Sample records for geology cosmological chemistry

  1. Chemistry Major, Geology Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Chemistry Major, Geology Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact Professor Richard Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers I, II (1, 1) E. Chemistry, Geology Emphasis Core courses, plus: CHEM to Earth Systems (3) GEO 1115 Laboratory for Introduction to Earth Systems (1) GEO 3060 Structural Geology

  2. UCR Chemistry Program 1953-1966; 2nd floor, Geology Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    UCR Chemistry Program 1953-1970 1953-1966; 2nd floor, Geology Building 1966-2005; Pierce Hall of Physical Sciences ­ chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics ­ W. Conway Pierce, Chairman #12;Hart Schmidt of Geology bld; 1954-66 ­ Plus 2nd floor addition; 1959-66 ­ Pierce Hall; 1966-2005 · Instruments and support

  3. PII S0016-7037(00)00379-3 Geologic control of Sr and major element chemistry in Himalayan Rivers, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garzione, Carmala N.

    , Nepal N. B. ENGLISH,* J. QUADE, P. G. DECELLES, and C. N. GARZIONE Department of Geology, University) Abstract--Our study of the Seti River in far western Nepal shows that the solute chemistry of the river

  4. Geology, hydrology, chemistry, and microbiology of the in situ bioremediation demonstration site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Hall, S.H.; Truex, M.J.; Vermeul, V.R.; Engelman, R.E.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes characterization information on the geology, hydrology, microbiology, contaminant distribution, and ground-water chemistry to support demonstration of in situ bioremediation at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this information is to provide baseline conditions, including a conceptual model of the aquifer being utilized for in situ bioremediation. Data were collected from sampling and other characterization activities associated with three wells drilled in the upper part of the suprabasalt aquifer. Results of point-dilution tracer tests, conducted in the upper 9 m (30 ft) of the aquifer, showed that most ground-water flow occurs in the upper part of this zone, which is consistent with hydraulic test results and geologic and geophysical data. Other tracer test results indicated that natural ground-water flow velocity is equal to or less than about 0.03 m/d (0.1 ft/d). Laboratory hydraulic conductivity measurements, which represent the local distribution of vertical hydraulic conductivity, varied up to three orders of magnitude. Based on concentration data from both the vadose and saturated zone, it is suggested that most, if not all, of the carbon tetrachloride detected is representative of the aqueous phase. Concentrations of carbon tetrachloride, associated with a contaminant plume in the 200-West Area, ranged from approximately 500 to 3,800 {mu}g/L in the aqueous phase and from approximately 10 to 290 {mu}g/L in the solid phase at the demonstration site. Carbon tetrachloride gas was detected in the vadose zone, suggesting volatilization and subsequent upward migration from the saturated zone.

  5. Groundwater and pollution chemistry of the Silurian reef at Carey, Ohio: Geological influences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, R.P. (Heidelberg Coll., Tiffin, OH (United States). Water Quality Lab.); Lu, Jun; Ruedisili, L. (Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ridge, located northwest of Carey, Ohio, is an arcuate topographic high with thin soils overlying massive to poorly bedded, reef core and reef flank limestones and dolostones of the Lockport and Salina groups. The reef core facies is porous, and solution channels are well developed locally. In the area adjacent to the Ridge, 20--50 + feet of drift overlies carbonates belonging to the same strata, but of unknown facies. Land use is agricultural/residential, and residents rely on private wells for their water supply. Groundwater on the Ridge has been contaminated with nitrate at least since 1965. Recent studies, done in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water, show that nitrate contamination ([gt] 3 mg/l as N) is widespread on the topographic high but confined to it; wells less than 1 km from the Ridge show no nitrate. Other chemical differences between groundwater on the Ridge and that adjacent to it are equally sharp, and include ammonia, dissolved silica, and sulfate (all lower on the Ridge); and dissolved oxygen concentrations (higher on the Ridge). Weekly samples in five wells show that these concentrations are stable over the course of a year. Seeking to understand these patterns, the authors examined the inferred ground-water flow paths, the thickness of the Lockport (as a proxy for the location of reef facies), the outcrop patterns of the formations, and the drift thickness. Only drift thickness was spatially related to groundwater chemistry. Apparently the drift supplies the silica and sulfate, and, when sufficiently thick, is a locus of oxygen reduction and denitrification.

  6. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry

  7. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES Thematerials | CenterChemistry

  8. Geologic Maps Geology 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Geologic Maps Geology 200 Geology for Environmental Scientists #12;Geologic Map of the US #12;Symbols found on geologic maps #12;Horizontal Strata #12;Geologic map of part of the Grand Canyon. Each color represents a different formation. #12;Inclined Strata #12;Dome #12;Geologic map of the Black Hills

  9. 147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem) Bayly Foundation PROFESSORS FRANCE, PLEVA ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS ALty A student may complete only one of the majors listed in the Department of Chemistry. The major in chemistry leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of 44 credits as follows: 1. Chemistry 111, 112

  10. YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    YOUNG GEOLOGY UNIVERSITY May, 1962 GEOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN WASATCH MOUNTAINS AND VICIN~IM,UTAH C O ....................J. Keith Rigby 80 Economic Geology of North-Central Utah ...,............... Kcnneth C.Bdodc 85 Rod Log ........................Lehi F. Hintze, J. Ka# Ri&, & ClydeT. Hardy 95 Geologic Map of Southern

  11. 1919-32: Geology Department In School of Commerce: 190508 Geology taught by Prof. John F. Fulton, Metallurgy and Mining Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1919-32: Geology Department In School of Commerce: 1905­08 Geology taught by Prof. John F. Fulton, Metallurgy and Mining Engineering 1907­13 Geology course o ered in the School of Engineering and Mechanical Art 1900­04 Geology course o ered in the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy 1913­1923 Henry Parks

  12. Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html Revised: 03/2013 Geology is a scientific discipline that aims to understand every aspect of modern and ancient Earth. A degree in geology the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees. A master

  13. 148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry 350 (3)--Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: Chemistry 250, 252, and 262. Anintro

  14. Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlayson-Pitts, B. J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in our understanding of important chemistry and highlightedin our knowledge. In summary, the chemistry occurring in theBJ, Pitts JN, Jr (2000) Chemistry of the Upper and Lower

  15. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

  16. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  17. Does Standard Cosmology Express Cosmological Principle Faithfully?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding-fang Zeng; Hai-jun Zhao

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1+1 dimensional case, Einstein equation cannot give us any information on the evolution of the universe because the Einstein tensor of the system is identically zero. We study such a 1+1 dimensional cosmology and find the metric of it according to cosmological principle and special relativity, but the results contradict the usual expression of cosmological principle of standard cosmology. So we doubt in 1+3 dimensional case, cosmological principle is expressed faithfully by standard cosmology.

  18. Cosmological bootstrap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev; S. A. Timofeev

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A huge value of cosmological constant characteristic for the particle physics and the inflation of early Universe are inherently related to each other: one can construct a fine-tuned superpotential, which produces a flat potential of inflaton with a constant density of energy $V=\\Lambda^4$ after taking into account for leading effects due to the supergravity, so that an introduction of small quantum loop-corrections to parameters of this superpotential naturally results in the dynamical instability relaxing the primary cosmological constant by means of inflationary regime. The model phenomenologically agrees with observational data on the large scale structure of Universe at $\\Lambda~10^{16}$ GeV.

  19. Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S/explaining the trends in J as a function of altitude and solar zenith angle. The second involves analyzing real

  20. A Handbook for Geology Students Why study Geology?.............................................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    1 A Handbook for Geology Students #12;2 Contents Why study Geology ..................................................................................7 Why Appalachian Geology?................................................................................10 Geology Faculty and Staff

  1. Organophosphorus chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Paul R.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    2087 Organophosphorus chemistry Paul R. Hanson Editorial Open Access Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582, USA Email: Paul R. Hanson - phanson@ku.edu. Keywords: organophosphorus... Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2014, 10, 2087–2088. doi:10.3762/bjoc.10.217 Received: 28 July 2014 Accepted: 06 August 2014 Published: 04 September 2014 This article is part of the Thematic Series "Organophosphorus chemistry" Guest Editor: P. R. Hanson © 2014...

  2. Designer Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce A. Bassett; David Parkinson; Robert C. Nichol

    2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight the flexibility of the IPSO experiment-design framework by contrasting its application to CMB, weak lensing and redshift surveys. We illustrate the latter with a 10 parameter MCMC D-optimisation of a dark energy redshift survey. When averaged over a standard dark energy model space the resulting optimal survey typically has only one or two redshift bins, located at zoptimisation we show how the statistical power of such surveys is significantly enhanced. Experiment design is aided by the richness of the figure of merit landscape which means one can impose secondary optimisation criteria at little cost. For example, one may choose either to maximally test a single model (such as \\Lambda CDM) or to get the most general model-independent constraints possible (e.g. on a whole space of dark energy models). Such freedom points to a future where cosmological experiments become increasingly specialised and optimisation increasingly important.

  3. Regional Geologic Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  4. Regional Geologic Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  5. GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    177Geology GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE A major in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology 160, 185, 211, 311, 330, 350

  6. Throat Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harling, B v

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study throats in the early, hot universe. Throats are a common feature of the landscape of type IIB string theory. If a throat is heated during cosmological evolution, energy is subsequently transferred to other throats and to the standard model. We calculate the heat transfer rate and the decay rate of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states in a ten-dimensional model. For the calculation, we employ the dual description of the throats in terms of gauge theories. We discuss modifications of the decay rate which arise in flux compactifications and for Klebanov-Strassler throats and emphasize the role of tachyonic scalars in such throats in mediating decays of Kaluza-Klein modes. Our results are also applicable to the energy transfer from the heated standard model to throats. We determine the resulting energy density in throats at our epoch in dependence of their infrared scales and of the reheating temperature. The Kaluza-Klein modes in the throats decay to other sectors with a highly suppresse...

  7. Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Grey Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Email: jkgrey@unm.edu Phone: 505.277.1658; Fax: 505.277.2609 Office: Clark Hall B70 Homepage: http://chemistry.unm.edu/faculty_web/jgrey Education B.S. in Chemistry, 1999, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Ph.D. in Chemistry

  8. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

  9. UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK 2012-2013 #12;Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................2 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office ..................................................................................................3 Majors in Chemistry

  10. Actinide Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinide Chemistry Actinide chemistry

  11. Cosmology with Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This review gives an update of the cosmological use of SNe Ia and the progress made in testing their properties from the local universe to high-z. The cosmological road from high-z supernovae down to Galactic SNe Ia is followed in search of the answer to standing questions on their nature and their validity as cosmological indicators.

  12. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part

  13. Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

  14. Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

  15. Chemistry 106X -Spring 2011 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Spring 2011 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 1 and can be purchased in the UAF bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1 or 2 semester) · TurningPoint Technologies ResponseCard RF

  16. School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level Tutorial Groups 2013/14 Name Programme Tutor Ahmed, Zacher Medicinal Chemistry Arif, Saboor Chemistry Bagnall, Samuel Chemistry Barbara, David Chemistry Beaumont, Nicholas Chemistry Quinn, Michael J Chemistry Bennett, Matthew Chemistry Booth, Natalie

  17. Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces Krista Pursuing a degree within the Geology & Geological Engineering department Record of financial need the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in geological engineering in 1982. After earning

  18. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section Read Ch. 7 before you begin. The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic

  19. Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html Revised: 04/2004 Environmental geology in environmental geology provides the diverse skills required to work in many different employment settings issues. Within the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees

  20. RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well characterized with much of its data being non-proprietary...

  1. CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER ­ I Chemistry-I: Physical principles (2:1) Atomic structure-state approximation, Arrhenius equation and collision theory and catalysis. SEMESTER ­ II Chemistry-II: Structure orbital theory: polyatomic molecules - Walsh diagram; Main group chemistry: periodic properties, chemistry

  2. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  3. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

  4. Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, James E.

    Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems: From Nanoassemblies to Dynamic Materials" Presented by: Professor Stuart J. Rowan Case Western Reserve University Departmental Colloquium Friday, May 15, 2009 3:00 p.m. 502 Rieveschl #12;Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems

  5. Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ligand reactivity, and the chemical synthesis of coordination compounds and other "solid" state materials 1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2010) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye: M-W 4:00-5:00, and by appointment Credits: 3 Text: (Required) Shriver & Atkins, "Inorganic Chemistry

  6. FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

  7. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  8. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  9. Averaging Hypotheses in Newtonian Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchert

    1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Average properties of general inhomogeneous cosmological models are discussed in the Newtonian framework. It is shown under which circumstances the average flow reduces to a member of the standard Friedmann--Lema\\^\\i tre cosmologies. Possible choices of global boundary conditions of inhomogeneous cosmologies as well as consequences for the interpretation of cosmological parameters are put into perspective.

  10. BS in GEOLOGY (694022) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    351 Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology

  11. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for geologic carbon sequestration in the Midcontinent Rift System in Minnesota, Minnesota Geological Survey IN THE MIDCONTINENT RIFT SYSTEM OF MINNESOTA : ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL FOR DEEP GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION OF CARBONMINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director POTENTIAL CAPACITY FOR GEOLOGIC CARBON

  12. REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ASTER that operate in visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum and Reflection Radiometer) Imagery Collection in CPRM Examples of sensors used in the CPRM geologic projects #12

  13. M Theory and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks

    1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a series of lectures on M Theory for cosmologists. After summarizing some of the main properties of M Theory and its dualities I show how it can be used to address various fundamental and phenomenological issues in cosmology.

  14. Massive neutrinos and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

  15. New Developments in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review is given of the present observational data in cosmology. A review of a new bimetric gravity theory with multiple light cones is presented. The physical consequences of this gravity theory for the early universe are analyzed.

  16. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  17. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  18. Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree gives you the understanding to contribute to our future in very topical areas) in Chemistry BSc (Hons) in Chemistry MChem (Hons) in Chemistry (with an industrial placement year) MChem (Hons

  19. BS in GEOLOGY: Environmental Geology Emphasis (694029) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology Geol 410

  20. Cosmology models with ?_M-dependent cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Majernik

    2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the evolution of the scale factor in a cosmological model in which the cosmological constant is given by the scalar arisen by the contraction of the stress-energy tensor.

  1. Computational Chemistry Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tyrrell, Simon M; Zhang, Yong

    Computational Chemistry Robots ACS Sep 2005 Computational Chemistry Robots J. A. Townsend, P. Murray-Rust, S. M. Tyrrell, Y. Zhang jat45@cam.ac.uk Can high-throughput computation provide a reliable “experimental” resource for molecular...

  2. Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree allows you to understand and to contribute to our future. Chemistry is challenging: understanding the very fabric of matter is both stimulating and rewarding. Studying chemistry

  3. Chemistry Division Department of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

  4. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  5. Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Endowment Fund To provide support for undergraduate biomedical research in the Department of Chemistry/or the purchase of supplies. Yes w/recommendation s from faculty Call goes out in February to all chemistry

  6. CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS Millersville University Millersville, Pennsylvania in the ChemistryDepartment. It brings together material not collected in other places and is not meant Resources 2 Programs in Chemistry and The General Education Curriculum Record Form 3 The Major Requirements

  7. Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact to Chemistry and Biochemistry entering graduate students who have asked for consideration to serve as research@chem.sc.edu Hiram and Lawanda Allen Scholarship for Excellence in Chemistry This award is given to a graduating

  8. Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    #12;Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation of Acridine Country: United States #12;Amit Gangar Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Design and Development Wagner Home Country: India #12;Dan Wang Medicinal Chemistry M.S. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation

  9. Higgs boson cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian G. Moss

    2015-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson opens up a range of speculative cosmological scenarios, from the formation of structure in the early universe immediately after the big bang, to relics from the electroweak phase transition one nanosecond after the big bang, on to the end of the present-day universe through vacuum decay. Higgs physics is wide-ranging, and gives an impetus to go beyond the Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology to explore the physics of ultra-high energies and quantum gravity.

  10. Dimensionality and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Wu

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Kaluza-Klein model with a cosmological constant and a flux, the external spacetime and its dimension of the created universe from a $S^s \\times S^{n-s}$ seed instanton can be identified in quantum cosmology. One can also show that in the internal space the effective cosmological constant is most probably zero.

  11. Geologic provinces of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northcutt, R.A.; Campbell, J.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The location of most of Oklahoma`s oil and gas resources are either influenced by, or are the direct result of Pennsylvanian tectonics and sedimentation patterns. Therefore, the present study also defines provinces in the subsurface on the basis of geological criteria. The authors have attempted to use the originally published names for the recognized provinces. However, we have also used the most geologically correct names, i.e., Nemaha Uplift, Nemaha Fault Zone, and Central Oklahoma Fault, in lieu of Nemaha {open_quotes}Ridge.{close_quotes} Oklahoma is separated into five major uplifts and five major basins. The Gulf Coastal Plain is not included in this study because it is a veneer of Cretaceous cover that masks significant structures. Faults are the most common boundary element. Although their precise age commonly is known only approximately, their geographic location is less controversial, except in detail. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries are based on less precise geological information. The major example of a surface stratigraphic/structural boundary is the southwestern limit of the Ozark Uplift in eastern Oklahoma. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries in the subsurface are commonly based on structural or isopachous contours from well or geophysical data, or on a structural trend, as well as the experience of the authors. Basement structure is preferred. An example is the boundary that separates the Marietta Basin from adjacent geologic elements.

  12. GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION Deformations around transpressive plate boundaries numerical models constrained by global positioning system (GPS) observations and Geology, September 2010; v. 38; no. 9; p. 823­826; doi: 10.1130/G30963.1; 3 figures; 1 table. © 2010 Geological Society

  13. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

  14. The Lapworth Museum of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    The Lapworth Museum of Geology www.lapworth.bham.ac.uk www.bham.ac.uk Events The Lapworth Lectures take place on evenings during University term time. These lectures are on a wide range of geological geological topics, usually based around collections in the museum. These provide an opportunity to see

  15. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  16. Relativistic Fractal Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo B. Ribeiro

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews an approach for constructing a simple relativistic fractal cosmology whose main aim is to model the observed inhomogeneities of the distribution of galaxies by means of the Lemaitre-Tolman solution of Einstein's field equations for spherically symmetric dust in comoving coordinates. This model is based on earlier works developed by L. Pietronero and J.R. Wertz on Newtonian cosmology, whose main points are discussed. Observational relations in this spacetime are presented, together with a strategy for finding numerical solutions which approximate an averaged and smoothed out single fractal structure in the past light cone. Such fractal solutions are shown, with one of them being in agreement with some basic observational constraints, including the decay of the average density with the distance as a power law (the de Vaucouleurs' density power law) and the fractal dimension in the range 1 fractal model we find that all Friedmann models look inhomogeneous along the backward null cone, with a departure from the observable homogeneous region at relatively close ranges. It is also shown that with these same observational relations the Einstein-de Sitter model can have an interpretation where it has zero global density, a result consistent with the "zero global density postulate" advanced by Wertz for hierarchical cosmologies and conjectured by Pietronero for fractal cosmological models. The article ends with a brief discussion on the possible link between this model and nonlinear and chaotic dynamics.

  17. Neutrino Oscillations and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in cosmological plasma is considered. Neutrino oscillations in vacuum are usually described in plane wave approximation. In this formalism there is an ambiguity if one should assume $\\delta p =0$ and correspondingly $\\delta E\

  18. Cosmological Tests of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) is tested accurately within the local universe i.e., the Solar System, but this leaves open the possibility that it is not a good description at the largest scales in the Universe. The standard model of cosmology assumes GR as the theory to describe gravity on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. The standard model of cosmology is based on a huge extrapolation of our limited knowledge of gravity. This discovery of the late time acceleration of the Universe may require us to revise the theory of gravity and the standard model of cosmology based on GR. We will review recent ...

  19. Cosmological dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genly Leon; Carlos R. Fadragas

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this book are studied, from the perspective of the dynamical systems, several Universe models. In chapter 1 we give a bird's eye view on cosmology and cosmological problems. Chapter 2 is devoted to a brief review on some results and useful tools from the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. They provide the theoretical basis for the qualitative study of concrete cosmological models. Chapters 1 and 2 are a review of well-known results. Chapters 3, 4, 5 and 6 are devoted to our main results. In these chapters are extended and settled in a substantially different, more strict mathematical language, several results obtained by one of us in arXiv:0812.1013 [gr-qc]; arXiv:1009.0689 [gr-qc]; arXiv:0904.1577[gr-qc]; and arXiv:0909.3571 [hep-th]. In chapter 6, we provide a different approach to the subject discussed in astro-ph/0503478. Additionally, we perform a Poincar\\'e compactification process allowing to construct a global phase space containing all the cosmological information in both finite and infinite regions for all the models.

  20. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  1. Cosmology and the Bispectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; /Fermilab /CCPP, New York; Crocce, Martin; Pueblas, Sebastian; Scoccimarro, Roman; /CCPP, New York

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present spatial distribution of galaxies in the Universe is non-Gaussian, with 40% skewness in 50 h{sup -1} Mpc spheres, and remarkably little is known about the information encoded in it about cosmological parameters beyond the power spectrum. In this work they present an attempt to bridge this gap by studying the bispectrum, paying particular attention to a joint analysis with the power spectrum and their combination with CMB data. They address the covariance properties of the power spectrum and bispectrum including the effects of beat coupling that lead to interesting cross-correlations, and discuss how baryon acoustic oscillations break degeneracies. They show that the bispectrum has significant information on cosmological parameters well beyond its power in constraining galaxy bias, and when combined with the power spectrum is more complementary than combining power spectra of different samples of galaxies, since non-Gaussianity provides a somewhat different direction in parameter space. In the framework of flat cosmological models they show that most of the improvement of adding bispectrum information corresponds to parameters related to the amplitude and effective spectral index of perturbations, which can be improved by almost a factor of two. Moreover, they demonstrate that the expected statistical uncertainties in {sigma}s of a few percent are robust to relaxing the dark energy beyond a cosmological constant.

  2. Organic Chemistry 51B -Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions(s). Chapter 7: Nucleophilic Substitution + + NaOH CH3O- #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chapter 8: Elimination Reactions #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013

  3. Geological Sciences and Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    : Experimental petrology and geochemis- try of metamorphic rocks, amphibole stability and crystal chemistry, Professor and Chair, PhD, 1980, University of Oregon: Igneous petrology, experimental petrology, volcanology: Petrology. (1961) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS The earth sciences embody a wide range of approaches to studying

  4. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  5. Holography from quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rashki; S. Jalalzadeh

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to the closed Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmological model. We show that the phase space average for the surface of the apparent horizon is quantized in units of the Planck's surface, and that the total entropy of the universe is also quantized. Taking into account these two concepts, it is shown that 't Hooft conjecture on the cosmological holographic principle (CHP) in radiation and dust dominated quantum universes is satisfied as a manifestation of quantization. This suggests that the entire universe (not only inside the apparent horizon) can be seen as a two-dimensional information structure encoded on the apparent horizon.

  6. Supersymmetric quantum cosmological billiards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Koehn, Michael; Nicolai, Hermann [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, ULB-CP231, BE-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, DE-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    D=11 supergravity near a spacelike singularity admits a cosmological billiard description based on the hyperbolic Kac-Moody group E{sub 10}. The quantization of this system via the supersymmetry constraint is shown to lead to wave functions involving automorphic (Maass wave) forms under the modular group W{sup +}(E{sub 10}) congruent with PSL{sub 2}(O) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the billiard domain. A general inequality for the Laplace eigenvalues of these automorphic forms implies that the wave function of the Universe is generically complex and always tends to zero when approaching the initial singularity. We discuss possible implications of this result for the question of singularity resolution in quantum cosmology and comment on the differences with other approaches.

  7. Cosmological Insights from Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente

    1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    While low-z Type Ia supernovae are used to measure the present rate of expansion of the Universe, high-z Type Ia measure its variation due to the cosmic matter-energy content. Results from those determinations imply a low matter density Universe with a non-zero cosmological constant (vacuum-energy component). The expansion rate of the Universe accelerates, according to these determinations. The validity of the Type Ia supernova approach for this cosmological research is addressed. An account is given of additional prospects to further investigate through supernovae what the Universe is made of. Those attempts range from constraining the large scale dark matter distribution to further test and interpret the presence of a vacuum energy component.

  8. Quantum cosmology: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bojowald

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum cosmology, one applies quantum physics to the whole universe. While no unique version and no completely well-defined theory is available yet, the framework gives rise to interesting conceptual, mathematical and physical questions. This review presents quantum cosmology in a new picture that tries to incorporate the importance of inhomogeneity: De-emphasizing the traditional minisuperspace view, the dynamics is rather formulated in terms of the interplay of many interacting "microscopic" degrees of freedom that describe the space-time geometry. There is thus a close relationship with more-established systems in condensed-matter and particle physics even while the large set of space-time symmetries (general covariance) requires some adaptations and new developments. These extensions of standard methods are needed both at the fundamental level and at the stage of evaluating the theory by effective descriptions.

  9. Quantum cosmology: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum cosmology, one applies quantum physics to the whole universe. While no unique version and no completely well-defined theory is available yet, the framework gives rise to interesting conceptual, mathematical and physical questions. This review presents quantum cosmology in a new picture that tries to incorporate the importance of inhomogeneity: De-emphasizing the traditional minisuperspace view, the dynamics is rather formulated in terms of the interplay of many interacting "microscopic" degrees of freedom that describe the space-time geometry. There is thus a close relationship with more-established systems in condensed-matter and particle physics even while the large set of space-time symmetries (general covariance) requires some adaptations and new developments. These extensions of standard methods are needed both at the fundamental level and at the stage of evaluating the theory by effective descriptions.

  10. Weak Interaction and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the connection among the themes: the cosmological constant, the weak interaction and the neutrino mass. Our main propose is to review and modify the ideas first proposed by Hayakawa [ Prog. Theor. Phys.Suppl.,532(1965).], in the light of the new-fashioned features of contemporary physics. Assuming the pressure of a Fermi gas of neutrinos should be balanced by its gravitational attraction, we evaluate the mass of the background neutrino and its number.The neutrino mass here evaluated is compatible with the known value for the cosmological constant (or dark energy).Taking in account the role played by the weak forces experimented by the neutrinos, we also determined a value for the electroweak mixing angle. For sake of comparison, an alternative evaluation of the neutrino mass is also done.

  11. Axion braneworld cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi; Masahiro Kawasaki; Federico R. Urban

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study axion cosmology in a 5D Universe, in the case of flat and warped extra dimension. The comparison between theoretical predictions and observations constrains the 5D axion decay constant and the 5D Planck mass, which has to be taken into account in building 5D axion models. The framework developed in this paper can be readily applied to other bulk fields in brane universes.

  12. Axion braneworld cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambi, Cosimo [IPMU, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [IPMU, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); ICRR, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Urban, Federico R. [UBC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada); KITPC, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study axion cosmology in a 5D universe, in the case of flat and warped extra dimensions. The comparison between theoretical predictions and observations constrains the 5D axion decay constant and the 5D Planck mass, which have to be taken into account in building 5D axion models. The framework developed in this paper can be readily applied to other bulk fields in brane universes.

  13. Cosmology of Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Burdyuzha; G. Vereshkov

    2007-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly the vacuum component of the Universe from the geometry point of view and from the point of view of the standard model of physics of elementary particles is discussed. Some arguments are given to the calculated value of the cosmological constant (Zeldovich approximation). A new component of space vacuum (the gravitational vacuum condensate) is involved the production of which has fixed time in our Universe. Also the phenomenon of vacuum selforganization must be included in physical consideration of the Universe evolution.

  14. Particle Physics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Pralavorio

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, both particle physics and cosmology are described by few parameter Standard Models, i.e. it is possible to deduce consequence of particle physics in cosmology and vice verse. The former is examined in this lecture, in light of the recent systematic exploration of the electroweak scale by the LHC experiments. The two main results of the first phase of the LHC, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle and the absence so far of new particles predicted by "natural" theories beyond the Standard Model (supersymmetry, extra-dimension and composite Higgs) are put in a historical context to enlighten their importance and then presented extensively. To be complete, a short review from the neutrino physics, which can not be probed at LHC, is also given. The ability of all these results to resolve the 3 fundamental questions of cosmology about the nature of dark energy and dark matter as well as the origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is discussed in each case.

  15. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  16. Quantum Vacuum Structure and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johann Rafelski; Lance Labun; Yaron Hadad; Pisin Chen

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Short review of riddles that lie at the intersection of quantum theory, particle physics and cosmology; dark energy as false vacuum; discussion of a possible detection experiment.

  17. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  18. CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone to change. #12;CH 450 Spring, 2009 -2- Course Outline (Tentative) Journal due dates are designated each week

  19. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W PROGRAMME Geological characterization prior to repositoryShort-term Characterization Program Geological Formations toexisting geological information, site characterization and

  20. Cosmological model with $?_M$-dependent cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Majernik

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea here is to set the cosmical constant $\\lambda$ proportional to the scalar of the stress-energy tensor of the ordinary matter. We investigate the evolution of the scale factor in a cosmological model in which the cosmological constant is proportional to the scalar of the stress-energy tensor.

  1. Petroleum geology of Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burollet, P.F. (CIFEG, Paris (France)); Ferjami, A.B.; Mejri, F. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discoveries and important oil shows have proven the existence of hydrocarbons in newly identified depocenters and reservoirs. In general, except for some areas around the producing fields, Tunisia is largely underdrilled. The national company ETAP has decided to release data and to publish a synthesis on the petroleum geology of Tunisia. The geology of Tunisia provides a fine example of the contrast between Alpine folding, which typifies northern Tunisia and the African craton area of the Saharan part. Eastern Tunisia corresponds to an unstable platform forming plains or low hills and extending eastwards to the shallow Pelagian Sea. There are a wide variety of basins: central and northern Tunisia represents a front basin the Saharan Ghadames basin or the Chott trough are sag basins; the Gulf of Gabes was formed as a distension margin the Gulf of Hammamet is a composite basin and several transversal grabens cut across the country, including offshore, and are rift-type basins. All these features are known to be oil prolific throughout the world. Two large fields and many modest-size pools are known in Tunisia. Oil and gas fields in the surrounding countries, namely the Saharan fields of Algeria and Libya the large Bouri field offshore Tripolitania and discoveries in the Italian part of the Straits of Sicily, suggest a corresponding potential in Tunisia. Exposed paleogeographic and structural maps, balanced sections, and examples of fields and traps will support an optimistic evaluation of the future oil exploration in Tunisia.

  2. WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum (structural)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum Geology GEL 3300 (structural) GEL 3400 (sed/strat) Geology Elective 1 Geology Elective 2 Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 PHY 2130/31 MAT 2010 PHY 2140/41 CHEM 1220/30 MAT 1800 Cognates GEL 5593 (writing intensive) GEL 3160 (petrology) GEL 3650 (field camp) Geology Elective 3 GEL 2130

  3. Marquette University Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Analysis Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Inorganic Synthesis Lab #12;Our Curriculum Physical Chemistry Lecture.... Directly influence the lives of others? Develop new materials with enhanced flame- retardant properties

  4. CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    day to add classes, select C/NC option or to audit a class is Jan. 23. 3. The last day to withdraw. The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services and activities for people: Chemistry 1010 aims to promote understanding of the basic environmental ingredients, energy, atoms

  5. GRADUATE PROGRAM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5342 Geological Engineering: Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 EOSC 535 Transport Processes in Porous Media 3 2 Site Investigation and Management 3 2 CIVL 574 Experimental Soil Mechanics 3 2 CIVL 579 Geosynthetics 2 Geological Engineering Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 CIVL 408 Geo-Environmental Engineering 3 2 CIVL 410

  6. The Role of H2 Molecules in Cosmological Structure Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Zoltan Haiman

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the relevance of H2 molecules for structure formation in cosmology. Molecules are important at high redshifts, when the first collapsed structures appear with typical temperatures of a few hundred Kelvin. In these chemically pristine clouds, radiative cooling is dominated H2 molecules. As a result, H2 ``astro-chemistry'' is likely to determine the epoch when the first astrophysical objects appear. We summarize results of recent three-dimensional simulations. A discussion of the effects of feedback, and implications for the reionization of the universe is also given.

  7. MOND cosmology from holographic principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongsheng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the MOND cosmology which is uniquely corresponding to the original MOND in galaxies via holographic approach of gravity. It inherits the key merit of MOND, that is, it reduces the byronic matter and mysterious non-byronic dark matter (dark matter for short) in the standard cosmology into byronic matter only. For the first time we derive the critical parameter in MOND, i.e., the transition acceleration $a_c$ on cosmological scale. We thus solve the long-standing coincidence problem $a_c\\sim cH_{0}$. More interestingly, a term like age-graphic dark energy emerges naturally. In the frame of this MOND cosmology, we only need byronic matter to describe both dark matter and dark energy in standard cosmology.

  8. GEOLOGY AND FRACTURE SYSTEM AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkiewicz, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of underground test site •• 1.5 Regional bedrock geology.Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine area.Fig. 2.1 Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine

  9. National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry" Super Science Saturday Saturday-on chemistry and science demonstrations! All students & families are welcome! Fun & educational for all ages! Sponsored by: American Chemical Society LSU Department of Chemistry LSU Athletic Department Free admission

  10. I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisor: Advisee: I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry CH 111 PY 211 _____ PY 212 _____ (or PY 242 _____ or PY 252 ______) II. Chemistry Options (one required) 1905 (Concentration in Chemistry) Option A (2 advanced CH courses, 401 or higher, only one may

  11. Cosmology with decaying particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.S.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a cosmological model in which an unstable massive relic particle species (denoted by X) has an initial mass density relative to baryons ..beta../sup -1/ identically equal rho/sub X//rho/sub B/ >> 1, and then decays recently (redshift z less than or equal to 1000) into particles which are still relativistic today (denoted by R). We write down and solve the coupled equations for the cosmic scale factor a(t), the energy density in the various components (rho/sub X/, rho/sub R/, rho/sub B/), and the growth of linear density perturbations (delta rho/rho). The solutions form a one parameter (..beta..) family of solutions; physically ..beta../sup -1/ approx. = (..cap omega../sub R//..cap omega../sub NR/) x (1 + z/sub D/) = (ratio today of energy density of relativistic to nonrelativistic particles) x (1 + redshift of (decay)). We discuss the observational implications of such a cosmological model and compare our results to earlier results computed in the simultaneous decay approximation. In an appendix we briefly consider the case where one of the decay products of the X is massive and becomes nonrelativistic by the present epoch. 21 references.

  12. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Y. Li, S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar

  13. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: suying.wei@lamar.edu; zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Q. He, Prof. S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA

  14. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

  15. Cosmological perturbations on local systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory S. Adkins; Jordan McDonnell; Richard N. Fell

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of cosmological expansion on orbits--galactic, planetary, or atomic--subject to an inverse-square force law. We obtain the laws of motion for gravitational or electrical interactions from general relativity--in particular, we find the gravitational field of a mass distribution in an expanding universe by applying perturbation theory to the Robertson-Walker metric. Cosmological expansion induces an ($\\ddot a/a) \\vec r$ force where $a(t)$ is the cosmological scale factor. In a locally Newtonian framework, we show that the $(\\ddot a/a) \\vec r$ term represents the effect of a continuous distribution of cosmological material in Hubble flow, and that the total force on an object, due to the cosmological material plus the matter perturbation, can be represented as the negative gradient of a gravitational potential whose source is the material actually present. We also consider the effect on local dynamics of the cosmological constant. We calculate the perihelion precession of elliptical orbits due to the cosmological constant induced force, and work out a generalized virial relation applicable to gravitationally bound clusters.

  16. Cosmological Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the imprint of new particles on the primordial cosmological fluctuations. New particles with masses comparable to the Hubble scale produce a distinctive signature on the non-gaussianities. This feature arises in the squeezed limit of the correlation functions of primordial fluctuations. It consists of particular power law, or oscillatory, behavior that contains information about the masses of new particles. There is an angular dependence that gives information about the spin. We also have a relative phase that crucially depends on the quantum mechanical nature of the fluctuations and can be viewed as arising from the interference between two processes. While some of these features were noted before in the context of specific inflationary scenarios, here we give a general description emphasizing the role of symmetries in determining the final result.

  17. The Mixmaster cosmological metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles W. Misner

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper begins with a short presentation of the Bianchi IX or ``Mixmaster'' cosmological model, and some ways of writing the Einstein equations for it. There is then an interlude describing how I came to a study of this model, and then a report of some mostly unpublished work from a Ph.\\ D. thesis of D. M. (Prakash) Chitre relating approximate solutions to geodesic flows on finite volume negative curvature Riemannian manifolds, for which he could quote results on ergodicity. A final section restates studies of a zero measure set of solutions which in first approximation appear to have only a finite number of Kasner epochs before reaching the singularity. One finds no plausible case for such behavior in better approximations.

  18. Protein folding and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz; C. L. Siguenza

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  19. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  1. Cosmological moduli problem, supersymmetry breaking, and stability in postinflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, T.; Berkooz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0849 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0849 (United States); Steinhardt, P.J. [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We review scenarios that have been proposed to solve the cosmological problem caused by moduli in string theory, the postmodern Polonyi problem (PPP). In particular, we discuss the difficulties encountered by the apparently ``trivial`` solution of this problem, in which moduli masses are assumed to arise from nonperturbative, SUSY-preserving, dynamics at a scale higher than that of SUSY breaking. This suggests a powerful {ital cosmological} {ital vacuum} {ital selection} {ital principle} in superstring theory. However, we argue that if one eschews the possibility of cancellations between different exponentials of the inverse string coupling, the mechanism described above cannot stabilize the dilaton. Thus, even if supersymmetric dynamics gives mass to the other moduli in string theory, the dilaton mass must be generated by SUSY breaking, and dilaton domination of the energy density of the Universe cannot be avoided. We conclude that the only proposal for solving the PPP that works is the intermediate scale inflation scenario of Randall and Thomas. However, we point out that all extant models have ignored unavoidably large inhomogeneities in the cosmological moduli density at very early times, and speculate that the effects associated with nonlinear gravitational collapse of these inhomogeneities may serve as an efficient mechanism for converting moduli into ordinary matter. As an important by-product of this investigation we show that in a postinflationary universe minima of the effective potential with a negative cosmological constant are not stationary points of the classical equations of scalar field cosmology. Instead, such points lead to catastrophic gravitational collapse of that part of the Universe which is attracted to them. Thus postinflationary cosmology dynamically chooses non-negative values of the cosmological constant. This implies that supersymmetry {ital must} be broken in any sensible inflationary cosmology. (Abstract Truncated)

  2. Open-File Report OFOG 1001.0 CHEMISTRY AND ORIGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    and production of gas from the Marcellus shale. Recent analyses of flow- back water from Marcellus wells indicateOpen-File Report OFOG 10­01.0 2010 CHEMISTRY AND ORIGIN OF OIL AND GAS WELL BRINES IN WESTERN AND GEOLOGIC SURVEY George E. W. Love, Director #12;[BLANK PAGE] #12;Open-File Oil and Gas Report 10

  3. Degradation(%) Bureau of Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and geomechanical modeling Randy Marrett, DGS; quantitative analysis and structural geology Julia Gale, BEG; Develop the capability to accurately predict reservoir-scale deformation using geomechanical, structural, diagenetic, and linked geomechanical/diagenetic models; Improve the usefulness of seismic response

  4. Geological Characterization of California's Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sequestration pilot studies to determine which technologies for permanently storing CO2 in underground electricity from baseload facilities meet the state's greenhouse gas emission performance standard emissions to 1990 levels by 2020; by developing costeffective longterm geologic sequestration

  5. Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science React. Science #12;Contents 2 Welcome to the Department of Chemistry 2 Course Advice 3 What is Chemistry? 4 Career Profiles in Chemistry 5 An Undergraduate Degree in Chemistry 6 Chemistry Streams 13 Chemistry Honours Programme 14 Research

  6. MOND cosmology from entropic force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsheng Zhang; Xin-Zhou Li

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the MOND cosmology which is uniquely corresponding to the original MOND at galaxy scales via entropic gravity method. It inherits the key merit of MOND, that is, it reduces the baryonic matter and non-baryonic dark matter into baryonic matter only. For the first time we obtain the critical parameter in MOND, i.e., the transition acceleration $a_c$ at cosmological scale. We thus solve the long-standing coincidence problem $a_c\\sim cH_{0}$. More interestingly, a term like age-graphic dark energy emerges naturally. In the frame of this MOND cosmology, we only need baryonic matter to describe both dark matter and dark energy in standard cosmology.

  7. Rip Cosmology via Inhomogeneous Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Obukhov; A. V. Timoshkin; E. V Savushkin

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions for the appearance of the Little Rip, Pseudo Rip and Quasi Rip universes in the terms of the parameters in the equation of state of some dark fluid are investigated. Several examples of the Rip cosmologies are investigated.

  8. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Fang Li; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. And the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but are actually also found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  9. Precision cosmology and the landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing the cosmological constant problem -- why is Lambda not huge? -- I outline the two basic approaches that had emerged by the late 1980s, and note that each made a clear prediction. Precision cosmological experiments now indicate that the cosmological constant is nonzero. This result strongly favors the environmental approach, in which vacuum energy can vary discretely among widely separated regions in the universe. The need to explain this variation from first principles constitutes an observational constraint on fundamental theory. I review arguments that string theory satisfies this constraint, as it contains a dense discretuum of metastable vacua. The enormous landscape of vacua calls for novel, statistical methods of deriving predictions, and it prompts us to reexamine our description of spacetime on the largest scales. I discuss the effects of cosmological dynamics, and I speculate that weighting vacua by their entropy production may allow for prior-free predictions that do not resort to explicitly anthropic arguments.

  10. Constraining fundamental physics from cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Simeon

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I use mathematical models and numerical simulations to constrain cosmological inflation, the seeds of structure, and the mass of the neutrino. I revisit arguments that simple models of inflation with a small red tilt in the scalar power spectrum...

  11. Bimetric gravity is cosmologically viable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akrami, Yashar; Könnig, Frank; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Solomon, Adam R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bimetric theory describes gravitational interactions in the presence of an extra spin-2 field. Previous work has suggested that its cosmological solutions are generically plagued by instabilities. We show that by taking the Planck mass for the second metric, $M_f$, to be small, these instabilities can be pushed back to unobservably early times. In this limit, the theory approaches general relativity with an effective cosmological constant which is, remarkably, determined by the spin-2 interaction scale. This provides a late-time expansion history which is extremely close to $\\Lambda$CDM, but with a technically-natural value for the cosmological constant. We find $M_f$ should be no larger than the electroweak scale in order for cosmological perturbations to be stable by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  12. Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    4-H 340 Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology Member Guide OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE #12;Contents 4-H Geology Project 3 Project Recommendations 3 Books on Geology 4 Trip Planning 4 Contests 7 Identification of Rocks and Minerals 7 Physical Properties of Minerals 8 Generalized Geologic

  13. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  14. 242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Geology Chairperson: Abdel. Assistant Instructor: P Hajj-Chehadeh, Abdel-Halim The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology, and Master of Science degrees in certain areas of the vast

  15. Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012 1. Learning Goals ALL students in geology, classification schemes, geologic history and processes, and the structure of the Earth. 3. demonstrate an understanding of the variability, complexity, and interdependency of processes within geologic systems. 4. use

  16. Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, David

    Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, miningCareers in Geology Department of Geosciences #12;Geology is the scientific study of planet Earth on the following pages. UNL students examine tidal flats on a recent trip to the Bahamas. #12; Economic geology

  17. ?CDM cosmology from matter only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman Telkamp

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a matter-only interpretation of {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, based on conservation of energy and assuming a Machian definition of inertia. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology can be linked to a Newtonian cosmic potential, subject to a propagating gravitational horizon. In a matter-only universe where total energy is conserved, Machian inertia related to the evolving potential may cause both deceleration and acceleration of recession.

  18. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE WWW.GEOLOGY" for a complete range of advising information plus the latest Environmental Geology requirements. CORE COURSES (check each as completed): (30 credits) ____Choose one of the following introductory geology classes

  19. Chemistry at the Dirac Point of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Santanu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Haddon, R. C. Covalent Chemistry for Graphene Electronics.P. K. ; Yang, J. X. The Chemistry of Graphene. J. Mater.R. C. Organometallic Chemistry of Extended Periodic ?-

  20. CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR)...

  1. Axion cold dark matter in nonstandard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with nonstandard thermal histories before big bang nucleosynthesis: the low-temperature reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these nonstandard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  2. Chemistry | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization ofChemistry and TransportChemistry of

  3. Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry Soft Matter

  4. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Leszczynska; Adam Balcerzak; Mariusz P. Dabrowski

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including $\\Lambda$-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ans\\"atze for the variability of constants: $c(a) = c_0 a^n$ and $G(a)=G_0 a^q$. We find that most of the varying $c$ and $G$ minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe "from nothing" ($a=0)$ to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor $a_t$ is large for growing $c$ models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing $c$ models. As for $G$ varying, the probability of tunneling is large for $G$ diminishing, while it is small for $G$ increasing. In general, both varying $c$ and $G$ change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  5. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  6. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  7. Lectures on Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Christodoulakis

    2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The problems encountered in trying to quantize the various cosmological models, are brought forward by means of a concrete example. The Automorphism groups are revealed as the key element through which G.C.T.'s can be used for a general treatment of these problems. At the classical level, the time dependent automorphisms lead to significant simplifications of the line element for the generic spatially homogeneous geometry, without loss of generality. At the quantum level, the ''frozen'' automorphisms entail an important reduction of the configuration space --spanned by the 6 components of the scale factor matrix-- on which the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, is to be based. In this spirit the canonical quantization of the most general minisuperspace actions --i.e. with all six scale factor as well as the lapse function and the shift vector present-- describing the vacuum type II, I geometries, is considered. The reduction to the corresponding physical degrees of freedom is achieved through the usage of the linear constraints as well as the quantum version of the entire set of all classical integrals of motion.

  8. Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

  9. Chemistry Portfolio (Revised August, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    at or above the 75th percentile on the American Chemical Society (ACS) Introductory Chemistry Exami- nation

  10. MAC 560 --Tropospheric Chemistry I Spring, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    chemistry · to learn the atmospheric chemistry behind well-known phenomena such as smog, acid rain.3. Sulfur chemistry and acid rain 5.4. Nitrogen chemistry 5.5. Organic acids 5.6. Ecological and structural

  11. pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart 1101, 1102, 1103,1104, 1105 2250 3160 2500 hours geology junior standing; six hours geology depends on course senior standing, permission hours geology six hours geology Evolution of the Earth Geophysics Physical Geology , Historical Geology

  12. Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

  13. Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} \\mathcal{M}_\\odot$ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in $L_{B} \\propto (1+z)^{(2.40 \\pm 0.03)}$ and $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(1.1\\pm0.2)}$. However, using the GSMF results produces $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(-0.58 \\pm 0.22)}$. We chose the latter result as it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

  14. www.geology.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geomorphology, geomechanics, engineering geology, and teaching and learning. e PSU program serves geology majors Glaciology Geomechanics Environmental and engineering geology K-12 education In addition to their work

  15. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

  16. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

  17. Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, AnticipatingUSA Macdougall, Doug. Why Geology Matters: Decoding theE-book available. Why Geology Matters pursues two goals: to

  18. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington State Department of Natural Resources Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey Wyoming State Geological Survey...

  19. Simulating Reionization in Numerical Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Sokasian; Tom Abel; Lars E. Hernquist

    2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of radiative transfer effects into cosmological hydrodynamical simulations is essential for understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) makes the transition from a neutral medium to one that is almost fully ionized. Here, we present an approximate numerical method designed to study in a statistical sense how a cosmological density field is ionized by a set of discrete point sources. A diffuse background radiation field is also computed self-consistently in our procedure. The method requires relatively few time steps and can be employed with simulations having high resolution. We describe the details of the algorithm and provide a description of how the method can be applied to the output from a pre-existing cosmological simulation to study the systematic reionization of a particular ionic species. As a first application, we compute the reionization of He II by quasars in the redshift range 3 to 6.

  20. Cosmological AMR MHD with Enzo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Hao [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzoto include magnetic fields. We use the hyperbolic solver of Li et al. (2008) for the computation of interface fluxes. We use constrained transport methods of Balsara & Spicer (1999) and Gardiner & Stone (2005) to advance the induction equation, the reconstruction technique of Balsara (2001) to extend the Adaptive Mesh Refinement of Berger & Colella (1989) already used in Enzo, though formulated in a slightly different way for ease of implementation. This combination of methods preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non cosmologjcal tests problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  1. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  2. Cosmological dark energy effects from entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Capozziello; O. Luongo; S. Mancini

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The thorny issue of relating information theory to cosmology is here addressed by assuming a possible connection between quantum entanglement measures and observable universe. In particular, we propose a cosmological toy model, where the equation of state of the cosmological fluid, which drives the today observed cosmic acceleration, can be inferred from quantum entanglement between different cosmological epochs. In such a way the dynamical dark energy results as byproduct of quantum entanglement.

  3. Quasar Structure and Cosmological Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Elvis

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from quasars and AGNs is being invoked frequently in several cosmological settings. Currently, order of magnitude, or more, uncertainties in the structure of both the wind and the 'obscuring torus' make predictions highly uncertain. To make testable models of this 'cosmological feedback' it is essential to understand the detailed structure of AGNs sufficiently well to predict their properties for the whole quasar population, at all redshifts. Progress in both areas is rapid, and I describe the near-term prospects for reducing these uncertainties for 'slow' (non-relativistic) AGN winds and the obscuring torus.

  4. Noncommutative models in patch cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy) and INFN-Gruppo Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy)

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider several classes of noncommutative inflationary models within an extended version of patch cosmological braneworlds, starting from a maximally invariant generalization of the action for scalar and tensor perturbations to a noncommutative brane embedded in a commutative bulk. Slow-roll expressions and consistency relations for the cosmological observables are provided, both in the UV and IR region of the spectrum; the inflaton field is assumed to be either an ordinary scalar field or a Born-Infeld tachyon. The effects of noncommutativity are then analyzed in a number of ways and energy regimes.

  5. Stringy Model of Cosmological Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Ya. Aref'eva

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A string field theory(SFT) nonlocal model of the cosmological dark energy providing w<-1 is briefly surveyed. We summarize recent developments and open problems, as well as point out some theoretical issues related with others applications of the SFT nonlocal models in cosmology, in particular, in inflation and cosmological singularity.

  6. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle, Juab and Utah Counties, Utah of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle, Juab and Utah Counties, Utah* MARK E. JENSEN UtahGeological and Mineral orogeny, Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks of the Slate Jack Canyon Quadrangle were folded and thrust

  7. GEOLOGY, July 2011 683 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    GEOLOGY, July 2011 683 INTRODUCTION Calcite (CaCO3 ) sedimentation in the ocean represents in the rate and locations of CaCO3 sedimentation and their association with carbon cycle per- turbations over system (e.g., Lyle et al., 2008). However, reconstructing global changes in CaCO3 sedimentation pat

  8. Geology in coal resource utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 37 papers in this book were compiled with an overriding theme in mind: to provide the coal industry with a comprehensive source of information on how geology and geologic concepts can be applied to the many facets of coal resource location, extraction, and utilization. The chapters have been arranged to address the major coal geology subfields of Exploration and Reserve Definition, Reserve Estimation, Coalbed Methane, Underground Coal Gasification, Mining, Coal Quality Concerns, and Environmental Impacts, with papers distributed on the basis of their primary emphasis. To help guide one through the collection, the author has included prefaces at the beginning of each chapter. They are intended as a brief lead-in to the subject of the chapter and an acknowledgement of the papers' connections to the subject and contributions to the chapter. In addition, a brief cross-reference section has been included in each preface to help one find papers of interest in other chapters. The subfields of coal geology are intimately intertwined, and investigations in one area may impact problems in another area. Some subfields tend to blur at their edges, such as with reserve definition and reserve estimation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. GEOLOGY, February 2008 151 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Yemane Asmerom Victor Y. Polyak Department of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, Florida 33149, USA Peter Cole Department of Geology, Cornell College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Ann F. Budd Department of Geoscience

  10. Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    2011 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook #12 Environmental Management 14 Environmental Science 18 Geography 22 Geographic Information Science 26 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook Editors David Hayward, Ilse

  11. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

  12. Roadmap: Geology Environmental Geology -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO] College of Arts This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses on page 2 General Elective 8 #12;Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS

  13. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL) GEOL 102 Our Dynamic Earth: intrODuctiOn tO GEOLOGy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Emphasis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Laboratory study

  14. ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has promoted the systematic philosophical and fundamental study of geology since 1893. The Journal publishes original research across a broad range of subfields in geology, including geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology

  15. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL) geoL 102 our dynAMiC eArtH: introduCtion to geoLogy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Empha- sis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Labo- ratory study

  16. Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break 2015 Interested in field geology? Interested in environmental hazards and climate? Want to visit #12;Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan This is a 3-week course for students interested in mixing field

  17. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baran, Sándor

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological there is a large amount of missing observations, which often is the case in geological applications. We make,predictions,MarkovchainMonteCarlo,simulatedannealing,incomplete observations. INTRODUCTION In many geological applications, there is an interest in predicting properties

  18. R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro-leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Kingdom) and a geological con- sultant for various oil companies. His research focused primarilyAUTHORS R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro- leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Texas 77060; rene.jonk@exxonmobil.com Rene Jonk received his M.Sc. degree in structural geology from

  19. Electric Time in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephon Alexander; Martin Bojowald; Antonino Marciano; David Simpson

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum cosmology is formulated with a realistic global internal time given by the electric vector potential. New possibilities for the quantum behavior of space-time are found, and the high-density regime is shown to be very sensitive to the specific form of state realized.

  20. Interpretation of the Cosmological Metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Cook; M. Shane Burns

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological Robertson-Walker metric of general relativity is often said to have the consequences that (1) the recessional velocity $v$ of a galaxy at proper distance $\\ell$ obeys the Hubble law $v=H\\ell$, and therefore galaxies at sufficiently great distance $\\ell$ are receding faster than the speed of light $c$; (2) faster than light recession does not violate special relativity theory because the latter is not applicable to the cosmological problem, and because ``space itself is receding'' faster than $c$ at great distance, and it is velocity relative to local space that is limited by $c$, not the velocity of distant objects relative to nearby ones; (3) we can see galaxies receding faster than the speed of light; and (4) the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift, but is due to a stretching of photon wavelength during propagation in an expanding universe. We present a particular Robertson-Walker metric (an empty universe metric) for which a coordinate transformation shows that none of these interpretation necessarily holds. The resulting paradoxes of interpretation lead to a deeper understanding of the meaning of the cosmological metric.

  1. Noncommutative Quantum Scalar Field Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz Barron, L. R.; Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Sabido, M. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI-Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Guanajuato (Mexico); Yee, C. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study noncommutative Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology coupled to a scalar field endowed with an exponential potential. The quantum scenario is analyzed in the Bohmian formalism of quantum trajectories to investigate the effects of noncommutativity in the evolution of the universe.

  2. Towards Noncommutative Supersymmetric Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabido, M.; Socorro, J. [Physics Department of the Division of Science and Engineering of the University of Guanajuato, Campus Leon P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Guzman, W. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a construction of supersymmetric noncommutative cosmology is presented. We start with a ''noncommutative'' deformation of the minisuperspace variables, and by using the time reparametrization invariance of the noncommutative bosonic model we proceed to construct a super field description of the model.

  3. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  4. , UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    , UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

  5. GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

  6. MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBONATION AS A CARBON SEQUESTRATION METHOD IN MINNESOTA L. H. Thorleifson, Minnesota Geological Survey carbonation as a carbon sequestration method in Minnesota: Minnesota Geological Survey Open-File Report 11: Minnesota Geological Survey 2 #12;POTENTIAL FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF MINERAL CARBONATION AS A CARBON

  7. Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University © 2006 #12;i PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Ninth Edition Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University #12;ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank

  8. MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology, Stratigraphy Paleontology, Geography and Environment, Dynamic Geology and Tectonics/ Hydrogeology, Geophysics

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: atmospheric chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and atmospheric chemistry that is expected to benefit auto and engine manufacturers, oil and gas utilities, and other industries that employ combustion models. A paper...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: combustion chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and atmospheric chemistry that is expected to benefit auto and engine manufacturers, oil and gas utilities, and other industries that employ combustion models. A paper...

  11. agricultural chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Chemistry Honors in Chemistry Research Instructions (Seniors only) Materials Science Websites Summary: Department of Chemistry Honors in Chemistry Research Instructions...

  12. Cosmological Analysis of Pilgrim Dark Energy in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawad, Abdul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposal of pilgrim dark energy is based on speculation that phantom-like dark energy (with strong enough resistive force) can prevent black hole formation in the universe. We explore this phenomenon in loop quantum cosmology framework by taking Hubble horizon as an infra-red cutoff in pilgrim dark energy. We evaluate the cosmological parameters such as Hubble, equation of state parameter, squared speed of sound and also cosmological planes like $\\omega_{\\vartheta}-\\omega'_{\\vartheta}$ and $r-s$ on the basis of pilgrim dark energy parameter ($u$) and interacting parameter ($d^2$). It is found that values of Hubble parameter lies in the range $74^{+0.005}_{-0.005}$. It is mentioned here that equation state parameter lies within the ranges $-1\\mp0.00005$ for $u=2, 1$ and $(-1.12,-1), (-5,-1)$ for $u=-1,-2$, respectively. Also, $\\omega_{\\vartheta}-\\omega'_{\\vartheta}$ planes provide $\\Lambda$CDM limit, freezing and thawing regions for all cases of $u$. It is also interesting to mention here that $\\omega_{\\va...

  13. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  14. Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, William R.

    Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

  15. Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Spring 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

  16. Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Scholarship Rises. Freshman Year/ Fall Semester Cr) Honors Chemistry I 3 84.136 (H) Honors Chemistry II 3 84.123 (H) Honors Chemistry I Lab 1 84.124 (H) Honors Chemistry II Lab 1 92.131 Calculus I 4 92.132 Honors Calculus II 4 Hon 110 Honors FYSH (AH) 3 Gen

  17. Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Summer 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Summer 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

  18. Gravitational Radiation From Cosmological Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; Andrew Mack; Tinatin Kahniashvili

    2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection of energy into the early Universe on a given characteristic length scale will result in turbulent motions of the primordial plasma. We calculate the stochastic background of gravitational radiation arising from a period of cosmological turbulence, using a simple model of isotropic Kolmogoroff turbulence produced in a cosmological phase transition. We also derive the gravitational radiation generated by magnetic fields arising from a dynamo operating during the period of turbulence. The resulting gravitational radiation background has a maximum amplitude comparable to the radiation background from the collision of bubbles in a first-order phase transition, but at a lower frequency, while the radiation from the induced magnetic fields is always subdominant to that from the turbulence itself. We briefly discuss the detectability of such a signal.

  19. The Schwarzschild Static Cosmological Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. H. Pereyra

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work describes an immersion in 5D of the interior Schwarzschild solution of the general relativity equations. The model theory is defined in the context of a flat 5D space time matter Minkowski model, using a Tolman like technique, which shows via Lorentz transformations that the solution is compatible with homogeneity and isotropy,thus obeying the cosmological principle. These properties permit one to consider the solution in terms of a cosmological model. In this model, the Universe may be treated as an idealized star with constant density and variable pressure, where each observer can be the center of the same. The observed redshift appears as a static gravitational effect which obeys the sufficiently verified and generally accepted square distance law. The Buchdahl stability theorem establishes a limit of distance observation with density dependence.

  20. Cosmology: a bird's eye view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan A. Coley; Sigbjorn Hervik; Woei Chet Lim

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this essay we discuss the difference in views of the Universe as seen by two different observers. While one of the observers follows a geodesic congruence defined by the geometry of the cosmological model, the other observer follows the fluid flow lines of a perfect fluid with a linear equation of state. We point out that the information these observers collect regarding the state of the Universe can be radically different; while one observes a non-inflating ever-expanding ever-lasting universe, the other observer can experience a dynamical behaviour reminiscent to that of quintessence or even that of a phantom cosmology leading to a 'big rip' singularity within finite time (but without the need for exotic forms of matter).

  1. Thermodynamics of decaying vacuum cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima, J.A. [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)] [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic behavior of decaying vacuum cosmologies is investigated within a manifestly covariant formulation. Such a process corresponds to a continuous, irreversible energy flow from the vacuum component to the created matter constituents. It is shown that if the specific entropy per particle remains constant during the process, the equilibrium relations are preserved. In particular, if the vacuum decays into photons, the energy density {rho} and average number density of photons {ital n} scale with the temperature as {rho}{approximately}{ital T}{sup 4} and {ital n}{approximately}{ital T}{sup 3}. The temperature law is determined and a generalized Planckian-type form of the spectrum, which is preserved in the course of the evolution, is also proposed. Some consequences of these results for decaying vacuum FRW-type cosmologies as well as for models with {open_quote}{open_quote}adiabatic{close_quote}{close_quote} photon creation are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Cosmology, Thermodynamics and Matter Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; M. O. Calvao; I. Waga

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Several approaches to the matter creation problem in the context of cosmological models are summarily reviewed. A covariant formulation of the general relativistic imperfect simple fluid endowed with a process of matter creation is presented. By considering the standard big bang model, it is shown how the recent results of Prigogine et alii \\cite{1} can be recovered and, at the same time their limits of validity are explicited.

  3. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken for graduation. Complete the following: Chem 111* Honors Principles of Chemistry Chem 112 Principles of Chemistry

  4. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry - ACS Certified Major of the following courses Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4110 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug Action 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4120 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug

  5. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4610 Intro to Polymer Science 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4620 Polymer Chemistry 3 CH1153 University Chemistry

  6. Chameleon gravity on cosmological scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Farajollahi; A. Salehi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional approach to the chameleon mechanism, by assuming a static and spherically symmetric solutions in which matter density and chameleon field are given by $\\rho=\\rho(r)$ and $\\phi=\\phi(r)$, it has been shown that mass of chameleon field is matter density-dependent. In regions of high matter density such as earth, chameleon field is massive, in solar system it is low and in cosmological scales it is very low. In this article we revisit the mechanism in cosmological scales by assuming a redshift dependence of the matter density and chameleon field, i.e. $\\rho=\\rho(z)$, $\\phi=\\phi(z)$. To support our analysis, we best fit the model parameters with the observational data. The result shows that in cosmological scales, the mass of chameleon field increases with the redshift, i.e. more massive in higher redshifts. We also find that in both cases of power-law and exponential potential function, the current universe acceleration can be explained by the low mass chameleon field. In comparison with the high redshift observational data, we also find that the model with power-law potential function is in better agreement with the observational data.

  7. Multiverse Understanding of Cosmological Coincidences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Bousso; Lawrence J. Hall; Yasunori Nomura

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the timescales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  8. Multiverse understanding of cosmological coincidences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the time scales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  9. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  10. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

  11. Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

  12. The Berry phase in inflationary cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barun Kumar Pal; Supratik Pal; B. Basu

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive an analogue of the Berry phase associated with inflationary cosmological perturbations of quantum mechanical origin by obtaining the corresponding wavefunction. We have further shown that cosmological Berry phase can be completely envisioned through the observable parameters, viz. spectral indices. Finally, physical significance of this phase is discussed from the point of view of theoretical and observational aspects with some possible consequences of this quantity in inflationary cosmology.

  13. Cosmological Constant and Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory axions appear to be promising candidates for explaining cosmological constant via quintessence. In this paper, we study conditions on the string compactifications under which axion quintessence can happen. For sufficiently large number of axions, cosmological constant can be accounted for as the potential energy of axions that have not yet relaxed to their minima. In compactifications that incorporate unified models of particle physics, the height of the axion potential can naturally fall close to the observed value of cosmological constant.

  14. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trillion particle cosmological simulation completed A team of astrophysicists and computer scientists has created high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. December 3, 2014...

  15. Vacuum Energy and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Melissinos

    2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a numerical relation between the cosmological constant and the vacuum energy arising from the Casimir effect in extra dimensions

  16. Variable cosmological term - geometry and physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Dymnikova

    2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the dynamics of a cosmological term in the spherically symmetric case by an r-dependent second rank symmetric tensor \\Lambda_{\\mu\

  17. Landscape predictions from cosmological vacuum selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael; Yang, Sheng

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In Bousso-Polchinski models with hundreds of fluxes, we compute the effects of cosmological dynamics on the probability distribution of landscape vacua. Starting from generic initial conditions, we find that most fluxes are dynamically driven into a different and much narrower range of values than expected from landscape statistics alone. Hence, cosmological evolution will access only a tiny fraction of the vacua with small cosmological constant. This leads to a host of sharp predictions. Unlike other approaches to eternal inflation, the holographic measure employed here does not lead to staggering, an excessive spread of probabilities that would doom the string landscape as a solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  18. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  19. Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

  20. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

  1. A chemistry tale of two carbons | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A chemistry tale of two carbons A chemistry tale of two carbons Released: September 03, 2012 Comprehensive field study of urban, natural emissions interacting to affect climate...

  2. Marine geology of the Bay of Campeche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creager, Joe S.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY /i & L IBRRAYA B/ iA&Co MARINE GEOLOGY OP SHE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGER ? ? ? Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August, 1958 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography MARINE GEOLOGY OF THE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGEB Approved as to style and content by: JLN. Chairman of Committee Heady Department...

  3. Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic: Fieldstone, natural stone, diagenesis, microscopy with a great interest in sedimentation processes and diagenesis, in petrology and Flemish stratigraphy

  4. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

  5. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

  7. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  8. Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  9. Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, William F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOLOGY AND ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF A WILCOX LIGNITE DEPOSIT IN NORTHEASTERN RUSK COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by William F. Cole Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) ad of Department) August 1980 ABSTRACT Geology and Engineering Geology of a Wilcox Lignite Deposit in Northeastern Rusk County, Texas (August, 1980) William 7. Cole, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman...

  10. 26 AUGUST 2009, GSA TODAY Murray Hitzman, Dept. of Geology and Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    geology. Economic geology flourished from the end of World War II into the early 1970s, with major, industrial minerals, construction aggregates, and uranium but excludes carbon-based energy resources geology in academia: An impending crisis? (~15%) of the 2007 U.S. gross domestic product. The United

  11. College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Geology and Geological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Robert J. Weimer Distinguished Chair in Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology Mines is an EEO.D. degrees, with sub-disciplines of economic geology, petroleum geosciences, geological engineering and Engineering that includes the departments of Geophysics, Mining Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. Mines

  12. Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

  13. Axion Bounds from Precision Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffelt, G. G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Hamann, J.; Hannestad, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mirizzi, A. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Wong, Y. Y. Y. [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on their mass, axions produced in the early universe can leave different imprints in cosmic structures. If axions have masses in the eV-range, they contribute a hot dark matter fraction, allowing one to constrain m{sub a} in analogy to neutrinos. In the more favored scenario where axions play the role of cold dark matter and if reheating after inflation does not restore the Peccei-Quinn symmetry, the axion field provides isocurvature fluctuations that are severely constrained by precision cosmology. There remains a small sliver in parameter space where isocurvature fluctuations could still show up in future probes.

  14. Radioactive Waste Management: Study of Spent Fuel Dissolution Rates in Geological Storage Using Dosimetry Modeling and Experimental Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Brady; Miller, William

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This research will provide improved predictions into the mechanisms and effects of radiolysis on spent nuclear fuel dissolution in a geological respository through accurate dosimetry modeling of the dose to water, mechanistic chemistry modeling of the resulting radiolytic reactions and confirmatory experimental measurements. This work will combine effort by the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute (NSEI) and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the expertise and facilities at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  15. Cosmological birefringence induced by neutrino current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Q. Geng; S. H. Ho; J. N. Ng

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We review our recent work on the cosmological birefringence. We propose a new type of effective interactions in terms of the $CPT$-even dimension-six Chern-Simons-like term to generate the cosmological birefringence. We use the neutrino number asymmetry to induce a non-zero rotation polarization angle in the data of the cosmic microwave background radiation polarization.

  16. No hair theorem for inhomogeneous cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, L.G.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under very general conditions any inhomogeneous cosmological model with a positive cosmological constant, that can be described in a synchronous reference system will tend asymptotically in time towards the de Sitter solution. This is shown to be relevant in the context of inflationary models as it makes inflation very weakly dependent on initial conditions. 8 refs.

  17. Vacuum Fluctuations and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi Qi

    2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis is proposed that under the approximation that the quantum equations of motion reduce to the classical ones, the quantum vacuum also reduces to the classical vacuum--the empty space. The vacuum energy of QED is studied under this hypothesis. A possible solution to the cosmological constant problem is provided and a kind of parameterization of the cosmological "constant" is derived.

  18. Surface brightness in plasma-redshift cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Brynjolfsson

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 Lori M. Lubin and Allan Sandage, using big-bang cosmology for interpreting the data, found the surface brightness of galaxies to be inversely proportional to about the third power of (1+z), while the contemporary big-bang cosmology predicts that the surface brightness is inversely proportional to the fourth power of (1+z). In contrast, these surface brightness observations are in agreement with the predictions of the plasma-redshift cosmology. Lubin and Sandage (2001) and Barden et al. (2005), who surmised the big-bang expansion, interpreted the observations to indicate that the diameters of galaxies are inversely proportional to (1+z). In contrast, when assuming plasma-redshift cosmology, the diameters of galaxies are observed to be constant independent of redshift and any expansion. Lubin and Sandage (2001) and Barden et al. (2005), when using big-bang cosmology, observed the average absolute magnitude of galaxies to decrease with redshift; while in plasma redshift cosmology it is a constant. Lubin and Sandage and Barden et al. suggested that a coherent evolution could explain the discrepancy between the observed relations and those predicted in the big-bang cosmology. We have failed to find support for this explanation. We consider the observed relations between the redshift and the surface-brightness, the galaxy diameter, and the absolute magnitude to be robust confirmations of plasma-redshift cosmology.

  19. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  20. National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding is provided by the US Department of Energy.

  1. National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    he Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding...

  2. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  3. The U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    U sing a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.525 trillion barrels of oil in place in seventeen oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado.

  4. Geological Sciences Jeffrey D. Keith, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    , such as assessment and forecasting of natural hazards, environmental change, and discovery of energy and mineral resources. Some of the diverse disciplines that can be studied in this department include general geology Catalog. Global Geology Program Each year the department provides opportunities for advanced

  5. Analogue models for FRW cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Barcelo; Stefano Liberati; Matt Visser

    2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is by now well known that various condensed matter systems may be used to mimic many of the kinematic aspects of general relativity, and in particular of curved-spacetime quantum field theory. In this essay we will take a look at what would be needed to mimic a cosmological spacetime -- to be precise a spatially flat FRW cosmology -- in one of these analogue models. In order to do this one needs to build and control suitable time dependent systems. We discuss here two quite different ways to achieve this goal. One might rely on an explosion, physically mimicking the big bang by an outflow of whatever medium is being used to carry the excitations of the analogue model, but this idea appears to encounter dynamical problems in practice. More subtly, one can avoid the need for any actual physical motion (and avoid the dynamical problems) by instead adjusting the propagation speed of the excitations of the analogue model. We shall focus on this more promising route and discuss its practicality.

  6. Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1995-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical mechanical concepts and processes such as decoherence, correlation, and dissipation can prove to be of basic importance to understanding some fundamental issues of quantum cosmology and theoretical physics such as the choice of initial states, quantum to classical transition and the emergence of time. Here we summarize our effort in 1) constructing a unified theoretical framework using techniques in interacting quantum field theory such as influence functional and coarse-grained effective action to discuss the interplay of noise, fluctuation, dissipation and decoherence; and 2) illustrating how these concepts when applied to quantum cosmology can alter the conventional views on some basic issues. Two questions we address are 1) the validity of minisuperspace truncation, which is usually assumed without proof in most discussions, and 2) the relevance of specific initial conditions, which is the prevailing view of the past decade. We also mention how some current ideas in chaotic dynamics, dissipative collective dynamics and complexity can alter our view of the quantum nature of the universe.

  7. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3 CONTENTS Three Creeks Caldera ................................................................................................................................... Scott Dean Geology of the Antelope Peak Area of the Southern .................................................................................................................. Craig D. Hall Geology of the Longlick and White Mountain Area, Southern San Francisco Mountains

  8. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I Preble Formation, a Cambrian Outer ..........................................................................J. Roger Olsen Geology of the Sterling Quadrangle, Sanpete County, Utah ..............................................................................James Michael Taylor Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Aertalphorograph rhowing

  9. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Chair: Dr. Clarence R Technical Exchange (open) Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: DOE & Performance Analysis and the Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: Repository

  10. CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011 1. Framework) in Chemistry. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry students a basic introduction to the Chemistry disciplines. In addition, the Bachelor's degree programme

  11. Report on geologic exploration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breslin, J.; Laughon, R. B.; Hall, R. J.; Voss, J. W. [comps.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the geological exploration activities being carried out as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, which has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop the technology and provide the facilities for the safe, environmentally acceptable isolation of civilian high-level and transuranic nuclear wastes, including spent fuel elements, for which the Federal government is responsible. The principal programmatic emphasis is on disposal in mined geologic repositories. Explorations are being conducted or planned in various parts of the country to identify potential sites for such repositories. The work is being undertaken by three separate but coordinated NWTS project elements. Under the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), basalt formations underlying DOE's Hanford Reservation are being investigated. Granite, tuff, and shale formations at the DOE Nevada Test Site (NTS) are being similarly studied in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI). The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) is investigating domed salt formations in several Gulf Coast states and bedded salt formations in Utah and Texas. The ONWI siting studies are being expanded to include areas overlying crystalline rocks, shales, and other geohydrologic systems. The current status of these NWTS efforts, including the projected budgets for FY 1981, is summarized, and the criteria and methodology being employed in the explorations are described. The consistency of the overall effort with the recommendations presented in the Report to the President by the Interagency Review Group on Nuclear Waste Management (IRG), as well as with documents representing the national technical consensus, is discussed.

  12. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  13. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

  14. Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Abstract Geology...

  15. arizona geologic framework: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Geological Engineering Engineering Websites Summary: Lowell Professional Program in Mineral Resources Department of Mining & Geological Engineering Fall 2013 Non-Credit Short...

  16. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatise of Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields,A-A’). phy, geology, stratigraphic contacts, oil and gas andgeology, initial information available from hydrogeology, oil

  17. Cosmological Vacuum in Unified Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Pervushin; V. I Smirichinski

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The unification of the Einstein theory of gravity with a conformal invariant version of the standard model for electroweak interaction without the Higgs potential is considered. In this theory, a module of the Higgs field is absorbed by the scale factor component of metric so that the evolution of the Universe and the elementary particle masses have one and the same cosmological origin and the flat space limit corresponds to the $\\sigma$-model version of the standard model. The red shift formula and Hubble law are obtained under the assumption of homogeneous matter distribution. We show that the considered theory leads to a very small vacuum density of the Higgs field $\\rho_\\phi^{Cosmic}=10^{-34}\\rho_{cr}$ in contrast with the theory with the Higgs potential $\\rho_\\phi^{Higgs}=10^{54}\\rho_{cr}$.

  18. Accelerated expansion from cosmological holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that holographic cosmology implies an evolving Hubble radius $c^{-1}\\dot{R}_H = -1 + 3\\Omega_m$ in the presence of a dimensionless matter density $\\Omega_m$ scaled to the closure density $3H^2/8\\pi G$, where $c$ denotes the velocity of light and $H$ and $G$ denote the Hubble parameter and Newton's constant. It reveals a dynamical dark energy and a sixfold increase in gravitational attraction to matter on the scale of the Hubble acceleration. It reproduces the transition redshift $z_t\\simeq 0.4$ to the present epoch of accelerated expansion and is consistent with $(q_0,(dq/dz)_0)$ of the deceleration parameter $q(z)=q_0+(dq/dz)_0z$ observed in Type Ia supernovae.

  19. Isotropic cosmological singularities: other matter models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Tod

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotropic cosmological singularities are singularities which can be removed by rescaling the metric. In some cases already studied (gr-qc/9903008, gr-qc/9903009, gr-qc/9903018) existence and uniqueness of cosmological models with data at the singularity has been established. These were cosmologies with, as source, either perfect fluids with linear equations of state or massless, collisionless particles. In this article we consider how to extend these results to a variety of other matter models. These are scalar fields, massive collisionless matter, the Yang-Mills plasma of Choquet-Bruhat, or matter satisfying the Einstein-Boltzmann equation.

  20. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horatiu Nastase; Amanda Weltman

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why $\\Lambda$ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why $\\Lambda$ is comparable to the matter density now).

  1. Experimental signatures of cosmological neutrino condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofazzal Azam; Jitesh R. Bhatt; Utpal Sarkar

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Superfluid condensation of neutrinos of cosmological origin at a low enough temperature can provide simple and elegant solution to the problems of neutrino oscillations and the accelerated expansion of the universe. It would give rise to a late time cosmological constant of small magnitude and also generate tiny Majorana masses for the neutrinos as observed from their flavor oscillations. We show that carefully prepared beta decay experiments in the laboratory would carry signatures of such a condensation, and thus, it would be possible to either establish or rule out neutrino condensation of cosmological scale in laboratory experiments.

  2. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  3. Page 1 | B.S. in Geology | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    in topics like sedimentology, structural geology and mineralogy. Extracurricular experiences are important in the subjects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and structural geology. In addition, students at UNC Charlotte

  4. Towards the cosmological constant problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eun Kyung Park; Pyung Seong Kwon

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a new self-tuning mechanism to the well-known Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT) model to address the cosmological constant problem. In this mechanism the cosmological constant $\\lambda$ contains a supersymmetry breaking term ${\\mathcal E}_{\\rm SB}$ besides the usual scalar potential ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ of the $N=1$ supergravity, which is distinguished from the usual theories where $\\lambda$ is directly identified with ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ alone. Also in this mechanism, whether $\\lambda$ vanishes or not is basically determined by the tensor structure of the scalar potential density, not by the zero or nonzero values of the scalar potential itself. As a result of this application we find that the natural scenario for the vanishing $\\lambda$ of the present universe is to take one of the AdS (rather than dS) vacua of KKLT as the background vacuum of our present universe. This AdS vacuum scenario does not suffer from the problematics of the dS vacua of KKLT. The background vacuum is stable both classically and quantum mechanically (no tunneling instabilities), and the value $\\lambda =0$ is also stable against quantum corrections because in this scenario the perturbative corrections of ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ and quantum fluctuations $\\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(NS)} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(R)}$ on the branes are all gauged away by an automatic cancelation between ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(NS)} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(R)}$ and ${\\mathcal E}_{\\rm SB}$.

  5. Computer Modelling of 3D Geological Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodge, B G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geological surveying presently uses methods and tools for the computer modeling of 3D-structures of the geographical subsurface and geotechnical characterization as well as the application of geoinformation systems for management and analysis of spatial data, and their cartographic presentation. The objectives of this paper are to present a 3D geological surface model of Latur district in Maharashtra state of India. This study is undertaken through the several processes which are discussed in this paper to generate and visualize the automated 3D geological surface model of a projected area.

  6. JUDSON MEAD GEOLOGIC FIELD STATION OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2013 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Geology G Structural Geology G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sophomore G

  7. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  8. analytical chemistry organic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology 25 SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Chemistry Websites Summary: Discussion...

  9. applied chemistry organic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology 18 SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Chemistry Websites Summary: Discussion...

  10. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  11. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  12. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Anne Green

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann Green

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  13. Cosmology of modified (but second order) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomi S. Koivisto

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief review of modified gravity cosmologies. Generically extensions of gravity action involve higher derivative terms, which can result in ghosts and instabilities. There are three ways to circumvent this: Chern-Simons terms, first order variational principle and nonlocality. We consider recent cosmological applications of these three classes of modified gravity models, in particular to the dark energy problem. The viable parameter spaces can be very efficiently constrained by taking into account cosmological data from all epochs in addition to Solar system tests and stability considerations. We make some new remarks concerning so called algebraic scalar-tensor theories, biscalar reformulation of nonlocal actions involving the inverse d'Alembertian, and a possible covariant formulation holographic cosmology with nonperturbative gravity.

  14. Cosmology on the Beach: Kendrick Smith

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  15. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  16. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Anne Green

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ann Green

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  17. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Simon White

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  18. Cosmological Inflation and generation of Primordial Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souradeep, Tarun

    to high accuracy. The Inflationary universe, first proposed by Guth[1] is a modification of the hot big cosmology has become one of the cornerstones of modern cos- mology. Inflationary universe scenario

  19. Asymptotically Vanishing Cosmological Constant in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hikaru Kawai; Takashi Okada

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of the cosmological constant in the context of the multiverse in Lorentzian spacetime, and show that the cosmological constant will vanish in the future. This sort of argument was started from Coleman in 1989, and he argued that the Euclidean wormholes make the multiverse partition a superposition of various values of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, which has a sharp peak at $\\Lambda=0$. However, the implication of the Euclidean analysis to our Lorentzian spacetime is unclear. With this motivation, we analyze the quantum state of the multiverse in Lorentzian spacetime by the WKB method, and calculate the density matrix of our universe by tracing out the other universes. Our result predicts vanishing cosmological constant. While Coleman obtained the enhancement at $\\Lambda=0$ through the action itself, in our Lorentzian analysis the similar enhancement arises from the front factor of $e^{iS}$ in the universe wave function, which is in the next leading order in the WKB approximation.

  20. Cosmological applications of weak gravitational flexion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Barnaby Thomas Peter

    Modern cosmology has reached an important juncture, at which the ability to make measurements of unprecedented accuracy has led to conclusions that are a fundamental challenge to natural science. The discovery that, in ...

  1. Cosmology and the S-matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Kachru, R. Kallosh, A. Linde and S. P. Trivedi: De sitter30] N. Kaloper and A. Linde: Cosmology vs. holography, hep-V. Hubeny, N. Kaloper, A. Linde, A. Mints, J. Polchinski, M.

  2. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: David Hughes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Hughes

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  3. Conformally Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a universe where, according to the standard cosmological models, some 97% of the total mass-energy is still "missing in action" it behooves us to spend at least a little effort critically assessing and exploring radical alternatives. Among possible, (dare we say plausible), nonstandard but superficially viable models, those spacetimes conformal to the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker class of cosmological models play a very special role --- these models have the unique and important property of permitting large non-perturbative geometric deviations from Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology without unacceptably distorting the cosmic microwave background. Performing a "cosmographic" analysis, (that is, temporarily setting aside the Einstein equations, since the question of whether or not the Einstein equations are valid on galactic and cosmological scales is essentially the same question as whether or not dark matter/dark energy actually exist), and using both supernova data and informat...

  4. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  5. GEOLOGIC NOTE Fault linkage and graben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    . Schultz $ Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering/172 (1982), and his Ph.D. in geomechanics from Purdue University (1987). He worked at the Lunar

  6. Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2014-3954P Geologic Storage of Hydrogen Anna S. Lord Geologist Geotechnology & Engineering Department & Peter H....

  7. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone #12;Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem Era (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source Weathering

  8. Montana State University 1 Geology Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Tectonics, Sedimentary Petrology, two geographic information science (GIS) courses, and Field Geology (a - Sedimentary Petrology 3 GEO 449 - Metamorphic Petrology*** or GEO 450 - Igneous Petrology 3 Take at least

  9. Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoversten, Shanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expensive, real reduction in CO2 emissions from their ownstored CO2 must create an actual reduction in the emissionsCO2 is instead obtained from geologic formations then the goal of the emission reduction

  10. Dark Energy and the New Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Turner

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A successor to the standard hot big-bang cosmology is emerging. It greatly extends the highly successful hot big-bang model. A key element of the New Standard Cosmology is dark energy, the causative agent for accelerated expansion. Dark energy is just possibly the most important problem in all of physics. The only laboratory up to the task of studying dark energy is the Universe itself.

  11. Dark spinors with torsion in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Burnett, James [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve one of the open problems in Einstein-Cartan theory, namely, we find a natural matter source whose spin angular momentum tensor is compatible with the cosmological principle. We analyze the resulting evolution equations and find that an epoch of accelerated expansion is an attractor. The torsion field quickly decays in that period. Our results are interpreted in the context of the standard model of cosmology.

  12. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology from matter only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telkamp, Herman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a matter-only interpretation of {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, based on conservation of energy and assuming a Machian definition of inertia. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology can be linked to a Newtonian cosmic potential, subject to a propagating gravitational horizon. In a matter-only universe where total energy is conserved, Machian inertia related to the evolving potential may cause both deceleration and acceleration of recession.

  13. Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 287306 Sediment chemistry and magnetic properties in an anomalously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Lange b,2 a Paleomagnetic Laboratory `Fort Hoofddijk', Utrecht UniÃ?ersity, Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands b ( )Institute of PaleoenÃ?ironments and Paleoclimate Utrecht IPPU , Department of Geochemistry, Faculty of Earth Sciences, Utrecht UniÃ?ersity, PO Box 80.021, 3508 TA Utrecht, Netherlands

  14. Syllabus for Winter 2011 Geological Sciences 130/Physics 119/Chemistry 108

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Keken, Peter

    , paleoclimate and notes global warming. Exam III (April 21 10:40-noon) #12; Electricity and magnetism, conductivity, voltage, current Ch. 5 Exam I (to be arranged) 6 Waves, sound and evolution of the planets. Ch. 16, notes 12 Earth's atmosphere, environment and global change Ch. 13, notes

  15. Z .Chemical Geology 154 1999 179192 Detailed determination of palaeofluid chemistry: an integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    microspectroscopy data, and ion Z .contents by a crush­leach technique and Laser Ablation Optical Emission

  16. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  17. Carbon Chemistry in interstellar clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryvonne Gerin; David Fosse; Evelyne Roueff

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss new developments of interstellar chemistry, with particular emphasis on the carbon chemistry. We confirm that carbon chains and cycles are ubiquitous in the ISM and closely chemically related to ea ch other, and to carbon. Investigation of the carbon budget in shielded and UV illuminated gas shows that the inventory of interstellar molecules is not complete and more complex molecules with 4 or more carbon atoms must be present. Finally we discuss the consequences for the evolution of clouds and conclude that the ubiquitous presence of carbon chains and cycles is not a necessary consequence of a very young age for interstellar clouds.

  18. Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry Soft

  19. A geologic application of Biot's buckling theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinze, William Daniel

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Geophysics A GEOLOGIC APPLlCATION OF BIOT'S BUCKLING THEORY A Thesis by WILLIAM DANIEL HEINZE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commit e) (Head of Department-Member) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT A Geologic..., et al. , (1967) indicates that the Georgetown was never buried by more than 2000 meters of sediment. The Del Rio Mark, 20 m thick, is predominantly clay and calcareous clay intercalated with thin lenses of clayey limestone. The thick-bedded Buda...

  20. Quantum Coherence Arguments for Cosmological Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindesay, James; /SLAC

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneity and correlations in the observed CMB are indicative of some form of cosmological coherence in early times. Quantum coherence in the early universe would be expected to give space-like phase coherence to any effects sourced to those times. If dark energy de-coherence is assumed to occur when the rate of expansion of the relevant cosmological scale parameter in the Friedmann-Lemaitre equations is no longer supra-luminal, a critical energy density is immediately defined. It is shown that the general class of dynamical models so defined necessarily requires a spatially flat cosmology in order to be consistent with observed structure formation. The basic assumption is that the dark energy density which is fixed during de-coherence is to be identified with the cosmological constant. It is shown for the entire class of models that the expected amplitude of fluctuations driven by the dark energy de-coherence process is of the order needed to evolve into the fluctuations observed in cosmic microwave background radiation and galactic clustering. The densities involved during de-coherence which correspond to the measured dark energy density turn out to be of the electroweak symmetry restoration scale. In an inflationary cosmology, this choice of the scale parameter in the FL equations directly relates the scale of dark energy decoherence to the De Sitter scales (associated with the positive cosmological constants) at both early and late times.

  1. Bulk viscous cosmology: statefinder and entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hu; Xin He Meng

    2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The statefinder diagnostic pair is adopted to differentiate viscous cosmology models and it is found that the trajectories of these viscous cosmology models on the statefinder pair $s-r$ plane are quite different from those of the corresponding non-viscous cases. Particularly for the quiessence model, the singular properties of state parameter $w=-1$ are obviously demonstrated on the statefinder diagnostic pair planes. We then discuss the entropy of the viscous / dissipative cosmology system which may be more practical to describe the present cosmic observations as the perfect fluid is just a global approximation to the complicated cosmic media in current universe evolution. When the bulk viscosity takes the form of $\\zeta=\\zeta_{1}\\dot{a}/a$($\\zeta_{1}$ is constant), the relationship between the entropy $S$ and the redshift $z$ is explicitly given out. We find that the entropy of the viscous cosmology is always increasing and consistent with the thermodynamics arrow of time for the universe evolution. With the parameter constraints from fitting to the 157 gold data of supernova observations, it is demonstrated that this viscous cosmology model is rather well consistent to the observational data at the lower redshifts, and together with the diagnostic statefinder pair analysis it is concluded that the viscous cosmic models tend to the favored $\\Lambda$CDM model in the later cosmic evolution, agreeable to lots of cosmological simulation results, especially to the fact of confidently observed current accelerating cosmic expansion.

  2. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 2 Lower and Middle Ordovician at Section G, Ibex, Utah. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah o ~ l z gUfziversity Geology Studies is published by the Department of Geology. This publication

  3. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1 Papers reviewing geology of field trip areas, 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28 ....................................................................................................................................................... Geology of Volcanic Rocks and Mineral Deposits in the Southern Thomas Range, Utah: A Brief Summary

  4. November 47 Geological Society of America 2012 Annual Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , Jason F., Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 615 E. Peabody Dr, Champaign, IL 61820, jthomaso@illinois.edu and KEEFER, Donald A., Illinois State Geological Survey, Prairie, Quaternary and Engineering Geology Section, Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign

  5. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    · Sedimentology/Paleontology/Petroleum Exploration In Geology and Geochemistry, opportunities for research at both

  6. Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Abstract: The ultraviolet...

  7. Capturing Chemistry in XML/CML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A; Adams, Sam; Goodman, Jonathan M; Murray-Rust, Peter; Waudby, Chris A

    Chemical Markup Language (CML) is an XML-conformant Schema that describes molecules, spectra, reactions, and computational chemistry. It is capable of capturing the chemistry in a variety of current publications and is becoming adopted by many...

  8. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  9. User Manual Frick Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    the atrium connects the laboratory wing with the administrative offices. This provides a light-filled space to make the new Frick Chemistry Laboratory (and the surrounding natural sciences neighborhood) one technologies that reduce energy demand and con- serve water. The design and construction teams have implemented

  10. Theoretical Chemistry Theory, Computation, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    1 23 Theoretical Chemistry Accounts Theory, Computation, and Modeling ISSN 1432-881X Volume 128). In order to explore the origin of this preference, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been-terminus of nascent eubacterial proteins during protein synthesis [1­4]. As PDF is essential for bacterial survival

  11. Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

  12. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  13. Technetium Chemistry Science Challenges in Environmental Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technetium Chemistry Science Challenges in Environmental Science and Waste Processing Workshop Sponsored by Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory Richland, Washington July...

  14. Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum Freshman Chemistry CHE 133/133L, 134/134L; ENG 131, 132, BIO elective Sophomore Chemistry CHE 231/231L, 241/241L, 331/331L, 332/332L; MTH 233, 234; PHY 241 elective Junior Chemistry CHE 337/337L, 338/338L, 452/452L; CSC 101 or 201, ENG 273, Eng. Lit; Core

  15. Friction forces in cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Daniele Gregoris; Sauro Succi

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of test particles undergoing friction forces in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. The interaction with the background fluid is modeled by introducing a Poynting-Robertson-like friction force in the equations of motion, leading to measurable (at least in principle) deviations of the particle trajectories from geodesic motion. The effect on the peculiar velocities of the particles is investigated for various equations of state of the background fluid and different standard cosmological models. The friction force is found to have major effects on particle motion in closed FRW universes, where it turns the time-asymptotic value (approaching the recollapse) of the peculiar particle velocity from ultra-relativistic (close to light speed) to a co-moving one, i.e., zero peculiar speed. On the other hand, for open or flat universes the effect of the friction is not so significant, because the time-asymptotic peculiar particle speed is largely non-relativistic also in the geodesic case.

  16. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  17. Cosmological consequences of string axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kain, Ben [Department of Physics, University of California and Theoretical Physics Group, Bldg. 50A5104, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion fluctuations generated during inflation lead to isocurvature and non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Following a previous analysis for the model independent string axion we consider the consequences of a measurement of these fluctuations for two additional string axions. We do so independent of any cosmological assumptions. The first axion has been shown to solve the strong CP problem for most compactifications of the heterotic string while the second axion, which does not solve the strong CP problem, obeys a mass formula which is independent of the axion scale. We find that if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment with a Hubble constant during inflation of H{sub inf} > or approx. 10{sup 13} GeV the existence of the first axion is ruled out and the second axion cannot obey the scale independent mass formula. In an appendix we quantitatively justify the often held assumption that temperature corrections to the zero temperature QCD axion mass may be ignored for temperatures T < or approx. {lambda}{sub QCD}.

  18. Cosmological Consequences of String Axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kain, Ben

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion fluctuations generated during inflation lead to isocurvature and non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Following a previous analysis for the model independent string axion we consider the consequences of a measurement of these fluctuations for two additional string axions. We do so independent of any cosmological assumptions except for the axions being massless during inflation. The first axion has been shown to solve the strong CP problem for most compactifications of the heterotic string while the second axion, which does not solve the strong CP problem, obeys a mass formula which is independent of the axion scale. We find that if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment with a Hubble constant during inflation of H{sub inf} {approx}> 10{sup 13} GeV the existence of the first axion is ruled out and the second axion cannot obey the scale independent mass formula. In an appendix we quantitatively justify the often held assumption that temperature corrections to the zero temperature QCD axion mass may be ignored for temperatures T {approx}< {Lambda}{sub QCD}.

  19. Quantum Vacuum Structure and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Hadad, Yaron; /Arizona U. /Munich U.; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary physics faces three great riddles that lie at the intersection of quantum theory, particle physics and cosmology. They are: (1) The expansion of the universe is accelerating - an extra factor of two appears in the size; (2) Zero-point fluctuations do not gravitate - a matter of 120 orders of magnitude; and (3) The 'True' quantum vacuum state does not gravitate. The latter two are explicitly problems related to the interpretation and the physical role and relation of the quantum vacuum with and in general relativity. Their resolution may require a major advance in our formulation and understanding of a common unified approach to quantum physics and gravity. To achieve this goal we must develop an experimental basis and much of the discussion we present is devoted to this task. In the following, we examine the observations and the theory contributing to the current framework comprising these riddles. We consider an interpretation of the first riddle within the context of the universe's quantum vacuum state, and propose an experimental concept to probe the vacuum state of the universe.

  20. Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education University of New Hampshire below), or candidate can obtain MS at UNH on the way to the PhD with Option in Chemistry Education Cumulative exams are split between education and chemistry cores Professional presentation allowed in place

  1. Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

  2. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also go toward BYU

  3. Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Student Academic.fleming@ucr.edu Minor in Chemistry Procedure: It is assumed that you have completed the requirements listed in section to Declare a Minor to Chemistry. Include the following: full name, student identification number, and email

  4. CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry Bachelor's degree programme provides graduates with the title Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Chemistry and Technology. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry

  5. Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 17-May-12/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

  6. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 BL1040 Principles of Biology 4 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 BL3310 Environmental Microbiology 3 CH1153 University

  7. The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate Research Students 2013/14 School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES #12;2 Welcome The School of Chemistry welcomes new postgraduate that is relevant for your time spent in the School, including information about facilities to support your research

  8. Chemistry Department Assessment Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    0 Chemistry Department Assessment May, 2006 Table of Contents Page Executive Summary 1 Prelude 1 Mission Statement and Learning Goals 1 Facilities 2 Staffing 3 Students: Chemistry Majors and Student Taking Service Courses Table: 1997-2005 graduates profile Table: GRE Score for Chemistry Majors, 1993

  9. Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    ) Calamostachys, Lower Black Coal (cones) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 3 Pteridophyta ambigua, Pennsylvanian of Indiana University Sphenopteris fern foliage, Lower Black Coal Progymnosperms (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

  10. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  11. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  14. Isotropic singularity in inhomogeneous brane cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; Y. He; W. C. Lim

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the asymptotic dynamical evolution of spatially inhomogeneous brane-world cosmological models close to the initial singularity. By introducing suitable scale-invariant dependent variables and a suitable gauge, we write the evolution equations of the spatially inhomogeneous $G_{2}$ brane cosmological models with one spatial degree of freedom as a system of autonomous first-order partial differential equations. We study the system numerically, and we find that there always exists an initial singularity, which is characterized by the fact that spatial derivatives are dynamically negligible. More importantly, from the numerical analysis we conclude that there is an initial isotropic singularity in all of these spatially inhomogeneous brane cosmologies for a range of parameter values which include the physically important cases of radiation and a scalar field source. The numerical results are supported by a qualitative dynamical analysis and a calculation of the past asymptotic decay rates. Although the analysis is local in nature, the numerics indicates that the singularity is isotropic for all relevant initial conditions. Therefore this analysis, and a preliminary investigation of general inhomogeneous ($G_0$) models, indicates that it is plausible that the initial singularity is isotropic in spatially inhomogeneous brane-world cosmological models and consequently that brane cosmology naturally gives rise to a set of initial data that provide the conditions for inflation to subsequently take place.

  15. Beyond the Cosmological Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin Joyce; Bhuvnesh Jain; Justin Khoury; Mark Trodden

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After a decade and a half of research motivated by the accelerating universe, theory and experiment have a reached a certain level of maturity. The development of theoretical models beyond \\Lambda, or smooth dark energy, often called modified gravity, has led to broader insights into a path forward, and a host of observational and experimental tests have been developed. In this review we present the current state of the field and describe a framework for anticipating developments in the next decade. We identify the guiding principles for rigorous and consistent modifications of the standard model, and discuss the prospects for empirical tests. We begin by reviewing attempts to consistently modify Einstein gravity in the infrared, focusing on the notion that additional degrees of freedom introduced by the modification must screen themselves from local tests of gravity. We categorize screening mechanisms into three broad classes: mechanisms which become active in regions of high Newtonian potential, those in which first derivatives become important, and those for which second derivatives are important. Examples of the first class, such as f(R) gravity, employ the familiar chameleon or symmetron mechanisms, whereas examples of the last class are galileon and massive gravity theories, employing the Vainshtein mechanism. In each case, we describe the theories as effective theories. We describe experimental tests, summarizing laboratory and solar system tests and describing in some detail astrophysical and cosmological tests. We discuss future tests which will be sensitive to different signatures of new physics in the gravitational sector. Parts that are more relevant to theorists vs. observers/experimentalists are clearly indicated, in the hope that this will serve as a useful reference for both audiences, as well as helping those interested in bridging the gap between them.

  16. Scrutinizing Exotic Cosmological Models Using ESSENCE Supernova Data Combined With Other Cosmological Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Tamara M.; Mortsell, E.; Sollerman, J.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Kirshner, R.P.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; Schmidt, B.P.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /Washington U.,

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first cosmological results from the ESSENCE supernova survey (Wood-Vasey et al. 2007) are extended to a wider range of cosmological models including dynamical dark energy and non-standard cosmological models. We fold in a greater number of external data sets such as the recent Higher-z release of high-redshift supernovae (Riess et al. 2007) as well as several complementary cosmological probes. Model comparison statistics such as the Bayesian and Akaike information criteria are applied to gauge the worth of models. These statistics favor models that give a good fit with fewer parameters. Based on this analysis, the preferred cosmological model is the flat cosmological constant model, where the expansion history of the universe can be adequately described with only one free parameter describing the energy content of the universe. Amongst the more exotic models that provide good fits to the data, we note a preference for models whose best-fit parameters reduce them to the cosmological constant model.

  17. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  18. The supernova cosmology cookbook: Bayesian numerical recipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpenka, N V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and observational cosmology have enjoyed a number of significant successes over the last two decades. Cosmic microwave background measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck, together with large-scale structure and supernova (SN) searches, have put very tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) played a central role in the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the amount of high quality SN observations, with SN catalogues now containing hundreds of objects. This number is expected to increase to thousands in the next few years, as data from next-generation missions, such as the Dark Energy Survey and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope become available. In order to exploit the vast amount of forthcoming high quality data, it is extremely important to develop robust and efficient statistical analysis methods to answer cosmological q...

  19. Inflationary universe in loop quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Zhang; Yi Ling

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology provides a nice solution of avoiding the big bang singularity through a big bounce mechanism in the high energy region. In loop quantum cosmology an inflationary universe is emergent after the big bounce, no matter what matter component is filled in the universe. A super-inflation phase without phantom matter will appear in a certain way in the initial stage after the bounce; then the universe will undergo a normal inflation stage. We discuss the condition of inflation in detail in this framework. Also, for slow-roll inflation, we expect the imprint from the effects of the loop quantum cosmology should be left in the primordial perturbation power spectrum. However, we show that this imprint is too weak to be observed.

  20. The Cosmological Constant in the Quantum Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Larsen; Yasunori Nomura; H. L. L. Roberts

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new framework for describing the multiverse has been proposed which is based on the principles of quantum mechanics. The framework allows for well-defined predictions, both regarding global properties of the universe and outcomes of particular experiments, according to a single probability formula. This provides complete unification of the eternally inflating multiverse and many worlds in quantum mechanics. In this paper we elucidate how cosmological parameters can be calculated in this framework, and study the probability distribution for the value of the cosmological constant. We consider both positive and negative values, and find that the observed value is consistent with the calculated distribution at an order of magnitude level. In particular, in contrast to the case of earlier measure proposals, our framework prefers a positive cosmological constant over a negative one. These results depend only moderately on how we model galaxy formation and life evolution therein.

  1. Brane f(R) gravity cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcerzak, Adam; DaPbrowski, Mariusz P. [Institute of Physics, University of Szczecin, Wielkopolska 15, 70-451 Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By the application of the generalized Israel junction conditions we derive cosmological equations for the fourth-order f(R) brane gravity and study their cosmological solutions. We show that there exists a nonstatic solution which describes a four-dimensional de Sitter (dS{sub 4}) brane embedded in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS{sub 5}) bulk for a vanishing Weyl tensor contribution. On the other hand, for the case of a nonvanishing Weyl tensor contribution, there exists a static brane solution only. We claim that in order to get some more general nonstatic f(R) brane configurations, one needs to admit a dynamical matter energy-momentum tensor in the bulk rather than just a bulk cosmological constant.

  2. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Thomas

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

  3. Analysis of inflationary cosmological models in gauge theories of gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Minkevich; A. S. Garkun

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Inflationary homogeneous isotropic cosmological models filled by scalar fields and ultrarelativistic matter are examined in the framework of gauge theories of gravitation. By using quadratic scalar field potential numerical analysis of flat, open and closed models is curried out. Properties of cosmological models are investigated in dependence on indefinite parameter of cosmological equations and initial conditions at a bounce. Fulfilled analysis demonstrates regular character of all cosmological models.

  4. Quintom Cosmology: Theoretical implications and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Mohammad R. Setare; Jun-Qing Xia

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the paradigm of quintom cosmology. This scenario is motivated by the observational indications that the equation of state of dark energy across the cosmological constant boundary is mildly favored, although the data are still far from being conclusive. As a theoretical setup we introduce a no-go theorem existing in quintom cosmology, and based on it we discuss the conditions for the equation of state of dark energy realizing the quintom scenario. The simplest quintom model can be achieved by introducing two scalar fields with one being quintessence and the other phantom. Based on the double-field quintom model we perform a detailed analysis of dark energy perturbations and we discuss their effects on current observations. This type of scenarios usually suffer from a manifest problem due to the existence of a ghost degree of freedom, and thus we review various alternative realizations of the quintom paradigm. The developments in particle physics and string theory provide potential clues indicating that a quintom scenario may be obtained from scalar systems with higher derivative terms, as well as from non-scalar systems. Additionally, we construct a quintom realization in the framework of braneworld cosmology, where the cosmic acceleration and the phantom divide crossing result from the combined effects of the field evolution on the brane and the competition between four and five dimensional gravity. Finally, we study the outsets and fates of a universe in quintom cosmology. In a scenario with null energy condition violation one may obtain a bouncing solution at early times and therefore avoid the Big Bang singularity. Furthermore, if this occurs periodically, we obtain a realization of an oscillating universe. Lastly, we comment on several open issues in quintom cosmology and their connection to future investigations.

  5. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  6. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

  7. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

  8. Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

  9. Kinetics of the Dissolution of Scheelite in Groundwater: Implications for Environmental and Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Stephanie Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten, Its History, Geology, Ore-dressing, Metallurgy,5.1 Implications for Environmental Geology…………………………..26 5.2Implications for Economic Geology………………………………..27 6. Future

  10. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  11. Fischler-Susskind holographic cosmology revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Diaz; M. A. Per; Antonio Segui

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When Fischler and Susskind proposed a holographic prescription based on the Particle Horizon, they found that spatially closed cosmological models do not verify it due to the apparently unavoidable recontraction of the Particle Horizon area. In this article, after a short review of their original work, we expose graphically and analytically that spatially closed cosmological models can avoid this problem if they expand fast enough. It has been also shown that the Holographic Principle is saturated for a codimension one brane dominated Universe. The Fischler-Susskind prescription is used to obtain the maximum number of degrees of freedom per Planck volume at the Planck era compatible with the Holographic Principle.

  12. Thermodynamics of Ideal Gas in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Qiu Gu

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The equation of state and the state functions for the gravitational source are necessary conditions for solving cosmological model and stellar structure. The usual treatments are directly based on the laws of thermodynamics, and the physical meanings of some concepts are obscure. This letter show that, we can actually derive all explicit fundamental state functions for the ideal gas in the context of cosmology via rigorous dynamical and statistical calculation. These relations have clear physical meanings, and are valid in both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. Some features of the equation of state are important for a stable structure of a star with huge mass.

  13. Cosmology as Science?: From Inflation to Eternity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade or two have represented the golden age of observational cosmology, producing a revolution in our picture of the Universe on its largest scales, and perhaps also its smallest ones. I will argue that these recent development bring to the forefront some vexing questions about whether various fundamental assumptions about the universe are in fact falsifiable. I will focus on 3 issues: (1) "Proving" Inflation, (2) Dark Energy and Anthropic Arguments, and (3) Cosmology of the far future.Interview with Lawrence M. Krauss

  14. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iorio; G. Lambiase

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, that cannot be explained by the conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  15. The Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It will be argued here that the cosmological constant problem exists because of the way the vacuum is defined in quantum field theory. It has been known for some time that for QFT to be gauge invariant certain terms--such as part of the vacuum polarization tensor--must be eliminated either explicitly or by some form of regularization followed by renormalization. It has recently been shown that lack of gauge invariance is a result of the way the vacuum is defined, and redefining the vacuum so that the theory is gauge invariant may also offer a solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  16. Domain wall cosmology and multiple accelerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonwoo; Nam, Siyoung; Park, Chanyong [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We classify the cosmological behaviors of the domain wall under junctions between two spacetimes in terms of various parameters: cosmological constants of bulk spacetime, a tension of a domain wall, and mass parameters of the black-hole-type metric. Especially, we consider the false-true vacuum-type junctions and the domain wall connecting between an inner AdS space and an outer AdS Reissner-Nordstroem black hole. We find that there exists a solution to the junction equations with multiple accelerations.

  17. Exact Classical Correspondence in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncy V. John

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a Friedmann model with appropriate matter/energy density such that the solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation exactly corresponds to the classical evolution. The well-known problems in quantum cosmology disappear in the resulting coasting evolution. The exact quantum-classical correspondence is demonstrated with the help of the de Broglie-Bohm and modified de Broglie-Bohm approaches to quantum mechanics. It is reassuring that such a solution leads to a robust model for the universe, which agrees well with cosmological expansion indicated by SNe Ia data.

  18. Relativity of spatial scale and of the Hubble flow: The logical foundations of relativity and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V Guruprasad

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Formalising the logical dependence of physical quantities on material referents of scale, I show that both Hubble's law and the cosmological constant are in fact exactly replicable by a spatial contraction of referents locally on earth, and that the Pioneer anomaly is irrefutable indication that this is the case. The formalism literally embodies Feynman's ``hot-plate'' model, predictably yielding a logical derivation of the relativity postulates, and importantly, suffices to demonstrate the inherent logical consistency of general relativity and quantum mechanics, whose foundations I have shown separately to be fundamentally computational. I further show that the spatial contraction of our referents also accounts for considerable planetary and geological data inexplicable in the standard model, and predicts that the Hubble flow appears differently or is altogether absent from platforms in deep space, depending on the local physics.

  19. GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary? P K. Haft Division of Earth and Ocean 27708 Ie-mail: /wff@geo.duke_eciul ABSTRACT Ongoing ctisruption of ancient, varnished desert pavement that the pavement disturbances reported here ~ue rarc on the millcnnhll time scale of desert varnish format ion

  20. CLARA S. CHAN Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    19716 302-831-1819 Delaware Biotechnology Institute 15 Innovation Way Newark, DE 19711 302 and Environmental Engineering, 1998 B. S. Stanford University Geological and Environmental Sciences, 1997, PI. 2000-2006 Geologist and Environmental Engineer CDM (now CDM Smith), Walnut Creek, CA 1998

  1. Department of Geological Sciences Undergraduate Handbook 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    about future sea-level rise, and are there untapped energy and mineral resources both onshore and offshore New Zealand; are also increasingly important concerns both at the regional and global scales. Come-exploration, volcanology, hazard management, engineering geology, environmental planning, water resources, science teaching

  2. Department of Geological Sciences Postgraduate Handbook 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    about future sea-level rise, and are there untapped energy and mineral resources both onshore and offshore New Zealand; are also increasingly important concerns both at the regional and global scales. Come-exploration, volcanology, hazard management, engineering geology, environmental planning, water resources, science teaching

  3. 145Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201314

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    . An introduction to seismic, gravity, and magnetic methods and their interpretation procedures and applications and their methods of interpretation. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL 221 and GEOL 222. GEOL 306 Economic Minerals Geology.2; 3 cr. A course on the principles of air photo interpretation and remote sensing; the construction

  4. 149Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An introduction to seismic, gravity, and magnetic methods and their interpretation procedures and applications and their methods of interpretation. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL 221 and GEOL 222. GEOL 306 Economic Minerals Geology.2; 3 cr. A course on the principles of air photo interpretation and remote sensing; the construction

  5. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437 SPRING 2014 OF NATURAL RESOURCES INCLUDING OIL, COAL, MINERALS AND GROUNDWATER. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF GEOPHYSICS MAY, IF AVAILABLE, WE WILL VISIT AN OIL DRILLING RIG IN OPERATION. DATES FOR FIELD TRIPS WILL DEPEND ON THE WEATHER

  6. Petrology GEOL 315 SIUC Department of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Petrology GEOL 315 SIUC Department of Geology Spring 2014 Syllabus Professor Dr. Justin: 6184534849 TA: Ben Farcy Email: bfarcy@siu.edu Text: Petrology, Blatt, Tracy and Owens, third addition, May 9 Chapt # Lab Week 1 Intro to Petrology/Minerals 1, 2 Week 2 Classification 3 Intro

  7. INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH ADVANCED CONSTRAINED INVERSIONS by Peter George framework (i.e. minimization of an objective function). I developed several methods to reach this goal constraints to the inverse problem. Lastly, I developed an iterative procedure for cooperatively inverting

  8. Briefing Topic: Geologic Tools for the Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Briefing Topic: Geologic Tools for the Moon Review of Apollo David A. Kring 29 December 2009 #12 Apollo Lunar Sample Return Container 55 Small Tool Carrier 58 Large Tool Carrier 62 Crew Training on Apollo · Apollo 11 and 12 · 860 g (1.9 lb) · 41 cm hammer length · 16 cm head length · Apollo 14, 15, 16

  9. University College Dublin UCD School of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , production geology, petroleum geochemistry, petrophysics, reservoir engineering, reservoir modellingUniversity College Dublin UCD School of Geological Sciences Tullow Oil Professorship of Petroleum Geoscience Temporary 5year post Tullow Oil Lecturer in Petroleum Geoscience Two temporary 5year posts

  10. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Geologic Storage of CO2, in Carbon Dioxide Capture forFormations - Results from the CO2 Capture Project: GeologicBenson, Process Modeling of CO2 Injection into Natural Gas

  11. Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Internal Geology and...

  12. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  13. Neutrinos in physics, astrophysics, and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of neutrino anomalies in particle physics and of the role played by neutrinos in cosmology and astrophysics is presented. The main part of the talk is dedicated to the impact of neutrinos and in particular of neutrino oscillations on BBN and to a possible spatial variation of primordial abundances.

  14. A Critical Review of Classical Bouncing Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana Battefeld; Patrick Peter

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the proliferation of bouncing models in recent years, we gather and critically assess these proposals in a comprehensive review. The Planck data shows an unmistakably red, quasi scale-invariant, purely adiabatic primordial power spectrum and no primary non-Gaussianities. While these observations are consistent with inflationary predictions, bouncing cosmologies aspire to provide an alternative framework to explain them. Such models face many problems, both of the purely theoretical kind, such as the necessity of violating the NEC and instabilities, and at the cosmological application level, as exemplified by the possible presence of shear. We provide a pedagogical introduction to these problems and also assess the fitness of different proposals with respect to the data. For example, many models predict a slightly blue spectrum and must be fine-tuned to generate a red spectral index; as a side effect, large non-Gaussianities often result. We highlight several promising attempts to violate the NEC without introducing dangerous instabilities at the classical and/or quantum level. If primordial gravitational waves are observed, certain bouncing cosmologies, such as the cyclic scenario, are in trouble, while others remain valid. We conclude that, while most bouncing cosmologies are far from providing an alternative to the inflationary paradigm, a handful of interesting proposals have surfaced, which warrant further research. The constraints and lessons learned as laid out in this review might guide future research.

  15. COSMOLOGICAL LITHIUM PROBLEM: A DIFFERENT APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    LITHIUM 7Li sources BBN cosmic-ray interactions (ingredients: shock waves, magnetic field, chargedCOSMOLOGICAL LITHIUM PROBLEM: A DIFFERENT APPROACH Tijana Prodanovi, University of Novi Sad Tamara Observations - boxes 4He ­ OK D ­ right on! 7Li ­ problem! Factor of 3-4 discrepancy! LITHIUM PROBLEM

  16. Cosmology constrains gravitational four-fermion interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I.B.; Rudenko, A.S., E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su, E-mail: a.s.rudenko@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI). This interaction gets dominating on the Planck scale. If one confines to the regular, axial-axial part of this interaction, the results do not comply with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology for the spatial flat or closed Universe. In principle, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction could restore the agreement.

  17. Cosmology constrains gravitational four-fermion interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich; A. S. Rudenko

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI). This interaction gets dominating on the Planck scale. If one confines to the regular, axial-axial part of this interaction, the results do not comply with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology for the spatial flat or closed Universe. In principle, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction could restore the agreement.

  18. Closed inflationary universe models in Braneworld Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera; Joel Saavedra

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we study closed inflationary universe models proposed by Linde in a brane world cosmological context. In this scenario we determine and characterize the existence of a closed universe, in presence of one self-interacting scalar field with an inflationary stage. Our results are compared to those found in General Relativity.

  19. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  20. Nonlocality as Evidence for a Multiverse Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank J. Tipler

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that observations of quantum nonlocality can be interpreted as purely local phenomena, provided one assumes that the cosmos is a multiverse. Conversely, the observation of quantum nonlocality can be interpreted as observation evidence for a multiverse cosmology, just as observation of the setting of the Sun can be interpreted as evidence for the Earth's rotation.

  1. Axion-dilaton cosmology and dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo; Moeller, Jan, E-mail: catena@sissa.it, E-mail: janmoe@mail.desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Theory Group, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a class of flat FRW cosmological models based on D = 4 axion-dilaton gravity universally coupled to cosmological background fluids. In particular, we investigate the possibility of recurrent acceleration, which was recently shown to be generically realized in a wide class of axion-dilaton models, but in the absence of cosmological background fluids. We observe that, once we impose the existence of radiation- and matter-dominated earlier stages of cosmic evolution, the axion-dilaton dynamics is altered significantly with respect to the case of pure axion-dilaton gravity. Explicit computations are done considering a universal metric coupling between the dilaton and the matter fields. As a result we find that during the matter-dominated epoch the scalar fields remain either frozen, due to the large expansion rate, or enter a cosmological scaling regime. In both cases, oscillations of the effective equation of state around the acceleration boundary value are impossible. Models which enter an oscillatory stage in the low redshift regime, on the other hand, are disfavored by observations. We also comment on the viability of the axion-dilaton system as a candidate for dynamical dark energy. In a certain subclass of models, an intermediate scaling regime is succeeded by eternal acceleration. We also briefly discuss the issue of dependence on initial conditions.

  2. Axion-Dilaton Cosmology and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Catena; Jan Möller

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a class of flat FRW cosmological models based on D=4 axion-dilaton gravity universally coupled to cosmological background fluids. In particular, we investigate the possibility of recurrent acceleration, which was recently shown to be generically realized in a wide class of axion-dilaton models, but in absence of cosmological background fluids. We observe that, once we impose the existence of radiation -and matter- dominated earlier stages of cosmic evolution, the axion-dilaton dynamics is altered significantly with respect to the case of pure axion-dilaton gravity. During the matter dominated epoch the scalar fields remain either frozen, due to the large expansion rate, or enter a cosmological scaling regime. In both cases, oscillations of the effective equation of state around the acceleration boundary value are impossible. Models which enter an oscillatory stage in the low redshift regime, on the other hand, are disfavored by observations. We also comment on the viability of the axion-dilaton system as a candidate for dynamical dark energy. In a certain subclass of models, an intermediate scaling regime is succeeded by eternal acceleration. We also briefly discuss the issue of dependence on initial conditions.

  3. Vacuum Fluctuations Cannot Mimic a Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Klauber

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    When the vacuum fluctuation pressure is calculated directly from fundamental principles of quantum field theory, in the same manner as vacuum fluctuation energy density is commonly calculated, one finds it is not equal to the negative of the vacuum fluctuation energy density. Thus, vacuum fluctuations cannot manifest as a cosmological constant of any order.

  4. Cosmological model with movement in fifth dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Belayev

    2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented cosmological model is 3D brane world sheet moved in extra dimension with variable scale factor. Analysis of the geodesic motion of the test particle gives settle explanation of the Pioneer effect. It is found that for considered metric the solution of the semi-classical Einstein equations with various parameters conforms to isotropic expanded and anisotropic stationary universe.

  5. Fluctuation, Dissipation and Irreversibility in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the appearance of time-asymmetric behavior in physical processes in cosmology and in the dynamics of the Universe itself. We begin with an analysis of the nature and origin of irreversibility in well-known physical processes such as dispersion, diffusion, dissipation and mixing, and make the distinction between processes whose irreversibility arises from the stipulation of special initial conditions, and those arising from the system's interaction with a coarse-grained environment. We then study the irreversibility associated with quantum fluctuations in cosmological processes like particle creation and the `birth of the Universe'. We suggest that the backreaction effect of such quantum processes can be understood as the manifestation of a fluctuation-dissipation relation relating fluctuations of quantum fields to dissipations in the dynamics of spacetime. For the same reason it is shown that dissipation is bound to appear in the dynamics of minisuperspace cosmologies. This provides a natural course for the emergence of a cosmological and thermodynamic arrow of time and suggests a meaningful definition of gravitational entropy. We conclude with a discussion on the criteria for the choice of coarse-grainings and the stability of persistent physical structures. Invited Talk given at the Conference on The Physical Origin of Time-Asymmetry Huelva, Spain, Oct. 1991, Proceedings eds. J. J. Halliwell, J. Perez-Mercader and W. H. Zurek, Cambridge University Press, 1993

  6. Surface Tension and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Samuel; Supurna Sinha

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The astronomically observed value of the cosmological constant is small but non-zero. This raises two questions together known as the cosmological constant problem a) why is lambda so nearly zero? b) why is lambda not EXACTLY zero? Sorkin has proposed that b) can be naturally explained as a one by square root N fluctuation by invoking discreteness of spacetime at the Planck scale due to quantum gravity. In this paper we shed light on these questions by developing an analogy between the cosmological constant and the surface tension of membranes. The ``cosmological constant problem'' has a natural analogue in the membrane context: the vanishingly small surface tension of fluid membranes provides an example where question a) above arises and is answered. We go on to find a direct analogue of Sorkin's proposal for answering question b) in the membrane context, where the discreteness of spacetime translates into the molecular structure of matter. We propose analogue experiments to probe a small and fluctuating surface tension in fluid membranes. A counterpart of dimensional reduction a la Kaluza-Klein and large extra dimensions also appears in the physics of fluid membranes.

  7. area geological characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL sequestration pilot studies to determine...

  8. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

  9. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geochemistry in carbon sequestration environments. Abstractimplications for carbon sequestration. Environ Earth Sci. ,from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic

  10. GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN, SOUTHERN UASCSTCH H Q - W T A X H E i i - UT&H #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Department of Gedogy Provo, Utah #12;GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN PART OF DRY MOUNTAIN, SOUTHERN WASATCH M O U N

  11. What can I do with a degree in Geology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    What can I do with a degree in Geology? Science Planning your career Choosing a career involves.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Geology? Geology in the twenty-first century is a fascinating, exciting,incredibly diverse,earthquakes,dramatic and varied geomorphology,and its 500 million years of pre and post-Gondwana geological history,is one

  12. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN By R.M. Flores,1 C.W. Keighin,1 A.M. Ochs,2 P.D. Warwick,1 L.R. Bader,1 and E.C. Murphy3 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 3 North

  13. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Geological Engineering CEE 330 & GLE 474 or instructor consent 3 0.0 CEE 631 Toxicants in the Environment

  14. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal...

  15. Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

  16. Chemistry Add-In for Word

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Add-In (.NET) links a semantic chemistry engine (.NUMBO) through a command interface (CID) to a chemistry zone. Chemistry zones are textual or graphic renderings within a Word document (DOCX). All content and relationships are bound to CML... OOXML + CML •Data publication difficult and unsupported •Insufficient data to fully support research •Data preparation integrated into user workflow •Open Standards promote Open Semantic Science Domain aware software and semantic data allows...

  17. Lab 4: Plate Tectonics Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    1 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics ­ Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction The likelihood of major geologic hazards associated with the lithosphere, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, is not uniform around provides a ready explanation for the distribution of these types of geologic hazards. It is useful

  18. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik difficult to produce a reliable subdivision. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological samples

  19. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik Difficult to Produce a Reliable Subdivision The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often the area, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological

  20. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to ductivities. Geologic logs sometimes show thin layers limit further spreading of contaminants. This flow model accounts for of potentially high hydraulic conductivity embedded complex geologic units that vary measured different methods can be employed to represent thein a geologic unit. A composite model was used

  1. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3 CONTENTS Studies for Students #lo, Geologic Guide to Provo Canyon and Weber Canyon, Central Wasatch Mountains, Utah ............................................................................................................................. Randy L. Chamberlain The Geology of the Drum Mountains, Millard and Juab Counties, Utah

  2. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I Papers presented at the 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28-29, 1978, at Brig- ham Young ............................................................................................................................Publications and Maps of the Geology Department 91 Cover The Great Basrn seen from a htgh

  3. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2 CONTENTS The Kinnikinic Quartzite ........................................................Robert Q. Oaks,Jr., and W . Calvin James Geology of the Sage Valley 7 W'Quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho, and Lincoln County, Wyoming ....................J ohn L. Conner Geology of the Elk Valley Quadrangle, Bear

  4. Semantic e-Science and Geology Clinton Smyth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, David

    Semantic e-Science and Geology Clinton Smyth1 , David Poole2 and Rita Sharma3 1 Georeference Online@cs.ubc.ca Abstract e-Science, as implemented for the study of geology with Geographic Information Systems over the Internet, has highlighted the need for standardization in the semantics of geology, and stimulated

  5. CHAPTER II GEOLOGY Blank page retained for pagination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER II GEOLOGY #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;SHORELINES AND COASTS OF THE GULF or discordant with the grain (dominant trend) of the geologic structures of a coastal regi?n, but King (1942, pIOnal geology, geomorphology, sedimentation, oceanography of the inshore zone, meteorology, climatology, biol

  6. SEPM (Society for Sedementary Geology) Twenhofel medal awarded to USGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    SEPM (Society for Sedementary Geology) Twenhofel medal awarded to USGS Scientist Emeritus Walter the highest award given by the Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) -- the Twenhofel medal. Walt joins an illustrious list of past Twenhofel recipients, which reads as a veritable "Who's Who" of sedimentary geology

  7. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2013 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  8. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA b Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713

  9. Job Vacancy Notice Job Title: Assistant Professor -Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    1 Job Vacancy Notice Job Title: Assistant Professor - Geology Job ID: 6477 Location: Regular-track Assistant Professor in the general area of "hardrock" geology. The SEES community includes 14 full-time faculty members, 25 Masters and PhD candidates, and approximately 150 Geology, Environmental Science

  10. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  11. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  12. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4 The Fossil Vertebrates of Utah Salt Lake Gty, Utah 84102 W .E. Miller Deparlment~of Geology and Zoology Bngham Young Unrwerrrly Provo of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblln Cynthia M. Gardner Issue

  13. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  14. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2012 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  15. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology College of Sciences geoscience.unlv.edu/ Mission of the College: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Geology Career Geoscientists are stewards understanding of Earth processes and history. Value of the Geology Degree Opportunities for interesting

  16. SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, David L.

    SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology Course Syllabus Spring 2011 Instructor: Professor David L. Kimbrough email: dkimbrough@geology.sdsu.edu, Phone: 594-1385 Office: GMCS-229A; Office Necessary: Field notebook similar to "Rite in the Rain" all-weather Geological Field Book No., 540F J

  17. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2 CONTENTS Studies for Students ............................................................................................................................... Robert C. Ahlborn Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Sahara dune sand, X130. Photo, Univer~ityof Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham

  18. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2 CONTENTS Stratigraphy ...................................................................................................... Terry C. Gosney 27 Geology of the Champlin Peak Quadrangle,Juab and Millard Counties, Utah ..................................................................................................................................... David R. Keller 103 Publications and Maps of the Department of Geology 117 Cover: Rafted orjoreign

  19. Inverse Modelling in Geology by Interactive Evolutionary Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    Inverse Modelling in Geology by Interactive Evolutionary Computation Chris Wijns a,b,, Fabio of geological processes, in the absence of established numerical criteria to act as inversion targets, requires evolutionary computation provides for the inclusion of qualitative geological expertise within a rigorous

  20. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1 CONTENTS Diagenetic Aspects ................................................................................................... Steven G. Driese Geology of the Dog Valley-Red Ridge Area, Southern Pavant Mountains, Millard County .................................................................................................. Lynn C Meibos Geology of the Southwestern Quarter of the Scipio North (15-Minute) Quadrangle, Millard

  1. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2014 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  2. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3 CONTENTS Remains of Ornithopod ...........................................................................................................................................................ames M. Stolle Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Index to volumes 21-25 of Brigham Young University Geology Studies ........................................Carol T . Smith and Nathan M. Smith Cwec

  3. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2 CONTENTS A New Large Theropod................................................................................................................................................................ Danny J. Wyatt Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Cretaceouscoals near Castle Gate, Utab. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors

  4. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;P I - #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3 Conodont Biostratigraphy-meeting field trip held in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain section, Geological Society of America of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblin Cynthia M

  5. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  6. VOLUMF -31, PART 1 BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Y O U N G VOLUMF -31, PART 1 #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES VOLUME 31.PART 1 CONTENTS .................................................................. Ralph E.Lambert Geology of the Mount Ellen Quadrangle. Henry Mountains. Garfield County. Utah near White Horse Pass. Elko County. Nevada ............Stephen M Smith Geology of the Steele Butte

  7. The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski S Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski Submitted to the Department capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs

  8. The kinematic component of the cosmological redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Chodorowski

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift. However, Bunn & Hogg have recently pointed out that to settle properly this problem, one has to transport parallelly the velocity four-vector of a distant galaxy to the observer's position. Performing such a transport along the null geodesic of photons arriving from the galaxy, they found that the cosmological redshift is purely kinematic. Here we argue that one should rather transport the velocity four-vector along the geodesic connecting the points of intersection of the world-lines of the galaxy and the observer with the hypersurface of constant cosmic time. We find that the resulting relation between the transported velocity and the redshift of arriving photons is not given by a relativistic Doppler formula. Instead, for small redshifts it coincides with the well known non-relativistic decomposition of the redshift into a Doppler (kinematic) component and a gravitational one. We perform such a decomposition for arbitrary large redshifts and derive a formula for the kinematic component of the cosmological redshift, valid for any FLRW cosmology. In particular, in a universe with Omega_m = 0.24 and Omega_Lambda = 0.76, a quasar at a redshift 6, at the time of emission of photons reaching us today had the recession velocity v = 0.997c. This can be contrasted with v = 0.96c, had the redshift been entirely kinematic. Thus, for recession velocities of such high-redshift sources, the effect of deceleration of the early Universe clearly prevails over the effect of its relatively recent acceleration. Last but not least, we show that the so-called proper recession velocities of galaxies, commonly used in cosmology, are in fact radial components of the galaxies' four-velocity vectors. As such, they can indeed attain superluminal values, but should not be regarded as real velocities.

  9. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe made of stiff matter, dust matter, and dark energy. A stiff matter era is present in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich (1972) where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. It also occurs in certain cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the energy density of the stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular. It starts from a state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the energy density of the stiff matter is negative (anti-stiff matter). This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction. In that case, the primordial universe is non-singular. It starts from a state in which the scale factor is finite and the energy density is equal to zero. For the sake of generality, we consider a cosmological constant of arbitrary sign. When the cosmological constant is positive, the universe asymptotically reaches a de Sitter phase where the scale factor increases exponentially rapidly. This can account for the accelerating expansion of the universe that we observe at present. When the cosmological constant is negative (anti-de Sitter), the evolution of the universe is cyclic. Therefore, depending on the sign of the energy density of the stiff matter and of the dark energy, we obtain singular and non-singular expanding or cyclic universes.

  10. Geology Department Graduate Certificates: These certificates are designed to provide practicing professionals an opportunity to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geology Department Graduate Certificates: These certificates are designed to provide practicing are offered: Certificate in Engineering Geology Purpose The Graduate Certificate in Engineering Geology provides practicing geologists an opportunity to upgrade their engineering geology credentials while

  11. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of SelectiveBrownFirstU.S. DOEChemistry

  12. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  13. CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIVISION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartmentCAIRSPlanning TimelineChemistry |CHARTERExponent,

  14. Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry: Solving the Cofactor Imbalance Problem Imbalances for the production of biofuels or other valuable chemicals. Though several research groups have re

  15. 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Emily A

    2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

  16. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies...

  17. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

  18. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

  19. Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2014-06-02 08:56:54...

  20. Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forensics, and consequence management," Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, 1-18 (2012). Magen E. Coleman, Evelyn M. Bond, W. Allen Moody, and Lav Tandon,...

  1. CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of --Chemistry This publication refers.imperial.ac.uk/pgprospectus. Chemistry Interests in chemistry at Imperial College cover physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, polymer and biological chemistry and chemical crystallography, as well as intersectional and medical topics

  2. Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry The Department of Chemistry offers a minor in chemistry to students who wish to enhance their degrees with a strong concentration in this area. The Chemistry minor and enhances the records of students. The Chemistry minor provides a broad and general exposure

  3. The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P.N.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

  4. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  5. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  7. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  8. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  9. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  11. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  12. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  14. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  15. ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY FALL 2008 CHEMISTRY 410 (CRN 11299:), CHEMISTRY 510 (CRN 11315)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    materials and announcements will be posted on the site. Required Text: "Synthesis and Technique in InorganicADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY ­ FALL 2008 CHEMISTRY 410 (CRN 11299:), CHEMISTRY 510 (CRN 11315 to a wide range of conceptual and practical (laboratory) inorganic chemistry. Because of the introductory

  16. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 Problem 1: Nighttime loss of NOx in the lower troposphere proceeds by: 1 Air Pollution Physics and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

  17. Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMR Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building supports research and experimental activities for plutonium and uranium analytical chemistry and metallurgy. In 1952, the first LANL CMR facility was completed. At that time

  18. International Journal of Geography and Geology, 2013, 2(1):1-13 THE REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY, NEW CHALLENGES FOR GEOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    International Journal of Geography and Geology, 2013, 2(1):1-13 1 THE REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY, NEW CHALLENGES FOR GEOLOGICAL AND MINING MAPPING IN THE WEST AFRICAN CRATON - THE EXAMPLE OF CÔTE D'IVOIRE Gbele of the evolution on the use of remote sensing imagery for geological and mining mapping in West Africa

  19. Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

  20. Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

  1. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education - 40 credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH3020 Laboratory Teaching Internship 2 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4810 Design/Oper of High School Chemistry

  2. Geological well log analysis. Third ed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirson, S.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

  3. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  4. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  5. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  6. Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

  7. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  8. Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic Introduction to Municipal Solid Waste Incineration 2 Chapter 2 Plants Considered and Samples Collected 5 Chapter 3 Mapping of Ash Chemistry in MSWI Plants 8 Chapter 4 Advanced Characterization Methods 12 4

  9. Richard T. Oakley FRSC, Professor of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Interests: Synthesis and solid state transport properties of open shell inorganic and organic ring systems. Heavy atom radicals as multifunctional molecular conductors and magnetic materials. Academic Background: B.Sc., 1969, Honours Chemistry, University of British Columbia M.Sc., 1970, Inorganic Chemistry

  10. Exploring Chemistry Using SMT Rolf Fagerberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flamm, Christoph

    Exploring Chemistry Using SMT Rolf Fagerberg1 , Christoph Flamm2 , Daniel Merkle1 , Philipp Peters1 power of Satisfiability Modulo Theory (SMT) solvers. We show results for an analysis of the Pentose in the usage of SMT for expressing search problems in chemistry, and in the generality of its resulting

  11. Chemistry 593: Stirling's Formula David Ronis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    Chemistry 593: Stirling's Formula © David Ronis McGill University There is a simple way to obtain) Winter, 2014 #12;Chemistry 593 -2- Stirling's Formula which implies that ln(x!)x ln(x) - x + ln[(2 x)1/2 ]. (4') Clearly, for xO(1023 ), the last logarithm is negligible, and the simple form of Stirling

  12. advanced organic chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Chemistry Websites Summary: Discussion...

  13. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  14. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  15. EUNHA: a new cosmological hydro simulation code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shina, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S; Park, Changbom

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a parallel cosmological hydrodynamic simulation code designed for the study of formation and evolution of cosmological structures. The gravitational force is calculated using the TreePM method and the hydrodynamics is implemented based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The initial displacement and velocity of simulation particles are calculated according to second-order linear perturbation theory using the power spectra of dark matter and baryonic matter. The initial background temperature is given by Recfast and the temperature uctuations at the initial particle position are determined by the adiabatic model. We use a time-limiter scheme over the individual time steps to capture shock-fronts and to ease the time-step tension between the shock and preshock particles. We also include the astrophysical gas processes of radiative heating/cooling, star formation, metal enrichment, and supernova feedback. We have tested the code in several standard cases such as one-dimensional Riemann prob...

  16. Torsion, Scalar Field, Mass and FRW Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanta Mahato

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Einstein-Cartan space $U_4$, an axial vector torsion together with a scalar field connected to a local scale factor have been considered. By combining two particular terms from the SO(4,1) Pontryagin density and then modifying it in a SO(3,1) invariant way, we get a Lagrangian density with Lagrange multipliers. Then under FRW-cosmological background, where the scalar field is connected to the source of gravitation, the Euler-Lagrange equations ultimately give the constancy of the gravitational constant together with only three kinds of energy densities representing mass, radiation and cosmological constant. The gravitational constant has been found to be linked with the geometrical Nieh-Yan density.

  17. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  18. Nonsingular Decaying Vacuum Cosmology and Entropy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; S. Basilakos; Joan Solà

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic behavior of a decaying vacuum cosmology describing the entire cosmological history evolving between two extreme (early and late time) de Sitter eras is investigated. The thermal evolution from the early de Sitter to the radiation phase is discussed in detail. The temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically determined. The entropy of the effectively massless particles is initially zero but evolves continuously to the present day maximum value within the current Hubble radius, $S_0 \\sim 10^{88}$ in natural units. By using the Gibbons-Hawking temperature relation for the de Sitter spacetime, it is found that the ratio between the primeval and the late time vacuum energy densities is $\\rho_{vI}/\\rho_{v0} \\sim 10^{123}$, as required by some naive estimates from quantum field theory.

  19. The Construction of Sudden Cosmological Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Barrow; S. Cotsakis; A. Tsokaros

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of the Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmological equations of general relativity have been found with finite-time singularities that are everywhere regular, have regular Hubble expansion rate, and obey the strong-energy conditions but possess pressure and acceleration singularities at finite time that are not associated with geodesic incompleteness. We show how these solutions with sudden singularities can be constructed using fractional series methods and find the limiting form of the equation of state on approach to the singularity.

  20. On Doppler tracking in cosmological spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Carrera; Domenico Giulini

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a rigorous derivation of the general-relativistic formula for the two-way Doppler tracking of a spacecraft in Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker and in McVittie spacetimes. The leading order corrections of the so-determined acceleration to the Newtonian acceleration are due to special-relativistic effects and cosmological expansion. The latter, although linear in the Hubble constant, is negligible in typical applications within the Solar System.

  1. Physical space and cosmology. I: Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy P. Polulyakh

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the physical space seems the most important subject in physics. A present paper proceeds from the assumption of physical reality of space contrary to the standard view of the space as a purely relational nonexistence - void. The space and its evolution are the primary sources of phenomena in Mega- and micro-worlds. Thus cosmology and particle physics have the same active agent - physical space.

  2. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Chao-Jun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  3. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  4. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Cluster Velocity Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman Bhattacharya; Arthur Kosowsky

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Future microwave sky surveys will have the sensitivity to detect the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from moving galaxy clusters, thus providing a direct measurement of their line-of-sight peculiar velocity. We show that cluster peculiar velocity statistics applied to foreseeable surveys will put significant constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters. We consider three statistical quantities that can be constructed from a cluster peculiar velocity catalog: the probability density function, the mean pairwise streaming velocity, and the pairwise velocity dispersion. These quantities are applied to an envisioned data set which measures line-of-sight cluster velocities with normal errors of 100 km/s for all clusters with masses larger than $10^{14}$ solar masses over a sky area of up to 5000 square degrees. A simple Fisher matrix analysis of this survey shows that the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the dark energy equation of state can be constrained to better than 10 percent, and the Hubble constant and the primordial power spectrum index can be constrained to a few percent, independent of any other cosmological observations. We also find that the current constraint on the power spectrum normalization can be improved by more than a factor of two using data from a 400 square degree survey and WMAP third-year priors. We also show how the constraints on cosmological parameters changes if cluster velocities are measured with normal errors of 300 km/s.

  5. Robust model comparison disfavors power law cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Daniel L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late-time power law expansion has been proposed as an alternative to the standard cosmological model and shown to be consistent with some low-redshift data. We test power law expansion against the standard flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology using goodness-of-fit and model comparison criteria. We consider Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data from two current compilations (Union2.1 and JLA) along with a current set of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements that includes the high-redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest measurements from BOSS quasars. We find that neither power law expansion nor $\\Lambda$CDM is strongly preferred over the other when the SN Ia and BAO data are analyzed separately but that power law expansion is strongly disfavored by the combination. We treat the $R_\\text{h} = ct$ cosmology (a constant rate of expansion) separately and find that it is conclusively disfavored by all combinations of data that include SN Ia observations and a poor overall fit when systematic errors in the SN Ia measurements are ig...

  6. Photon Consumption in Minihalos during Cosmological Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Haiman; Tom Abel; Piero Madau

    2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    At the earliest epochs of structure formation in cold dark matter (CDM) cosmologies, the smallest nonlinear objects are the numerous small halos that condense with virial temperatures below 10,000 K. Such ``minihalos'' are not yet resolved in large-scale three-dimensional cosmological simulations. Here we employ a semi-analytic method, combined with three-dimensional simulations of individual minihalos, to examine their importance during cosmological reionization. We show that, depending on when reionization takes place, they potentially play an important role as sinks of ionizing radiation. If reionization occurs at sufficiently high redshifts (z_r > 20), the intergalactic medium is heated to 10,000 K and most minihalos never form. On the other hand, if z_r 10 percent) of all baryons have already collapsed into minihalos, and are subsequently removed from the halos by photoevaporation as the ionizing background flux builds up. We show that this process can require a significant budget of ionizing photons; exceeding the production by a straightforward extrapolation back in time of known quasar and galaxy populations by a factor of up to 10 and 3, respectively.

  7. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  8. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH4UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Chemical Physics -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry I 3 PH4210 Electricity and Magnetism I 3 CH3511 Physical Chemistry Lab I 2 PH4510 Intro to Solid Analysis 5 General Education Requirements - 28 credits CH4310 Inorganic Chemistry I 3 UN1001 Perspectives

  9. NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

  10. June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0...

  11. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

  12. analytical chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  13. analytical chemistry division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  14. analytical chemistry biochemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  15. analytical chemistry dac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  16. Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An inventory of 2,300 batches of...

  17. Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to Substantially...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to Substantially Improve Combustion Engine Simulation Software Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to...

  18. association chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  19. activation chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  20. applied chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...