California's Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sequestration pilot studies to determine which technologies for permanently storing CO2 in underground electricity from baseload facilities meet the state's greenhouse gas emission performance standard emissions to 1990 levels by 2020; by developing costeffective longterm geologic sequestration

  20. Simple Models of the Protein Folding Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Tang

    1999-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The protein folding problem has attracted an increasing attention from physicists. The problem has a flavor of statistical mechanics, but possesses the most common feature of most biological problems -- the profound effects of evolution. I will give an introduction to the problem, and then focus on some recent work concerning the so-called ``designability principle''. The designability of a structure is measured by the number of sequences that have that structure as their unique ground state. Structures differ drastically in terms of their designability; highly designable structures emerge with a number of associated sequences much larger than the average. These highly designable structures 1) possess ``proteinlike'' secondary structures and motifs, 2) are thermodynamically more stable, and 3) fold faster than other structures. These results suggest that protein structures are selected in nature because they are readily designed and stable against mutations, and that such selection simultaneously leads to thermodynamic stability and foldability. According to this picture, a key to the protein folding problem is to understand the emergence and the properties of the highly designable structures.

  1. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  2. Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    4-H 340 Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology Member Guide OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE #12;Contents 4-H Geology Project 3 Project Recommendations 3 Books on Geology 4 Trip Planning 4 Contests 7 Identification of Rocks and Minerals 7 Physical Properties of Minerals 8 Generalized Geologic

  3. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  4. 242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Geology Chairperson: Abdel. Assistant Instructor: P Hajj-Chehadeh, Abdel-Halim The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology, and Master of Science degrees in certain areas of the vast

  5. Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012 1. Learning Goals ALL students in geology, classification schemes, geologic history and processes, and the structure of the Earth. 3. demonstrate an understanding of the variability, complexity, and interdependency of processes within geologic systems. 4. use

  6. Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, David

    Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, miningCareers in Geology Department of Geosciences #12;Geology is the scientific study of planet Earth on the following pages. UNL students examine tidal flats on a recent trip to the Bahamas. #12; Economic geology

  7. Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 15 (2013), 69-83 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY POTENTIAL IN SRI LANKA: A PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 15 (2013), 69-83 69 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY POTENTIAL faults or hot dry rock that would help geothermal energy development. Data show three regions, metamorphic terrains INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy development in Sri Lanka has been considered

  8. International Geology Review, Vol. 38, 1996, p. 979-994. Copyright 1996 by V. H. Winston & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi "Luke"

    migrating transform faults or spreading ridges is common in Earth history (Sisson et al., 1994). Accordingly, Inc. All rights reserved. Tectono-Metamorphic Impact of a Subduction-Transform Transition 94544 Abstract Subduction-transform tectonic transitions were common in the geologic past, yet

  9. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE WWW.GEOLOGY" for a complete range of advising information plus the latest Environmental Geology requirements. CORE COURSES (check each as completed): (30 credits) ____Choose one of the following introductory geology classes

  10. The detection of high impedance faults using random fault behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carswell, Patrick Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) request for pro- posed solutions for the detection of high impedance faults, the Hughes Aircraft Corporation developed a detection technique based solely on the level of the third harmonic current... for proposed solutions from EPRI that brought the Hughes technique, Power Technologies Incorporated (PTI) proposed a technique which statistically monitors the first, third, and fifth harmonics of current to make a, determination as to the presence of a high...

  11. Faulting in the Yucca Mountain region: Critical review and analyses of tectonic data from the central Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrill, D.A.; Stirewalt, G.L.; Henderson, D.B.; Stamatakos, J.; Morris, A.P.; Spivey, K.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Wernicke, B.P. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. The tectonic setting of Yucca Mountain presents several potential hazards for a proposed repository, such as potential for earthquake seismicity, fault disruption, basaltic volcanism, magma channeling along pre-existing faults, and faults and fractures that may serve as barriers or conduits for groundwater flow. Characterization of geologic structures and tectonic processes will be necessary to assess compliance with regulatory requirements for the proposed high level waste repository. In this report, we specifically investigate fault slip, seismicity, contemporary stain, and fault-slip potential in the Yucca Mountain region with regard to Key Technical Uncertainties outlined in the License Application Review Plan (Sections 3.2.1.5 through 3.2.1.9 and 3.2.2.8). These investigations center on (i) alternative methods of determining the slip history of the Bare Mountain Fault, (ii) cluster analysis of historic earthquakes, (iii) crustal strain determinations from Global Positioning System measurements, and (iv) three-dimensional slip-tendency analysis. The goal of this work is to assess uncertainties associated with neotectonic data sets critical to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses` ability to provide prelicensing guidance and perform license application review with respect to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

  12. Unconventional modelling of faulted reservoirs: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldthorpe, W.H.; Chow, Y.S.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An example is presented of detailed unconventional gridding of the North Rankin Field, which is a large, structurally complex gas-condensate field offshore Western Australia. A non-Cartesian areal grid was used with corner point geometry to approximate a generalized curvilinear coordinate system for the surface and interior of each reservoir unit. Coordinate lines in the vertical plane at any node in the grid were tilted where necessary to define sloping edges and sides of grid blocks. Thus, any sloping twisted surface could be modelled. To investigate possible communication across faults between different geological units, transmissibilities at faults were automatically calculated for any over-lapping cells and sensitivities made of the effect of varying these transmissibilities on well production, recovery factors, pressure decline and water encroachment. The model was solved with a fully implicit simulator using a Newton-Raphson iteration method for the non-linear equations and a variant of the Conjugate Gradient procedure with a preconditioning matrix for the linear equations.

  13. Development of secondary faults between en echelon, oblique-slip faults: examples from basement controlled, small-fault systems in the Llano Uplift of central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedgcoxe, Howard Reiffert

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    correspond to the NE trending set of faults and the secondary antithetic faults corre- spond to the N to NNE set (Figure 12). Fractures, represented by the dashed lines in Figure 12, occur in direct association with the primary and secondary faults...DEVELOPMENT OF SECONDARY FAULTS BETWEEN EN ECHELON, OBLIQUE-SLIP FAULTS: EXAMPLES FROM BASEMENT CONTROLLED, SMALL-FAULT SYSTEMS IN THE LLANO UPLIFT OF CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by HOWARD REIFFERT HEDGCOXE Submitted to the Graduate College...

  14. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Nature's proteins set a high bar...

  15. Computational and experimental investigations of forces in protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schell, David Andrew

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    in protein folding is essential to the understanding and treatment of protein misfolding diseases. When proteins fold, a significant amount of surface area is buried in the protein interior. It has long been known that burial of hydrophobic surface area...

  16. Experimental and Computational Studies on Protein Folding, Misfolding and Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yun

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Proteins need fold to perform their biological function. Thus, understanding how proteins fold could be the key to understanding life. In the first study, the stability and structure of several !-hairpin peptide variants derived from the C...

  17. Why are MD simulated protein folding times wrong? Dmitry Nerukh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Why are MD simulated protein folding times wrong? Dmitry Nerukh Unilever Centre for Molecular.ac.uk The question of significant deviations of protein folding times simulated using molecular dynamics from

  18. Protein Folding Simulation in CCP Luca Bortolussi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bortolussi, Luca

    Protein Folding Simulation in CCP Luca Bortolussi1 , Alessandro Dal Pal`u1 , Agostino Dovier1 as the protein folding. This problem is fundamental for biological and pharmaceutical research. Currently

  19. abakaliki fold belt: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cenozoic partitioning of oblique plate convergence in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt (Iran) Physics Websites Summary: of oblique plate convergence in the Zagros fold-and-thrust...

  20. Folding simulations of small proteins Seung-Yeon Kima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jooyoung

    Abstract Understanding how a protein folds is a long-standing challenge in modern science. We have used-native conformations are carried out for each protein. In all cases, proteins fold into their native-like conformations, ~108 Monte Carlo steps). D 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Protein folding; Computer

  1. Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalet, Xavier

    Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding David E. Hertzog,, Xavier a microfluidic mixer for studying protein folding and other reactions with a mixing time of 8 µs and sample) measurements of single-stranded DNA. We also demon- strate the feasibility of measuring fast protein folding

  2. COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

  3. Protein folding: Then and now Yiwen Chen 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Review Protein folding: Then and now Yiwen Chen 1 , Feng Ding 1 , Huifen Nie 1 , Adrian W decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how a protein folds has now become vital in understanding diseases and our abilities to rationally

  4. Thermodynamics of Protein Folding from Coarse-Grained Models' Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    8 Thermodynamics of Protein Folding from Coarse-Grained Models' Perspectives Michael Bachmann applications. In this lecture, we focus on the anal- ysis of mesoscopic models for protein folding, aggregation for a more universal description of the notoriously difficult problem of protein fold- ing. In this approach

  5. Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 , Susan Stepney1 and Leo Caves1 1 University-like structures. Models of protein folding vary in complexity and the amount of prior knowledge they contain). The energy landscape theory of protein folding (Onuchic et al., 1997) predicts a rugged funnel-like energy

  6. Evolutionary Monte Carlo for protein folding simulations Faming Lianga)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Faming

    Evolutionary Monte Carlo for protein folding simulations Faming Lianga) Department of Statistics to simulations of protein folding on simple lattice models, and to finding the ground state of a protein. In all structures in protein folding. The numerical results show that it is drastically superior to other methods

  7. John von Neumann Institute for Computing Monte Carlo Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    John von Neumann Institute for Computing Monte Carlo Protein Folding: Simulations of Met://www.fz-juelich.de/nic-series/volume20 #12;#12;Monte Carlo Protein Folding: Simulations of Met-Enkephalin with Solvent-Accessible Area difficulties in applying Monte Carlo methods to protein folding. The solvent-accessible area method, a popular

  8. Protein Folding Challenge and Theoretical Computer Science Somenath Biswas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Somenath

    Protein Folding Challenge and Theoretical Computer Science Somenath Biswas Department of Computer the chain of amino acids that defines a protein. The protein folding problem is: given a sequence of amino to use an efficient algorithm to carry out protein folding. The atoms in a protein molecule attract each

  9. Author's personal copy Protein folding: Then and now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Author's personal copy Review Protein folding: Then and now Yiwen Chen 1 , Feng Ding 1 , Huifen Nie Available online 8 June 2007 Abstract Over the past three decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how a protein folds has now become vital

  10. Author's personal copy Protein folding in confined and crowded environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Author's personal copy Review Protein folding in confined and crowded environments Huan-Xiang Zhou protein folding in cellular environments. Theories based on considerations of excluded volumes predict disparate effects on protein folding stability for confinement and crowding: confinement can stabilize

  11. Combinatorial Problems on Strings with Applications to Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Alantha

    Combinatorial Problems on Strings with Applications to Protein Folding Alantha Newman MIT San Jose, CA 95120, USA ruhl@almaden.ibm.com Abstract We consider the problem of protein folding in linear time. 1 Introduction We consider the problem of protein folding in the HP model on the three

  12. Modeling Protein Folding Pathways Christopher Bystroff, Yu Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    Modeling Protein Folding Pathways Christopher Bystroff, Yu Shao Dept of Biology Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. e-mail:{bystrc, shaoy}@rpi.edu Summary Proteins fold through a series of intermediate states called a pathway. Protein folding pathways have been modeled using either simulations

  13. Polymer Collapse, Protein Folding, and the Percolation Threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Polymer Collapse, Protein Folding, and the Percolation Threshold HAGAI MEIROVITCH University (Macromolecules 1989, 22, 3986­3997) to study protein folding, where H and P are the hydrophobic and polar amino; computer simulation; collapse transition; protein folding Introduction The behavior of dilute polymer

  14. Steiner Minimal Trees, Twist Angles, and the Protein Folding Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. MacGregor

    Steiner Minimal Trees, Twist Angles, and the Protein Folding Problem J. MacGregor Smith, Yunho Jang. These properties should be ultimately useful in the ab ini- tio protein folding prediction. Proteins 2007;66:889­ 902. VVC 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: Steiner trees; twist angles; protein fold- ing; side chain

  15. MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING Daniel B. Dix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dix, Daniel B.

    MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING Daniel B. Dix Department of Mathematics University of South Carolina Abstract. We present an elementary introduction to the protein folding problem directed toward, and biological problem, protein folding can also be precisely formulated as a set of mathematics problems. We

  16. Protein Folding Simulation by Two-Stage Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Will, Sebastian

    Protein Folding Simulation by Two-Stage Optimization A. Dayem Ullah1 , L. Kapsokalivas1 , M. Mann2 propose a two-stage optimization approach for protein folding simulation in the FCC lattice, inspired from procedure based on simulated annealing alone. 1 Introduction The question of how proteins fold and whether

  17. Fault prophet : a fault injection tool for large scale computer systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchwella, Tal

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I designed and implemented a fault injection tool, to study the impact of soft errors for large scale systems. Fault injection is used as a mechanism to simulate soft errors, measure the output variability ...

  18. Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing operating speed and shrinking technology, timing defects in integrated circuits are becoming increasingly important. The well established stuck-at-fault model is not sufficient because it is a static fault ...

  19. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. McCallum (1999), Reservoir damage around faults: OutcropSkar (2005), Controls on damage zone asymmetry of a normal2007), The evolution of the damage zone with fault growth in

  20. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8 m fault 14 m fault Lonewolf Wadi Araba Carboneras Caletasiltstone, conglomerate Wadi As Sir Limestone gneiss schistFaulkner et al. , 2003], and Wadi Araba [Du Bernard et al. ,

  1. Fault-tolerant dynamic task graph scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt, Mehmet C.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Kunal; Agrawal, Gagan

    2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present an approach to fault tolerant execution of dynamic task graphs scheduled using work stealing. In particular, we focus on selective and localized recovery of tasks in the presence of soft faults. We elicit from the user the basic task graph structure in terms of successor and predecessor relationships. The work stealing-based algorithm to schedule such a task graph is augmented to enable recovery when the data and meta-data associated with a task get corrupted. We use this redundancy, and the knowledge of the task graph structure, to selectively recover from faults with low space and time overheads. We show that the fault tolerant design retains the essential properties of the underlying work stealing-based task scheduling algorithm, and that the fault tolerant execution is asymptotically optimal when task re-execution is taken into account. Experimental evaluation demonstrates the low cost of recovery under various fault scenarios.

  2. pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart 1101, 1102, 1103,1104, 1105 2250 3160 2500 hours geology junior standing; six hours geology depends on course senior standing, permission hours geology six hours geology Evolution of the Earth Geophysics Physical Geology , Historical Geology

  3. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  4. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  5. Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  6. Introduction to protein folding for physicists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Echenique

    2007-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction of the three-dimensional native structure of proteins from the knowledge of their amino acid sequence, known as the protein folding problem, is one of the most important yet unsolved issues of modern science. Since the conformational behaviour of flexible molecules is nothing more than a complex physical problem, increasingly more physicists are moving into the study of protein systems, bringing with them powerful mathematical and computational tools, as well as the sharp intuition and deep images inherent to the physics discipline. This work attempts to facilitate the first steps of such a transition. In order to achieve this goal, we provide an exhaustive account of the reasons underlying the protein folding problem enormous relevance and summarize the present-day status of the methods aimed to solving it. We also provide an introduction to the particular structure of these biological heteropolymers, and we physically define the problem stating the assumptions behind this (commonly implicit) definition. Finally, we review the 'special flavor' of statistical mechanics that is typically used to study the astronomically large phase spaces of macromolecules. Throughout the whole work, much material that is found scattered in the literature has been put together here to improve comprehension and to serve as a handy reference.

  7. Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotfifard, Saeed

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quality Meters (PQM), are installed to capture harmonics and certain disturbances for analyzing the power quality indices. Digital Protective Relays are utilized to detect occurrence of the faults and isolate faulted section as fast as possible. Digital... Protective Relays) use synchronous methods [28]. Therefore, if the available data is provided by RTUs, fault location methods that operate based on direct comparison of the input samples cannot be 17 utilized. However, if the data could be gathered from...

  8. Geology, Murzuk oil development could boost S. W. Libya prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. (Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom))

    1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent involvement of Repsol, Total, and OMV in developing the 2 billion bbl oil-in-place Murzuk field complex, an infrastructure will be finally constructed in western Libya which will act as a precursor to more exploration activity and development projects in the Murzuk and Ghadames basins. Murzuk, an intra-cratonic sag basin, is a huge ladle-shaped structural basin covering more than 400,000 sq km and extending beyond the borders of southern Libya. The structure of the area is quite simple. The sub-horizontal or gently dipping strata are faulted and the faults are most frequently parallel to the anticlinal axis. Tectonic movements affected the basin to a greater or lesser degree from early Paleozoic (Caledonian) to post-Eocene (Alpine) times. The paper describes the exploration history; stratigraphy; the Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian, and Carboniferous reservoirs; source rocks; oil gravity and gas content; hydrogeologic constraints; aquifer influence on hydrocarbon accumulation; geologic structures; Murzuk field development; and acreage availability.

  9. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Crump Geyser: High Precision...

  10. Towards Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip: Defects, Fault Modeling, Testing, and Reconfiguration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Towards Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip: Defects, Fault Modeling, Testing, NC 27708, USA Abstract Dependability is an important attribute for microfluidic lab-on-chip devices microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. Defects are related to logical fault models that can be viewed not only

  11. Contribution of Identified Active Faults to Near Fault Seismic Hazard in the Flinders Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Somerville1 , Peggy Quijada1 , Hong Kie Thio1 , Mike Sandiford2 and Mark Quigley2 1. URS Corporation estimates of fault slip rate from Quigley et al. (2006) to quantify the seismic activity rate on the faults of these models was used in conjunction with the active fault model. Quigley et al. (2006) identified a system

  12. A fault location approach for fuzzy fault section estimation on radial distribution feeders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andoh, Kwame Sarpong

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was involved in the fault was evaluated using the event-phase possibility values and line section phase topology information. The fault distance algorithm was used to eliminate sections of the feeder that were not likely to be possible faulted section...

  13. www.geology.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geomorphology, geomechanics, engineering geology, and teaching and learning. e PSU program serves geology majors Glaciology Geomechanics Environmental and engineering geology K-12 education In addition to their work

  14. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

  15. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

  16. Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, AnticipatingUSA Macdougall, Doug. Why Geology Matters: Decoding theE-book available. Why Geology Matters pursues two goals: to

  17. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington State Department of Natural Resources Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey Wyoming State Geological Survey...

  18. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  19. Accurate resistive bridge fault modeling, simulation, and test generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sar-Dessai, Vijay Ramesh

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive bridging faults in CMOS combinational circuits are studied in this work. Bridging faults are modeled using HSPICE circuit simulation of the various types of bridging faults that can occur in CMOS combinational ...

  20. Earthquake behavior and structure of oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland, Emily Carlson

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic transform faults that accommodate strain at mid-ocean ridge offsets represent a unique environment for studying fault mechanics. Here, I use seismic observations and models to explore how fault structure affects ...

  1. Low-cost motor drive embedded fault diagnosis systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Bilal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric motors are used widely in industrial manufacturing plants. Bearing faults, insulation faults, and rotor faults are the major causes of electric motor failures. Based on the line current analysis, this dissertation mainly deals with the low...

  2. Accurate resistive bridge fault modeling, simulation, and test generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sar-Dessai, Vijay Ramesh

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive bridging faults in CMOS combinational circuits are studied in this work. Bridging faults are modeled using HSPICE circuit simulation of the various types of bridging faults that can occur in CMOS combinational circuits. The results...

  3. Signatures of the protein folding pathway in two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, J; Lai, Z; Wang, J; Mukamel, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2) Dobson, C. M. Protein Folding and Misfolding. Naturethe Complexity of Protein Folding. Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol.Signatures of the Protein Folding Pathway in Two-Dimensional

  4. Microfluidic advantage : novel techniques for protein folding and oxygen control in cell cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polinkovsky, Mark E.; Polinkovsky, Mark E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel Techniques for Protein Folding and Oxygen Control inTemperature Jump System to Study Fast Protein FoldingNovel Techniques for Protein Folding and Oxygen Control in

  5. Carbon-deuterium bonds as an infrared probe of protein dynamics, local electrostatics and folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagle, Laura B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Englander, W. S. , Protein Folding: A Stepwise AssemblyEnglander, S. W. , Protein Folding Intermediates – NativeR. L. , How Does Protein Folding Get Started? Trends

  6. The folding energy landscape of Cytochrome c : theoretical and experimental investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinkam, Patrick

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical Frustration in the Protein Folding Landscape: GrandChemical Frustration in the Protein Folding Landscape: GrandEnzyme Catalysis and Protein Folding (Freeman, New York). [

  7. Topology, frustration, folding and function of the inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1[beta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capraro, Dominique T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the features of protein folding, where proteins with manychain connectivity on protein folding (53). Application ofhave gone beyond protein folding and have characterized

  8. Energy landscapes for protein folding, binding, and aggregation : simple funnels and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Samuel Sung-Il

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coordinates capture protein folding on smooth landscapes.in the Prediction of Protein Folding Kinetics. Proc. Natl.Landscapes for Protein Folding, Binding, and Aggregation:

  9. Off-fault Damage Associated with a Localized Bend in the North Branch San Gabriel Fault, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Andrew 1987-

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures within very large displacement, mature fault zones, such as the North Branch San Gabriel Fault (NBSGF), are the product of a complex combination of processes. Off-fault damage within a damage zone and first-order geometric asperities...

  10. Improving Distribution System Reliability Through Risk-base Doptimization of Fault Management and Improved Computer-based Fault Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yimai

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    )’s regulation on power quality. Optimization in fault management tasks has the potential of improving system reliability by reducing the duration and scale of outages caused by faults through fast fault isolation and service restoration. The research reported...

  11. Evaluation of faulting characteristics and ground acceleration associated with recent movement along the Meers Fault, Southwestern Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrell, Richard Dennis

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that a 27 km section of the Meers Fault was reactivated during Holocene time. Although these studies have proven the occurrence of recent fault activity, many basic characteristics of the faulting remain unresolved...

  12. An algorithm for faulted phase and feeder selection under high impedance fault conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Carl Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proximate lines served by the same substation. Because of this signal propagation, a fault will be detected simultaneously on the faulted line and possibly several other lines served by the substation. Since it would not be plausible for a utility company... to deenergize the entire area served by a substation due to a high impedance fault on one lateral, a technique is needed to discriminate the faulted line from neighboring healthy feeders and healthy phases of the faulted feeder. Such a technique would also...

  13. active fault segments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fault activation Kuzmanov, Georgi 140 Early stage evolution of growth faults: 3D seismic insights from the Levant Basin, Eastern Mediterranean Materials Science Websites...

  14. Modeling and Measurement Constraints in Fault Diagnostics for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafi, Massieh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Fault Diagnostics for HVAC Systems Massieh Najafi 1 ,tools for determining HVAC diagnostics, methods todetect faults in HVAC systems are still generally

  15. GEOLOGY, July 2011 683 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    GEOLOGY, July 2011 683 INTRODUCTION Calcite (CaCO3 ) sedimentation in the ocean represents in the rate and locations of CaCO3 sedimentation and their association with carbon cycle per- turbations over system (e.g., Lyle et al., 2008). However, reconstructing global changes in CaCO3 sedimentation pat

  16. Geology in coal resource utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 37 papers in this book were compiled with an overriding theme in mind: to provide the coal industry with a comprehensive source of information on how geology and geologic concepts can be applied to the many facets of coal resource location, extraction, and utilization. The chapters have been arranged to address the major coal geology subfields of Exploration and Reserve Definition, Reserve Estimation, Coalbed Methane, Underground Coal Gasification, Mining, Coal Quality Concerns, and Environmental Impacts, with papers distributed on the basis of their primary emphasis. To help guide one through the collection, the author has included prefaces at the beginning of each chapter. They are intended as a brief lead-in to the subject of the chapter and an acknowledgement of the papers' connections to the subject and contributions to the chapter. In addition, a brief cross-reference section has been included in each preface to help one find papers of interest in other chapters. The subfields of coal geology are intimately intertwined, and investigations in one area may impact problems in another area. Some subfields tend to blur at their edges, such as with reserve definition and reserve estimation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. GEOLOGY, February 2008 151 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Yemane Asmerom Victor Y. Polyak Department of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, Florida 33149, USA Peter Cole Department of Geology, Cornell College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Ann F. Budd Department of Geoscience

  18. Fault-tolerant TCP mechanisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satapati, Suresh Kumar

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    point (TSAPs). In BSD, a service access point is a TCP socket identified by an IP address and port number, A TCP based fault-tolerant service is realized by replicating a server program onto one or more hosts and by having all replicas bind... backup sends the SEQUENCE NUMBER of the segment it recently sent. Since the primary server doesn't exist, the client does not acknowledge. The TCP on backup server keeps retransmitting the same segment, which can be counted to initiate a...

  19. Fault Controlled | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway,FarmersFastcap SystemsShear Zone:Fault

  20. Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    2011 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook #12 Environmental Management 14 Environmental Science 18 Geography 22 Geographic Information Science 26 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook Editors David Hayward, Ilse

  1. Spatial analysis of hypocenter to fault relationships for determining fault process zone width in Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Roberts, Barry L.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary investigation areas (PIA) for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste must be evaluated by NUMO with regard to a number of qualifying factors. One of these factors is related to earthquakes and fault activity. This study develops a spatial statistical assessment method that can be applied to the active faults in Japan to perform such screening evaluations. This analysis uses the distribution of seismicity near faults to define the width of the associated process zone. This concept is based on previous observations of aftershock earthquakes clustered near active faults and on the assumption that such seismic activity is indicative of fracturing and associated impacts on bedrock integrity. Preliminary analyses of aggregate data for all of Japan confirmed that the frequency of earthquakes is higher near active faults. Data used in the analysis were obtained from NUMO and consist of three primary sources: (1) active fault attributes compiled in a spreadsheet, (2) earthquake hypocenter data, and (3) active fault locations. Examination of these data revealed several limitations with regard to the ability to associate fault attributes from the spreadsheet to locations of individual fault trace segments. In particular, there was no direct link between attributes of the active faults in the spreadsheet and the active fault locations in the GIS database. In addition, the hypocenter location resolution in the pre-1983 data was less accurate than for later data. These pre-1983 hypocenters were eliminated from further analysis.

  2. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

  3. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, James [Professor

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  4. Optimized Fault Location Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Research Center Optimized Fault Location Concurrent Technologies Corporation Final Project Report by the Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). NeitherOptimized Fault Location Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National

  5. Sensor Fault Diagnosis Using Principal Component Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifi, Mahmoudreza

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to address the problem of fault diagnosis of sensors which measure a set of direct redundant variables. This study proposes: 1. A method for linear senor fault diagnosis 2. An analysis of isolability and detectability...

  6. Sensor Fault Diagnosis Using Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifi, Mahmoudreza

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to address the problem of fault diagnosis of sensors which measure a set of direct redundant variables. This study proposes: 1. A method for linear senor fault diagnosis 2. An analysis of isolability and detectability...

  7. INDUCTION MOTOR FAULT DIAGNOSTIC AND MONITORING METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    INDUCTION MOTOR FAULT DIAGNOSTIC AND MONITORING METHODS by Aderiano M. da Silva, B.S. A Thesis;i Abstract Induction motors are used worldwide as the "workhorse" in industrial applications material. However, induction motor faults can be detected in an initial stage in order to prevent

  8. Roadmap: Geology Environmental Geology -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO] College of Arts This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses on page 2 General Elective 8 #12;Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS

  9. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL) GEOL 102 Our Dynamic Earth: intrODuctiOn tO GEOLOGy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Emphasis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Laboratory study

  10. ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has promoted the systematic philosophical and fundamental study of geology since 1893. The Journal publishes original research across a broad range of subfields in geology, including geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology

  11. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL) geoL 102 our dynAMiC eArtH: introduCtion to geoLogy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Empha- sis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Labo- ratory study

  12. Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break 2015 Interested in field geology? Interested in environmental hazards and climate? Want to visit #12;Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan This is a 3-week course for students interested in mixing field

  13. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baran, Sándor

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological there is a large amount of missing observations, which often is the case in geological applications. We make,predictions,MarkovchainMonteCarlo,simulatedannealing,incomplete observations. INTRODUCTION In many geological applications, there is an interest in predicting properties

  14. R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro-leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Kingdom) and a geological con- sultant for various oil companies. His research focused primarilyAUTHORS R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro- leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Texas 77060; rene.jonk@exxonmobil.com Rene Jonk received his M.Sc. degree in structural geology from

  15. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  16. , UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    , UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

  17. GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

  18. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBONATION AS A CARBON SEQUESTRATION METHOD IN MINNESOTA L. H. Thorleifson, Minnesota Geological Survey carbonation as a carbon sequestration method in Minnesota: Minnesota Geological Survey Open-File Report 11: Minnesota Geological Survey 2 #12;POTENTIAL FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF MINERAL CARBONATION AS A CARBON

  19. Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University © 2006 #12;i PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Ninth Edition Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University #12;ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank

  20. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  1. Analysis of Potential Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO(sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We used a multifaceted approach to investigate the nature of caprocks above, and the interface between, reservoir-­?quality rocks that might serve as targets for carbon storage. Fieldwork in southeastern Utah examined the regional-­? to m-­?scale nature of faults and fractures across the sedimentiological interfaces. We also used microscopic analyses and mechanical modeling to examine the question as to how the contacts between units interact, and how fractures may allow fluids to move from reservoirs to caprock. Regional-­?scale analyses using ASTER data enabled us to identify location of alteration, which led to site-­?specific studies of deformation and fluid flow. In the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a seal for the Navajo Sandstone, we evaluated mesoscale variability in fracture density and morphology and variability in elastic moduli in the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a proposed seal to the underlying Navajo Sandstone for CO{sub 2} geosequestration. By combining mechano-­?stratigraphic outcrop observations with elastic moduli derived from wireline log data, we characterize the variability in fracture pattern and morphology with the observed variability in rock strength within this heterolithic top seal. Outcrop inventories of discontinuities show fracture densities decrease as bed thickness increases and fracture propagation morphology across lithologic interfaces vary with changing interface type. Dynamic elastic moduli, calculated from wireline log data, show that Young’s modulus varies by up to 40 GPa across depositional interfaces, and by an average of 3 GPa across the reservoir/seal interface. We expect that the mesoscale changes in rock strength will affect the distributions of localized stress and thereby influence fracture propagation and fluid flow behavior within the seal. These data provide a means to closely tie outcrop observations to those derived from subsurface data and estimates of subsurface rock strength. We also studied damage zones associated normal faults in the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone, southeastern Utah. These faults are characterized by a single slip surfaces and damage zones containing deformation bands, veins, and joints. Field observations include crosscutting relationships, permeability increase, rock strength decrease, and ultraviolet light induced mineral fluorescence within the damage zone. These field observations combined with the interpreted paragenetic sequence from petrographic analysis, suggests a deformation history of reactivation and several mineralization events in an otherwise low-­?permeability fault. All deformation bands and veins fluoresce under ultraviolet light, suggesting connectivity and a shared mineralization history. Pre-­?existing deformation features act as loci for younger deformation and mineralization events, this fault and its damage zone illustrate the importance of the fault damage zone to subsurface fluid flow. We model a simplified stress history in order to understand the importance of rock properties and magnitude of tectonic stress on the deformation features within the damage zone. The moderate confining pressures, possible variations in pore pressure, and the porous, fine-­?grained nature of the Cedar Mesa Sandstone results in a fault damage zone characterized by enhanced permeability, subsurface fluid flow, and mineralization. Structural setting greatly influences fracture spacing and orientation. Three structural settings were examined and include fault proximity, a fold limb of constant dip, and a setting proximal to the syncline hinge. Fracture spacing and dominant fracture orientation vary at each setting and distinctions between regional and local paleo-­?stress directions can be made. Joints on the fold limb strike normal to the fold axis/bedding and are interpreted to be sub-­?parallel to the maximum regional paleo-­?stress direction as there is no fold related strain. Joints proximal to faults and the syncline hinge may have formed under local stress conditions associated with folding and faulting, and

  2. The Starr fault system of southeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannock, M.C. (Qauker State Corp., Belpre, OH (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Starr fault system is a series of east-west-trending faults located in southeastern Ohio. This fault system was discovered by mapping the anomalous sedimentary sequence of the [open quotes]Big Lime[close quotes]. The Big Lime is a driller's term for the stratigraphic section that includes the Lower Devonian Onondaga through Middle Silurian Lockport formations. The use of trend-surface analysis identified the probable fault orientation, which was then verified by seismic. The system is a series of high-angle faults, originating in the Precambrian, that occur along a narrow corridor traversing several townships. Analysis of the sedimentary section preserved by faulting indicates fault movement after the deposition of the Bass Island Formation, which was followed by a regional unconformity that removed the Bass Islands and a part of the upper Salina Formation. The Onondaga subsequently was deposited, masking fault movement evidence in the shallower formations. Some minor movement occurred later, as evidenced by the expansion in the Devonian shale sequence. The geometry of the fault system and other data suggest a pattern similar to the Albio-Scipio field of southern Michigan. A group of wells were drilled to test the Ordovician Trenton and Black River formations to determine the existence of secondary dolomite, which could be a potential reservoir. Secondary dolomite was encountered, but no commercial hydrocarbons were found in either the Trenton or Black River. Other formations produced hydrocarbons and water from fractured zones that were not known for this behavior. Other probable fault systems in southern Ohio, identified by using the same mapping techniques, may provide deeper targets for future drilling.

  3. An energy landscape theory for cotranslational protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourigny, David S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy landscape theory describes how a full-length protein can attain its native fold by sampling only a tiny fraction of all possible structures. Although protein folding is now understood to be concomitant with synthesis on the ribosome, there have been few attempts to modify energy landscape theory by accounting for cotranslational folding. This paper introduces a model for cotranslational folding that leads to a natural definition of a nested energy landscapes. By applying concepts drawn from submanifold differential geometry, the dynamics of protein folding on the ribosome can be explored in a quantitative manner and conditions on the nested potential energy landscapes for a good cotranslational folder are obtained. A generalisation of diffusion rate theory using van Kampen's technique of composite stochastic processes is then used to account for entropic contributions and the effects of variable translation rates on cotranslational folding. This stochastic approach agrees well with experimental results...

  4. Inferring the Rate-Length Law of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the rate-length scaling law of protein folding, a key undetermined scaling law in the analytical theory of protein folding. We demonstrate that chain length is a dominant factor determining folding times, and that the unambiguous determination of the way chain length corre- lates with folding times could provide key mechanistic insight into the folding process. Four specific proposed laws (power law, exponential, and two stretched exponentials) are tested against one an- other, and it is found that the power law best explains the data. At the same time, the fit power law results in rates that are very fast, nearly unreasonably so in a biological context. We show that any of the proposed forms are viable, conclude that more data is necessary to unequivocally infer the rate-length law, and that such data could be obtained through a small number of protein folding experiments on large protein domains.

  5. Accordian-folded boot shield for flexible swivel connection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoh, Joseph C. (Naperville, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible swivel boot connector for connecting a first boot shield section to a second boot shield section, both first and second boot sections having openings therethrough, the second boot section having at least two adjacent accordian folds at the end having the opening, the second boot section being positioned through the opening of the first boot section such that a first of the accordian folds is within the first boot section and a second of the accordian folds is outside of the first boot, includes first and second annular discs, the first disc being positioned within and across the first accordian fold, the second disc being positioned within and across the second accordian fold, such that the first boot section is moveably and rigidly connected between the first and second accordian folds of the second boot section.

  6. MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology, Stratigraphy Paleontology, Geography and Environment, Dynamic Geology and Tectonics/ Hydrogeology, Geophysics

  7. Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By Fault Propagation And InteractionInformation geology

  8. Variational theory for site resolved protein folding free energy surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Portman; Shoji Takada; Peter G. Wolynes

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microscopic variational theory for the free energy surface of a fast folding protein that allows folding kinetics to be resolved to the residue level using Debye-Waller factors as local order parameters. We apply the method to lambda-repressor and compare with site directed mutagenesis experiments. The formation of native structure and the free energy profile along the folding route are shown to be well described by the capillarity approximation but with some fine structure due to local folding topology.

  9. Topological complexity, contact order and protein folding rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. N. Faisca; R. C. Ball

    2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulations of protein folding show the emergence of a strong correlation between the relative contact order parameter, CO, and the folding time, t, of two-state folding proteins for longer chains with number of amino acids, N>=54, and higher contact order, CO > 0.17. The correlation is particularly strong for N=80 corresponding to slow and more complex folding kinetics. These results are qualitatively compatible with experimental data where a general trend towards increasing t with CO is indeed observed in a set of proteins with chain length ranging from 41 to 154 amino acids.

  10. Mechanics of large folds in thin interfacial films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Démery; Benny Davidovitch; Christian D. Santangelo

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film at a liquid interface responds to uniaxial confinement by wrinkling and then by folding; its shape and energy have been computed exactly before self contact. Here, we address the mechanics of large folds, i.e. folds that absorb a length much larger than the wrinkle wavelength. With scaling arguments and numerical simulations, we show that the antisymmetric fold is energetically favorable and can absorb any excess length at zero pressure. Then, motivated by puzzles arising in the comparison of this simple model to experiments on lipid monolayers and capillary rafts, we discuss how to incorporate film weight, self-adhesion and energy dissipation.

  11. affecting protein folding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes...

  12. assisted protein folding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes...

  13. arrestin fold variations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Variational theory for site resolved protein folding free energy surfaces Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: We present a microscopic...

  14. Protein folding: A complex potential for the driving force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Helmholtz decomposition of the vector field of folding fluxes in a reduced space of collective variables, a potential of the driving force for protein folding is determined. The potential has two components and can be written as a complex function. One component is responsible for the source and sink of the folding flows (representing, respectively, the unfolded states and the native state of the protein), and the other accounts for the vorticity of the flow that is produced at the boundaries of the main flow by the contact of the moving folding "fluid" with the quiescent surroundings. The theoretical consideration is illustrated by calculations for a model $\\beta$-hairpin protein.

  15. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these...

  16. Thermodynamics of protein folding: a random matrix formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pragya Shukla

    2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of protein folding from an unfolded state to a biologically active, folded conformation is governed by many parameters e.g the sequence of amino acids, intermolecular interactions, the solvent, temperature and chaperon molecules. Our study, based on random matrix modeling of the interactions, shows however that the evolution of the statistical measures e.g Gibbs free energy, heat capacity, entropy is single parametric. The information can explain the selection of specific folding pathways from an infinite number of possible ways as well as other folding characteristics observed in computer simulation studies.

  17. A dynamical approach to protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Torcini; Roberto Livi; Antonio Politi

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we show that a dynamical description of the protein folding process provides an effective representation of equilibrium properties and it allows for a direct investigation of the mechanisms ruling the approach towards the native configuration. The results reported in this paper have been obtained for a two-dimensional toy-model of amino acid sequences, whose native configurations were previously determined by Monte Carlo techniques. The somewhat controversial scenario emerging from the comparison among various thermodynamical indicators is definitely better resolved relying upon a truly dynamical description, that points out the crucial role played by long-range interactions in determining the characteristic step-wise evolution of ``good'' folders to their native state. It is worth stressing that this dynamical scenario is consistent with the information obtained by exploring the energy landscapes of different sequences. This suggests that even the identification of more efficient ``static'' indicators should take into account the peculiar features associated with the complex ``orography'' of the landscape.

  18. Fault-Tolerant CCM Middleware for Embedded Adaptive Dependability (MEAD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Priya

    Fault-Tolerant CCM Middleware for Embedded Adaptive Dependability (MEAD) Real-Time Fault Narasimhan Carnegie Mellon University CCM Workshop, Nashville, TN December 10, 2003 #12;12/11/2003 Page 2 Model precursor to a real-time fault tolerant CCM ­ Real-Time Fault Tolerant CORBA Standard RFP launched

  19. Characterizing fault-plume intersection probability for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Preston D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage of carbon dioxide: comparison of hysteretic and non-hysteretic characteristic curves, Energy

  20. Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,Jump to:Locations2002) | Open

  1. A geological fingerprint of low-viscosity fault fluids mobilized during an earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Emily E.; Rowe, Christie D.; Moore, J. Casey; Meneghini, Francesca

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Principles of Physical Sedimentology, George Allen andCalifornia, paper presented at Sedimentology of Gravels andcoarse-grained sediments, Sedimentology, 22(2), 157 – 204.

  2. Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

  3. 1. Detect ground faults in PV arrays mounted on the roofs of 2. Interrupt the fault current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    1. Detect ground faults in PV arrays mounted on the roofs of dwellings 2. Interrupt the fault current 3. Indicate that a ground fault had occurred 4. Disconnect the faulted part of the PV array 5. "Crowbar" (short-circuit) the PV array The original GFPD prototype was developed in two versions that were

  4. Thermodynamic control and dynamical regimes in protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. N. Faisca; R. C. Ball

    2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulations of a simple lattice model of protein folding show two distinct regimes depending on the chain length. The first regime well describes the folding of small protein sequences and its kinetic counterpart appears to be single exponential in nature, while the second regime is typical of sequences longer than 80 amino acids and the folding performance achievable is sensitive to target conformation. The extent to which stability, as measured by the energy of a sequence in the target, is an essential requirement and affects the folding dynamics of protein molecules in the first regime is investigated. The folding dynamics of sequences whose design stage was restricted to a certain fraction of randomly selected amino acids shows that while some degree of stability is a necessary and sufficient condition for successful folding, designing sequences that provide the lowest energy in the target seems to be a superfluous constraint. By studying the dynamics of under annealed but otherwise freely designed sequences we explore the relation between stability and kinetic accessibility. We find that there is no one-to-one correspondence between having low energy and folding quickly to the target, as only a small fraction of the most stable sequences were also found to fold relatively quickly.

  5. Multi-Agent Simulation of Protein Folding Luca Bortolussi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bortolussi, Luca

    Multi-Agent Simulation of Protein Folding Luca Bortolussi1 , Agostino Dovier1 , and Federico residues) is known. The process for reaching this state is known as the protein fold- ing. This problem the feasibility and the power of the method. Keywords: Computational Biology, Agent-Based Technologies, Protein

  6. Statistical Analysis of Protein Folding Kinetics Aaron R. Dinner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    Statistical Analysis of Protein Folding Kinetics Aaron R. Dinner , Sung-Sau So ¡ , and Martin and theoretical studies over several years have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein folding that serves as a framework for the design and interpretation of research in this area [1

  7. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

  8. Method for fabricating fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figures.

  9. Structure of the eastern Red Rocks and Wind Ridge thrust faults, Wyoming: how a thrust fault gains displacement along strike 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntsman, Brent Stanley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF FIELD MAPPING Methods . Thrust Faults . The Wind Ridge Thrust Fault System The Red Rocks Thrust Fault System CLAY MODEL STUDIES Purpose and Description Model Results DISCUSSION OF RESULTS Kinematics of the Red Rocks Thrust Fault Termination... . Kinematics of the Southern Wind Ridge Thrust Fault . . . A Conceptual Model of the Red Rocks Thrust Fault Termination Implications of the Red Rocks Fault Termination . . . . . . Page V1 V11 1X X1 X11 7 9 17 18 18 21 24 27 35 35 38 49 49...

  10. Fault Tolerant Control using Cartesian Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Fault Tolerant Control using Cartesian Genetic Programming Yoshikazu Hirayama University of York]: Robotics-- Sensors; F.2.2 [Analysis of Algorithms and Problem Complexity]: Nonnumerical Algorithms and Problems General Terms Algorithms, Reliability Keywords cartesian genetic programming, evolutionary

  11. Microscopic feather fractures in the faulting process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Robert Eugene

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Naximum compressive stress trajectories in a photoelastic model are shown by solid lines. Short lines are drawn on isoclinics in crossed polarized light at 10' intervals of rotation. Load axis is N-S. stress (o'I) trajectories curve near the fault..., maximum compressive stress, trajectories to a two dimensional during sliding along (dashed lines) in a cylindrical specimen reduced elastic problem. (b) Expected ol trajectories a fault. crack by shear along the crack surfaces (Bieniawski, 1967...

  12. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ah Young, AP; Koehl, A; Cascio, D; Egea, PF

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion forfalciparum: targeting protein folding and secretion for

  13. Polymer uncrossing and knotting in protein folding, and their role in minimal folding pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohazab, Ali R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a method for calculating the extent to which chain non-crossing is important in the most efficient, optimal trajectories or pathways for a protein to fold. This involves recording all unphysical crossing events of a ghost chain, and calculating the minimal uncrossing cost that would have been required to avoid such events. A depth-first tree search algorithm is applied to find minimal transformations to fold $\\alpha$, $\\beta$, $\\alpha/\\beta$, and knotted proteins. In all cases, the extra uncrossing/non-crossing distance is a small fraction of the total distance travelled by a ghost chain. Different structural classes may be distinguished by the amount of extra uncrossing distance, and the effectiveness of such discrimination is compared with other order parameters. It was seen that non-crossing distance over chain length provided the best discrimination between structural and kinetic classes. The scaling of non-crossing distance with chain length implies an inevitable crossover to entanglement-do...

  14. Marine geology of the Bay of Campeche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creager, Joe S.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY /i & L IBRRAYA B/ iA&Co MARINE GEOLOGY OP SHE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGER ? ? ? Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August, 1958 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography MARINE GEOLOGY OF THE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGEB Approved as to style and content by: JLN. Chairman of Committee Heady Department...

  15. 2014 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved. Late Pleistocene-Holocene right-slip rate and paleoseismology of the Nayband fault,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and paleoseismology of the Nayband fault, western margin of the Lut block, Iran M. Foroutan1,2,3 , B. Meyer1,2 , M mohammad.foroutan@upmc.fr, bertrand.meyer@upmc.fr, michel.sebrier@upmc.fr, kristell.ledortz@gmail.com 2: Geological Survey of Iran, Azadi Square, Meraj Avenue, PO Box: 13185-1494, Tehran, Iran foroutan@gsi.ir, m

  16. The Fabric of Clasts, Veins and Foliations within the Actively Creeping Zones of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD: Implications for Deformation Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sills, David Wayne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee, Judith Chester Committee Members, Frederick Chester David Schechter Head of Department, Andreas Kronenberg December 2010 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT The Fabric of Clasts, Veins and Foliations within the Actively... Creeping Zones of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD: Implications for Deformation Processes. (December 2010) David Wayne Sills, B.S., Sam Houston State University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Judith Chester Recovered...

  17. Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic: Fieldstone, natural stone, diagenesis, microscopy with a great interest in sedimentation processes and diagenesis, in petrology and Flemish stratigraphy

  18. Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Simmons; Joel L. Weiner

    2011-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied to folding nor have the points of similarity with optics been identified or exploited. A putative underlying physical link between caustics and folding is a torsion wave of non-constant wave speed, propagating on the dihedral angles and $\\Psi$ found in an analytical model of the molecule. Regardless of whether we have correctly identified an underlying link, the analogy between caustic formation and folding is strong and the parallels (and differences) in the physics are useful.

  19. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

  20. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

  2. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  3. Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  4. Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, William F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOLOGY AND ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF A WILCOX LIGNITE DEPOSIT IN NORTHEASTERN RUSK COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by William F. Cole Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) ad of Department) August 1980 ABSTRACT Geology and Engineering Geology of a Wilcox Lignite Deposit in Northeastern Rusk County, Texas (August, 1980) William 7. Cole, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman...

  5. Fault Detection and Load Distribution for the Wind Farm Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borchehrsen, Anders B.; Larsen, Jesper A.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a fault detection system and a fault tolerant controller for a wind farm model. The wind farm model used is the one proposed as a public challenge. In the model three types of faults are introduced to a wind farm consisting of nine turbines. A fault detection system designed, by taking advantage of the fact that within a wind farm several wind turbines will be operating under all most identical conditions. The turbines are then grouped, and then turbines within each group are used to generate residuals for turbines in the group. The generated residuals are then evaluated using dynamical cumulative sum. The designed fault detection system is cable of detecting all three fault types occurring in the model. But there is room for improving the fault detection in some areas. To take advantage of the fault detection system a fault tolerant controller for the wind farm has been designed. The fault tolerant controller is a dispatch controller which is estimating the possible power at each individual turbine and then setting the reference accordingly. The fault tolerant controller has been compared to a reference controller. And the comparison shows that the fault tolerant controller performance better in all measures. The fault detection and a fault tolerant controller has been designed, and based on the simulated results the overall performance of the wind farm is improved on all measures. Thereby this is a step towards improving the overall performance of current and future wind farms.

  6. Modeling two-state cooperativity in protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Fan; J. Wang; W. Wang

    2001-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A protein model with the pairwise interaction energies varying as local environment changes, i.e., including some kinds of collective effect between the contacts, is proposed. Lattice Monte Carlo simulations on the thermodynamical characteristics and free energy profile show a well-defined two-state behavior and cooperativity of folding for such a model. As a comparison, related simulations for the usual G\\={o} model, where the interaction energies are independent of the local conformations, are also made. Our results indicate that the evolution of interactions during the folding process plays an important role in the two-state cooperativity in protein folding.

  7. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  8. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.

    Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones Heather M. Savage1,2 and Emily E. Brodsky1 Received 22 April 2010; revised 10 of fracture distributions as a function of displacement to determine whether damage around small and large

  9. Fault-tolerant Sensor Network based on Fault Evaluation Matrix and Compensation for Intermittent Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fault-tolerant Sensor Network based on Fault Evaluation Matrix and Compensation for Intermittent-tolerant sensor network configuration problem for a target navigation. A sensor network system consists of many sensor nodes and its network connections. Each sensor node can exchange information by wireless

  10. 26 AUGUST 2009, GSA TODAY Murray Hitzman, Dept. of Geology and Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    geology. Economic geology flourished from the end of World War II into the early 1970s, with major, industrial minerals, construction aggregates, and uranium but excludes carbon-based energy resources geology in academia: An impending crisis? (~15%) of the 2007 U.S. gross domestic product. The United

  11. College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Geology and Geological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Robert J. Weimer Distinguished Chair in Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology Mines is an EEO.D. degrees, with sub-disciplines of economic geology, petroleum geosciences, geological engineering and Engineering that includes the departments of Geophysics, Mining Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. Mines

  12. Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

  13. Computational investigations of folded self-avoiding walks related to protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahi, Jacques M; Mazouzi, Kamel; Philippe, Laurent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various subsets of self-avoiding walks naturally appear when investigating existing methods designed to predict the 3D conformation of a protein of interest. Two such subsets, namely the folded and the unfoldable self-avoiding walks, are studied computationally in this article. We show that these two sets are equal and correspond to the whole $n$-step self-avoiding walks for $n\\leqslant 14$, but that they are different for numerous $n \\geqslant 108$, which are common protein lengths. Concrete counterexamples are provided and the computational methods used to discover them are completely detailed. A tool for studying these subsets of walks related to both pivot moves and proteins conformations is finally presented.

  14. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Edwards, E.B. [ Ogle & Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States); Heck, R.G. [Ogle & Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  15. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. (CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Edwards, E.B. ( Ogle Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (Ogle Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  16. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the project resources. With this in mind, a protection system that uses fault interrupting switches, hi

  17. Speeding up protein folding: mutations that increase the rate at which Rop folds and unfolds by over four orders of magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mochrie, Simon

    Speeding up protein folding: mutations that increase the rate at which Rop folds and unfolds. Introduction When a protein folds, the backbone and sidechain atoms organize from the extensive number protein folding usually occurs on the order of milliseconds to seconds, it is gener- ally accepted

  18. DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200700247 Collapsed But Not Folded: Looking with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    at Protein Folding Jçrg Enderlein*[a] Protein folding, that is, the organization of proteins into a highly folded structure. To solve Levinthal's paradox it was postulated that proteins fold along specific path- ways (older view), or follow one of many parallel paths down the now famous protein folding funnel

  19. RoadmapMethodsforProteinFolding MarkMoll, DavidSchwarz, LydiaE.Kavraki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RoadmapMethodsforProteinFolding MarkMoll, DavidSchwarz, LydiaE.Kavraki Abstract--Protein folding, and get a coarse view of the energy landscape. Keywords: protein folding, folding kinetics, roadmap methods, conformation sampling techniques, energy landscape. 1 Introduction Protein folding refers

  20. Kinetic Studies of the Folding of Heterodimeric Monellin: Evidence for Switching between Alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keywords: monellin; heterodimeric protein; folding kinetics; parallel pathways Determining whether or not a protein uses multiple pathways to fold is an important goal in protein folding studies. When multiple to the protein folding reaction, and the utilization of more than one pathway would speed protein folding.2

  1. Protein Quaternary Fold Recognition Using Conditional Graphical Models Yan Liu Jaime Carbonell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonell, Jaime

    02139 pweigele@mit.edu Abstract Protein fold recognition is a crucial step in infer- ring biological- acid sequences is protein fold recognition and alignment. Given a target protein fold 1 , the task-to-topology alignment against the fold. There are different kinds of protein folds based on their structural properties

  2. DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201300141 Exploring the Protein Folding Dynamics of Beta3s with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201300141 Exploring the Protein Folding Dynamics of Beta3s with Two folding process. Howev- er, monitoring protein folding dynamics is still challeng- ing. Experiments of protein folding. However, most folding processes of interest occur on timescales (microsecond to second

  3. Using Bit-Vector Decision Procedures for Analysis of Protein Folding Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmead, Christopher James

    Using Bit-Vector Decision Procedures for Analysis of Protein Folding Pathways Christopher James-vector decision procedures for the analysis of protein folding pathways. We argue that the protein fold- ing by the different nature of the protein folding problem, we present a translation of the protein folding pathways

  4. PCB origami : folding circuit boards into electronic products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, Yoav

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PCB origami is a concept for an alternative manufacturing process of electronic products, in which the electronic material will be manufactured flat and folded into functional 3D graspable products by the user. PCBs will ...

  5. Probing the Origins of Two-State Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Thomas J; Beauchamp, Kyle A; Pande, Vijay S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many protein systems fold in a two-state manner. Random models, however, rarely display two-state kinetics and thus such behavior should not be accepted as a default. To date, many theories for the prevalence of two-state kinetics have been presented, but none sufficiently explain the breadth of experimental observations. A model, making a minimum of assumptions, is introduced that suggests two-state behavior is likely for any system with an overwhelmingly populated native state. We show two-state folding is emergent and strengthened by increasing the occupancy population of the native state. Further, the model exhibits a hub-like behavior, with slow interconversions between unfolded states. Despite this, the unfolded state equilibrates quickly relative to the folding time. This apparent paradox is readily understood through this model. Finally, our results compare favorable with experimental measurements of protein folding rates as a function of chain length and Keq, and provide new insight into these result...

  6. Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Walter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied ...

  7. Low energy pathways for reproducible in vivo protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonor Cruzeiro

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two proteins, one belonging to the mainly alpha class and the other belonging to the alpha/beta class, are selected to test a kinetic mechanism for protein folding. Targeted molecular dynamics is applied to generate folding pathways for those two proteins, starting from two well defined initial conformations: a fully extended and a alpha-helical conformation. The results show that for both proteins the alpha-helical initial conformation provides overall lower energy pathways to the native state. For the alpha/beta protein, 30 % (40%) of the pathways from an initial alpha-helix (fully extended) structure lead to unentangled native folds, a success rate that can be increased to 85 % by the introduction of a well-defined intermediate structure. These results open up a new direction in which to look for a solution to the protein folding problem, as detailed at the end.

  8. Determining the role of hydration forces in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorenson, J.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Hura, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Soper, A.K. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot (United Kingdom). ISIS Facility] [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot (United Kingdom). ISIS Facility; Pertsemlidis, A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry] [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Head-Gordon, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary issues in protein folding is determining what forces drive folding and eventually stabilize the native state. A delicate balance exists between electrostatic forces such as hydrogen bonding and salt bridges, and the hydrophobic effect, which are present for both intramolecular protein interactions and intermolecular contributions with the surrounding aqueous environment. This article describes a combined experimental, theoretical, and computational effort to show how the complexity of aqueous hydration can influence the structure, folding and aggregation, and stability of model protein systems. The unification of the theoretical and experimental work is the development or discovery of effective amino acid interactions that implicitly include the effects of aqueous solvent. The authors show that consideration of the full range of complexity of aqueous hydration forces such as many-body effects, long-ranged character of aqueous solvation, and the assumptions made about the degree of protein hydrophobicity can directly impact the observed structure, folding, and stability of model protein systems.

  9. UFO (UnFold Operator) computer program abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L.; Biggs, F.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UFO (UnFold Operator) is an interactive user-oriented computer program designed to solve a wide range of problems commonly encountered in physical measurements. This document provides a summary of the capabilities of version 3A of UFO.

  10. Characterization of the vocal fold lamina propria towards voice restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Mariah S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During normal speech, human vocal folds sustain greater than 100 high impact collisions each second. When the pliability of this complex biomechanical system is reduced by scarring, voice quality may be compromised. ...

  11. Faulted joints: kinematics, displacementlength scaling relations and criteria for their identication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelder, Terry

    and kinematics based on two sets of joints, pinnate joints and fault striations, reveal that some mesoscale faults (i.e., faults without linked fault segments) at the mesoscale: ªneoformed faultsº which form

  12. Microfracture fabric of the Punchbowl fault zone, San Andreas System, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Jennifer Elizabeth

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of fault zone structure is not completely understood. On the basis of mechanistic models of faulting, the characteristic internal structure of faults may largely be established early during growth of the fault, or it may develop...

  13. Robust Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Variable Speed Induction Motor Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Seungdeog

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The main types of faults studied in the literature are commonly categorized as electrical faults and mechanical faults. In addition to well known faults, the performance of a diagnostic algorithm and its operational reliability in harsh environments...

  14. A Hybrid Model Based and Statistical Fault Diagnosis System for Industrial Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chen-Han

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a hybrid model based and statistical fault diagnosis system, which applied on the nonlinear three-tank model. The purpose of fault diagnosis is generating and analyzing the residual to find out the fault occurrence. This fault...

  15. Master equation approach to protein folding and kinetic traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Cieplak; Malte Henkel; Jan Karbowski; Jayanth R. Banavar

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The master equation for 12-monomer lattice heteropolymers is solved numerically and the time evolution of the occupancy of the native state is determined. At low temperatures, the median folding time follows the Arrhenius law and is governed by the longest relaxation time. For good folders, significant kinetic traps appear in the folding funnel whereas for bad folders, the traps also occur in non-native energy valleys.

  16. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  17. The U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    U sing a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.525 trillion barrels of oil in place in seventeen oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado.

  18. Geological Sciences Jeffrey D. Keith, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    , such as assessment and forecasting of natural hazards, environmental change, and discovery of energy and mineral resources. Some of the diverse disciplines that can be studied in this department include general geology Catalog. Global Geology Program Each year the department provides opportunities for advanced

  19. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3 CONTENTS Three Creeks Caldera ................................................................................................................................... Scott Dean Geology of the Antelope Peak Area of the Southern .................................................................................................................. Craig D. Hall Geology of the Longlick and White Mountain Area, Southern San Francisco Mountains

  20. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I Preble Formation, a Cambrian Outer ..........................................................................J. Roger Olsen Geology of the Sterling Quadrangle, Sanpete County, Utah ..............................................................................James Michael Taylor Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Aertalphorograph rhowing

  1. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Chair: Dr. Clarence R Technical Exchange (open) Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: DOE & Performance Analysis and the Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: Repository

  2. Report on geologic exploration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breslin, J.; Laughon, R. B.; Hall, R. J.; Voss, J. W. [comps.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the geological exploration activities being carried out as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, which has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop the technology and provide the facilities for the safe, environmentally acceptable isolation of civilian high-level and transuranic nuclear wastes, including spent fuel elements, for which the Federal government is responsible. The principal programmatic emphasis is on disposal in mined geologic repositories. Explorations are being conducted or planned in various parts of the country to identify potential sites for such repositories. The work is being undertaken by three separate but coordinated NWTS project elements. Under the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), basalt formations underlying DOE's Hanford Reservation are being investigated. Granite, tuff, and shale formations at the DOE Nevada Test Site (NTS) are being similarly studied in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI). The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) is investigating domed salt formations in several Gulf Coast states and bedded salt formations in Utah and Texas. The ONWI siting studies are being expanded to include areas overlying crystalline rocks, shales, and other geohydrologic systems. The current status of these NWTS efforts, including the projected budgets for FY 1981, is summarized, and the criteria and methodology being employed in the explorations are described. The consistency of the overall effort with the recommendations presented in the Report to the President by the Interagency Review Group on Nuclear Waste Management (IRG), as well as with documents representing the national technical consensus, is discussed.

  3. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of fault-tolerant quantum computer architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Andrew W. (Andrew William), 1979-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fault-tolerance is the cornerstone of practical, large-scale quantum computing, pushed into its prominent position with heroic theoretical efforts. The fault-tolerance threshold, which is the component failure probability ...

  5. FEATURE BASED HANDLING OF SURFACE FAULTS IN COMPACT DISC PLAYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickerhauser, M. Victor

    two photo detectors. The distances are the distance from the actual position of the OPU such surface faults. The core idea is not to rely on sensor information during the fault. The sensor signals

  6. Observations on the capability of the Criner fault, southern Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Shawn Collin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the present study suggest that the Criner fault is an old tectonic feature with a deceptively youthful geomorphic appearance. Differential erosion has likely exhumed the Criner fault-line scarp in the resistant Ordovician limestone of the Criner Hills...

  7. Design and analysis of a fault tolerant network processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Shaishav A

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the effect of transient faults on a processor and proposes on-chip fault tolerant design techniques to improve its reliability. The target processor is a general 32-bit, four stage pipeline, dual context RISC style design...

  8. Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the Longitudinal Valley Fault, Taiwan myself lucky to do what I love and to wake up every day, happy and excited about the day to come

  9. East-west faults due to planetary contraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contraction, expansion and despinning have been common in the past evolution of Solar System bodies. These processes deform the lithosphere until it breaks along faults. The type and orientation of faults are usually determined under the assumption of a constant lithospheric thickness, but lithospheric thinning can occur at the equator or at the poles due either to latitudinal variation in solar insolation or to localized tidal dissipation. Using thin elastic shells with variable thickness, I show that the equatorial thinning of the lithosphere transforms the homogeneous and isotropic fault pattern caused by contraction/expansion into a pattern of faults striking east-west, preferably formed in the equatorial region. By contrast, lithospheric thickness variations only weakly affect the despinning faulting pattern consisting of equatorial strike-slip faults and polar normal faults. If contraction is added to despinning, the despinning pattern first shifts to thrust faults striking north-south and then to thrus...

  10. New approach to the fault location problem using synchronized sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrkic, Jasna

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new approach to solving the problem of fault location on a transmission line using synchronized data from both ends of the line. The synchronized phase voltage and current samples taken during the fault transient are used...

  11. Detection and characterization of partially folded forms on the protein energy landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Rachel Simma

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the mechanism of protein folding in cytochrome C. Int Jstructure analysis of a protein folding transition state;of a three-state protein folding pathway by NMR relaxation

  12. Beyond the native state: Exploring the role of partially folded conformations on the protein energy landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connell, Katelyn Blair

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intermediate state in protein folding by a hydrophobicThe Yin and Yang of protein folding. FEBS J Varley, P. ,H. (2006). Early events in protein folding explored by rapid

  13. Parallel ContinuationBased Global Optimization for Molecular Conformation and Protein Folding \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Parallel Continuation­Based Global Optimization for Molecular Conformation and Protein Folding­ pecially protein folding. Global minimization problems are difficult to solve when the objective functions­ cluding energy functions for molecular conformation and protein folding. Mathematical theory

  14. On the Complexity of Protein Folding Pierluigi Crescenzi, Deborah Goldman, Christos Papadimitriou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    On the Complexity of Protein Folding Pierluigi Crescenzi, Deborah Goldman, Christos Papadimitriou Antonio Piccolboni, Mihalis Yannakakis Abstract We show that the protein folding problem in the two protein folding are the interactions between their monomers; recently, the view that non

  15. Long-time protein folding dynamics from short-time molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chodera, J D; Swope, W C; Pitera, J W; Dill, Ken A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the simulation of protein folding by short time scaleand W. A. Eaton, The protein folding “speed limit,” Curr.and T. Head-Gordon, Protein folding by distributed computing

  16. Crucial stages of protein folding through a solvable model: Predicting target sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecconi, Fabio

    Crucial stages of protein folding through a solvable model: Predicting target sites for enzyme. Keywords: Protein-folding modeling; prediction of key folding sites; HIV-1 protease; drug resistance One

  17. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIFYING FRAMEWORK FOR THE PREDICTION OF PROTEIN FOLDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnick, Tobin R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIFYING FRAMEWORK FOR THE PREDICTION OF PROTEIN FOLDING PATHWAYS the protein folding problem challenging? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Some essential concepts: Ingredients of a protein folding algorithm . . . . . . . 15 1.4 Some useful formalisms regarding protein

  18. Parallel ContinuationBased Global Optimization for Molecular Conformation and Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Parallel Continuation­Based Global Optimization for Molecular Conformation and Protein Folding protein folding. Global minimization problems are difficult to solve when the objective functions have energy functions for molecular conformation and protein folding. Mathematical theory for the method

  19. VCSEL fault location apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

  20. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  1. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

  2. Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Abstract Geology...

  3. arizona geologic framework: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Geological Engineering Engineering Websites Summary: Lowell Professional Program in Mineral Resources Department of Mining & Geological Engineering Fall 2013 Non-Credit Short...

  4. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatise of Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields,A-A’). phy, geology, stratigraphic contacts, oil and gas andgeology, initial information available from hydrogeology, oil

  5. Experimental characterization of faults on low-voltage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Jubayer

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was to simulate a con- trolled arcing fault. Hence, the arcgap was maintained constant for a particular test. A tungsten welding rod was used as the electrode because it does not melt easily. This test was performed on a. single-phase system with 240 volts... better understanding of the problem. These arcing faults and high impedance and incipient faults constitute the previously mentioned low-current faults. Journal model is IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery. Although these problems have been...

  6. Fault seal analysis of Okan and Meren fields, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, R.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Brenneman, R.J. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Co., San Ramon, CA (United States); Adeogba, A.A. [Chevron Nigeria Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sealing capacity and the dynamic seal behavior of faults between juxtaposed reservoirs were analyzed for Okan and Meren fields, offshore Nigeria. In both fields correlations were found between reservoir performance, juxtaposed fluid types, oil geochemistry, interpreted fluid contact relationships, fault sealing/leaking condition, and calculated smear gouge ratios. Integration of these data has been invaluable in quantifying fault seal risk and may effect depletion strategies for fault-juxtaposed reservoirs within these fields. Fault plane sections defined reservoir juxtapositions and aided visualization of potential cross-fault spill points. Smear gouge ratios calculated from E-logs were used to estimate the composition of fault-gouge materials between the juxtaposed reservoirs. These tools augmented interpretation of seal/nonseal character based on fluid contact relationships in proved reservoirs and, in addition, were used to quantify fault seal risk of untested fault-dependent closures in Okan. The results of these analyses were then used to interpret production-induced fault seal breakdown within the G-sands and also to risk seal integrity of fault dependent closures within the untested O-sands in an adjacent, upthrown fault block. Within this fault block the presence of potential fault intersection leak points and large areas of sand/sand juxtaposition with high smear gouge ratios (low sealing potential) limits potential reserves within the O-sand package. In Meren Field the E- and G-sands are juxtaposed, on different pressure decline, geochemically distinct, and are characterized by low smear gouge ratios. In contrast, specific G- and H-sands, juxtaposed across the same fault, contain similar OOWCs and are characterized by high smear gouge ratios. The cross-sealing and/or cross-leaking nature of compartment boundaries at Meren is related to fault displacement variation and the composition of displaced stratigraphy.

  7. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources- Pearl Hot Spring, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  8. Photovoltaic ground fault and blind spot electrical simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground faults in photovoltaic (PV) systems pose a fire and shock hazard. To mitigate these risks, AC-isolated, DC grounded PV systems in the United States use Ground Fault Protection Devices (GFPDs), e.g., fuses, to de-energize the PV system when there is a ground fault. Recently the effectiveness of these protection devices has come under question because multiple fires have started when ground faults went undetected. In order to understand the limitations of fuse-based ground fault protection in PV systems, analytical and numerical simulations of different ground faults were performed. The numerical simulations were conducted with Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) using a circuit model of the PV system which included the modules, wiring, switchgear, grounded or ungrounded components, and the inverter. The derivation of the SPICE model and the results of parametric fault current studies are provided with varying array topologies, fuse sizes, and fault impedances. Closed-form analytical approximations for GFPD currents from faults to the grounded current carrying conductor-known as %E2%80%9Cblind spot%E2%80%9D ground faults-are derived to provide greater understanding of the influence of array impedances on fault currents. The behavior of the array during various ground faults is studied for a range of ground fault fuse sizes to determine if reducing the size of the fuse improves ground fault detection sensitivity. The results of the simulations show that reducing the amperage rating of the protective fuse does increase fault current detection sensitivity without increasing the likelihood of nuisance trips to a degree. Unfortunately, this benefit reaches a limit as fuses become smaller and their internal resistance increases to the point of becoming a major element in the fault current circuit.

  9. Understanding Fault Characteristics of Inverter-Based Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses issues and provides solutions for dealing with fault current contributions from inverter-based distributed energy resources.

  10. Experimental wrench faulting at confining pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartlett, Wendy Louise

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    along the precut, resembling the "flower or palm tree" structure noted by Sylvester and Smith (1976), in the Salton Sea area, California. The bounding fault above the down-dropped block dips at a lower angle to the forcing block-veneer interface than..., the oeometries, ori- gins, and sequence of development of structural elements comprising the fault zones. Specimens (2. 8 or 3. 4 x 3. 4 x 9. 4 cm) are loaded parallel to their longest dimension, at an average displacement rate -3 -1 of 7. 3 x 10 cm sec...

  11. 2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; April 2006; v. 34; no. 4; p. 261264; doi: 10.1130/G22172.1; 2 figures; 1 table. 261

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Eugene

    . SJF--San Jacin- to fault; ELS--Elsinore fault; LS--Laguna Salada fault; IMP--Imperial fault; CP--Cerro Prieto fault; SB--San Bernardino Moun- tains; ST--Salton Trough basin; BT--basal tractions; SS

  12. UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi1 of prototypical behaviors. Its performance is tested with respect to an artificial case study and then applied on transients originated by different faults in the pressurizer of a nuclear power reactor. Key Words: Fault

  13. On Distributed Fault-Tolerant Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    On Distributed Fault-Tolerant Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Xuanwen Luo, Student Member problems for distributed fault-tolerant detection in wireless sensor networks: 1) how to address both it possible to perform energy- efficient fault-tolerant detection in a wireless sensor network. Index Terms

  14. Outlier Detection Rules for Fault Detection in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    , MPPT of the PV inverters, high fault impedance, or degradation of solar cells [1]. Without proper fault Abstract-- Solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays are unique power sources that may have uncleared fault current when utilizing conventional overcurrent protection devices. To monitor the PV operation and detect

  15. A Parametric Spectral Estimator for Faults Detection in Induction Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    since their frequency resolution is limited and additional post-processing algorithms are required of bearing faults. Index Terms--Induction machine, faults detection, bearing faults, stator current that avoids the use of extra sensors since the stator currents are usually available and inexpensive

  16. RIS-M-2311 AUTOMATIC FAULT TREE CONSTRUCTION WITH RIKKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2311 AUTOMATIC FAULT TREE CONSTRUCTION WITH RIKKE A COMPENDIUM OF EXAMPLES, VOLUME I BASIC MODELS J.R. Taylor Abstract. Examples of automatically constructed fault trees are given. In this first are intended to illustrate the prin- ciples of fault tree construction using the RIKKE failure analysis system

  17. Ris-M-2311 AUTOMATIC FAULT TREE CONSTRUCTION WITH RIKKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-M-2311 Vol. 2 AUTOMATIC FAULT TREE CONSTRUCTION WITH RIKKE A COMPENDIUM OF EXAMPLES. VOLUME 2. CONTROL AND SAFETY LOOPS. J.R. Taylor Abstract. This second volume describes the construction of fault In this volume, examples of HIKKE fault tree construction including loops are given. The principles involved were

  18. Statistical estimation of multiple faults in aircraft gas turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    415 Statistical estimation of multiple faults in aircraft gas turbine engines S Sarkar, C Rao of multiple faults in aircraft gas-turbine engines, based on a statistical pattern recognition tool called commercial aircraft engine. Keywords: aircraft propulsion, gas turbine engines, multiple fault estimation

  19. Identifying Security Fault Reports via Text Mining Michael Gegick, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Identifying Security Fault Reports via Text Mining 1 Michael Gegick, 2 Pete Rotella, 1 Tao Xie 1 contains fault reports (FRs) collected from various sources such as development teams, test teams, and end-users. Software or security engineers manually analyze the FRs to label the subset of FRs that are security fault

  20. Diverse neural net solutions to a fault diagnosis problem \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Abstract The development of a neural net system for fault diagnosis in a mar­ ine diesel engine system solution to a problem of fault diagnosis in a four­stroke marine diesel engine; that of early to recognise faults in simulated data from a diesel engine; specifically to classify combustion condition

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acids detection folding Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medicine 4 International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding Summary: folded proteins generally have polar amino acids on the outside of their...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - ab initio folding Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fold recogniion Ab initio Methods... Methods Ab initio methods: solution of a protein folding problem search in conformational space Energy... Protein Structure Analysis...

  3. Topological Aspects of DNA Function and Protein Folding 523 Knotting pathways in proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Topological Aspects of DNA Function and Protein Folding 523 Knotting pathways in proteins Joanna I Key words: artificial knot, chaperone, free energy landscape, knotted protein, protein folding

  4. A Summary of Fault Recurrence and Strain Rates in the Vicinity of the Hanford Site--Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to fault recurrence and strain rates within the Yakima Fold Belt. Strain rates have met with contention in the expert community and may have a significant potential for impact on the seismic hazard estimate at the Hanford Site. This report identifies the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some prospective approaches to reducing uncertainties about earthquake recurrence rates for the Yakima Fold Belt.

  5. Page 1 | B.S. in Geology | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    in topics like sedimentology, structural geology and mineralogy. Extracurricular experiences are important in the subjects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and structural geology. In addition, students at UNC Charlotte

  6. The effect of consensus mutation on the folding and binding kinetics of I(kappa)B(alpha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Ingrid L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the transition state of protein folding: alternativeet al. (2008). "Protein folding and stability usingH. Rosner, et al. (2002). "Protein folding and stability of

  7. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  8. Computer Modelling of 3D Geological Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodge, B G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geological surveying presently uses methods and tools for the computer modeling of 3D-structures of the geographical subsurface and geotechnical characterization as well as the application of geoinformation systems for management and analysis of spatial data, and their cartographic presentation. The objectives of this paper are to present a 3D geological surface model of Latur district in Maharashtra state of India. This study is undertaken through the several processes which are discussed in this paper to generate and visualize the automated 3D geological surface model of a projected area.

  9. JUDSON MEAD GEOLOGIC FIELD STATION OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2013 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Geology G Structural Geology G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sophomore G

  10. An algorithm for faulted phase and feeder selection under high impedance fault conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Carl Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One method based on increases in third and fifth harmonic symmetrical current components under high impedance fault conditions has been proposed by Balser et. Journal model is IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery. al, of Power Technologies Inc [1...

  11. Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coupled lines. To cope up with these realistic testing problems, it is necessary to model the circuit defects by considering the capacitively coupling between lines. This needs a better fault model which can incorporate the local defects (such...

  12. Seismoelectric Imaging of a Shallow Fault System Employing Fault Guided Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohrs, Frelynn Joseph Reese

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent sets of reflection seismic and seismoelectric data were collected, processed, and interpreted with the aim of generating and studying guided waves within a fault zone. While seismic surveys have recently been utilized to investigate...

  13. Clay fabric intensity in natural and artificial fault gouges: Implications for brittle fault zone processes and sedimentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clay fabric intensity in natural and artificial fault gouges: Implications for brittle fault zone processes and sedimentary basin clay fabric evolution Samuel H. Haines,1 Ben A. van der Pluijm,1 Matt J intensity measurements using X-ray texture goniometry on 22 natural clay-rich fault gouges from low

  14. We develop a microprocessor design that tolerates hard faults, including fabrication defects and in-field faults,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Daniel J.

    1 Abstract We develop a microprocessor design that tolerates hard faults, including fabrication defects and in-field faults, by leveraging existing microprocessor redundancy. To do this, we must: detect FDUs with hard faults. In our reliable microprocessor design, we use DIVA dynamic verification

  15. Thermal anomaly near the Aigio fault, Gulf of Corinth, Greece, maybe due to convection below the fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal anomaly near the Aigio fault, Gulf of Corinth, Greece, maybe due to convection below intersecting the active Aigio fault, Corinth Rift, Greece. The heat flow is 53 mW/m2 , indicating of Corinth, Greece, maybe due to convection below the fault, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L06314, doi:10

  16. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  17. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  18. Fault Tolerant CORBASpecification, OMG document: ptc/20000404

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Fault Tolerant CORBASpecification, V1.0 OMG document: ptc/2000­04­04 replaces draft adopted specification ptc/2000­03­04 and submission document orbos/00­01­19 This document is an OMG Final Adopted in the finalization phase. Comments on the content of this document are welcomed, and should be directed to issues

  19. All row, planar fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian Edward

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product and method for detecting nodal faults may simultaneously cause designated nodes of a cell to communicate with all nodes adjacent to each of the designated nodes. Furthermore, all nodes along the axes of the designated nodes are made to communicate with their adjacent nodes, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  20. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.