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1

The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System. Navigation. Seismic Data Interpretation. Bathymetry. Identification of Geological Features. . Drilling and Coring Surveys. Isopach Maps anci Sedil. lent Velociiy OBSERVATIONS. Hath metrv 10 13 13 13 15 20 20 Physiograohic...). The geologic structures seen in the upper 300 m (1000 ft) of sediment are mainly a result of the large influx of terrigenous sediments and deep seated salt tectonism. Drilling and seismic stratigraphy have confirmed that numerous topographic highs...

Buck, Arvo Viktor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

Eliason, Jay R. (Richland, WA); Eliason, Valerie L. C. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

SCRATCH: a protein structure and structural feature prediction server  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCRATCH: a protein structure and structural feature prediction server J. Cheng, A. Z. Randall, M. J protein tertiary structure and structural features. The SCRATCH soft- ware suite includes predictors for secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, disordered regions, domains, disulfide bridges, single

Cheng, Jianlin Jack

4

Shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHALLOW GEOLCGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTI~wAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by TOK~ EDWIN TATUM, JR. Submitted to the Graduate ColleSe of Texas A&N University in partial fulfill . ent of the requirement fo= the deenee cf i...%STER F SCIENCE December. 1977 Najoz Subject: 3c ano~phy SHALLOW GEOLOGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTINENTAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GUIZ OF ?EXICO A Thesis by TOMMY EDWIN TATUM, JR. Approved as to sty'e and content by: (Chairman of Committee Head...

Tatum, Tommy Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Scaled Experimental Modeling of Geologic Structures Rutgers University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uncertainty associated with hydrocarbon exploration and production. Furthermore, experimental models allow us in the Department of Geological Sciences at Rutgers University. She has thirty years of experience in the oil & gas experimental models provide valuable information about structural processes, especially those not observed

6

Expandable tubulars for use in geologic structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expandable tubular includes a plurality of leaves formed from sheet material that have curved surfaces. The leaves extend around a portion or fully around the diameter of the tubular structure. Some of the adjacent leaves of the tubular are coupled together. The tubular is compressed to a smaller diameter so that it can be inserted through previously deployed tubular assemblies. Once the tubular is properly positioned, it is deployed and coupled or not coupled to a previously deployed tubular assembly. The tubular is useful for all types of wells and boreholes.

Spray, Jeffery A.; Svedeman, Steven; Walter, David; Mckeighan, Peter; Siebanaler, Shane; Dewhurst, Peter; Hobson, Steven; Foss, Doug; Wirz, Holger; Sharpe, Aaron; Apostal, Michael

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effects of some common geological features on two-dimensional variably saturated flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of unsaturated flow simulations undertaken as an auxiliary analysis for the Iterative Performance Assessment (IPA) project, one of the approaches adopted by the U.S. NRC to develop repository license application review capabilities. The effects on flow of common geological features, such as nonhorizontal stratification and vertical or near-vertical fault zones intersecting the strata, in a two-dimensional (2D) domain are studied. Results indicate that the presence of layers and crosscutting fault zones tend to induce three-dimensional (3D) unstable flows in the unsaturated zone. The instability is manifested in our simulations by an oscillatory behavior of steady state. This numerical instability imposes extremely stringent criteria on the time step used in the simulation. Finally, once stable steady-state solutions are attained, the effect of the crossing point in the matrix-fault unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curve on groundwater flux vectors and moisture content distributions is studied.

Bagtzoglou, A.C.; Ababou, R.; Sagar, B.; Islam, M.R. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - active geological structures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: structure - ground 12;9 October 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack & Tegtmeier 14 Past... in NL - Hack & Tegtmeier 16 Past: Surface structures 12;9...

9

Regional Geologic Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Regional Geologic Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

11

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With GPS Units And Pocket Computers Abstract Hand-held global positioning system (GPS) units and pocket personal computers (PCs) were used to map surface geothermal features at the Bradys Hot Springs and Salt Wells geothermal systems, Churchill County, Nevada, in less time and with greater accuracy than would have been possible with conventional mapping methods. Geothermal features that were mapped include fumaroles, mud pots, warm ground, sinter, and a variety of silicified rocks. In both areas, the digital mapping was able to resolve structural

12

Relationship Between Heat Flows and Geological Structures in the Sichuan Basin, P.R. China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on an extensive data collection and analysis, this research has provided reliable representations of the features of the geothermal fields, their heat flow, and relationships with geological structures in the Sichuan Basin. The isotherms below a depth of 1,000 m show high values in the Central Uplift and the Southwest Uplift, and low values in the Northwest and Southeast Depressions. These features probably indicate undulation of crystalline basement and structural depression. At depths greater than 3,000 m, the isotherms tend to become simpler and regionalized. The mean heat flow in the basin is 69.1 mW/m{sup 2}. In the Central Uplift, the Northwest Depression and the East of the basin, heat-flow values range from 58.6 to 71.2 mW/m{sup 2}, with a mean value of 66.1 mWE/m{sup 2}. In the south and southwest, it varies from 76.6 to 100.5 mW/m{sup 2}, with a mean value of 86.2 mW/m{sup 2}. High heat-flow values occur within the uplift of the crystalline basement in the southwest Sichuan, and the heat flow decreases from the south, through the central area, to the northwest.

Zeng, Y.; Yu, H.; Wang, X.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features With Gps Units And Pocket Computers Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hand-held global positioning system (GPS) units and pocket personal computers (PCs) were used to map surface geothermal features at the Bradys Hot Springs and Salt Wells geothermal systems, Churchill County, Nevada, in less time and with greater accuracy than would have been possible with conventional mapping methods. Geothermal features that were mapped include fumaroles, mud pots, warm ground, sinter, and a variety of silicified rocks. In both areas, the digital mapping was able to resolve

14

Structural Features and Water Interactions of Etherified Xylan Thin Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the model film approach was used to investigate the structural features and humidity induced changes of the etherified xylan derivatives by using surface sensitive methods. Two routes to modify the...

Maria Soledad Peresin; Kari Kammiovirta…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A distinctive feature of the surface structure of quasicrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews a feature of atomically-clean quasicrystal surfaces that distinguishes them from surfaces of crystalline materials. That feature is a high degree of heterogeneity among different terraces, and among structurally-identical adsorption sites. The heterogeneity can be both structural and chemical in origin. A large variability is expected even for a surface which is perfectly bulk-terminated, and we call this intrinsic heterogeneity. Additional variability can derive from the surface preparation process, which can yield metastable structures. We call this extrinsic heterogeneity. Experimental evidence is given for both cases. This heterogeneity can be an important factor in understanding and predicting surface phenomena such as chemisorption.

Thiel, Patricia; Unal, Baris; Jenks, Cynthia; Goldman, Alan; Lograsso, Thomas; Canfield, Paul; Evans, James; Quiquandon, Marianne; Gratias, Denis; Van Hove, Michel

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Forecast of Geological Gas Hazards for “Three-Soft” Coal Seams in Gliding Structural Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas outbursts from “three-soft” coal seams (soft roof, soft floor and soft coal) constitute a very serious problem in the Ludian gliding structure area in western Henan. By means of theories and methods of gas geology, structural geology, coal petrology and rock tests, we have discussed the effect of control of several physical properties of soft roof on gas preservation and proposed a new method of forecasting gas geological hazards under open structural conditions. The result shows that the areas with type III or IV soft roofs are the most dangerous areas where gas outburst most likely can take place. Therefore, countermeasures should be taken in these areas to prevent gas outbursts.

Zhi-rong WANG; Ling-xia CHEN; Cong-ren CHENG; Zhen-xiang LI

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability, slope design, engineering geology, fault, open pit mines, SOMAIR uranium mine, OCP phosphate mine1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well

Boyer, Edmond

18

Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Features science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Science & Innovation Features Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop...

19

Method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological structures from a vertical bore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological strata from a vertical position. The geological structures intended to be penetrated in this fashion are coal seams, as for in situ gasification or methane drainage, or in oil-bearing strata for increasing the flow rate from a pre-existing well. Other possible uses for this device might be for use in the leaching of uranium ore from underground deposits or for introducing horizontal channels for water and steam injections.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO); Barker, Clark R. (Rolla, MO); Keith, H. Dean (Rolla, MO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Developing a fundamental understanding of biomass structural features responsible for enzymatic digestibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the conversion of biomass to chemicals and fuels. This limitation is due to inherent structural features (i.e., acetyl content, lignin content, crystallinity, surface area, particle size, and pore volume) of biomass. These structural features are barriers...

O'Dwyer, Jonathan Patrick

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Exploring syntactic structural features for sub-tree alignment using bilingual tree kernels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose Bilingual Tree Kernels (BTKs) to capture the structural similarities across a pair of syntactic translational equivalences and apply BTKs to sub-tree alignment along with some plain features. Our study reveals that the structural features ...

Jun Sun; Min Zhang; Chew Lim Tan

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Overview of the structural geology and tectonics of the Central Basin Platform, Delaware Basin, and Midland Basin, West Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural geology and tectonics of the Permian Basin were investigated using an integrated approach incorporating satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, gravity, seismic, regional subsurface mapping and published literature. The two primary emphases were on: (1) delineating the temporal and spatial evolution of the regional stress state; and (2) calculating the amount of regional shortening or contraction. Secondary objectives included delineation of basement and shallower fault zones, identification of structural style, characterization of fractured zones, analysis of surficial linear features on satellite imagery and their correlation to deeper structures. Gandu Unit, also known as Andector Field at the Ellenburger level and Goldsmith Field at Permian and younger reservoir horizons, is the primary area of interest and lies in the northern part of Ector county. The field trends northwest across the county line into Andrews County. The field(s) are located along an Ellenburger thrust anticline trap on the eastern margin of the Central Basin Platform.

Hoak, T. [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering Geosciences Careers in the ik ou ve n ver see t b f rel e y ' e n i e o ! Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Queen's University See the World Geological Sciences Arts and Science Faculty

Ellis, Randy

24

3?D tomographic imaging of the geologic structure in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three?dimensional tomographic reconstruction of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field is presented. This reconstruction is developed from data gathered in the course of one year between 15 September 1987 and 30 September 1988 using a microearthquake network. This geothermal field is important not only due to understanding potential energy sources but also because it is the result of a tectonic spreading zone bounded between two transverse fault systems: The San Andres system to the North and the Brawley fracture zone (BFZ) to the South. Here magma has penetrated into the crust to a depth of at least 8 km. This magmatic source is responsible for the microearthquakes generated along the BFZ as well as providing the thermal source for the geothermal activity. Using techniques for both blind source estimation as well as blind deconvolution a travel time tomographic algorithm is applied to these data. The objective is to characterize the subterranean geological structure and estimate the fracturing that supports the geothermal field. These studies are a necessary foundation for future research into the energy capacity of this field. [Work performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W?7405?Eng?48.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Structural and stratigraphic evolution of the central Mississippi Canyon Area: interaction of salt tectonics and slope processes in the formation of engineering and geologic hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The analysis focused on salt tectonics and sequence stratigraphy to develop a geologic model for the study area and its potential impact on engineering and geologic hazards. Salt in the study area was found to be established structural end-members derived from...

Brand, John Richard

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fundamental study of structural features affecting enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lignocellulose is a promising and valuable alternative energy source. Native lignocellulosic biomass has limited accessibility to cellulase enzyme due to structural features; therefore, pretreatment is an essential prerequisite to make biomass...

Zhu, Li

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Indiana based on existing geologic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general geology of Indiana is presented including the following: physiography, stratigraphy, and structural features. The following indicators of geothermal energy are discussed: heat flow and thermal gradient, geothermal occurrences, seismic activity, geochemistry, and deep sedimentary basins. (MHR)

Vaught, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Structural features of Athabasca bitumen related to upgrading performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a combination of instrumental and chemical methods, many new classes of compounds appearing as homologous series have been detected in Athabasca oil sand bitumen and in the chemical and thermal degradative products of asphaltene and the heavy ends of maltene. In general, the volatile portion of the maltene is rich in cyclic terpenoid structures and devoid in aliphatic compounds or normal alkane-derived cyclic molecules while the asphaltene fraction and heavy ends of maltene are abundant in normal alkyl-substituted aromatics, thianes, thiolanes, thiophenes, benzo- and dibenzothiophenes. This paper reports that Ru(VIII)-catalyzed oxidation permitted the quantitative estimation of the n-alkyl groups attached to aromatic carbons and of n-alkyl bridges between two aromatic units and their concentration distribution according to chain length. It also showed the presence of a large naphthenic core containing cyclic sulfides, which, during oxidation, were converted to their sulfones.

Strausz, O.P.; Lown, E.M. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Predictive Models of Biohydrogen and Biomethane Production Based on the Compositional and Structural Features of Lignocellulosic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictive Models of Biohydrogen and Biomethane Production Based on the Compositional and Structural Features of Lignocellulosic Materials ...

Florian Monlau; Cecilia Sambusiti; Abdellatif Barakat; Xin Mei Guo; Eric Latrille; Eric Trably; Jean-Philippe Steyer; Hélène Carrere

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Defects in Divided Zinc?Copper Aluminate Spinels:? Structural Features and Optical Absorption Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Defects in Divided Zinc?Copper Aluminate Spinels:? Structural Features and Optical Absorption Properties† ... XRD-powder data refinements (Rietveld method) have demonstrated that both compound series crystallize in the spinel structure (Fd3?m) and exhibit similar inversion rates. ... 8 This is the case of CuAlO2 composition adopting the delafossite-type structure9and which can be considered as a p-type transparent conductive oxide (TCO). ...

Anne Le Nestour; Manuel Gaudon; Gérard Villeneuve; Marco Daturi; Ronn Andriessen; Alain Demourgues

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Identify Molecular Structural Features of Biomass Recalcitrance Using Nondestructive Microscopy and Spectroscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identify Molecular Structural Features of Biomass Recalcitrance Using Non- Identify Molecular Structural Features of Biomass Recalcitrance Using Non- destructive Microscopy and Spectroscopy Shi-You Ding 1 , Mike Himmel 1 , Sunney X. Xie 2 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 2 Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Lignocellulosic biomass has long been recognized as a potential sustainable source of mixed sugars for fermentation to fuels and other bio-based products. However, the chemical and enzymatic conversion processes developed during the past 80 years are inefficient and expensive. The inefficiency of these processes is in part due to the lack of knowledge about the structure of biomass itself; the plant cell wall is indeed a complex nano-composite material at the molecular and nanoscales. Current processing strategies have been derived empirically, with

32

Journal of the Nepal Geological Society, Volume 38, Dec. 2008 1 EARTHQUAKES AND CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE HIMALAYA FROM THE HIMALAYAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of the Nepal Geological Society, Volume 38, Dec. 2008 1 EARTHQUAKES AND CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE HIMALAYA FROM THE HIMALAYAN NEPAL TIBET SEISMIC EXPERIMENT (HIMNT) Anne F. Sheehan1 , Thomas de la Torre1 Seismological Centre, Kathmandu, NEPAL3 Submitted on occasion of International Workshop on Seismology

Sheehan, Anne F.

33

The geologic structures observed in drillhole DOE-2 and their possible origins: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Questions remain as the origins of evaporite deformation within the Salado and Castile formations. Two miles north of the WIPP site, a stacked sequence of depressions was indicated by shallow boreholes. Such structures raise questions regarding the role of dissolution and gravity tectonics at the WIPP site. To investigate these structures, DOE drilled hole DOE-2 north of the WIPP site. At DOE-2, the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado confirmed the presence of stacked depressions, which were the primary target of the drilling program. The halitic units between the marker beds were thickened compared to the average section determined from basin-wide drilling. The remaining question is whether dissolution occurred in the underlying Castile and resulted in the deformation of the Salado. Markers in the anhydrite units indicate recumbent structures and thickening of the anhydrite units by folding. As a consequence, the Castile Formation is nearly its average thickness, with the folded thickness of anhydrite compensating for the missing halite. The nearby thickening of halite within the Castile, the absence of relic anhydrite laminae in the attenuated halite units, and the high strain fabric of the remaining halite suggest that dissolution was not the dominant process in the Castile. The favored hypothesis for the Castile structures is salt flow in response to gravity inversion of the anhydrite and halite units of the Castile. 21 refs., 18 figs.

Borns, D.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Identification of structural features in chemicals associated with cancer drug response: a systematic data-driven analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of structural features in chemicals associated with cancer drug...analyses of a large number of chemical features of drugs against...the most abundant microarray platform (HT-HG-U133A). The...times 11 327 genes. 2.2 Chemical descriptor datasets The chemical......

Suleiman A. Khan; Seppo Virtanen; Olli P. Kallioniemi; Krister Wennerberg; Antti Poso; Samuel Kaski

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator and the wide-angle correction preserve more dynamic information carried by the elastic waves. The vector imaging condition solves the polarization problem of converted wave imaging. Both P-P and P-S images can be calculated. We also use converted waves to improve the image of steep sub-salt structures. The synthetic data for the SEG/EAGE salt model are migrated with a generalized screen algorithm and for the converted PSS-wave path. All the sub-salt faults are properly imaged.

Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Definition: Field Mapping-Structural Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping-Structural Analysis Field Mapping-Structural Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Mapping-Structural Analysis Field mapping involves sending one or more geologist to a geothermal site of interest to collect and map surficial hydrologic, geologic and structural information that might be useful in identifying a hydrothermal system. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A geologic map or geological map is a special-purpose map made to show geological features. Rock units or geologic strata are shown by color or symbols to indicate where they are exposed at the surface. Bedding planes and structural features such as faults, folds, foliations, and lineations are shown with strike and dip or trend and plunge symbols which give these features' three-dimensional orientations. Stratigraphic contour

38

Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

Munson, Darrell E.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the geologic framework model (200 feet [61 meters]), discussed in Section 6.4.2, limits the size of features that can be resolved by the model but is appropriate for the distribution of data available and its intended use. Uncertainty and limitations are discussed in Section 6.6 and model validation is discussed in Section 7.

T. Vogt

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the 1962 meetings of the Rocky Mountain Section of the Geological Society of America held on the Brigham University Provo, Utah Part I partially supported by the Rocky Mountaln Section. Officers of the Rocky ....................................................................Blackhawk Formation 56 Castlegate Sandstone and South Flat Formation ............................ 56

Seamons, Kent E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geologic factors in coal mines roof stability: a progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 10 selected United States Bureau of Mines research contract reports produced from 1970 to 1980 that consist largely of geologic studies of coal-mine roof-support problems. The reports focus on the Appalachian and Illinois coal-mining regions. In the Appalachian region two geologic structures, roof rolls and slickensides, predominate as features that directly contribute to roof falls. Studies of these and other structures are reviewed, and improved methods of utilizing drill core and core logs to prepare hazard maps are presented. Among the reports described are several on the weakening effects of moisture on shale roof, as determined from both laboratory and underground measurements, and an assessment of air tempering as a humidity-control method. Also summarized are findings concerning the time lapse between roof exposure and permanent support installation as a factor in the effectiveness of roof bolting.

Moebs, N.N.; Stateham, R.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Structure of the zz Transmembrane Dimer Reveals Features Essential for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- lized by extensive hydrogen bonding, and there is evidence for a structural water molecule (or molecules Program in Immunology 3 Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Harvard Medical al., 1988; Exley et al., 1991). Early studies suggested that basic and acidic residues in the trans

Chou, James

43

Structures and Reactivity of Transition-Metal Compounds Featuring Metal-Ligand Multiple Bonds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

isomers of product 2a-f. .................................................................. 89 Figure 34. The rearrangement between 2_iso6 and 2_iso3. ............................................. 92 Figure 35. The solvated ?G (kcal/mol) diagram... iso3 and iso6 for 2a-f (kcal/mol). ................ 91 Table 17. Results of energies differencesa between 2c_iso6 and 2c_iso3. ...................... 92 xv Table 18. Selected structural parameters of 2a from computations and experiments. (Bond...

Xu, Zhenggang

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geological resources, geological hazards and environmental pollution. The curriculum includes courses fromThe Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set- ting (Structural Geology). The Geology Department is housed in the historic and newly renovated Old Main Building

Baskaran, Mark

45

Investigation of the crystallization features, atomic structure, and microstructure of chromium-doped monticellite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of Cr{sup 4+}:CaMgSiO{sub 4} single crystals is grown using floating zone melting, and their microstructure, composition, and crystal structure are investigated. It is shown that regions with inclusions of second phases, such as forsterite, akermanite, MgO, and Ca{sub 4}Mg{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12}, can form over the length of the sample. The composition of the single-phase regions of the single crystals varies from the stoichiometric monticellite CaMgSiO{sub 4} to the solid solution Ca{sub (1-x)}Mg{sub (1+x)}SiO{sub 4}(x = 0.22). The Cr:(Ca{sub 0.88}Mg{sub 0.12})MgSiO{sub 4} crystal is studied using X-ray diffraction. It is revealed that, in this case, the olivine-like orthorhombic crystal lattice is distorted to the monoclinic lattice with the parameters a = 6.3574(5) A, b = 4.8164(4) A, c = 11.0387(8) A, {beta} = 90.30(1){sup o}, Z = 4, V = 337.98 A{sup 3}, and space group P2{sub 1}/c. In the monoclinic lattice, the M(1) position of the initial olivine structure is split into two nonequivalent positions with the center of symmetry, which are occupied only by Mg{sup 2+} cations with the average length of the Mg-O bond R{sub av} = 2.128 A. The overstoichiometric Mg{sup 2+} cations partially replace Ca{sup 2+} cations (in the M(2) position of the orthorhombic prastructure) with the average bond length of 2.347 A in the [(Ca,Mg)-O{sub 6}] octahedron. The average distance in SiO{sub 4} distorted tetrahedra is 1.541 A.

Subbotin, K. A., E-mail: soubbot@lsk.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Iskhakova, L. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Fiber Optics Research Center (Russian Federation); Zharikov, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Lavrishchev, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Fiber Optics Research Center (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Earthquake distribution patterns in Africa: their relationship to variations in lithospheric and geological structure, and their rheological implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......length of the western rift from southern Sudan to Mozambique. The eastern branch presents...age of the seafloor, and its expected thermal structure (McKenzie et al. 2005...conductive lithosphere will provide a degree of thermal insulation for the crust from the convective......

T. J. Craig; J. A. Jackson; K. Priestley; D. McKenzie

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Structural feature controlling superconductivity in compressed BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconductivity can be induced with the application of pressure but it disappears eventually upon heavy compression in the iron-based parent compound BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. Structural evolution with pressure is used to understand this behavior. By performing synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements with diamond anvil cells up to 26.1?GPa, we find an anomalous behavior of the lattice parameter with a S shape along the a axis but a monotonic decrease in the c-axis lattice parameter with increasing pressure. The close relationship between the axial ratio c/a and the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} is established for this parent compound. The c/a ratio is suggested to be a measure of the spin fluctuation strength. The reduction of T{sub c} with the further increase of pressure is a result of the pressure-driven weakness of the spin-fluctuation strength in this material.

Yang, Wenge, E-mail: wyang@ciw.edu [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Jia, Feng-Jiang [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics and Center for Energy Matter in Extreme Environments, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Tang, Ling-Yun [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Department of Physics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tao, Qian; Xu, Zhu-An [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, Xiao-Jia, E-mail: xjchen@ciw.edu [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Physics and Center for Energy Matter in Extreme Environments, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural geology of the CP Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; and regional implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed mapping and structural analysis of upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks in the CP Hills of the Nevada Test Site, together with analysis of published maps and cross sections and a reconnaissance of regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust of Barnes and Poole (1968) actually comprises two separate, oppositely verging Mesozoic thrust systems: (1) the west-vergent CP thrust which is well exposed in the CP Hills and at Mine Mountain, and (2) the east-vergent Belted Range thrust located northwest of Yucca Flat. West-vergence of the CP thrust is indicated by large scale west-vergent recumbent folds in both its hangingwall and footwall and by the fact that the CP thrust ramps up section through hangingwall strata toward the northwest. Regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust forms part of a narrow sigmoidal belt of west-vergent folding and thrusting traceable for over 180 km along strike. The Belted Range thrust represents earlier Mesozoic deformation that was probably related to the Last Chance thrust system in southeastern California, as suggested by earlier workers. A pre-Tertiary reconstruction of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in the region between the NTS and the Las Vegas Range bears a close resemblance to other regions of the Cordillera and has important implications for the development of hinterland-vergent deformation as well as for the probable magnitude of Tertiary extension north of Las Vegas Valley. Subsequent to Mesozoic deformation, the CP Hills were disrupted by at least two episodes of Tertiary extensional deformation: (1) an earlier episode represented by pre-middle Miocene low-angle normal faults, and (2) a later, post-11 Ma episode of high-angle normal faulting. Both episodes of extension were related to regional deformation, the latter of which has resulted in the present basin and range topography of the NTS region.

Caskey, S.J. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature geothermal system in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature geothermal system in Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Lithologic units encountered in the Dixie Valleygeothermalfield range from Triassic marine sediments toRecent basin-filling sediments. Structural features affectingthe location of the geothermal activity include Mesozoicthrusting. late Tertiary normal faulting andQuaternary to Recent normal faulting. The hydrothermalmineral suite is variable, due in part to rock-gasreactions. Author A. F. Waibel Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1987

50

Geologic spatial analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

AASG State Geological Survey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

53

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential radioactive waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for the repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 2.

R. Clayton

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Structural and Morphologic Study of Shatsky Rise Oceanic Plateau in the Northwest Pacific Ocean from 2D Multichannel Seismic Reflection and Bathymetry Data and Implications for Oceanic Plateau Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shatsky Rise is one of the largest oceanic plateaus, a class of volcanic features whose formation is poorly understood. It is also a plateau that was formed near spreading ridges, but the connection is unclear. The geologic structure and morphology...

Zhang, Jinchang

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Structure and features of the surface morphology of A{sup 4}B{sup 6} chalcogenide epitaxial films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure and features of the surface morphology of Pb{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Se (x = 0.03) epitaxial films grown on freshly cleaved BaF{sub 2}(111) faces and PbSe{sub 1-x}S{sub x}(100) (x = 0.12) single-crystal wafers were investigated by molecular beam condensation and the hot-wall method. It is shown that the epitaxial films, in accordance with the data in the literature for other chalcogenides, grow in the (111) and (100) planes, repeating the substrate orientation. Black aggregates are observed on the film surface of the films grown. The results obtained are compared with the data in the literature and generalized for other chalcogenides: A{sup 4}B{sup 6}:Pb (S, Se, Te); Pb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} (S, Se, Te); and Pb{sub 1-x}Mn (Se, Te). It is established that the formation of black aggregates, which are second-phase inclusions on the surface of epitaxial films obtained by vacuum thermal deposition, is characteristic of narrow-gap A{sup 4}B{sup 6} chalcogenides.

Nuriyev, I. R., E-mail: afinnazarov@yahoo.com [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geologic Survey of the Ewing Bank, Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Located along the edge of the continental shelf in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, the Ewing Bank is a significant geologic feature: yet, little information about the bank is generally available. This thesis represents a preliminary survey...

Brooks, Daniel M

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

59

Principles of Historical Geology Geology 331  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in West Virginia. #12;Original Lateral Continuity #12;Geology Field Camp in the Badlands of South Dakota surface of igneous or metamorphic rocks. #12;Crystalline Rocks #12;James Hutton, 18th Century founder Smith, the first 19th Century geologist to understand stratigraphy and make correlations. #12

Kammer, Thomas

60

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

62

Geologic factors in coal mine roof stability--a progress report. Information circular/1984. [Effects of moisture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 10 selected Bureau of Mines research contract reports produced from 1970 to 1980 which consist largely of geologic studies of coal mine roof support problems. Significant highlights from the contract final reports are discussed and presented in practical terms. The selected reports focus on the Appalachian and Illinois coal mining regions. In the Appalachian coal region, two geologic structures, roof rolls and slickensides, predominate over all structures as features that directly contribute to roof falls. Studies of these and other structures are reviewed, and improved methods of utilizing drill core and core logs to prepare hazard maps are presented. Among the reports described are several on the weakening effects of moisture on shale roof, as determined from both laboratory and underground measurements, and an assessment of air tempering as a humidity-control method. Also summarized are findings concerning the time lapse between roof exposure and permanent support installation as a factor in the effectiveness of roof bolting.

Moebs, N.N.; Stateham, R.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Geological Development of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Panama that geologists see today is a young ... /early Tertiary time. The geological development of Panama is a consequence of the relative motions ... igneous rocks that comprise much of present-day Panama f...

Russell S.Harmon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reprint of "3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines" [Comput. Geosci. 34 (2008) 278-290  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geological development, origin, and energy mineral resources of Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin of North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota, and south-central Canada (Manitoba and Saskatchewan) is a major producer of oil and gas, lignite, and potash. Oil exploration and development in the United States portion of the Williston basin since 1972 have given impetus to restudy basin evolution and geologic controls for energy-resource locations. Consequently, oil production in North Dakota has jumped from a nadir of 19 million bbl in 1974 to 40 million bbl in 1980. The depositional origin of the basin and the major structural features of the basin are discussed. (JMT)

Gerhard, L.C.; Anderson, S.B.; Lefever, J.A.; Carlson, C.G.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Features of the band structure and conduction mechanisms in the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with Ru  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal and electronic structure and energy and kinetic properties of the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with a Ru acceptor impurity are investigated in the temperature and Ru concentration ranges T = 80–400 K and N{sub A}{sup Ru} ? 9.5 × 10{sup 19}?5.7 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} (x = 0–0.03), respectively. The mechanism of structural-defect generation is established, which changes the band gap and degree of compensation of the semiconductor and consists in the simultaneous concentration reduction and elimination of donor structural defects by means of the displacement of ?1% of Ni atoms from the Hf (4a) positions, the generation of acceptor structural defects upon the substitution of Ru atoms for Ni atoms in the 4c positions, and the generation of donor defects in the form of vacancies in the Sn (4b) positions. The calculated electronic structure of HfNi{sub 1?x}Ru{sub x}Sn is consistent with the experiment. The results obtained are discussed within the Shklovsky-Efros model for a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

Romaka, V. A., E-mail: vromaka@polynet.lviv.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Pidstrygach Institute for Applied Problems in Mechanics and Mathematics (Ukraine); Rogl, P. [Universität Wien, Institut für Physikalische Chemie (Austria); Romaka, V. V. [National University Lvivska Politekhnika (Ukraine); Stadnyk, Yu. V. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine); Korzh, R. O.; Krayovskyy, V. Ya. [National University Lvivska Politekhnika (Ukraine); Horyn, A. M. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feature Stories Feature Stories Topic - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Powertrain research ---Vehicle testing --Building design --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Hydrogen --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics -Energy usage --Energy life-cycle analysis --Energy storage ---Batteries ----Lithium-ion batteries ----Lithium-air batteries ----Sodium batteries --Electricity

68

Special features of the excitation spectra and kinetics of photoluminescence of the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er/Si structures with relaxed heterolayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Luminescent properties of heteroepitaxial Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er/Si structures with relaxed heterolayers are studied. The results of combined studies of the excitation spectra and kinetics of photoluminescence (PL) are used to single out the components providing the largest contribution to the PL signal of the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er/Si structures in the wavelength region of 1.54 {mu}m. It is shown that relaxation of elastic stresses in the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er heterolayer affects only slightly the kinetic characteristics of erbium luminescence and manifests itself in insignificant contribution of the defects and defect-impurity complexes to the luminescent response of the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er/Si structures. In the excitation spectra of the erbium PL, special features related to the possibility of the rare-earth impurity excitation at energies lower than the band gap of the Si{sub 1} {sub -x}Ge{sub x} solid solution are revealed. It is shown that a peak the width of which depends on the band gap of the solid solution and the extent of its relaxation is observed in the excitation spectra of the erbium-related PL in the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er/Si structures in the wavelength region of 1040-1050 nm. The observed specific features are accounted for by involvement of intermediate levels in the band gap of the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:Er solid solution in the process of excitation of an Er{sup 3+} ion.

Krasilnikova, L. V., E-mail: Luda@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Yablonskiy, A. N.; Stepikhova, M. V.; Drozdov, Yu. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Shengurov, V. G. [Lobachevsky State University, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation); Krasilnik, Z. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 6, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates in the Panama Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Panama Basin, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, distribution of hydrates within the sediments, and the relation of hydrate distribution to other features such as salt diapirism are also included. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 63 refs., 38 figs., 7 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

71

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION A number of geodetic and morphotectonic techniques. 2). Geology, November 2008; v. 36; no. 11; p. 871­874; doi: 10.1130/G25073A.1; 3 figures; Data

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

72

Study of immobilized catalysts. XVI. Study of structural features and catalytic properties of immobilized mono-and binuclear cobalt complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of polymeric carriers with chelate-forming groups of diacylamine and aminovinyl ketone types and also mono- and binuclear Co (II) complexes based on them were obtained by methods of polymer-analogous transformations, startting from polyethylene (PE)-grafted (rgr-) polyacetylonitrile (PE-gr-PAN), PE-gr-polyacrylamide (PE-gr-PAA), or PE-gr-poly(methyl vinyl ketone) CPE-grPMVK). From the data of spectral and magnetic studies, a conclusion was made on the chelate structure of the Co (II) complexes synthesized with a tetrahedral configuration of the coordination unit. It was found that the immobilized Co (II) chelates have a high and stable catalytic activity in the sterospecific 1,4-cispolymerization of butadiene. It was shown that an increase in the number of Co (II) ions in the complex molecule leads to a decrease in the specific activity of the catalytic systems based on them.

Pomogailo, A.D.; Golubeva, N.D.; Uflyand, I.E.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

PETSc: Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Features Features Home Download Features Component Details Diagram GPUs Theads Documentation Applications/Publications Miscellaneous External Software Developers Site PETSc is intended for use in large-scale application projects, many ongoing computational science projects are built around the PETSc libraries. PETSc is easy to use for beginners. Moreover, its careful design allows advanced users to have detailed control over the solution process. PETSc includes a large suite of parallel linear, nonlinear equation solvers and ODE integrators that are easily used in application codes written in C, C++, Fortran and now Python. PETSc provides many of the mechanisms needed within parallel application codes, such as simple parallel matrix and vector assembly routines that allow the overlap of communication and computation.

74

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

76

Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Feature Article  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Feature Article Feature Article * $ &RPSDULVRQ RI 6HOHFWHG (,$'DWD:LWK2WKHU'DWD 6RXUFHV A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data With Other Data Sources by Theresa E. Hallquist Introduction The Petroleum Marketing Division (PMD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects information re- lating to petroleum market prices and volumes on the EIA-782 survey. One way PMD assesses the quality of these data is to compare the data with other sources. Large, irreconcilable differences among data series could indicate the need for improvement in survey design or implementa- tion, or may be due to conceptual differences. For more de- tailed information on the EIA-782 survey, refer to the notes at the end of this article. PMD compares its EIA-782 series of petroleum market prices and volumes with both internal and external data sources

78

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology's report on the Petrographic, Stratigraphic, and Structural Evidence for Dissolution of Upper Permian Bedded Salt, Texas Panhandle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following recommendations for improving the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (TBEG) report entitled Petrographic, Stratigraphic, and Structural Evidence for Dissolution of Upper Permian Bedded Salt, Texas Panhandle have been abstracted from the body of this review report. The TBEG report should be resided to conform to one of the following alternatives: (1) If the report is intended to be a review or summary of previous work, it should contain more raw data, be edited to give equal treatment to all types of data, and include summary tables and additional figures. (2) If the report is intended to be a description and interpretation of petrographic evidence for salt dissolution, supported by collateral stratigraphic and structural evidence, the relevant indirect and direct data should become the focal point of the report. The following recommendations apply to one or both of the options listed above. (1) The text should differentiate more carefully between the data and inferences based on those data. (2) The authors should retain the qualifiers present in cited works. Statements in the report that are based on earlier papers are sometimes stronger than those in the papers themselves. (3) The next revision should present more complete data. (4) The authors should achieve a more balanced presentation of alternative hypotheses and interpretations. They could then discuss the relative merits of the alternative interpretations. (5) More attention should be given to clear exposition.

Fenster, D.F.; Anderson, R.Y.; Gonzales, S.; Baker, V.R.; Edgar, D.E.; Harrison, W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ALSNews Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

feed-image feed-image Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource Home ALSNews Features ALSNews Features Students Get a Taste of ALS User Experience Print A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle (BPC) school in Berkeley recently had a rare opportunity to experience the ALS as "users" via a scientific research proposal project and field trip. The students were led by science and technology teacher Christine Mytko, who spent the past summer at the ALS through the Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME) program. Mytko's time at the ALS was focused on 3D imaging and printing techniques. An integral part of the ISME program is educators taking their experiences back to the classroom through new curriculum development. As such, Mytko put together a program that would engage her students in collaborative proposal process similar to a typical ALS user proposal. Students worked in groups to craft proposals for scanning items of interest at the tomography beamline, a selection of which were chosen through a peer-review process and then scanned at Beamline 8.3.2. ALS beamline scientist Dula Parkinson worked with Mytko to develop the program and gave feedback on the kids' proposal, which Mytko says was thrilling for her students.

80

Special Feature:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Five Five Questions for Sudip Dosanjh Special Feature: Five Questions for Sudip Dosanjh September 27, 2013 Sudip-wide.jpg Sudip Dosanjh Sudip Dosanjh is Director of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. NERSC's mission is to accelerate scientific discovery at the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science through high performance computing and extreme data analysis. NERSC deploys leading-edge computational and data resources for over 4,700 users from a broad range of disciplines. As a result of this support for science, NERSC users published 1,900 research papers in 2012. To continue its mission, NERSC will be partnering with computer companies to develop and deploy pre-exascale and exascale systems during the next

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Featured Scientist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chuck Ankenbrandt Chuck Ankenbrandt Chuck Ankenbrandt is our featured scientist this quarter. Chuck has been a Fermilab physicist since 1973 and is a member of the Accelerator Division. He is also heavily involved in educational activities at the Lab. As the father of five children ranging in age from 33 to 8 and the stepfather of four more, Chuck has had a lot of personal educational experience, too! Chuck, thanks for taking the time to talk with us. Would you start by telling us about your current activities at Fermilab? There are three main things now. I'm Experimental Coordinator for the Accelerator Division. I'm designing a high-intensity Fermilab Booster and I'm working with the Education Office on a variety of physics-related activities. What do you do as Experimental Coordinator?

82

Chinese Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Place: China Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Chinese body which is involved in surveys of geothermal sites. References: Chinese Geological Survey1 This...

83

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

84

Structural geology of the Earth's interior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...techniques are still under development, with much current work...the core phase P'DF are energy scattered at or near the core-mantle...the surface geologist. This research was supported by National...Beneath the Imperial Valley Geothermal Region, Technical Report...

Thomas H. Jordan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL offshore onto the continental shelf, and these offshore sections constitute additional storage capacity potential of Californias offshore subsurface environment. California offshore sedimentary basins (in green

86

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

87

Central American geologic map project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

Dengo, G.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geologic investigation :an update of subsurface geology on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to generate a revised geologic model of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) incorporating the geological and geophysical data produced since the Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project (SWHC) of 1994 and 1995. Although this report has certain stand-alone characteristics, it is intended to complement the previous work and to serve as a status report as of late 2002. In the eastern portion of KAFB (Lurance Canyon and the Hubbell bench), of primary interest is the elevation to which bedrock is buried under a thin cap of alluvium. Elevation maps of the bedrock top reveal the paleodrainage that allows for the interpretation of the area's erosional history. The western portion of KAFB consists of the eastern part of the Albuquerque basin where bedrock is deeply buried under Santa Fe Group alluvium. In this area, the configuration of the down-to-the-west, basin-bounding Sandia and West Sandia faults is of primary interest. New geological and geophysical data and the reinterpretation of old data help to redefine the location and magnitude of these elements. Additional interests in this area are the internal stratigraphy and structure of the Santa Fe Group. Recent data collected from new monitoring wells in the area have led to a geologic characterization of the perched Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater system and have refined the known limits of the Ancestral Rio Grande fluvial sediments within the Santa Fe Group. Both the reinterpretation of the existing data and a review of the regional geology have shown that a segment of the boundary between the eastern and western portions of KAFB is a complicated early Tertiary (Laramide) wrench-fault system, the Tijeras/Explosive Ordnance Disposal Area/Hubbell Spring system. A portion of this fault zone is occupied by a coeval ''pull-apart'' basin filled with early Tertiary conglomerates, whose exposures form the ''Travertine Hills''.

Van Hart, Dirk (GRAM, Inc.)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Auto-segmentation of normal and target structures in head and neck CT images: A feature-driven model-based approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows greater control over dose distribution, which leads to a decrease in radiation related toxicity. IMRT, however, requires precise and accurate delineation of the organs at risk and target volumes. Manual delineation is tedious and suffers from both interobserver and intraobserver variability. State of the art auto-segmentation methods are either atlas-based, model-based or hybrid however, robust fully automated segmentation is often difficult due to the insufficient discriminative information provided by standard medical imaging modalities for certain tissue types. In this paper, the authors present a fully automated hybrid approach which combines deformable registration with the model-based approach to accurately segment normal and target tissues from head and neck CT images. Methods: The segmentation process starts by using an average atlas to reliably identify salient landmarks in the patient image. The relationship between these landmarks and the reference dataset serves to guide a deformable registration algorithm, which allows for a close initialization of a set of organ-specific deformable models in the patient image, ensuring their robust adaptation to the boundaries of the structures. Finally, the models are automatically fine adjusted by our boundary refinement approach which attempts to model the uncertainty in model adaptation using a probabilistic mask. This uncertainty is subsequently resolved by voxel classification based on local low-level organ-specific features. Results: To quantitatively evaluate the method, they auto-segment several organs at risk and target tissues from 10 head and neck CT images. They compare the segmentations to the manual delineations outlined by the expert. The evaluation is carried out by estimating two common quantitative measures on 10 datasets: volume overlap fraction or the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and a geometrical metric, the median symmetric Hausdorff distance (HD), which is evaluated slice-wise. They achieve an average overlap of 93% for the mandible, 91% for the brainstem, 83% for the parotids, 83% for the submandibular glands, and 74% for the lymph node levels. Conclusions: Our automated segmentation framework is able to segment anatomy in the head and neck region with high accuracy within a clinically-acceptable segmentation time.

Qazi, Arish A.; Pekar, Vladimir; Kim, John; Xie, Jason; Breen, Stephen L.; Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Philips Research North America, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

AN OPTIMIZATION-BASED METHOD FOR FEATURE RANKING IN ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fields such as medicine and biology. A valuable survey on .... Finally, we remark that the nature of the features influences the structure ..... A review of feature.

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Short History of Engineering Geology and Geophysics at the British Geological Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Engineering geology in the British Geological Survey (BGS) began, in a formal sense, with the creation of the Engineering Geology Unit in 1967. Virtually since its inception, despite changing research prioriti...

M. G. Culshaw; K. J. Northmore; D. M. McCann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Entangled topological features of light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the entanglement of topological features, namely, isolated, linked optical vortex loops in the light from spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC). In three dimensions, optical vortices are lines of phase singularity and vortices of energy flow which percolate through all optical fields. This example of entanglement is between features that extend over macroscopic and finite volumes, furthermore, topological features are robust to perturbation . The entanglement of photons in complex three-dimensional(3D) topological states suggests the possibility of entanglement of similar structures in other quantum systems describable by complex scalar functions, such as superconductors, superfluids and Bose-Einstein condensates.

J. Romero; J. Leach; B. Jack; M. R. Dennis; S. Franke-Arnold; S. M. Barnett; M. J. Padgett

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

42nd Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference, September 28-29, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology of Page Valley: Stratigraphy, Structure, and Landscape Evolution #12;Luray Elkton Shenandoah 0 2/ Swift Run Formations Cambrian Chilhowee Group Cambrian - Ordovician carbonates undivided Ordovician Beekmantown Group Ordovician Edinburg Formation, Lincolnshire, New Market Limestones Ordovician Martinsburg

Whitmeyer, Steven J.

94

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologic map data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii geologic map data Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

96

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

Watson, Andrew

98

Geological and geotechnical databases and developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological and geotechnical databases and developments in the Netherlands Robert Hack & Wiebke Tegtmeier Namur, Belgium, 9 October 2007 #12;9 October 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack & Tegtmeier 3 Surface data: · Climate · Vegetation

Hack, Robert

99

11 Years Engineering Geology Fieldwork in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 2 What did we Produce ? Why did we ? #12;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 3 happy #12;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 4 Why keep

Hack, Robert

100

MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology Environmental Geology 3 3. Specialization in Stratigraphy and Palaeontology 5 4. Specialization programme leading to MSc degree in the following specializations (majors): · Applied Environmental Geology

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

none,

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY CATALOG 131 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

106 Historical Geology (3-3) 4 MATH 151 Engineering Math. I (3-2) 4 MATH 152 Engineering Math. II (3-0) 3 GEOL 309 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods (1-6) 3 MATH 251 Engineering Math. III (3-0) 3-3) 4 GEOL 305 Paleobiology (2-3) 3 GEOL 312 Structural Geology and Tectonics (3-3) 4 U.S. history

103

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

105

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Proceedings of ERAD (2002): 95103 c Copernicus GmbH 2002 Extraction and analysis of structural features in cloud radar and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Zhariy3 , P. MaaÃ?3 , and K. Sassen4 1 GKSS Research Center, Institute for Coastal Research, Geesthacht the morphology of cloud fields as well as cloud internal structure. The GKSS 95 GHz cloud radar: M. Quante (markus.quante@gkss.de) is of importance for the development of strategies and codes

Teschke, Gerd

107

Probing Structural and Motional Features of the CTerminal Part of the Human Centrin 2/P17-XPC Microcrystalline Complex by Solid-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loop.8 The complex acquires a unique 3D structure in the presence of an excess of calcium and a 1 flexibility of the loops except for residues involved in coordination with the Ca2+ cation that stabilizes EF-hand domain (-helix-loop--helix) with two EF-hand motifs (EF-III and EF-IV) separated by a linker

108

Patch layout generation by detecting feature networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The patch layout of 3D surfaces reveals the high-level geometric and topological structures. In this paper, we study the patch layout computation by detecting and enclosing feature loops on surfaces. We present a hybrid framework which combines several key ingredients, including feature detection, feature filtering, feature curve extension, patch subdivision and boundary smoothing. Our framework is able to compute patch layouts through concave features as previous approaches, but also able to generate nice layouts through smoothing regions. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework by comparing with the state-of-the-art methods.

Yuanhao Cao; Dong-Ming Yan; Peter Wonka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

99 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Geology Today,Vol. 24, No. 3, MayJune 2008 Clay as sealing material in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

99© Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Geology Today,Vol. 24, No. 3, May­June 2008 FEATURE Feature Clay of the initial uranium or plutonium fuel and the products of their decay. The radioactivity of this mixture for at least a hundred thousand years, when its radioactivity will reach that of natural uranium. The most

Kammer, Thomas

110

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study of the Coso Formation Study of the Coso Formation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geologic Study of the Coso Formation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the

112

Chapter 4 - Audio Features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter focuses on presenting a wide range of audio features. Apart from the theoretical background of these features and respective MATLAB code, their discrimination ability is also demonstrated for particular audio types.

Theodoros Giannakopoulos; Aggelos Pikrakis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

features Utility Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;features function utility Training Pool Utility Generator Per-frame function content utility classes utility classes utility Tree Decision Generator Module Utility Clustering Adaptive Content Classification Loop features content VO selection & Utility Selector content features Real

Chang, Shih-Fu

114

News Features | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News & Awards News & Awards News Releases Honors & Awards News Features Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | News & Awards | News Features News Features 1-2 of 2 Results Nanotech toolbox July 01, 2013 - One of the most remarkable aspects of this super-small-scale world is that, under the right conditions, bits and pieces of materials will put themselves together-a natural phenomenon known as self-assembly. For example, polymer molecules, like the ones used to make plastic bags, organize themselves into a variety of structures based on what's going on in their environment. New family of tiny crystals glow bright in LED lights May 23, 2013 - Minuscule crystals that glow different colors may be the missing ingredient for white LED lighting that illuminates homes and

115

Geological Aspects of the Port Hacking Estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The geology of Port Hacking, a small estuary on Australia’s east ... construction sand that could be dredged from Port Hacking.

Alberto D. Albani; Peter C. Rickwood…

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

117

geologic-sequestration | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

118

Handbook of the Geology of Ireland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE work is based on the late Prof. Cole's contributions to the "Handbook of Regional Geology," published some years ago in Heidelberg, and revised and brought ...

1925-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of...

120

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

doi: 10.1130/focus012012.1 2012;40;95-96Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Society of America on December 26, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;GEOLOGY, January

122

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

Demouchy, Sylvie

123

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

124

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geology, Society and the Environmental health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Environmental analysis Sustainability Learning Objectives #12; As members of the biological The water we drink The air we breathe Geologic factors in environmental health #12; Health can be definedChapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future #12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste

Pan, Feifei

126

Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coal, and water. Environmental geology ­ study of problems associated with pollution, waste disposal ­ study of earth materials of economic interest, including metals, minerals, building stone, petroleum Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, mining

Logan, David

127

Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As it turns out, a good portion of the pipeline is not in the Sandhills and doesn't overlie the Ogallala1 Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke Providing a short, succinct description of the sandhills geology is a difficult and nebulous request. The sandhills themselves are primarily eolian

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

128

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin; Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 7462, 35 pGEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462 Alteration within the basement rocks associated with the P2 fault and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin E.E. Adlakha, K. Hattori, G

129

Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of LANL scientist A. Park Williams and partners from the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona and several other organizations. February 27, 2013 Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas fire. Image by Craig D. Allen, USGS. Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas fire. Image by Craig D. Allen, USGS. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print issue of the journal Nature Climate Change released this week features as its cover story the

130

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

James E. Faulds

133

Northwest Geological Society Society Field Trips in Pacific Northwest Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through the Western Channeled Scablands June 21-22 2008 Bruce Bjornstad #12;This field trip guide has been - 22 2008 Bruce Bjornstad Dry Falls and the Lower Grand Coulee #12;Introduction Ice Age floods were Age flood features is repro- duced from a previous field trips (Bjornstad 2004; Kiver and Bjornstad

134

Geological and Geophysical Exploration for Uranium Mineralization on EI-Erediya Prospect Area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground geologic, structural, radiometric, magnetic and horizontal-loop electromagnetic data (surface and mining) have been applied to follow the surface and downward extension of the uranium mineralizations showi...

S. I. Rabie; A. A. A. Meguid; A. S. Assran

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Article: Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential Author L.T. Grose Published Journal Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin, 1974 DOI Not Provided...

136

Geothermal Well Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Logging: Geological...

137

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy January 11, 2013 -...

138

Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey Abstract Abstract...

139

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geologic and tectonic characteristics of rockbursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern mining enterprises have attained such scales of engineering activity that their direct influence to a rock massif and in series of cases to the region seismic regime doesn`t provoke any doubts. Excavation and removal of large volumes of rock mass, industrial explosions and other technological factors during long time can lead to the accumulation of man-made changes in rock massifs capable to cause catastrophic consequences. The stress state changes in considerable domains of massif create dangerous concentration of stresses at large geological heterogeneities - faults localized in the mining works zone. External influence can lead in that case to such phenomena as tectonic rockbursts and man-made earthquakes. The rockbursts problem in world mining practice exists for more than two hundred years. So that its actuality not only doesn`t decrease but steadily mounts up as due to the mining works depth increase, enlargement of the useful minerals excavations volumes as due to the possibility of safe use of the rock massif potential energy for facilitating the mastering of the bowels of the Earth and for making that more cheap. The purpose of present work is to study the engineering activity influence to processes occurring in the upper part of Earth crust and in particular in a rock massif. The rock massif is treated in those studies as a geophysical medium - such approach takes into account the presence of block structure of medium and the continuous exchange of energy between parts of that structure. The idea ``geophysical medium`` is applied in geophysics sufficiently wide and stresses the difference of actual Earth crust and rock massifs from the continuous media models discussed in mechanics.

Adushkin, V.V. [Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Dynamics of the Geospheres; Charlamov, V.A.; Kondratyev, S.V.; Rybnov, Y.S.; Shemyakin, V.M.; Sisov, I.A.; Syrnikov, N.M.; Turuntaev, S.B.; Vasilyeva, T.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

David Archer

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

NREL: NEWS - Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Printable Version Bookmark and Share Printable Version Feature News The following feature stories take an in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at how NREL is advancing energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. You may subscribe to receive weekly news features by e-mail or via RSS feed. NREL Features RSS Feed (XML) 2013 December 2013 New Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines New Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines Five-megawatt dynamometer will accelerate the development of next-generation wind energy technologies. Bright Ideas Chase Investor Dollars at Forum Bright Ideas Chase Investor Dollars at Forum Annual Industry Growth Forum sponsored by NREL is where green technology seeks greenbacks. NREL Takes Efficiency to the Great Outdoors NREL Takes Efficiency to the Great Outdoors

143

Quantifying Community Assembly Processes and Identifying Features that Impose Them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Across a set of ecological communities connected to each other through organismal dispersal (a ‘meta-community’), turnover in composition is governed by (ecological) Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation. Quantitative estimates of these processes remain elusive, but would represent a common currency needed to unify community ecology. Using a novel analytical framework we quantitatively estimate the relative influences of Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation on subsurface, sediment-associated microbial meta-communities. The communities we study are distributed across two geologic formations encompassing ~12,500m3 of uranium-contaminated sediments within the Hanford Site in eastern Washington State. We find that Drift consistently governs ~25% of spatial turnover in community composition; Selection dominates (governing ~60% of turnover) across spatially-structured habitats associated with fine-grained, low permeability sediments; and Dispersal Limitation is most influential (governing ~40% of turnover) across spatially-unstructured habitats associated with coarse-grained, highly-permeable sediments. Quantitative influences of Selection and Dispersal Limitation may therefore be predictable from knowledge of environmental structure. To develop a system-level conceptual model we extend our analytical framework to compare process estimates across formations, characterize measured and unmeasured environmental variables that impose Selection, and identify abiotic features that limit dispersal. Insights gained here suggest that community ecology can benefit from a shift in perspective; the quantitative approach developed here goes beyond the ‘niche vs. neutral’ dichotomy by moving towards a style of natural history in which estimates of Selection, Dispersal Limitation and Drift can be described, mapped and compared across ecological systems.

Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Chen, Xingyuan; Kennedy, David W.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Konopka, Allan

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automated Feature Design...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proc. Proceedings of International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Palo Alto, California. 2013. D.Y. Harvey, M.D. Todd, Automated extraction of damage features...

145

Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Geological Survey Utah Geological Survey Name Utah Geological Survey Address 1594 W. North Temple Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6100 Phone number 801.537.3300 Website http://geology.utah.gov/ Coordinates 40.7713859°, -111.9367973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7713859,"lon":-111.9367973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

147

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...reservoir sandstones (5 to 20...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

149

NETL: Features - August 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Key Technology for Clean Coal Power Coal lay in ledges under the ground since the Flood, until a laborer with pick and windlass brings it to the surface. We may well call it black diamonds. Every basket is power and civilization. For coal is a portable climate. It carries the heat of the tropics to Labrador and the polar circle: and it is the means of transporting itself whithersoever it is wanted. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson The Greenhouse Effect Courtesy of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency When American essayist and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson christened coal "a portable climate" in his 1860 essay "Wealth," he was not referring to global climate change. And yet his statement that coal "carries the heat

150

NETL: Features - February 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 All Walled Up and No Place to Go: Large-Scale Geologic Sequestration Successes Put Carbon Dioxide in Its Place Jan Baptist Van Helmont Jan Baptist Van Helmont, the 17th-century scientist who first observed CO2. It is the mid-17th century. Jan Baptist Van Helmont, a Belgian chemist, places a carefully measured 62 pounds of coal into a basin, which he ignites, covers, and allows to burn. When the fire has at last smoldered down to nothing but ash and embers, Van Helmont measures the remains and finds not the expected 62 pounds he had started with, but rather one lonely pound of debris. In his treatise, he declares that "the 61 remaining pounds are the wild spirit." This entity, "which can neither be contained by Vessels, nor reduced into a visible body," he labels "the

151

Feature Stories | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases Features 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 Story Tips Audio Spots Honors and Awards Videos ORNL Review Magazine ORNL Reporter DOE Pulse Media Contacts Media Mentions RSS Feeds News Home | ORNL | News | Features Features ORNL's Office of Communications works with national, regional, and local media outlets on news stories about the laboratory. For more information on ORNL and its research and development activities, please refer to one of our Media Contacts. If you have a general media-related question or comment, you can send it to news@ornl.gov. 1-25 of 25 Results Comprehensive phonon "map" offers direction for engineering new thermoelectric devices January 08, 2014 - If you've ever been stuck in traffic on a hot, sunny afternoon, you might have noticed the rippling effect caused by the release

152

Environment Feature Stories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Environment Feature Stories /community-environment/_assets/images/icon_earthday.jpg Environment Feature Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will clean up the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. - 7/10/13 Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot more to the

153

Summer Feature | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Summer Feature Summer Feature U.S. DOE Office of Science Workforce Development for Teachers & Scientists WDTS plays a distinctive role in inspiring, engaging, and training the next generation of scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and technologists, in the science and technology mission of DOE. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship provides fellowships for elementary and secondary school mathematics and science teachers Brochure Graduate Student Awards for the Lindau Meeting of Nobel Laureates provides opportunity for U.S. doctoral students to travel to Lindau to participate in discussions with the Nobel Laureates 2011 Participants Community College Institute of Science and Technology (CCI) provides paid internships in science and engineering and technology

154

Substation fire protection features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes Commonwealth Edison`s (ComEd) approach to substation fire protection. Substation fires can have a major operational, financial, as well as political impact on a utility. The overall Company philosophy encompasses both active and passive fire protection features to provide prompt detection, notification, and confinement of fire and its by-products. Conservatively designed smoke detection systems and floor and wall penetration seals form the backbone of this strategy. The Company has implemented a program to install these features in new and existing substations. Thus far these measures have been successful in mitigating the consequences of substation fires.

Hausheer, T.G. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ACR-1000 Passive Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced CANDU Reactor{sup TM} (ACR{sup TM}) is a Generation III+ pressure tube type reactor using light water coolant and heavy water moderator. The ACR-1000 reactor design is an evolutionary extension of the proven CANDU reactor design. The ACR-1000 incorporates multiple and diverse passive systems for accident mitigation. Where necessary, one or more features that are passive in nature have been included for mitigation of any postulated accident event. This paper describes how the use of passive design elements complements active features enhances reliability and improves safety margins. (authors)

Lekakh, Boris; Hau, Ken; Ford, Steven [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Copyright 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 0883-1351/07/0022-0577/$3.00 PALAIOS, 2007, v. 22, p. 577582  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPLICATIONS OF URANIUM ROLL FRONTS PENNILYN HIGGINS* University of Wyoming Department of GeologyCopyright 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 0883-1351/07/0022-0577/$3.00 PALAIOS, 2007 deep structural basins containing both abundant vertebrate fossils and uranium-ore deposits in the form

Higgins, Pennilyn

158

Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3): a collaborative approach to the management of geological GHG storage projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic storage projects associated with large anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) will have lifecycles that may easily span a century, involve several numerical simulation cycles, and have distinct modeling teams. The process used for numerical simulation of the fate of GHG in the subsurface follows a generally consistent sequence of steps that often are replicated by scientists and engineers around the world. Site data is gathered, assembled, interpreted, and assimilated into conceptualizations of a solid-earth model; assumptions are made about the processes to be modeled; a computational domain is specified and spatially discretized; driving forces and initial conditions are defined; the conceptual models, computational domain, and driving forces are translated into input files; simulations are executed; and results are analyzed. Then, during and after the GHG injection, a continuous monitoring of the reservoir is done and models are updated with the newly collected data. Typically the working files generated during all these steps are maintained on workstations with local backups and archived once the project has concluded along with any modeling notes and records. We are proposing a new concept for supporting the management of full-scale GHG storage projects where collaboration, flexibility, accountability and long-term access will be essential features: the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite, GS3.

Bonneville, Alain; Black, Gary D.; Gorton, Ian; Hui, Peter SY; Murphy, Ellyn M.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; White, Mark D.; Williams, Mark D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion Issues Related to Carbon Capture, Transportation, and Storage Capture, Transportation, and Storage--Aspects of Corrosion and Materials. "Until these new technologies are developed and applied, corrosion engineers are focusing on how to best design pipelines for CO2 transport

Botte, Gerardine G.

160

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THE SIXTEENTH INTERNATIONAL GEOLOGICAL CONGRESS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the origin and accumulation of oil. Two points of view appeared-one that oil migrates long distances (be-cause...divided, one group visiting the Marathon Basin and Carlsbad Caverns...stratigraphy, structure and oil fields of the region. After...

W. C. MENDENHALL

1933-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ore Metals Through Geologic History  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...structural arrays which may )ute of solar enerdiverge significantly from...than from descending oceanic slabs. In the western United States...melts could be gen-erated, collector mechanisms for tin and tungsten...tin and tungsten. Once the "collector mecha-nism" at the point...

Charles Meyer

1985-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear fuel corrosion over millennia interpreted using geologic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion of nuclear fuel over the 10,000 year regulatory period in a geologic repository will be a function of physical characteristics (e.g., crystallinity, crystal sizes, crystal forms) and chemical characteristics (e.g., crystal composition, compositional variability, accessory phases). Natural uraninite (nominally UO{sub 2+x}) which has undergone long-term corrosion can be studied to infer the long-term behavior of nuclear fuel. Previously, uraninite from the Nopal I deposit, Pena Blanca district, Chihuahua, Mexico, has been shown to constitute an outstanding analog material for comparison with nuclear fuel. Similarities between Nopal I uraninite and nuclear fuel have been shown to include bulk composition, general crystal structure, and total trace element content. Data presented here suggest that, as a bulk material, Nopal I uraninite compares favorably with irradiated nuclear fuel. Nevertheless, some fine-scale differences are noted between Nopal I uraninite and irradiated nuclear fuel with respect to both internal structures and compositions. These observations suggest that whereas the long-term responses of the two materials to oxidative alteration in a geologic repository may be similar, the detailed mechanisms of initial oxidant penetration and the short-term oxidative alternation of Nopal I uraninite and irradiated nuclear fuel are likely to be different.

Pearcy, E.C.; Manaktala, H.K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

Goff, F.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

166

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Importance of Geological Features in Designing Open-Pit Lignite Exploitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greece covers today 50 per cent of its electric power generation by burning low grade lignite extracted from open pits. Greece or more correctly the Greek Public ... year 1990. To achieve it, new open pits will b...

J. Tanakakis

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

News and Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News and Features: News and Features: Oak Ridge Labor-Management Prayer Breakfast donates $6,000 to Steps House, Inc. The 16th annual Oak Ridge area prayer breakfast was held on December 5, 2014, at the Cokesbury Center on Kingston Pike in Knoxville. The event drew over 400 people who contributed $3,522 to the Steps House after hearing Patrick W. White, Founder and Chief Operating Officer speak about the history of the effort to help men who are in desperation and cannot obtain help elsewhere. From two houses to now 28 half-way type houses for these veterans and others who are at the bottom of their lives through drug and alcohol abuse or other similar difficulties, White told his compelling life story. The speaker donated his honorarium and the committee added sufficient

170

Fermilab | Recovery Act | Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Features - Archive Features - Archive photo Industrial Building 3 addition Fermilab Today-November 5, 2010 IB3 addition nears completion The future site of FermilabÂ’s new materials laboratory space has evolved from a steel outline to a fully enclosed building over the past five months. Read full column photo Fermilab Today-October 22, 2010 Recovery Act gives LBNE team chance to grow Thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the collaboration for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment, LBNE, has expanded its project team. Read full column photo cooling units Fermilab Today-October 15, 2010 Local company completes FCC roof construction A local construction company recently completed work on the roof of the Feynman Computing Center, an important step in an ongoing project funded by

171

Geographic information systems (GIS) for geologic mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer-based Geographic Information System (GIS) is a powerful and versatile tool for preparation of geologic maps. Using GIS different types of geographically oriented information can be displayed on a common base in a flexible format that facilitates examination of relationships between the types of information. In addition, text-based and graphic information (attributes) from separate databases can be attached to points, lines or areas within the different map layers. Although GIS has enormous potential for geologic mapping, it must be used with care. Key considerations when using GIS include realistic representation of the geology, choice of an appropriate scale for the maps, and comparison of the computer-generated maps with field observations to maintain quality control. In building multilayer GIS maps, the data sources must be at a scale appropriate to the intended use. Information derived from diverse sources must be examined carefully to assure that it is valid at the scale of representation required. Examples of GIS products created for one purpose, but potentially misused for a different purpose, include formation contacts (lines) on a regional geologic map scaled up for a facility siting study or well locations on a small-scale location map subsequently contoured for contaminant plume prediction at a very large scale. In using GIS to prepare geologic maps, it is essential to have a clear rationale for the map and use an appropriate scale to depict the various layers of information. The authors of GIS-based geologic maps must be aware that the attractive, polished appearance of their products may tempt some end users to stretch and misinterpret the information displayed.

Schock, S.C. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Center for Environmental Research Information)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Geology and recognition criteria for uranium deposits of the quartz-pebble conglomerate type. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is concerned with Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates. This class of deposit has been estimated to contain between approximately 16 and 35 percent of the global uranium reserve in two rather small areas, one in Canada, the other in South Africa. Similar conglomerates, which are often gold-bearing, are, however, rather widespread, being found in parts of most Precambrian shield areas. Data have been synthesized on the geologic habitat and character of this deposit type. The primary objective has been to provide the most relevant geologic observations in a structural fashion to allow resource studies and exploration to focus on the most prospective targets in the shortest possible time.

Button, A.; Adams, S.S.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

175

Argonne Transportation - 2001 Features Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Features Archive 1 Features Archive SAE Award for Excellence in Oral Presentation Christopher Powell of Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Research (CTR) received a Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Award for Excellence in Oral Presentation for his presentation entitled "X-Ray Measurement of High Pressure Diesel Sprays" at the March 2001 SAE World Congress in Detroit, Michigan. (More...) Discover Award Finalist, Transportation: Using “X-Ray Vision” to Study Fuel Spray Processes Inside Engines By using high-brilliance X-rays from Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source, researchers are able to obtain never-before-possible, time-resolved and quantitative information on the structure of gasoline and diesel fuel sprays at the very moment they enter the engine cylinder. Before the new “X-ray vision” technique, the portion of fuel sprays nearest the injector nozzle (the first one inch) had been too opaque for visible light to penetrate, leaving engine designers and manufacturers to guess at conditions inside the fuel spray

176

Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure Structure functions 1 NOTE: THE FIGURES IN THIS SECTION ARE INTENDED TO SHOW THE REPRESENTATIVE DATA. THEY ARE NOT MEANT TO BE COMPLETE COMPILATIONS OF ALL THE WORLD'S RELIABLE DATA. Q 2 (GeV 2 ) F 2 (x,Q 2 ) * 2 i x H1 ZEUS BCDMS E665 NMC SLAC 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 Figure 16.6: The proton structure function F p 2 measured in electromagnetic scattering of positrons on protons (collider experiments ZEUS and H1), in the kinematic domain of the HERA data, for x > 0.00006 (cf. Fig. 16.9 for data at smaller x and Q 2 ), and for electrons (SLAC) and muons (BCDMS, E665, NMC) on a fixed target. Statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature are shown. The data are plotted as a function of Q 2 in bins of fixed x. Some points have been slightly offset in Q 2 for clarity. The ZEUS binning in x is used in this plot; all other data are rebinned to the x values of

177

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

178

Processing of Neutron Diffraction Data for Strain Measurement in Geological Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

: Conventional rock mechanics testing techniques typically involve the loading of samples and measurement of displacements or strains on the outer boundary of the specimen surface. Neutron diffraction based strain measurement techniques represent a unique and powerful tool for measuring the strain within geological materials under load. The structural variability and non-uniform crystallinity of geological materials, however, create many complexities in the intensity patterns that must be analyzed to quantify strains within the material. The attenuating and scattering properties of the pressure cell housing the sample further add difficulties to the data analysis. This paper describes the methods and processes used to process neutron scattering data for strain measurement in geological materials. It is intended to provide a primer for those in the rock mechanics community that are interested in utilizing this technique along with additional discussion of neutron diffraction experimental factors that may affect data quality.

Polsky, Yarom [ORNL] [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL] [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Online Exams 1, 2 & 3 In general, know Cretaceous 145.0-- 66.0 Jurassic 201.3 -- 145.0 Triassic 252.2 -- 201.3 Paleozoic Permian 298.9 -- 252 Supergroup: rifting of Pangaea to form Central Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

180

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Exams 1 & 2 In general, know the basic 145.5 -- 65.5 Jurassic 201.5 -- 145.5 Triassic 252.3 -- 201.5 Paleozoic Permian 299 -- 252 to form Central Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Exams 1 & 2 In general, know the basic 145.5 -- 65.5 Jurassic 199.6 -- 145.5 Triassic 251 -- 199.6 Paleozoic Permian 299 -- 251 Carboniferous Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak Mesozoic Era: Jurassic

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

182

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Online Exams 1, 2 & 3 In general, know.0 Triassic 252.2 -- 201.3 Paleozoic Permian 298.9 -- 252.2 Carboniferous/Pennsylvanian 323.2 -- 298 Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak Mesozoic Era: Jurassic

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

183

Sir John Flett and the Geological Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON October 1 Sir John Flett retired from the directorship of the Geological Survey and Museum. He joined the ... in 1901, in 1903 he was appointed petrographer, and in 1911 he succeeded Dr. John Home as assistant director for Scotland. On the retirement of Sir Aubrey Strahan in ...

1935-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...the sands. Porosity. High-grade...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...Ath-abasca reservoir is the distribution...ofpri-mary porosity and permeability in the McMurray...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...flow only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...the subsurface reservoir and supplying...ex-cellent reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...petroleum reservoir sandstones (5 to 20 0036-8075...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

, UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies; and depositing of sedi- ments in an Ice-Age lake called Lake Bonneville which intermittently filled the valley-transported sediment more than a mile in thickness (Text-fig. 2). At the;ery top of this accumulation of valley

Seamons, Kent E.

188

The Sandia Hand Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sandia Hand Sandia Hand Features ï‚· Low Cost: using 3D high-resolution rapid prototyping technologies for low volumes, ensuring each component is amenable to injection molding for high volumes, and designing around components found in large consumer markets has enabled significant cost reductions ï‚· Dexterous: designed with four 3 Degree of Freedom (DOF) fingers to enable dexterous tasks such as finger gating while still maintaining form closure ï‚· Modular: a hand frame with identical finger modules that attach through magnetic attachment with electrical power and communications achieved through spring contacts. Power to each finger socket is actively controlled, permitting hot swapping of finger modules. Benefits

189

Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-D seismic data acquired by Petroleum Geo-Services Inc. (PGS), Houston, Texas. The study area ranges from approximately 180 m - 2500 m water depth. Research included regional geologic correlation, seismic interpretation, and structural modeling...

Gray, Max Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Petroleum reservoir porosity versus depth: Influence of geological age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in late Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal of the Geological Society of...carbonate reservoir quality: Examples from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya Basin: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v.-15, p...

S. N. Ehrenberg; P. H. Nadeau; Ø. Steen

191

Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website Abstract Provides access to digital...

192

Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Iowa Tracheophyta (vascular plants) Spores, New Albany Shale Sporing bodies, Dugger Fm. #12;Department (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

Polly, David

193

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic  Geology Billion  Gallons  per  Year Brine  Use  Sequence Carbon  dioxide  Capture  and  Storage Carbon  Dioxide Coal-­?

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

195

Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geologic Mapping and Database for Portland Area Fault Studies Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This collection of digital geologic data derives from geologic and interpretive maps prepared by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) over the last 15 years. Most of the data was collected in the course of preparing digital earthquake hazards maps for all or part of the greater Portland (METRO) urban growth

Ian P. Madin

197

Topology-based Feature Definition and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Defining high-level features, detecting them, tracking them and deriving quantities based on them is an integral aspect of modern data analysis and visualization. In combustion simulations, for example, burning regions, which are characterized by high fuel-consumption, are a possible feature of interest. Detecting these regions makes it possible to derive statistics about their size and track them over time. However, features of interest in scientific simulations are extremely varied, making it challenging to develop cross-domain feature definitions. Topology-based techniques offer an extremely flexible means for general feature definitions and have proven useful in a variety of scientific domains. This paper will provide a brief introduction into topological structures like the contour tree and Morse-Smale complex and show how to apply them to define features in different science domains such as combustion. The overall goal is to provide an overview of these powerful techniques and start a discussion how these techniques can aid in the analysis of astrophysical simulations.

Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Gyulassy, Attila; Pascucci, Valerio

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

SciFeatureSciFeature SEA-MONKEYS AND ALIENS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SciFeatureSciFeature MSU SEA-MONKEYS® AND ALIENS? What is the connection between Sea-Monkeys® and aliens? Believe it or not NASA scientists think it is possible that some alien life might resemble Sea

199

Cedar Creek: a significant paleotectonic feature of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cedar Creek is the major anticlinal structure demarcating the southwest flank of the Williston basin. This pronounced fold developed through a geologic history of recurrent tectonic movements along a northwest-southeast striking fault zone. The four major periods of tectonism documentable in the Cedar Creek area from early Paleozoic through mid-Tertiary affected the local and regional distribution, erosion, and/or preservation, and, though moderately, the depositional facies of sedimentary strata since Ordovician time.

Clement, J.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hopper Featured Announcements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Announcements Announcements Hopper Featured Announcements Hopper OS upgrade and new SW set to default next Wed, Feb 27 February 21, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments 1) There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, February 27, from 7 am to 7 pm Pacific time. This is a major OS upgrade. Most applications are highly recommended to recompile (or at least relink) after the maintenance. C++ and PGAS applications are recommended to recompile and relink. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. 2) After the maintenance, the following software versions will be set to default on Hopper: -- pgi/12.9.0 -- gcc/4.7.2 -- cce/8.1.3 -- intel/13.0.1.117

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: Features - December 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Extreme Drilling Laboratory Is Ready to “Rock and Roll” The Extreme Drilling Laboratory The Extreme Drilling Laboratory is located at the NETL Morgantown site. Initial research operations will begin in 2010. The Extreme Drilling Laboratory (XDL) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) proudly announces the much-anticipated debut of its prototype Ultra-deep Drilling Simulator (UDS), the rock star of the XDL. Drilling research will begin soon at an experimental well site with pressures reaching 30,000 pounds of force per square inch and temperatures exceeding 480 °F at the bottom of the well. One of the many unique features of this extreme drilling research is that 100 percent of the drilling will occur above ground. In addition, the UDS operating pressure

202

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 Mazda 3 VIN: JMZBLA4G601111865 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD Weights Design Curb Weight: 2,954 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2,850 lb Distribution F/R (%): 63/37 GVWR: 4,050 lb GAWR F/R: 2,057/1,896 lb Payload 1 : 1,096 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 103.9 in Track F/R: 60.4/59.8 in Length: 175.6 in Width: 69.1 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 6.1 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Yokohama Model: YK520 Size: P205/55R17 Pressure F/R: 35/33 psi

203

Salient Biological Features, Systematics,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Salient Salient Biological Features, Systematics, and Genetic Variation of Populus Gancho T. Slavov and Peter Zhelev Abstract The genus Populus includes morphologically diverse species of decid- uous, relatively short-lived, and fast-growing trees. Most species have wide ranges of distribution but tend to occur primarily in riparian or mountainous habitats. Trees from this genus are typically dioecious, flower before leaf emer- gence, and produce large amounts of wind-dispersed pollen or seeds. Seedlings are drought- and shade-intolerant, and their establishment depends on distur- bance and high soil moisture. Asexual reproduction is common and occurs via root sprouting and/or rooting of shoots. Fossil records suggest that the genus appeared in the late Paleocene or early Eocene (i.e., 50-60 million years BP). According to one commonly used classification, the genus is comprised

204

Structural Control of Hydrology, Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry along the Eastern Escarpment of the Jordan Rift Valley, JORDAN.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The relationship of structural geology and hydrogeological characteristics NW Jordan. Superior 3 phase tectonic model was derived from re-evaluation of structural elements which are strongly… (more)

Sahawneh, Julia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geological structures from downward continuation of gravity anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operator and two grid spacings (2 and 4 km), the depth to the upper surface of the source is about 4 km, with the center of' mass located at about 8 km. Comparison of these results with those for a sphere yield a density contrast of 0. 3 g/cc . Both... km 18. Downward-continuation residual gravity map and profile at the depth of 6 km. Contours in mGals. Grid spacing 4 km by 4 km 19. Downward-continuation residual gravity map and profile at the depth of 8 km. Contours in mGals. Grid spacing 4 km...

Yao, Chia-Chi George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Three-dimensional geologic structures from inversion of gravity anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from an analysis of the sampling interval. 39 100 80 z0= 7km p = 1gm/cra R, /R6= 2 ~ 10 60 mgal . ~ ~ Numerical Integration Parker Method 40 20 64 56 48 40 32 km 10 a) 24 16 8 mgal ! km 10b) 16 8 Figure 10. Gravity profile across.... The input was the gravity profile shown in Figure 5. The model parameters are the same used by Oldenburg (1974, Figure 2, p. 533) for the case Z =6km. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Comparison of gravity profiles from the cosine model and from...

Hinson, Charles Alvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

Structural geology of the Henneberry Ridge area, Beaverhead County, Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brown calar; often weathers ta saft "punky? state. Law raunded h111 equivalent ta Thaynes Fm. Brawn hippv soil. permian Phasphoria Fm. Oolamfte at base changing ta chert and sandstone at tap, Oalamite is lfght gray ta white, chert and sand... brown calar; often weathers ta saft "punky? state. Law raunded h111 equivalent ta Thaynes Fm. Brawn hippv soil. permian Phasphoria Fm. Oolamfte at base changing ta chert and sandstone at tap, Oalamite is lfght gray ta white, chert and sand...

Coryell, Jeffrey John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

United States Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Survey Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Geological Survey Name United States Geological Survey Address USGS National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive Place Reston, VA Zip 20192 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 1879 Phone number 703-648-5953 Website http://www.usgs.gov/ Coordinates 38.947077°, -77.370315° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.947077,"lon":-77.370315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State North Carolina State North Carolina Name North Carolina Geological Survey Address 1612 Mail Service Center City, State Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27699-1612 Website http://www.geology.enr.state.n Coordinates 35.67°, -78.66° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.67,"lon":-78.66,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Idaho Geological Survey Name Idaho Geological Survey Address 300 North 6th Street Suite 103 City, State Boise, Idaho Zip 83720-0050 Website http://www.idahogeology.org/Dr Coordinates 43.615992°, -116.199217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615992,"lon":-116.199217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

212

Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

Collins, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storagereservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in deep geologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologic carbon storage is to trap CO{sub 2} underground, CO{sub 2} could migrate away from the storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeable pathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitude releases of CO{sub 2} have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs in numerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbon dioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO{sub 2} reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due to influences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. These systems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potential release of CO{sub 2} from geologic storage reservoirs and provide important information about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that are associated with releases, as well as the health, safety, and environmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can be applied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO{sub 2} and industrial releases of CO{sub 2} and natural gas in the context of these characteristics. Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessons can be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO{sub 2} can both accumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondary reservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Both primary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO{sub 2} should therefore be well characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO{sub 2} have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release, such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential for processes that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks and trigger the release of CO{sub 2} from a storage reservoir should be evaluated. Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and direct conduits for CO{sub 2} flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment should therefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO{sub 2} migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurally unsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on the potential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO{sub 2} to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells are abundant. Fifth, the style of CO{sub 2} release at the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites. In rare circumstances, the release of CO{sub 2} can be a self-enhancing and/or eruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO{sub 2} leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health has been small in most cases of large surface releases of CO{sub 2}. This could be due to implementation of public education and CO{sub 2} monitoring programs; these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health, safety, and environmental effects associated with CO{sub 2} leakage. Finally, while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO{sub 2} leakage due to acidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, waters remained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored for changes that may be associated with storage reservoir leakage.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

216

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The unique features of starch metabolism in red algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unique features of starch metabolism in red algae Roberto Viola 1 * Pi Nyvall 2 Marianne...SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden Red algae (Rhodophyceae) are photosynthetic eukaryotes...plastids. The starch granules from red algae (floridean starch) show structural similarities...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Available potential energy of an isolated feature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The true available potential energy (APE) of an isolated feature (e.g. a warm-core ring) in a basin is the difference in the potential plus internal energy between the observed and reference state. The reference state is that in which the same fluid is redistributed adiabatically to a stably stratified state and the isopycnals are on constant geopotential surfaces. For an isolated feature in an infinitely wide basin, it would seem reasonable to assume that the far-field density structure is a good approximation of the reference state. This approximation to the reference state will be examined in this paper. Four different methods of calculating the available potential of an isolated feature are compared. These are (1) the gravitational available potential energy using the reference state (APE/sub G/), (2) the gravitational available potential energy using the far-field density structure as an approximation for the reference state, (3) the Boussinesq available potential energy using the reference state (APE/sub B/), and (4) the Boussinesq available potential energy using the far-field density structure instead of the reference state. The gravitational available potential energy using the the reference state (APE/sub G/) is the true available potential energy for an incompressible fluid.

Hebert, D.

1988-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

ARM - Features and Releases Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CenterFeaturesFeatures and Releases Archive CenterFeaturesFeatures and Releases Archive Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance Features and Releases Archive 2013 Dec 30 Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere Nov 13 Research Flights Completed for Biomass Burning Field Campaign Nov 07 MAGIC Takes a Bow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Petroleum geology of the Gulf of California, Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of California basin proper is a very young (late Miocene) feature in northwestern Mexico, produced by the tectonic interaction of the Pacific and American plates. Sediments are mostly siliciclastic with thicknesses that may exceed 8,000 m (26,248 ft). Exploratory drilling started in 1979 and since then, ten offshore and seven onshore wells have been spudded. Foremost among the former the Extremeno 1 well tested from a thin deltaic sand 4,115 m deep (13,501 ft) a daily flow of 6.2 million ft{sup 3} of gas and 130 bbl of gas condensate through a 0.25 in. choke with a pressure of 280 kg/cm{sup 2} (3,981 psi). In the southern part of the basin, the offshore Huichol 1 well was also a gas and condensate producer, albeit noncommercial. Geologically, the basin's favorable generation and trapping conditions make up a very attractive scenario for a future petroleum producing province, once exploration priorities are considered timely.

Guzman, A.E. (Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), San Luis Potosi, Mexico)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (CRWMS M&O 2000b) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) engineering design basis in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The engineering design basis documented in the PDD is to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the engineering design basis from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the engineering design basis captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 2-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1),the Engineering Design Bases (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. M. Curry

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations. Many of the technologies on the list were in fact used during the characterization of Yucca Mountain and elsewhere by LBNL personnel. The study also includes emerging technologies and identifies the need to develop better estimation of important parameters for repository siting. Notable emerging technologies include 3-D seismic and satellite-based remote sensing and wireless micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors. They enable cost-effective and ubiquitous monitoring to be applied for site characterization. We list and classify the types of uncertainties involved in site characterization. Uncertainties can exist in all aspects of site characterization: data, interpretation, conceptualization, and modeling. We use the Swedish program to exemplify such uncertainties. We also devote a chapter on geochemical issues regarding the interaction between groundwater and natural and engineered barrier materials. A recommendation has been made to take advantage of the recent advancement in geochemical modeling capabilities in natural systems. Although it is not of immediate relevance at the preliminary investigation stage, it serves as a good reminder that geochemical investigation efforts should not be overlooked at any stage in the repository program. We construct a synthetic preliminary-investigation site based on an extensive data set available from a geoscientific project in Japan, which we use as a 'real' site to evaluate uncertainties resulting from hydrogeological modeling and examine strategies for characterizing a new site. We plan various preliminary-investigation configurations and conduct preliminary numerical investigations at the synthetic site. We construct a model of the 'real' site for each PI configuration, make predictions of particle travel times, and compare against the 'real' data obtained from the 'real' model. We conclude that drilling as many as nine boreholes does not necessarily improve the understanding of the site compared to drilling as few as three boreholes, unless there is an underlying structure that is larger than the spacing of the boreholes. The

Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alaska Feature Articles and Blogs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

resourcesalaska-feature-articles-blogs Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 (202) 586-1272 en Minto Upgrades Community Lodge...

226

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

227

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)] [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The future of oil: Geology versus technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We discuss and reconcile the geological and economic/technological views concerning the future of world oil production and prices, and present a nonlinear econometric model of the world oil market that encompasses both views. The model performs far better than existing empirical models in forecasting oil prices and oil output out-of-sample. Its point forecast is for a near doubling of the real price of oil over the coming decade, though the error bands are wide, reflecting sharply differing judgments on the ultimately recoverable reserves, and on future price elasticities of oil demand and supply.

Jaromir Benes; Marcelle Chauvet; Ondra Kamenik; Michael Kumhof; Douglas Laxton; Susanna Mursula; Jack Selody

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geologic considerations in underground coal mining system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic characteristics of coal resources which may impact new extraction technologies are identified and described to aid system designers and planners in their task of designing advanced coal extraction systems for the central Appalachian region. These geologic conditions are then organized into a matrix identified as the baseline mine concept. A sample region, eastern Kentucky is analyzed using both the developed baseline mine concept and the traditional geologic investigative approach.

Camilli, F.A.; Maynard, D.P.; Mangolds, A.; Harris, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geology of the Carlos-East area, Grimes County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY ' ' A &M COLLEGE OF TEYJ5 '4, GEOLOGY OF TRE CARLOS EAST AREA ' *, , GRIIKS COUNTY, TEXAS ==, . :; A Thesii "?, :, WILLIAM' LAWRENCE WALTON 'I ' Submitted to thi Graduate School of the, . : Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in ~ ' k '. -. . -. Partial fulflllnent of the, ' requireaents' for the' degree 'of ;i llASTER OF SCIENCE: 'k ' - Ltigor' Subgeht: 'Geology. r . - '7 r 'k GEOLOGY OP TBE, CARLOS-EAST AREA GRIEES COUNTY' TEXAS 'I ?ILLIAB u...

Walton, William Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rolling hills and broad beaches of southern Taiwan to the tropical rain forests that cover much of the lower elevations in northern Taiwan. Above 1000 m, drier air results in thinner forest dominated by hard woods and conifers and, at the highest elevations, alpine-like meadows and rolling hills. Geologically

Alpay, S. Pamir

234

Implementation of efficient algorithms for the computation of morphological texture features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features, morphological granulometry texture features are the least utilized partly due to the immense amount of time needed for their computation. This is especially so when structuring elements of any geometry are utilized in obtaining a granulometry...

Patel, Manish J

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equation  2   5  Carbon  capture  technology  requires  for  Geologic  Carbon  Capture  and   Sequestration."  the  additional  carbon  capture  system  (1.24  assuming  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Survey of expert geological...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Survey of expert geological opinion on feasibility of Plowshare stimulation of natural geothermal systems. Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact...

237

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE's) Coal Program...

238

International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

239

Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 8, 2012 ... greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide in depleted hydrocarbon ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract hydrocarbons for energy needs. The apparatus provides more efficient...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract...

242

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fired  Power  Plants”,  DOE/NETL,  2010.   Chelme-­?Ayala,  Capture. ”   RADS  LLC,  DOE/NETL.  2011.   Gong,  Y.  and  Geologic   Formations. ”  NETL.  2009.   Texas  Water  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Development of a Geological and GeomechanicalFramework for the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

during shearing; geological study of the mechanisms accommodating deformation at fracture walls using literature review, core observations, and numerical simulations 5 | US...

244

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

- 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

James E. Faulds

246

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial...

247

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Awardee Website http:www.azgs.az.gov Partner 1 Microsoft Research Partner 2 Energy Industry Metadata Standards Working Group Partner 4 String representation "Geological...

248

Paleomagnetism, Potassium-Argon Ages, and Geology of Rhyolites...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Dalrymple, 1966). Authors Richard R. Doell, G. Brent Dalrymple, Robert Leland Smith and Roy A. Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoirs, 1968 DOI...

249

Geophysics, Geology and Geothermal Leasing Status of the Lightning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Status of the Lightning Dock KGRA, Animas Valley, New Mexico Author C. Smith Published New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

250

A seismic modeling methodology for monitoring CO2 geological ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 20, 2011 ... possible causes of the greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the. 30 options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide ...

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Publications AASG State Geological Survey National Geothermal Data Systems Data Acquisition and Access National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance...

252

Full-Wave Seismic Data Assimilation: Theoretical Background and Recent Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Wave Seismic Data Assimilation: Theoretical Background and Recent Advances Po Chen Department of Geology will formulate the seismological inverse problem for estimating seismic source and Earth structure parameters in the form of weak-constraint generalized inverse, in which the seismic wave equation and the associated

Chen, Po

253

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

V. Trebules

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 25, 2009 Feature Stories and Releases Nature Magazine Features Mobile Facility Deployment In China Bookmark and Share A news feature published in Vol. 461 of Nature...

255

Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Equipment and procedures for fluid flow and wettability tests of geological materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy, has developed several unique types of laboratory apparatus: (1) equipment for measurement of petroleum reservoir fluids at simulated subsurface conditions of temperature and pressure, (2) apparatus for saturation of geological cores with liquids, (3) design of a low internal volume pressure relief valve, and (4) apparatus and procedures for the quantitative determination of the relative wetting of oil and water on geologic materials. The fluid flow apparatus operates on the principles of liquid chromatography except for the replacement of the standard chromatographic column by a geologic core sample; it can be operated at an internal pore pressure of 400 atmospheres and 150/sup 0/C. The apparatus can be applied to the measurement of the adsorption characteristics of reservoir fluids such as surfactants, polymers, chemical tracers and biocides; it is also applicable to the determination of relative permeability relationships and miscible and immiscible fluid flow behavior. The apparatus for the saturation of geologic cores is adaptable for simultaneous saturation of several small cores or a single core up to 50 cm in length and 4 cm in diameter. The pressure relief valve has an internal volume less than 0.5 ml and can operate at pressures as high as 500 atmospheres. The apparatus for determination of wettability was constructed by modification of a commercial centrifuge and the procedure is based on the thermodynamic work required for fluid displacement from a porous medium. This paper incorporates the design features and operational procedures of the apparatus in addition to the computer programs for calculation of miscible phase dispersion of reservoir fluids and adsorption characteristics of reservoir chemicals.

Donaldson, E.C.; Kendall, R.F.; Pavelka, E.A.; Crocker, M.E.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2012 [Feature Stories and Releases] 7, 2012 [Feature Stories and Releases] Southern Great Plains Site in Path of Tornado Bookmark and Share Property of several SGP site personnel took a hit during the April 30 tornado. Site operations manager John Schatz shared this photo of damage to and around his barn. Property of several SGP site personnel took a hit during the April 30 tornado. Site operations manager John Schatz shared this photo of damage to and around his barn. On April 30, at about 10:30 p.m, a tornado touched down in Medford, Oklahoma, northwest of the Central Facility at ARM's Southern Great Plains site. The storm track moved southeast, passing through several counties and leaving a path of destruction in its wake. In spite of winds in excess of 80 mph and baseball-sized hail, ARM instruments and structures

259

Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Dynamic simulations of geologic materials using combined FEM/DEM/SPH analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC now includes implementations of Cosserat point theory and cohesive elements. This approach directly simulates the transition from continuum to discontinuum behavior, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture within a combined finite element/discrete element framework. In addition, there are many application involving geologic materials where fluid-structure interaction is important. To facilitate solution of this class of problems a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) capability has been incorporated into LDEC to simulate fully coupled systems involving geologic materials and a saturating fluid. We will present results from a study of a broad range of geomechanical problems that exercise the various components of LDEC in isolation and in tandem.

Morris, J P; Johnson, S M

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

James E. Faulds

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Z .Marine Geology 162 2000 303316 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermargeo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources and Energy Directorate, PB 5091 Majorstua, 0301 Oslo, Norway b Institute of Geology, Uni�ersity of Oslo, PB 1047, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway c Institute of Geology, Uni�ersity of Oslo, PB 1047, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway d J.S.I. Oil and Gas Consultants AS, PB 218, 1301 Sand�ika, Norway e

263

GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Dolomite Pine Canyon Limestone Humbug Formation Tertiary System North Horn Formation Moroni Formation Quaternary System Pre-Lake Bonneville Fanglomerate Lake Bonneville Sediments Recent Lake Sediments Igneous

Seamons, Kent E.

264

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross?section.

Hinz, Nick

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Presented, the nuclear industry faces unique hurdles to expansion and waste management. Geology plays a critical role in the nuclear fuel cycle beyond just the mining of uranium for nuclear fuel. Come hear Frannie Skomurski

266

Florida Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Florida Name Florida Geological Survey Address 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard M.S. 49 City, State Tallahassee, Florida Zip 32399 Website http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geo Coordinates 30.47491°, -84.357967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.47491,"lon":-84.357967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

267

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

269

GIS data models for coal geology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of spatial data models can be applied to different aspects of coal geology. The simple vector data models found in various Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) programs are sometimes used for routine mapping and some simple analyses. However, more sophisticated applications that maintain the topological relationships between cartographic elements enhance analytical potential. Also, vector data models are best for producing various types of high quality, conventional maps. The raster data model is generally considered best for representing data that varies continuously over a geographic area, such as the thickness of a coal bed. Information is lost when contour lines are threaded through raster grids for display, so volumes and tonnages are more accurately determined by working directly with raster data. Raster models are especially well suited to computationally simple surface-to-surface analysis, or overlay functions. Another data model, triangulated irregular networks (TINs) are superior at portraying visible surfaces because many TIN programs support break fines. Break lines locate sharp breaks in slope such as those generated by bodies of water or ridge crests. TINs also {open_quotes}honor{close_quotes} data points so that a surface generated from a set of points will be forced to pass through those points. TINs or grids generated from TINs, are particularly good at determining the intersections of surfaces such as coal seam outcrops and geologic unit boundaries. No single technique works best for all coal-related applications. The ability to use a variety of data models, and transform from one model to another is essential for obtaining optimum results in a timely manner.

McColloch, G.H. Jr.; Timberlake, K.J.; Oldham, A.V. [West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

272

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

273

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Project Description The project is expected to make large quantities of geothermal-relevant geoscience data held by the State Geological Surveys available via the NGDS. State Arizona Objectives Expand and enhance the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermalrelevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

274

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

275

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Paleontological Resources Preservation Act 43 CFR 8365.1-5: Public Property and Resources 43 CFR 3620: Petrified Wood 16 USC 4301: Federal Cave Resources Protection Act 43 CFR 1610.7-2: Areas of Critical Environmental Concern Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

276

Newsletter Features | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features Newsletter Features Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter. September 6, 2013 The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians had plenty of used vegetable oil and grease on hand and a desire to convert the waste to biofuel to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Tribes participated in a demonstration project with the intent to share their experience and lessons learned so that other Tribes

277

MagLab Feature Stories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem-solve in a world-class laboratory. Read more. 2013 Feature Stories Date Subject December 17 MagLab Mentors Middle-Schoolers November 26 MagLab User Awarded the 2014...

278

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

279

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

280

Evaluation of a New Method to Build Geological Models of Fractured Reservoirs Calibrated to Production Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Associates (UK) Ltd, Clyde House, Reform Road, Maidenhead, Berks SL6 8BY, UK...Conference and Exhibition, Villahermosa, Mexico, 1-3 February. Wei, L. , Hadwin...2001-051943 Economic geology, geology of energy sources Geological Society Publishing...

Keith Rawnsley; Lingli Wei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Methodologies of preparing erosion features map by using RS and GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The erosion features map is one of the basic maps in erosion and sediment studies and watershed management programs. Some methodologies of preparing erosion features map by using RS and GIS were compared in research which took place in the Jajrood sub-basin in north-east Tehran, Iran. In the first phase, four working units' maps were prepared by integration a) plant cover, geology and slope b) land use, geology and slope c) land use, rocks sensitivity to erosion and slope and d) land use, rocks sensitivity to erosion and land units' layers. In addition to these four working units' maps, three more maps were also evaluated in separating erosion features including e) land units f) sensitivity of rocks to erosion and g) image photomorphic units. The efficiency of these seven working units' maps was evaluated by 314 control points. For this purpose, by using erosion features of control points regarding field views, surface, rill, gully and channel erosion maps were prepared and compared by crossing them with working units' maps. Results showed that method “d” was better than “a”, “b” and “c” in providing soil erosion features regarding economic and executive considerations. The accuracy of methods “e” and “f” was 53.0 and 42.9% and their Root Mean Squared Error was more than method “g” and methods “a” to “d”. The coefficient of variation was highest for methods “e” and “f” and the least for method “e” and the greatest precision was related to image interpretation.

Torkashvand Ali Mohammadi; Davood Nikkami

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors-581-7250) Faculty Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

Johnson, Cari

283

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2013-14 academic year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

Johnson, Cari

284

LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology Laboratory. Our catalog also includes material housed in the separately administered Law Library in White Hall and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in the Department

McConnell, Terry

285

Feature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explains Vehicle Technologies to Illinois Companies and Government Explains Vehicle Technologies to Illinois Companies and Government Illinois chamber of commerce Attendees lined up for the test drive opportunities. On August 16, 2011, Argonne participated in the event, "Taking the Future Out for a Spin," organized by the Illinois Chamber of Commerce and held at the Autobahn Racing Country Club in Joliet, Il. Argonne researchers Glenn Keller and Henning Lohse-Busch were on hand to help attendees understand the advanced technology vehicles at the event. Lohse-Busch gave a presentation titled, "Current and Future Trends in Alternative Fuel Vehicles: A Research Perspective." Folks attending had the opportunity to drive a variety of advanced hybrid cars, including plug-in hybrids, electric vehicles and natural gas vehicles around a one and one-half mile closed racing course. Car manufacturers Chevy, Nissan, Tesla, Think, Mitsubishi and Ford provided electric vehicles, including the Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf. Hybrid vehicles were provided by Toyota, Porsche, Kia, Cadillac and Ford. Chevy, VPG, Green Alternative Systems and Freightliner provided vehicles that run on compressed natural gas.

286

FEATURES:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......America's latest geostationary weather satellite, GOES-12, will also improve forecasts of space weather. A NASA-built Solar...activity and forecast space weather disturbances that can destroy satellite electronics, disrupt long-distance......

Space shorts

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

FEATURES:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the past decades. A change in the solar climate would bring different...a sort of solar climate change Sunskimmers and sunplungers...universities, schools and companies; these three identical...according to project leader Bob Lin of University......

NAM 2012 in Manchester

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual engineering geology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manhattan Summary: , C. A., 1994, Bedrock and engineering geology maps of New York County and parts of Kings and Queens... -199 in New York (State) Geological Survey Annual...

289

Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium concentrations (NURE). Fig. 3. Geologic map of Newuranium concentrations (NURE). New Hampshire Geology Geol.Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), which were processed (

Apte, M.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University consists of five full-time faculty and five  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology (Site Assessment, Soils and Soil Pollution, Environmental Isotope Geochemistry, Environmental (Economic Geology). The Geology Department is housed in the historic Old Main Building, and owns in traditional fields (Hydrogeology, Eco- nomic Geology, Geochronology), and in the field of Environmental

Baskaran, Mark

291

Green Power Network: Featured Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alphabetical Listing Alphabetical Listing Categorical Listing Chronological Listing Featured Reports Featured Reports Selected from from our Library of Green Power Publications Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Feature Report Heeter, J., T. Nicholas, 2013. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2012 Data). NREL Report No. TP-6A20-60210. (PDF 1.2 MB) Heeter, J., 2013. Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Tracking Systems: Costs & Verification Issues (Presentation). NREL/PR-6A20-60640. (PDF 517 KB) Heeter, J., P. Armstrong, L. Bird, 2012. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data). NREL/TP-6A20-52925 (PDF 974 KB) Bird, L., A. Reger, and J. Heeter, 2012. Distributed Solar Incentive

292

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

293

Geology and geophysics of the Beata Ridge - Caribbean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS OF THE BEATA RIDGE - CARIBBEAN A Thesis by LANAR BURTON ROEMER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Ak? University in partial fu1fillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Ma...)or Subject: Oceanography GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS OF THE BEATA RIDGE ? CARIBBEAN A Thesis by LAMAR BURTON ROEMER Approved as to style and content by: o-Chairman o C it ee -Car f o ee ea o Dep r e Member August 1973 ABSTRACT Geology and Geophysics...

Roemer, Lamar Burton

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Regulation of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been actively developing needed regulations over the last two years for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Technical criteria are about to be published in the form of a proposed regulation. The waste packages, underground facility, and geologic setting form the major elements of any geologic repository and the basis of a multibarrier system. Performance objectives and supporting technical criteria have been developed for each of these repository elements to provide benchmarks for scientists and engineers working in each of these major areas. 9 refs.

White, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Featured Webinars | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Featured Webinars Featured Webinars Jump to: navigation, search This page highlights the webinars conducted by the Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network, Clean Energy Solutions Center, Enhancing Capacity for Low Emissions Development Strategies program, and the LEDS Global Dialogue Working Group. Finance Webinars CESC-Webinar: Building an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Driven Economy: How Policies Can Foster Risk Capital Investment in Renewable Energy CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Implementation Webinars GHG Inventory Webinars Low-carbon plans/TNAs/NAMAs Webinars CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning CLEAN-Linked Open Data (LOD) Webinar

296

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

Reitze, Arnold

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

Brian Cox

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

Brian Cox

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

302

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

303

STATE OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OREGON OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Portland, Oregon 97201 910 State Office Building r DOE/ID/12526--T2 OPEN-FILE REPORT 0-86-3 DE87 013077 INVESTIGATION OF THE TEIERMAL REGIME AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF THE DRILLING IN THE CASCADE RANGE CASCADE VOLCANIC ARC: FIRST PHASE OF A PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFIC Prepared by George R . Priest Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Preparation and publication of this document were supported b the Ore on Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Grant No. DE-%G07-841&.2526 from the U . S . Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

304

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

305

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

306

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

307

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

308

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In recent years there has been interest in the possibility of generating electricity from geothermal steam in many countries. The initial stage is the preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources and, apart from economic considerations, the problem is essentially geological. This paper deals with the factors involved in the selection of areas that warrant expenditure on investigation and development. Preferred requirements in geothermal fields for power generation are temperatures above 200°C and permeable aquifers or zones within 2000 m from the surface. The existence

309

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

310

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

311

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

312

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

313

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

314

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

315

Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada, in: Gold and Silver Deposits of Western Nevada Authors Hastings, J.S., Burkhart, T.H., and Richardson and R.E. Published Geological Society of Nevada 1993 fall field trip...

316

Engineering geology at Imperial College London; 1907–2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Building Stones; Bricks and Clays, Limes, Cements and Plasters; Roads and Canals; Rivers; Coastal Erosion; Use of Minerals...and studentships were reduced and staff not replaced. To consolidate resources Dr de Freitas initiated a Centre for Geological...

M.H. de Freitas; M.S. Rosenbaum

317

High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Impacts of Geochemical Reactions on Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the face of increasing energy demands, geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change. To ensure the environmental sustainability of this option, we must understand the rates and mechanisms of ...

Young-Shin Jun; Daniel E. Giammar; Charles J. Werth

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

320

Technical Geologic Overview of Long Valley Caldera for the Casa...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Technical Geologic Overview of Long Valley Caldera for the Casa Diablo IV Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MexicoInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Abstract unavailable Cartographers Robert Leland Smith, Roy A. Bailey and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1970 DOI Not...

322

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

host hydrocarbon reservoirs and oil and gas produc- tionthroat radius mm Radius (m) Reservoirs Oil Gas um GeologicalIn each of these reservoirs, oil fields have been dis-

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Structure of the Presidio Bolson area, Texas, interpreted from gravity data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To obtain a better understanding of the structure and tectonism of the region, an integrated geophysical-geological study of the Presidio area, Texas, was undertaken using gravity measurements and deep drilling data. New gravity data were combined with existing data to construct simple Bouguer anomaly maps of the Presidio area, and two-dimensional computer modeling of gravity profiles was used to derive earth models. These data outline the major geologic features of the area that are dominated by the effects of Tertiary block faulting and volcanism. The main feature of interest was the Presidio Graben, which is approximately 1.5 km deep near Ruidosa, Texas. One motivation for this study was the collection of a part of the basic scientific data needed to assess the geothermal potential of the area, and the results obtained support the hypothesis that hot springs associated with the Presidio Graben derive their heat from deep circulation along its boundary faults. However, some gravity anomalies observed could be interpreted as indicating the presence of late Tertiary intrusions that could provide heat for the hot springs.

Mraz, J.R.; Keller, G.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geology of the South Mason-Llano River area, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mountain formation and located and redes- cribed many of Roemer's type localities (Bridge 1937). Bridge and Girty (1937) redescribed Roemer" s Paleozoic fossils and included notes on the geology of the region. Ventifacts of the basal Hickory sandstone... Mountain formation and located and redes- cribed many of Roemer's type localities (Bridge 1937). Bridge and Girty (1937) redescribed Roemer" s Paleozoic fossils and included notes on the geology of the region. Ventifacts of the basal Hickory sandstone...

Duvall, Victor Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Shock compression and dynamic fragmentation of geological materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The theory of fracture and fragmentation and previous fracture studies on geological materials are reviewed in Chap- ter 6. The dynamic fragmentation experiments on the geological materials and how their response compares with predictions from metal... of the cube exposed. The exposed surface was polished using Silicon Carbide paste on a polish- ing machine to create a flat specimen. Each specimen was viewed under 13 14 CHAPTER 2. COMPOSITION & MICROSTRUCTURE an optical microscope to preliminarily...

Kirk, Simon

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of interrelated effects on plateau ecosystems. These may include UNDERSTANDING EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES AND GEOLOGY

328

Geological model of the Jurassic section in the State of Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until the end of the seventies, the knowledge of Jurassic Geology in the State of Kuwait was very limited, since only one deep well was drilled and bottomed in the Triassic sediments. Few scattered wells partially penetrated the Jurassic sequence. During the eighties, appreciable number of wells were drilled through the Jurassic, and added a remarkable volume of information. consequently it was necessary to analyze the new data, in order to try to construct a geological model for the Jurassic in the State of Kuwait. This paper includes a number of isopach maps explaining the Jurassic depositional basin which also helps in trying to explain the Jurassic basin in the Arabian Gulf basin. Structural evolution of the Jurassic sequence indicated an inversion of relief when compared with the Cretaceous sequence. In fact, the main Cretaceous arches were sites of sedimentation troughs during the Jurassic period. This fact marks a revolution in the concepts for the Jurassic oil exploration. One of the very effective methods of the definition of the Jurassic structures is the isopaching of the Gotnia Formation. Najmah, Sargelu and Marrat Formations include the main Jurassic reservoirs which were detected as a result of the exploration activities during the eighties. Selective stratigraphic and structural cross sections have been prepared to demonstrate and explain the nature of the Jurassic sediments.

Yousif, S.; Nouman, G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geology and the New Conservation Movement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and the destruction of natural beauty received nationwide...Interstate Oil Compact at Corpus Christi, Texas, 6 December...major changes in the natural scene or raze structures...flaring (burn-ing) of natural gas where no market exists...

Peter T. Flawn

1966-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Argonne Transportation - 2005 Features Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Features Archive 5 Features Archive South African Science Park Street Naming Michael Thackeray of Argonne National Laboratory's Chemical Engineering Division was recently honored as one of 11 notable South African scientists and innovators to have streets named after them in Pretoria's new Innovation Hub science park. (More...) Electrochemical Society Battery Division Research Award Michael Thackeray of Argonne National Laboratory received the 2005 Research Award of the Battery Division of the Electrochemical Society. The award was established in 1958 to recognize outstanding contributions to the science and technology of primary and secondary cells and batteries and fuel cells. (More...) SAE Barry D. McNutt Award for Excellence in Automotive Policy Analysis Steve Plotkin of Argonne's Center for Transportation Research was the winner of the Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE) 2005 Barry D. McNutt Award, which recognizes the importance of sound policy analysis and inspires members of the mobility community in government, industry and elsewhere to strive for excellence. (More...)

332

Argonne Transportation - 2003 Features Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Features Archive 3 Features Archive Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers Fellow Ali Erdemir of Argonne's Energy Technology Division has been named a Fellow of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE). Last year, Erdemir received the Al Sonntag Award and the Allan A. Manteuffel Award from STLE's Chicago chapter for his development of a carbon coating that showed the lowest coefficient of friction (less than .001) when tested in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. (More...) Argonne Researcher Honored for Career in Engine Research The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) honored Argonne's Ramanujam (Raj) Sekar by elevating his membership to the status of a Fellow, in recognition of his many "significant engineering achievements and contributions to the engineering profession" over a career spanning more than 33 years. Sekar manages the Engine and Emissions Research Group at Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center. (More...)

333

Argonne Transportation - 2008 Features Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Features Archive 8 Features Archive Battery Test Facility Since 1976, researchers have used Argonne's Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory to study advanced battery systems for applications such as hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and utility load-leveling during peak demand periods. The facility houses a computer-operated test laboratory, where individual cells and multicell modules of battery systems are subjected to performance and lifetime tests under simulated real-world conditions. (More...) EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles The EnerDel/Argonne lithium-ion battery is a highly reliable and extremely safe device that is lighter in weight, more compact, more powerful and longer-lasting than the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). (More...)

334

PETSc: Features: Nvidia GPU support  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nvidia GPU support Nvidia GPU support Home Download Features Component Details Diagram GPUs Theads Documentation Applications/Publications Miscellaneous External Software Developers Site PETSc algebraic solvers now run on Nvidia GPU systems. This sometimes provides an alternative high-performance, low-cost solution technique. We recommend working with petsc-dev if you wish to work witht his feature. If you use the PETSc GPU code in your published work, please cite the following paper: @article{minden2010preliminary, title={Preliminary implementation of PETSc using GPUs}, author={Minden, V. and Smith, B.F. and Knepley, M.G.}, journal={Proceedings of the 2010 International Workshop of GPU Solutions to Multiscale Problems in Science and Engineering}, year={2010} } WARNING: Using GPUs effectively is difficult! You must be dedicated and

335

Argonne Transportation - 2000 Features Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Features Archive 0 Features Archive Argonne Technology Wins R&D 100 Award Argonne researchers have won an R&D 100 Award for developing a catalyst that may help bring environmentally friendly electric cars to the marketplace. These awards are given annually by R&D Magazine to the 100 most significant technical products of the year. (More...) Argonne's Automotive Recycling Processes Win Awards The automobile shredder industry recovers over 10 million tons of ferrous (iron-containing) scrap annually from obsolete automobiles and sells the metals at a significant profit. After metals recovery, though, the auto recyclers are left with about 5 million tons of nonmetallic auto shredder residue (ASR) to dispose of annually. Argonne's processes to recover valuable plastics from this scrap have won two prestigious awards. (More...)

336

Implementations of a Flexible Framework for Managing Geologic Sequestration Modeling Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is a standard practice used to support designing, operating, and monitoring CO2 injection projects. Although a variety of computational tools have been developed that support the numerical simulation process, many are single-purpose or platform specific and have a prescribed workflow that may or may not be suitable for a particular project. We are developing an open-source, flexible framework named Velo that provides a knowledge management infrastructure and tools to support modeling and simulation for various types of projects in a number of scientific domains. The Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3) is a version of this framework with features and tools specifically tailored for geologic sequestration studies. Because of its general nature, GS3 is being employed in a variety of ways on projects with differing goals. GS3 is being used to support the Sim-SEQ international model comparison study, by providing a collaborative framework for the modeling teams and providing tools for model comparison. Another customized deployment of GS3 has been made to support the permit application process. In this case, GS3 is being used to manage data in support of conceptual model development and provide documentation and provenance for numerical simulations. An additional customized deployment of GS3 is being created for use by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) to aid in the CO2 injection permit application review process in one of its regions. These use cases demonstrate GS3’s flexibility, utility, and broad applicability

White, Signe K.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Black, Gary D.; Purohit, Sumit; Bacon, Diana H.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Gorton, Ian; Bonneville, Alain

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells June 7, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Best practices for managing wells used to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations are the focus of a publication just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The newest manual in the Department's series on current best practices associated with carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities covers the planning, permitting, design, drilling, implementation, and decommissioning of CO2 storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research,

339

New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells June 7, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Best practices for managing wells used to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations are the focus of a publication just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The newest manual in the Department's series on current best practices associated with carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities covers the planning, permitting, design, drilling, implementation, and decommissioning of CO2 storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research,

340

Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion science; however, it is applicable to many other science domains.

Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ENGINEERING FEATURES OF THE FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT (FIRE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fusion energy program. It has a major radius of 2 m, and a minor radius of 0.525 m. The general with antenna through the large ports. The major features are shown in Figure 1. -TF Coils and Global Structure coils. Each vessel quadrant has a large mid plane port, angled ports above and below the mid

342

Characterizing fault-plume intersection probability for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage of CO{sub 2} out of the designated storage region via faults is a widely recognized concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The probability of such leakage can be separated into the probability of a plume encountering a fault and the probability of flow along such a fault. In the absence of deterministic fault location information, the first probability can be calculated from regional fault population statistics and modeling of the plume shape and size. In this study, fault statistical parameters were measured or estimated for WESTCARB's Phase III pilot test injection in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Combining CO{sub 2} plume model predictions with estimated fault characteristics resulted in a 3% probability that the CO{sub 2} plume will encounter a fault fully offsetting the 180 m (590 ft) thick seal. The probability of leakage is lower, likely much lower, as faults with this offset are probably low-permeability features in this area.

Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Criticality safety considerations in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Features of geologic disposal which hamper the demonstration that criticality cannot occur therein include possible changes of shape and form, intrusion of water as a neutron moderator, and selective leaching of spent fuel constituents. If the criticality safety of spent fuel disposal depends on burnup, independent measurements verifying the burnup should be performed prior to disposal. The status of nondestructive analysis method which might provide such verification is discussed. Calculations were performed to assess the potential for increasing the allowed size of a spent fuel disposal canister if potential water intrusion were limited by close-packing the enclosed rods. Several factors were identified which severely limited the potential of this application. The theoretical limit of hexagonal close-packing cannot be achieved due to fuel rod bowing. It is concluded that disposal canisters should be sized on the basis of assumed optimum moderation. Several topics for additional research were identified during this limited study.

Gore, B.F.; McNair, G.W.; Heaberlin, S.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

345

The crustal structure of the Dead Sea Transform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure of the Levant Basin, eastern Mediterranean...from the Los Angeles basin to the Mojave Desert...Derin B., 1984. Permian-early Mesozoic tectonism...geological record of historic earthquakes in the Dead Sea basin, J. geophys. Res......

DESERT Group; M. Weber; K. Abu-Ayyash; A. Abueladas; A. Agnon; H. Al-Amoush; A. Babeyko; Y. Bartov; M. Baumann; Z. Ben-Avraham; G. Bock; J. Bribach; R. El-Kelani; A. Förster; H.-J. Förster; U. Frieslander; Z. Garfunkel; S. Grunewald; H. J. Götze; V. Haak; Ch. Haberland; M. Hassouneh; S. Helwig; A. Hofstetter; K.-H. Jäckel; D. Kesten; R. Kind; N. Maercklin; J. Mechie; A. Mohsen; F. M. Neubauer; R. Oberhänsli; I. Qabbani; O. Ritter; G. Rümpker; M. Rybakov; T. Ryberg; F. Scherbaum; J. Schmidt; A. Schulze; S. Sobolev; M. Stiller; H. Thoss; U. Weckmann; K. Wylegalla

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Carbon dioxide dissolution in structural and stratigraphic traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in structural and stratigraphic traps is a viable option to reduce anthropogenic emissions. While dissolution of the CO[subscript 2] stored in these traps ...

Hesse, M. A.

347

Geological Disposal Concept Selection Aligned with a Voluntarism Process - 13538  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UK's Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD) is currently at a generic stage in its implementation programme. The UK site selection process is a voluntarist process and, as yet, no communities have decided to participate. RWMD has set out a process to describe how a geological disposal concept would be selected for the range of higher activity wastes in the UK inventory, including major steps and decision making points, aligned with the stages of the UK site selection process. A platform of information is being developed on geological disposal concepts at various stages of implementation internationally and, in order to build on international experience, RWMD is developing its approach to technology transfer. The UK has a range of different types of higher activity wastes with different characteristics; therefore a range of geological disposal concepts may be needed. In addition to identifying key aspects for considering the compatibility of different engineered barrier systems for different types of waste, RWMD is developing a methodology to determine minimum separation distances between disposal modules in a co-located geological disposal facility. RWMD's approach to geological disposal concept selection is intended to be flexible, recognising the long term nature of the project. RWMD is also committed to keeping alternative radioactive waste management options under review; an approach has been developed and periodic reviews of alternative options will be published. (authors)

Crockett, Glenda; King, Samantha [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)] [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Current Status of The Romanian National Deep Geological Repository Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of a deep geological repository is a very demanding and costly task. By now, countries that have Candu reactors, have not processed the spent fuel passing to the interim storage as a preliminary step of final disposal within the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Romania, in comparison to other nations, represents a rather small territory, with high population density, wherein the geological formation areas with radioactive waste storage potential are limited and restricted not only from the point of view of the selection criteria due to the rocks natural characteristics, but also from the point of view of their involvement in social and economical activities. In the framework of the national R and D Programs, series of 'Map investigations' have been made regarding the selection and preliminary characterization of the host geological formation for the nation's spent fuel deep geological repository. The fact that Romania has many deposits of natural gas, oil, ore and geothermal water, and intensively utilizes soil and also is very forested, cause some of the apparent acceptable sites to be rejected in the subsequent analysis. Currently, according to the Law on the spent fuel and radioactive waste management, including disposal, The National Agency of Radioactive Waste is responsible and coordinates the national strategy in the field and, subsequently, further actions will be decided. The Romanian National Strategy, approved in 2004, projects the operation of a deep geological repository to begin in 2055. (authors)

Radu, M.; Nicolae, R.; Nicolae, D. [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON), ILFOV County (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Geological Society of America Special Paper 352  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated contractional structures in the form of wrinkle ridges on terrains interpreted to be flood basalts that characterize coronae. On Earth, wrinkle ridges are associated with the 17-14 Ma Columbia River flood, in Ernst, R.E., and Buchan. K.L.. eds.. Mantle Plumes: Their Identification Through Time: Boulder, Colorado

Mege, Daniel

350

Simulations of Fracture and Fragmentation of Geologic Materials using Combined FEM/DEM Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geological media using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses with large numbers of intact polyhedral blocks. However, underground structures in jointed rock subjected to explosive loading can fail due to both rock motion along preexisting interfaces and fracture of the intact rock mass itself. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model these types of problems, we have implemented Cosserat point theory and cohesive element formulations into the current version of LDEC, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture and combined finite element/discrete element simulations. Results of a large-scale LLNL simulation of an explosive shock wave impacting an elaborate underground facility are also discussed. It is confirmed that persistent joints lead to an underestimation of the impact energy needed to fill the tunnel systems with rubble. Non-persistent joint patterns, which are typical of real geologies, inhibit shear within the surrounding rock mass and significantly increase the load required to collapse a tunnel.

Morris, J P; Rubin, M B; Block, G I; Bonner, M P

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the current major national environmental problems is the safe disposal of large quantities of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, which are rapidly accumulating throughout the country. These radioactive byproducts are generated as the result of national defense activities and from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear power plants. At present, spent nuclear fuel is accumulating at over 70 power plant sites distributed throughout 33 states. The safe disposal of these high-level radioactive materials at a central disposal facility is a high national priority. This Reference Design Description explains the current design for a potential geologic repository that may be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials. This document describes a possible design for the three fundamental parts of a repository: a surface facility, subsurface repository, and waste packaging. It also presents the current conceptual design of the key engineering systems for the final four phases of repository processes: operations, monitoring, closure, and postclosure. In accordance with current law, this design does not include an interim storage option. In addition, this Reference Design Description reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. It describes the natural barrier system which, together with the engineered systems, achieves the repository objectives. This design will protect the public and the environment by allowing the safe disposal of radioactive waste received from government-owned custodial spent fuel sites, high-level radioactive waste sites, and commercial power reactor sites. All design elements meet or exceed applicable regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The design will provide safe disposal of waste materials for at least a 10,000 year period. During this time interval, natural radioactive decay of the waste materials will result in fission products that pose a minimal radiological hazard to the public afterward. For example, after 100 years, the relative hazard from the waste fission products will have diminished approximately 90 percent. After 1,000 years, the hazard will have diminished 99 percent, and after 10,000 years it will have diminished 99.9 percent. The resulting radiological hazard after 10,000 years is minimal, being of the same order of magnitude as that posed by 0.2 percent uranium ore, which is equivalent to that which was used to originally produce the nuclear fuel. Because developing such a repository is extremely complex, the design will move forward in three stages: Site Recommendation, License Application, and Construction. This document presents the design as it will be submitted in the Site Recommendation Consideration Report; the design will be updated as the design process moves forward. As more cost-effective solutions, technical advancements, or changes to requirements occur, the design may evolve. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing a system that includes this potential repository. This waste management system integrates acceptance, transportation, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Acceptance and transportation will be handled by regional servicing contractors under contract to the DOE. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will conduct an in-depth and thorough licensing review to determine the acceptability of the proposed waste management system. Eight sections of this document follow. Section 2 discusses the design requirements for the proposed repository. Section 3 describes the physical layout of the proposed repository. Section 4 describes the evolutionary phases of the development of the proposed repository. Section 5 describes the receipt of waste. Section 6 details the various systems that will package the waste and move it below ground, as well as safety monitoring and closure. Section 7 describes the syst

NA

2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Cryogenic cooling using tunneling structures with sharp energy features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermoelectric cooling, based upon the extraction of hot electrons and holes from a metallic electron gas, holds unrealized potential for refrigeration at cryogenic temperatures. We discuss the performance of two such electronic refrigerators: the quantum-dot refrigerator (QDR) and the normal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) refrigerator. We obtain the QDR base temperature using a numerical simulation and verify the validity of certain simplifying assumptions which allow refrigerating performance to be summarized on a diagram of ambient temperature versus electronic temperature. In this way, we find that the best refrigeration is obtained with the electronic distribution far from the equilibrium Fermi-Dirac function and the temperature reduction achieved is limited by the rate at which phonons are absorbed. We predict that, with sufficient thermal isolation, electronic devices could be cooled to a small fraction of the ambient temperature using these solid-state refrigerators. The NIS refrigerator should be capable of cooling thin-film devices from above 300 mK to below 100 mK; the QDR will cool macroscopic metallic samples in the ?K or nK range. We also discuss topics related to thermoelectric refrigeration including other cryogenic thermoelectric cooling schemes, the validity of the linear-response theory of thermoelectric effects, the refrigerating efficiency of an optimized thermoelectric refrigerator, and the overall cooling power of thermoelectric refrigeration.

H. L. Edwards; Q. Niu; G. A. Georgakis; A. L. de Lozanne

1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the native B-form conformation. Measured X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which report on nitroxide rotational motions, were found to vary depending on...

354

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

355

Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mines and Geology Mines and Geology Jump to: navigation, search State Nevada Name Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Address University of Nevada/178 City, State Reno, Nevada Zip 89557 Website http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/Oil&Ga Coordinates 39.5440601°, -119.8136573° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5440601,"lon":-119.8136573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

357

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

358

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Abstract This report presents a stratigraphic study of an area of about 860 square miles in the southern part of the Carson Desert, near Fallen, Churchill County, Nev. The exposed rocks and surficial sediments range in age from early Tertiary (?) to Recent. The late Quaternary sediments and soils were especially studied: they furnish a detailed history of the fluctuations of Lake Lahontan (a huge but intermittent late Pleistocene lake) and of younger lakes, as well as a history of late Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, soil development, and climatic change that probably is

359

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

360

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env The Summary of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,

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361

Geologic considerations in underground coal mining system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic characteristics of coal resources which may impact new extraction technologies are identified and described to aid system designers and planners in their task of designing advanced coal extraction systems for the central Appalachian region. These geologic conditions are then organized into a matrix identified as the baseline mine concept. A sample region, eastern Kentucky, is next analyzed, using both the new baseline mine concept and traditional geologic investigative approach. The baseline mine concept presented is intended as a framework, providing a consistent basis for further analyses to be subsequently conducted in other geographic regions. The baseline mine concept is intended as a tool to give system designers a more realistic feel of the mine environment and will hopefully lead to acceptable alternatives for advanced coal extraction system.

Camilli, F.A.; Maynard, D.P.; Mangolds, A.; Harris, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

364

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a

365

Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: News and Features on AddThis.com... More in this section... Project Assistance News & Features Spanish Resources Contacts News and Features The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) helps transportation decision makers find alternative fuel information, data, and tools through

366

Preserving the feature record: a systematic analysis of cooking and heating features from the Richard Beene site (41BX831), Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remains, burned matrix, or ash. It must, however, exhibit morpho- logical characteristics such as basin-shape, concavity in profile, or evidence for in-filling. These discriminating morphological attributes for pit structure are critical in any feature... remains, burned matrix, or ash. It must, however, exhibit morpho- logical characteristics such as basin-shape, concavity in profile, or evidence for in-filling. These discriminating morphological attributes for pit structure are critical in any feature...

Clabaugh, Patricia Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modern Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modern Geothermal Features Modern Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Modern Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Modern Geothermal Features: Active geothermal manifestations such as hot springs, fumaroles, steaming ground, mud pots, mud pools, mud volcanoes, or geysers. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle When geothermal systems have conduits available to the surface, they cause surface manifestations (or geothermal features). These features may vary between steam seeps (fumaroles) or pure fluid manifestations (geysers and hot springs) causing spectacular mineral formations (e.g. sinter terraces, tufa mounds). These types of manifestations are clear indications of an underlying geothermal system. Geothermal systems with no modern surface

368

Geological development, origin, and energy and mineral resources of Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston Basin of North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota, and S.-Central Canada (Manitoba and Saskatchewan) is a major producer of oil and gas, lignite, and potash. Located on the western periphery of the Phanerozoic North American Craton, the Williston Basin has undergone only relatively mild tectonic distortion during Phanerozoic time. This distortion is related largely to movement of Precambrian basement blocks. Oil exploration and development in the US portion of the Williston basin from 1972 to present have given impetus to restudy of basin evolution and geologic controls for energy resource locations. Major structures in the basin, and the basin itself, may result from left-lateral shear along the Colorado-Wyoming and Eromberg zones during pre-Phanerozoic time. Deeper drilling in the basin has established several major new structures with indications of others.

Gerhard, L.C.; Anderson, S.B.; Lefever, J.A.; Carlson, C.G.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

French Geological Repository Project for High Level and Long-Lived Waste: Scientific Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility study presented in the Dossier 2005 Argile set out to evaluate the conditions for building, operating and managing a reversible disposal facility. The research was directed at demonstrating a potential for confining long-lived radioactive waste in a deep clay formation by establishing the feasibility of the disposal principle. Results have been enough convincing and a Planning Act was passed on 28 June, 2006. Decision in principle has been taken to dispose of intermediate and high level long-lived radioactive waste in a geological repository. An application file for a license to construct a disposal facility is requested by end of 2014 and its commissioning is planned for 2025. Based on previous results as well as on recommendations made by various Dossier 2005 evaluators, a new scientific programme for 2006-2015 has been defined. It gives details of what will be covered over the 2006-2015 period. Particular emphasis is placed on consolidating scientific data, increasing understanding of certain mechanisms and using a scientific and technical integration approach. It aims at integrating scientific developments and engineering advances. The scientific work envisaged beyond 2006 has the benefit of a unique context, which is direct access to the geological medium over long timescales. It naturally extends the research carried out to date, and incorporates additional investigations of the geological medium, and the preparation of demonstration work especially through full-scale tests. Results will aim at improving the representation of repository evolutions over time, extract the relevant parameters for monitoring during the reversibility phases, reduce the parametric uncertainties and enhance the robustness of models for performance calculations and safety analyses. Structure and main orientation of the ongoing scientific programme are presented. (author)

Landais, P.; Lebon, P.; Ouzounian, G. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geologic research of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--March 1, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the period from October 1, 1992 to March 1, 1993. The overall goals of the program task are to provide a final synthesis of six deep seismic reflection profiles and other geological and geophysical data from the southern Washington Cascades region where a probable extensive deep sedimentary basin has been discovered. This deep sedimentary basin is hypothesized from geological, regional magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, magnetic , and seismic reflection data as described in the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) article by Stanley and others (1992). This report analyzed three seismic reflection profiles acquired by the Morgantown Energy Technology Centers in combination with the extensive MT and other data to outline a probable geological model for a thick conductive section of rocks in the southern Washington Cascades (called the Southern Washington Cascades conductor, SWCC). Earlier MT models suggested that the section consisted of an east-dipping package that extended to depths of as much as 20 km but appeared to surface in the Bear Canyon area near Morton, Washington and along the axis of the Carbon River and Morton anticlines. Interpretation of the first three DOE seismic reflection approximately confirmed the MT interpretation and added new information on anticlinal structures and detailed stratigraphy. In this quarterly report, we summarize the progress over the first two quarters of the program for FY93, and project the possible findings during the remainder of the project. A milestone chart for the first two quarters has been submitted separately, along with cost reports, but a copy of these items are attached for completeness.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 9, Formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Middle America Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Pacific margin of Mexico and Central America, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments are also included in this report. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 150 refs., 84 figs., 17 tabs.

Finley, P.; Krason, J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

@ work' video segment features Robotic Software Engineer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

@ work highlights Idaho National Laboratory employees and the jobs they perform.This segment features Robotic Software Engineer Miles Walton.

Idaho National Laboratory

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

@ work' video segment features Robotic Software Engineer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

@ work highlights Idaho National Laboratory employees and the jobs they perform.This segment features Robotic Software Engineer Miles Walton.

Idaho National Laboratory

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Discriminant Absorption Feature Learning for Material Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Discriminant Absorption Feature Learning for Material Classification Zhouyu Fu, Antonio Robles in spectral imaging by combining the use of invariant spectral absorption features and statistical machine learning techniques. Our method hinges in the relevance of spectral absorption features for material

Robles-Kelly, Antonio

377

Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Name Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Address Ste. 965 Northeast Oregon Street Place Portland, OR Zip 97232 Website http://www.oregongeology.org/s Coordinates 45.5286301°, -122.656652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5286301,"lon":-122.656652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................Lake City, Utah Mark A. Solien, William A. Morgan, and David L. Clark, at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, on April 28-May 2, 1978 Charles A. Sandberg and David L. Clark. Gardner Issue Editors Charles A. Sandberg David L Clark B e a m Young Unzveraty Geology Studzes

Seamons, Kent E.

379

Changing Global Sea Levels as a Geologic Index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...level as geologic benchmarks, was an unexpected...Even other major oil com-panies are...crucial to oil exploration. The beauty ofthe...limestone for the oil found in the Bu...eventually trapped the oil in the weathered...Armentrout of Mobil Exploration and Producing...stratigraphic test (COST) wells drilled...

RICHARD A. KERR

1980-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geologic map of the Mount Adams Quadrangle, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

382

Edward "Ned" K. Vizy Department of Geological Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for research efforts. · Assist in external grant writing process. · Manage the in-house computer cluster. · Manage in-house computer cluster and observational database. · Assist in external grant writing. WeatherEdward "Ned" K. Vizy Department of Geological Sciences Jackson School of Geosciences phone: (512

Yang, Zong-Liang

383

SCALING OF FRACTURE SYSTEMS IN GEOLOGICAL MEDIA E. Bonnet,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCALING OF FRACTURE SYSTEMS IN GEOLOGICAL MEDIA E. Bonnet,1 O. Bour,2 N. E. Odling,1,3 P. Davy,2 I. Main,4 P. Cowie,4 and B. Berkowitz5 Abstract. Scaling in fracture systems has become an active field spread widely through the literature. Although it is rec- ognized that some fracture systems are best

Cowie, Patience

384

Geologic map of the Hood River Quadrangle, Washington and Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History Geology Assignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rocks is the energy of the environment: that is, how fast the water (or wind) was moving. EssentiallyName: 1 GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History Geology Assignment DUE: Mon. Sept. 18 Part I, the higher the energy, the larger the size of the particles of sediment. Slow moving water can only move

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

386

Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Jordan, T. H., H. W. Menard, and D.K. Smith, Density and size distribution of seamounts in the eastern. Smith, H. W. Menard, J. A. Orcutt and T. H. Jordan, Seismic reflection site survey: correlation

Smith, Deborah K.

387

State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Deploy and populate the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) with state-specific data by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermal-relevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

388

Advancing the Science of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (Registration: www.earthsciences.osu.edu/~jeff/carbseq/carbseq 2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing the Science of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (Registration: www & American Electric Power Agenda March 9 ­ Morning Session 1 ­ Geological Carbon Sequestration: Introductions, AEP) 3. Field Testing: The Laboratory for Geological Carbon Sequestration (Neeraj Gupta, Battelle

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

389

Geological Causes of Local Variation in Coastal Bluff Recession Rates, Northeast Ohio Shoreline of Lake Erie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 Scott...Geology at Bowling Green State University. Through an internship at the Ohio Geological...professor at Bowling Green State University...erosion include wave energy (shoreline orientation...bathymetry), currents, surface and...

Scott A. Dawson; James E. Evans

390

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Abstract...

391

Geologic spatial analysis. 1988 performance report, August 30, 1987--January 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region weathering over several million years, during which many climatological, hydrological, and geological changes

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

393

Feature Tracking Using Reeb Graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracking features and exploring their temporal dynamics can aid scientists in identifying interesting time intervals in a simulation and serve as basis for performing quantitative analyses of temporal phenomena. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for tracking subsets of isosurfaces, such as burning regions in simulated flames, which are defined as areas of high fuel consumption on a temperature isosurface. Tracking such regions as they merge and split over time can provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. However, the convoluted nature of the temperature isosurface and its rapid movement make this analysis particularly challenging. Our approach tracks burning regions by extracting a temperature isovolume from the four-dimensional space-time temperature field. It then obtains isosurfaces for the original simulation time steps and labels individual connected 'burning' regions based on the local fuel consumption value. Based on this information, a boundary surface between burning and non-burning regions is constructed. The Reeb graph of this boundary surface is the tracking graph for burning regions.

Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.; Pascucci, Valerio

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Geological Research in France - The Dossier 2005 Argile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of fifteen years of research defined by the French act of December 30, 1991 on radwaste management, ANDRA gave a report, 'Dossier Argile 2005', which concluded with the feasibility of a reversible disposal in the argillaceous Callovo-Oxfordian formation studied by means of an underground research laboratory at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site. Starting from source data like the characteristics of the geological medium and the waste inventory, the process followed by ANDRA to achieve this conclusion is of a sequential type, and iterative between concept design, scientific knowledge, in particular that of the phenomenological evolution of the repository and its geological environment from operating period to long term, and safety assessment. The 'Dossier Argile 2005' covers a broad radwaste inventory, ILLW, HLW and Spent Fuel, so that it makes it possible to cover the whole of the technological, scientific and safety topics. This article will give an overview of the geological disposal studies in France and draw the main conclusion of the Dossier 2005 Argile. It will be focused on the near field (engineering components and near field host rock), while considering, if necessary, its integration within the whole system. After a short description of the concepts (including waste inventory and the characteristics of the Meuse/Haute the Marne site) and the functions of the components of repository and geological medium, one will describe, successively, the broad outline of the phenomenological evolution of repository and the geological medium in near field, in particular, by releasing the time scales of processes and uncertainties of knowledge. On this basis, one will indicate the safety scenarios that were considered and the broad outline of performance and dose calculations. Lessons learn from the Dossier 2005 Argile will be discussed and perspectives and priorities for future will be indicated. (authors)

Plas, Frederic; Wendling, Jacques [DS/IT, Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, Chatenay-Malabry, 92298 (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

Scott, J.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geochemistry of a spring-dense karst watershed located in a complex structural setting, Appalachian Great Valley, West Virginia, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution and chemistry of the springs in the Tuscarora Creek watershed is controlled by both geologic structure and karst dissolution. The watershed is located in eastern West Virginia in the structurally...

Dorothy J. Vesper; Rachel V. Grand; Kristen Ward…

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geological Society of America Centennial Field Guide--Northeastern Section, 1987 The Geology of Cameron's Line, West Torrington, Connecticut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cameron's Line, West Torrington, Connecticut Charles Merguerian, Geology Department, Hofstra University, Connecticut, and consists of two stops in the West Torrington 7 ½-minute quadrangle (Fig. 1). They can be reached from Exit 44 of Connecticut 8 by traveling southwestward on Connecticut 202 (East Main Street

Merguerian, Charles

400

Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relict Geothermal Features Relict Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Relict Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Relict Geothermal Features: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Relict geothermal surface feature, include the mineral formations left behind by hot springs, fumaroles, and geysers as well as the alteration of minerals by geothermal waters (e.g. opalization of sediments). Such alteration and deposits are indicators of past hydrothermal activity. Though surface activity has ceased in many areas, relict geothermal features may indicate the presence of a still active geothermal system below the surface. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Relict_Geothermal_Features&oldid=600720"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DTW for Matching Radon Features: A Pattern Recognition and Retrieval Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This allows to exploit the Radon property to include both boundary as internal structure of shapes, whileDTW for Matching Radon Features: A Pattern Recognition and Retrieval Method Santosh K.C.1 , Bart. It is basically based on dynamic programming for matching the Radon features. The key char- acteristic

Boyer, Edmond

402

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration J. L the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects. To detect subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present), An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res

Hilley, George

403

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES · For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to understand Material Characterization for Intermediate-scale Testing to Develop Strategies for Geologic Sequestration to generate comprehensive data sets. Due to the nature of the CO2 geological sequestration where supercritical

404

University of Calgary, Department of Geoscience Sessional Instructor Position in Petroleum Engineering Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will focus on seismic methods used in petroleum exploration but will also include an overview of gravity in Petroleum Engineering Geology The Department of Geoscience at the University of Calgary is seeking a Sessional Instructor to fill 1/3 of course as lecturer for Geology 377 (Petroleum Engineering Geology

Garousi, Vahid

405

3D/4D MODELLING, VISUALIZATION AND INFORMATION FRAMEWORKS: CURRENT U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PRACTICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

33 3D/4D MODELLING, VISUALIZATION AND INFORMATION FRAMEWORKS: CURRENT U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY to visualize and model geologic data and information in 3 spatial dimensions (3D) and sometimes adding time in visualizing and coupling geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and biologic processes together into 3D/4D

406

GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS Description: Investigation of the geological and geotechnical aspects of offshore wind projects. Emphasis will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind

Firestone, Jeremy

407

Special Feature: Quantum Measurement Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This special feature is intended to present a comprehensive review of the present state and novel trends in the field of quantum measurement standards. Most of the present metrological research is concentrated on establishing and strengthening the links between the units and fundamental constants. This will be demonstrated in the nine articles in this feature. The first four articles are devoted to time, frequency and length metrology. They describe quantum standards that are used or intended to be used for the realization of the SI base units of time and length, the second and the metre. The two units are related to each other by an adopted fixed value of the speed of light in vacuum and the second is at present defined by the energy difference (frequency) of a hyperfine transition in the ground state of caesium. The special feature starts with the discussion of caesium atomic clocks as direct realizations of the second and as a basis for other standards (e.g. the Josephson voltage quantum standard). Whereas Cs atomic clocks still provide us with the most accurate realization of the second, optical frequency standards based on cold trapped ions or cold atoms may eventually lead us to even lower uncertainty levels and may replace the present definition of the second by an optical transition. This situation is described in the contribution on optical frequency standards based on trapped single ions. Since optical frequency standards are also needed as wavelength standards in length metrology, the third contribution reviews the definition of the metre. It describes the different methods of realization, in particular by optical frequency standards including standards based on cold atoms. The use of optical frequency standards in time and length metrology requires the precise knowledge of their frequencies. Methods of optical frequency measurements based on various methods—including frequency comb generators—are discussed in the fourth article. Turning to the electric units, the discovery of two macroscopic quantum effects, the Josephson effect—discovered in the early sixties—and the quantum Hall effect—discovered in 1980—allowed the linking of electric units to fundamental constants. By use of the Josephson effect quantized voltage values are realized as multiples of the product of a certain frequency and of the superconducting flux quantum (h/2e). Quantized resistance values are realized with the quantum Hall effect as submultiples of h/e2, where this fundamental constant can also be interpreted as the quotient of the flux quantum of a normal conductor and the elementary charge. The metrological application became much easier by making use of the possibility of designing and manufacturing appropriate samples with microelectronic techniques. Since 1990 all calibrations of voltages or resistances worldwide have been based on these two quantum effects. Relative uncertainties of the order of 10-9 are obtained. International comparisons have proved that the calibration results in different laboratories also agree within relative uncertainties of a few parts in 109. Great attempts have also been made to realize a current quantum standard by counting single electrons. The Josephson effect and its application are described by Kohlmann and co-workers. The quantum Hall effect is only briefly described in this issue of Measurement Science and Technology since a comprehensive review article by Jeckelmann and Jeanneret appeared recently [1]. The unit of mass, the kilogram, is the only base unit in the SI that is derived from an artefact. Therefore one major task of today's metrological research is the linking of the unit of mass to a fundamental constant. There are two rival attempts: the comparison of mechanical and electrical power using the watt-balance and the counting of a large number of identical particles, like atoms or ions. The watt balance was pioneered by B Kibble. This experiment consists of two parts. A balance in equilibrium is opposed to a gravitational force and to a force on a coil fed by a current and opp

Erich Braun; Jürgen Helmcke

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

MA et al.: SKETCH RETRIEVAL VIA STROKE FEATURES 1 Sketch Retrieval via Dense Stroke Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA et al.: SKETCH RETRIEVAL VIA STROKE FEATURES 1 Sketch Retrieval via Dense Stroke Features Chao search method. In this paper, we propose a representation scheme which takes sketch strokes into account with local features, thereby facilitat- ing efficient retrieval with codebooks. Stroke features are detected

Yang, Ming-Hsuan

409

Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Property:TopoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:TopoFeatures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name TopoFeatures Property Type String Description Describes topographic features within the vicinity of the field (e.g. volcanic features, rift valleys, extensional features) that may be significant reflections of underlying geothermal resources. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 4 subproperties: G Geysers Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area S Soda Lake Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area Pages using the property "TopoFeatures" Showing 23 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Horst and Graben + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Horst and Graben +

411

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. Whitney. 2004. Yucca Mountain Site Description. TDR-tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, J. Geophys.volcanoes near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. Geological

Karasaki, Kenzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Geological interpretation of Mount Ciremai geothermal system from remote sensing and magneto-teluric analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exploration of geothermal system at Mount Ciremai has been started since the early 1980s and has just been studied carefully since the early 2000s. Previous studies have detected the potential of geothermal system and also the groundwater mechanism feeding the system. This paper will discuss the geothermal exploration based on regional scale surface temperature analysis with Landsat image to have a more detail interpretation of the geological setting and magneto-telluric or MT survey at prospect zones, which identified by the previous method, to have a more exact and in depth local scale structural interpretation. Both methods are directed to pin point appropriate locations for geothermal pilot hole drilling and testing. We used four scenes of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper or ETM+ data to estimate the surface manifestation of a geothermal system. Temporal analysis of Land Surface Temperature or LST was applied and coupled with field temperature measurement at seven locations. By combining the TTM with ...

Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta E; Irawan, Diky; Fadillah, Ahmad

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Methodology for the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage Program September 2010 Summary of the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide 2 Authors: U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D John Litynski U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D/Sequestration Division Dawn Deel Traci Rodosta U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Office of Research and Development George Guthrie U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/

414

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

415

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

416

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

417

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

418

An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 1 An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration Gardiner Hill, BP Craig Lewis, Chevron 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 2 Disclaimer * The following may not be the only Industry Perspective on Storage & Sequestration * It represents the opinions of BP and Chevron and some other energy companies that we have talked to 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 3 Overview * Potential New Business Impact * Business Drivers for R&D * Technology Objectives * Definitions of Storage & Sequestration * Break-down of Geologic Storage R&D Categories * Where We Think Industry (and others) are already strong * Where We Think Additional R&D Gaps Still

419

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

420

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah expose a detachment fault that separates a hanging wall of Paleozoic rocks from Proterozoic and Archean rocks of the footwall. Beneath the detachment lies a 100 to 300m-thick top-to-the-east extensional shear zone. Geologic mapping, strain and kinematic analysis, and 40Ar/39 Ar thermochronology suggest that the shear zone and detachment fault had an initial low-angle regional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gamma ray bursts and spectral features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The situation concerning the presence of features in gamma ray burst (GRB) spectra is analyzed taking into account recent results obtained especially with the PHOBOS probes and GINGA satellite. If the existence of cyclotron features seems now to be generally accepted the situation for the other features reported around 400?500 keV is not completely clarified. The presence of such features is discussed. Moreover some aspects of the high and low energy variations in the GRB and on the characteristics of their total spectrum are also reviewed. Finally future missions which might have a great impact in the GRB spectral analysis will be shortly considered.

E. Jourdain

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2014 Feature Stories and Releases Biogenic Aerosols Examined in Finland Forest Bookmark and Share The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) is operating in Hyytil, Finland,...

423

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

activities, but still features the familiar faces of Professor Polar Bear, Teacher Turtle, and PI Prairie Dog. These "mascots" represent the ARM Climate Research Facility's...

424

Geology of the Cedar Mountain area, Llano County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the west side of Cedar Mountain. Numerous minor faults branch off the major fractures. These "adjustment" faults are generally short and have relatively small displacements. The Llano uplift is the strongly uplifted and deformed south- eastern end... Mountain area. Geologic and cultural data were inscribed on the photographs and later trans- ferred to a transparent overlay from which the finished map was made. The photographs are of series DMH-7V, numbers 127-130, 178-184, and 191-198, dated...

Dewitt, Gary Ray

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library : Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiInfo Graphic/Map/Chart Authors Frank A. Trusdell and Richard B. Moore Published U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Frank A. Trusdell,Richard B. Moore. Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. []. Place of publication not provided. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 2006. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/2614/downloads/pdf/2614map_508.pdf.

426

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

427

Geological controls on prediction of coalbed methane of No. 3 coal seam in Southern Qinshui Basin, North China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to better understand the geological controls on coalbed methane (CBM) in Southern Qinshui basin (SQB), North China, geological surveys and laboratory experiments, including coal petrology analysis, proximate analysis and methane adsorption/desorption, were conducted. Results show that the coals from the SQB contain 0.59–3.54% moisture, 3.5–15.54% ash yield, 73.62–88.92% fixed carbon and 2.14–4.04% hydrogen, with C/H ratios in the range of 19.96–36.25. The vitrinite reflectance (Ro,m) ranges from 1.95 to 3.49%. The coals are composed of 18.5–97.4% vitrinite and 2.4–81.4% inertinite. The geologic structures, coal-bearing strata and coal depositional environment were studied by both field geological research and laboratory tests. A positive relationship is found between CBM content and basin hydrodynamics, in which CBM easily concentrates in the groundwater stagnant zone because of the water pressure. Furthermore, integrated geographical information system (GIS) and analytical hierarchy fuzzy prediction method (AHP) were used to evaluate the CBM resources in the SQB. The results show that the amount of CBM associated with the No. 3 coal seam in the SQB is 3.62 × 1011 m3. The CBM resource concentration (gas-in-place per square kilometer) in the SQB is in the range of (0.72–2.88) × 108 m3/km2, with an average of 1.21 × 108 m3/km2, which decreases from Zhengzhuang coal district to Shitou fault and from Fanzhuang coal district to the margins of the basin. The best prospective targets for CBM production are likely located in the southwest/northwest Zhengzhuang and central Hudi coal districts.

Yidong Cai; Dameng Liu; Yanbin Yao; Junqian Li; Yongkai Qiu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE SECOND PRODUCTION-TEST FLARING, PROJECT RULISON ( R u l i s o n - 1 0 ) a 1 9 7 1 P r e p a r e d U n d e r A g r e e m e n t No. A T ( 2 9 - 2 ) -474 '. f o r the N e v a d a Operations Office . . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . USGS -474 - 1 2 2 R u l i sdn- 10 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 8 0 2 2 5 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE S EC OND PRODUCTION- TES T FLARING,

429

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report catalogs the existing geologic data that can be found in various databases, published and unpublished reports, and in individuals' technical files. The scope of this catalog is primarily on the 100, 200, and 300 Areas, with a particular emphasis on the 200 Areas. Over 2,922 wells are included in the catalog. Nearly all of these wells (2,459) have some form of driller's or geologist's log. Archived samples are available for 1,742 wells. Particle size data are available from 1,078 wells and moisture data are available from 356 wells. Some form of chemical property data is available from 588 wells. However, this catalog is by no means complete. Numerous individuals have been involved in various geologic-related studies of the Hanford Site. The true extent of unpublished data retained in their technical files is unknown. However, this data catalog is believed to represent the majority (>90%) of the geologic data that is currently retrievable.

Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Lignite resources of Turkey: Geology, reserves, and exploration history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article aims to emphasize the importance of lignite, which is the mostly used domestic energy source in the Turkish energy mix, by briefly overviewing its geology, reserves, and exploration. Lignites are distributed in mostly continental sedimentary basins of Tertiary age all over the country. The lignite-bearing basins display the characteristics of different geological settings, of which grabens and half-grabens are the most common ones especially in western Anatolia. The geological and chemical characteristics of Turkish lignites do not only create some important problems during mining and coal preparation but also make them unfavorable for consumption. However, since they are the most valuable energy resource of the country they should benefit the economy in the most efficient and environmentally friendly way. Moreover, two most important conclusions of this study are as follows: firstly, reserve estimation practices in the country should definitely be revised to provide a more realistic evaluation of the country's lignite potential for developing medium- and long-term energy strategies and policies for decision- and policy-makers. Secondly, exploration and development activities should be coordinated by a single institution, most likely a government institution, as has been the case for some 50 years.

Volkan ?. Ediger; Istemi Berk; Ayhan Kösebalaban

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Data Foundations Data Attributes and Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Data Foundations Data Attributes and Features Data Pre-processing Data Storage Data Analysis Data Sources 1 Data Attributes Describing data content and characteristics Representing data Data Sortable Data Numerical Attributes 4 Discrete vs. Continuous #12;3 Statistical Features of Data 5

Fang, Shiaofen

435

Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nature climate change features forest research Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

436

Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

437

Archives and History Office: Short Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Features > Short Features Features > Short Features Short Features in SLAC History 40th SLAC celebrated its 40th Anniversary in 2002 with a series of events and a photo book. 50th SLAC celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 2012 with a series of events and a special anniversary website: Celebrating 50 Years of Discovery. APS Burton Richter, Sid Drell , Martin Perl , and Herman Winick made presentations at the American Physical Society (APS) Centennial Celebration and Meeting ( March 20-26 1999). Angiogram The first synchrotron radiation coronary angiogram recorded on a human subject occurred in May 1986 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). BaBar BaBar was dedicated on August 13, 1999. Beam Trees Beam trees are not actually beams or trees. Blue Book The Blue Book is a SLAC classic written to document for posterity the design and building of SLAC's two-mile accelerator. Available in full-text from the SLAC Library.

438

Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geological characterization and statistical comparison of outcrop and subsurface facies: Shannon shelf sand ridges: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is to develop a methodology for constructing accurate quantitative models of reservoir heterogeneities. The resulting models are expected to improve predictions of flow patterns, spatial distribution of residual oil after secondary and tertiary recovery operations, and ultimate oil recovery. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary evaluation of the usefulness of outcrop information in characterizing analogous reservoirs and to develop research techniques necessary for model development. The Shannon Sandstone, a shelf sand ridge deposit in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, was studied. Sedimentologic and petrophysical features of an outcrop exposure of the High-Energy Ridge-Margin facies (HERM) within the Shannon were compared with those from a Shannon sandstone reservoir in Teapot Dome field. Comparisons of outcrop and subsurface permeability and porosity histograms, cumulative distribution functions, correlation lengths and natural logarithm of permeability versus porosity plots indicate a strong similarity between Shannon outcrop and Teapot Dome HERM facies petrophysical properties. Permeability classes found in outcrop samples can be related to crossbedded zones and shaley, rippled, and bioturbated zones. Similar permeability classes related to similar sedimentologic features were found in Teapot Dome field. The similarities of outcrop and Teapot Dome petrophysical properties, which are from the same geologic facies but from different depositional episodes, suggest that rocks deposited under similar depositional processes within a given deposystem have similar reservoir properties. The results of the study indicate that the use of quantitative outcrop information in characterizing reservoirs may provide a significant improvement in reservoir characterization. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

Jackson, S.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Tomutsa, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A comparison of bistatic scattering from two geologically distinct abyssal hills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bistatic scattering characteristics of two geologically distinct abyssal hills located on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge known as B ? and C ? are experimentally compared using data acquired with low-frequency towed-array systems at 1 2 convergence zone (?33 km) stand-off. The comparison is significant because the abyssal hills span the two classes of elevated seafloor crust that cover the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The highly lineated B ? feature is representative of abyssal hills composed of outside corner crust the most commonly occurring category whereas the domed C ? promontory is representative of the rougher low-aspect-ratio abyssal hills composed of inside corner crust. The latter are less common and usually restricted to segment valley margins. The mean biazimuthal scattering distributions of the two abyssal hills each exhibit Lambertian behavior with comparable albedos suggesting that the distinction between abyssal hills composed of differing crust is not significant in modeling long-range reverberation. The adverse effect of using bathymetry that undersamples seafloor projected area in scattering strength analysis is also quantified with data from the B ? ridge. Specifically the use of undersampled bathymetry can lead to significant overestimates in the strength of seafloor scattering.

Nicholas C. Makris

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Application of Cutting-Edge 3D Seismic Attribute Technology to the Assessment of Geological Reservoirs for CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project were to develop innovative 3D seismic attribute technologies and workflows to assess the structural integrity and heterogeneity of subsurface reservoirs with potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic attributes to aide in quantifying reservoir properies and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. Our study area is the Dickman field in Ness County, Kansas, a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontent to Indiana and beyond. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. Geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We systematically tested over a dozen seismic attributes, finding that curvature, SPICE, and ANT were particularly useful for mapping discontinuities in the data that likely indicated fracture trends. Our simulation results in the deep saline aquifer indicate two effective ways of reducing free CO{sub 2}: (a) injecting CO{sub 2} with brine water, and (b) horizontal well injection. A tuned combination of these methods can reduce the amount of free CO{sub 2} in the aquifer from over 50% to less than 10%.

Christopher Liner; Jianjun Zeng; Po Geng Heather King Jintan Li; Jennifer Califf; John Seales

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations October 5, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact onCCS Opportunities in the United States [click on imageto link to the publication]Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed the manual to better understand the characteristics of geologic formations

443

Geology of the Homer Martin Ranch Area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

angle bend in the Llano River~ the southwest corner i. s a right angle bend in the east fork of Panther Creek O?3 of a mile east of the Junction of the east and west forks~ the northeast corner is the ]unction of Comanche Creek with the Llano River... geologic study of an area that Joins the Homer Martin Ranch crea on the north, Bryant (1959) did a similar study of the Schep-Panther Creek area that )oins the Homer Martin Ranch area on the west. After a study of the Hickory sandstone, Goolsby (lo57...

Pool, Alexander Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N. [Univ. of Newcastle (Australia); Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

R.E. Sweeney

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources. Part 1. San Juan Basin. Annual report, August 1988-July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the San Juan Basin, Fruitland Formation coal seams contain an estimated 43 to 49 Tcf of methane. With more than 500 producing coalbed methane wells and approximately 1,000 wells scheduled for drilling in 1990, the basin is one of the most active areas of coalbed methane exploration and production in the United States. Among the most important geologic factors affecting the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane are depositional setting, structural attitude and fracturing of the coal, and regional hydraulic setting. In the second year of the study, the Bureau of Economic Geology evaluated the depositional setting and structure of Fruitland coal seams, which are both source rocks and reservoirs for coalbed methane, throughout the basin. The report summarizes the regional tectonic setting of the San Juan Basin; describes the Cretaceous stratigraphy, structure, and basin evolution; relates these factors to Fruitland coal and coalbed methane occurrence; describes studies of lineaments, fractures, and cleats; presents hydrodynamic controls on the producibility of coalbed methane from the Fruitland Formation; summarizes production from the Fruitland Formation; and evaluates geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility.

Ayers, W.B.; Kaiser, W.R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Swartz, T.E.; Laubach, S.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ARM - 2012 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data 2 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance 2012 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data Monday, January 23 Presentation Type Session ID and Presentation Title Presenters Time and Location Oral Invited J2.1, Next-Generation Global Precipitation Data for Hydrometeorogical Applications Arthur Y. Hou, Dalia Bach Kirschbaum 11:00 AM, 256

449

LEDSGP/tools/features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/tools/features LEDSGP/tools/features < LEDSGP‎ | tools Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us Tools Activities Inventory LEDS Toolkits Knowledge Portals Featured Tools Featured Tools The following resources can be used to support different stages of low emissions development planning. Click here to add a capacity building or training resource to the inventory. Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development: As part of this webinar, several members of the LEDS Global Partnership set out to review existing approaches to capturing and communicating development benefits of climate action and propose a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS

450

ARM - 2013 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data 3 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance 2013 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data Sunday, January 6 Presentation Type Session ID and Presentation Title Presenters Time and Location Poster Sessions Poster S150 Analysis of SPartiCus Data for Cirrus Modeling Case Studies R. L. Atlas, A. M. Fridlind and M. Diao 2:30-4:00 PM, Exhibit Hall 3

451

ARM - AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CenterAGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data CenterAGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data Monday, December 13 Presentation Type Session ID and Presentation Title Presenters Time and Location A11H. Atmospheric Sciences General Contributions: Clouds and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions I

452

News Releases & Features | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases SHARE News Releases and Features 1-2 of 2 Results U.S. Rep. Fleischmann touts ORNL as national energy treasure February 11, 2011 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Feb. 11, 2011 -...

453

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0, 2012 Feature Stories and Releases ARM Mobile Facility Completes Aerosol Campaign in India Bookmark and Share First-ever Indo-U.S. collaboration for climate research sets stage...

454

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2007 Feature Stories and Releases Climate Scientists Air Their Views in Oklahoma Bookmark and Share Media and distinguished guests are invited to talk with top U.S. climate...

455

Feature identification framework and applications (FIFA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collections that provides a general framework for applications while allowing decisions about the details of document representation and features identification to be deferred to domain specific implementations of that framework. These deferred decisions...

Audenaert, Michael Neal

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

ARM - 2014 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data Media Contact Rolanda Jundt rolanda-dot-jundt-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes99 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial...

457

Hybrid Solutions to the Feature Interaction Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calder,M. Kolberg,M. Magill,E. Marples,D. Reiff-Marganiec,S. Feature Interactions in Telecommunications and Software Systems VII pp 295-312 IOS Press

Calder, M.

458

ECG Feature Extraction Techniques - A Survey Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG Feature Extraction plays a significant role in diagnosing most of the cardiac diseases. One cardiac cycle in an ECG signal consists of the P-QRS-T waves. This feature extraction scheme determines the amplitudes and intervals in the ECG signal for subsequent analysis. The amplitudes and intervals value of P-QRS-T segment determines the functioning of heart of every human. Recently, numerous research and techniques have been developed for analyzing the ECG signal. The proposed schemes were mostly based on Fuzzy Logic Methods, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), Support Vector Machines (SVM), and other Signal Analysis techniques. All these techniques and algorithms have their advantages and limitations. This proposed paper discusses various techniques and transformations proposed earlier in literature for extracting feature from an ECG signal. In addition this paper also provides a comparative study of various methods proposed by researchers in extracting the feature from ECG signal.

Karpagachelvi, S; Sivakumar, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Engineering geologic feasibility of lignite mining in alluvial valleys by hydraulic dredging methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC FEASIBILITY OF LIGNITE MINING IN ALLUVIAL VALLEYS BY HYDRAULIC DREDGING METHODS A Thesis by CYNTHIA LYNN CASON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Niajor Subject: Geology ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC FEASIBILITY OF LIGNITE MINING IN ALLUVIAL VALLEYS BY HYDRAULIC DREDGING METHODS A Thesis by CYNTHIA LYNN CASON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Cason, Cynthia Lynn

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological structural feature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Feature selection for automatic solder joint inspection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEATURE SELECTION FOR AUTOMATIC SOLDER JOINT INSPECTION A Thesis CHENG-CHENG LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AiVM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering FEATURE SELECTION FOR AUTOMATIC SOLDER JOINT INSPECTION A Thesis by CHENG-CHENG LEE Approved as to style and content by: Morris Driels (Chairman of Committee) Norman Gris ld (Member) i(?? Oren Xlasor'i (kfembef...

Lee, Cheng-Cheng

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Projects Selected for Safe and Permanent Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of 13 projects to develop technologies and methodologies for geologic storage of carbon dioxide.

463

CO2 leakage in a Geological Carbon Sequestration system: Scenario development and analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this project was to study the leakage of CO2 in a Geological Carbon Sequestration (GCS) system. To define the GCS system,… (more)

Basirat, Farzad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The emerging field of geogenomics: Constraining geological problems with genetic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2014 Keywords: Genomics Molecular phylogenetics Neotropics Phylogeography Andes Amazon The development of a genomics-derived discipline within geology is timely, as a result of major advances

Battisti, David

465

Mining methods and geology of the Boston Consolidated Mine at Bingham, Utah .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??"This thesis does not so much attempt a detailed report on the geology of the disseminates ores of Bingham Canyon as a more particular description… (more)

Boucher, James Leonidas

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framwork for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framwork for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

467

New York State Geological Association 67th Annual meeting & Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists 26th Annual meeting, Union College, Schenectady, NY, October 13-15, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 New York State Geological Association 67th Annual meeting & Eastern Section of the American In The New York Capital District W.S.F. Kidd, A. Plesch, and F.W. Vollmer This trip will cover the full width and Structure of the Taconic Flysch, Melange, and Allochthon, in the New York Capital District. pp. 57

Kidd, William S. F.

468

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

470

Feature Selection based on Machine Learning in MRIs for Hippocampal Segmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurodegenerative diseases are frequently associated with structural changes in the brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans can show these variations and therefore be used as a supportive feature for a number of neurodegenerative diseases. The hippocampus has been known to be a biomarker for Alzheimer disease and other neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, it requires accurate, robust and reproducible delineation of hippocampal structures. Fully automatic methods are usually the voxel based approach, for each voxel a number of local features were calculated. In this paper we compared four different techniques for feature selection from a set of 315 features extracted for each voxel: (i) filter method based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test; two wrapper methods, respectively, (ii) Sequential Forward Selection and (iii) Sequential Backward Elimination; and (iv) embedded method based on the Random Forest Classifier on a set of 10 T1-weighted brain MRIs and tested on an independent set of 25 subjects...

Tangaro, Sabina; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano; Chincarini, Andrea; Errico, Rosangela; Inglese, Paolo; Longo, Giuseppe; Maglietta, Rosalia; Tateo, Andrea; Riccio, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Roberto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Sequential evaluation of the potential geologic repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the changes that are planned for the characterization program at Yucca Mountain due to budget changes. Yucca Mountain is the only site being studied in the US for a geologic repository. Funding for the site characterization program at Yucca Mountain program was cut by roughly one half from the 1994 projected budget to complete three major milestones. These project milestones included: (1) a time-phased determination of site suitability, and if a positive finding, (2) completion of an Environmental Impact Statement, and (3) preparation of a License Application to the US NRC to authorize repository construction. In reaction, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has shifted from parallel development of these milestones to a sequenced approach with the site suitability evaluation being replaced with a management assessment. Changes to the regulatory structure for the disposal program are under consideration by DOE and the NRC. The possibility for NRC and Doe to develop a site-specific regulatory structure follows from the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 that authorized the US EPA to develop a site specific environmental standard for Yucca Mountain.

Bjerstedt, T.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

Ernest A. Mancini

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

473

Geologic challenges and opportunities of the Cherokee group play (Pennsylvanian): Anadarko basin, Oklahoma. Topical report, January-March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report has four objectives: (1) to summarize both the geologic characteristics of the Cherokee Group and its production highlights; (2) to summarize what current Cherokee producing companies perceive to be the primary geologic challenges they face in developing the Cherokee play; (3) to suggest geologic strategies to help respond to these challenges; and (4) to assess the benefits to operators of geologic studies of the Cherokee. To increase the understanding and utilization of natural gas resources in the Cherokee Group of west-central Oklahoma and to help assess future geological and technological needs for efficient development of this resource, the report highlights current geological knowledge of the Cherokee play.

Hentz, T.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Stress, seismicity and structure of shallow oil reservoirs of Clinton County, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1993 and 1995 geophysicists of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in a project funded by the US Department of Energy, conducted extensive microseismic monitoring of oil production in the recently discovered High Bridge pools of Clinton County and were able to acquire abundant, high-quality data in the northern of the two pools. This investigation provided both three-dimensional spatial and kinetic data relating to the High Bridge fracture system that previously had not been available. Funded in part by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kentucky Geological Survey committed to develop a geological interpretation of these geophysical results, that would be of practical benefit to future oils exploration. This publication is a summary of the results of that project. Contents include the following: introduction; discovery and development; regional geology; fractured reservoir geology; oil migration and entrapment; subsurface stress; induced seismicity; structural geology; references; and appendices.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Application of Synchrotron Radiation in the Geological and Environmental Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of some of the different ways that synchrotrons x-ray beams can be used to study geological materials is presented here. This field developed over a period of about 30 years, and it is clear that the geological community has made major use of the many synchrotrons facilities operating around the world during this time period. This was a time of rapid change in the operational performance of the synchrotrons facilities and this in itself has made it possible for geologists to develop new and more refined types of experiments that have yielded many important results. The advance in experimental techniques has proceeded in parallel with a revolution in computing techniques that has made it possible to cope with the great amount of data accumulated in the experiments. It is reasonable, although risky, to speculate about what might be expected to develop in the field during the next five- to ten-year period. It does seem plausible that the rate of change in the performance of what might now be called conventional x-ray storage rings will slow. There are no new facilities that are superior to the ESRF, ALS, APS, or SPring8 facilities under construction or about to come into operation. Thus, performance increments in the characteristics of the x-ray sources may come through the introduction of specialized devices in existing storage rings. The free electron laser is one example of a developing new technology that should take us into new regions of performance for radiation sources and stimulate new types of experimental applications. It is also likely that major advances will come through the introduction of more sophisticated experimental devices developed for use with the very recently operational undulator or wiggler sources at the newer rings. Improved x-ray optics and x-ray detectors and more powerful computation and high-speed data transmission can bring about more refined experiments and make the synchrotrons facilities more widely available to the experimental community. The next years should therefore be a time of high productivity and great excitement quite comparable to the previous era of synchrotron-based geological research.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Satellite stories featured in Lab lecture series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February » February » Satellite stories featured Satellite stories featured in Lab lecture series Space adventures will be featured in the upcoming Frontiers in Science lecture series "Small Satellites on a Shoestring: The LANL Experience." February 14, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

478

Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

Neal, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Transition from the Farallon Plate subduction to the collision between South and Central America: Geological evolution of the Panama Isthmus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents new geological constraints on the collision of southern Central America with South America, and the resulting deformational episodes that have affected the Panama Isthmus since the Late Cretaceous. The Panama Isthmus is located in southwestern Central America, and it represents the zone of contact between the two land masses: Central America and South America. This collision event is still active today. It has resulted in regional uplift since the Late Miocene/Pliocene and is responsible for the Great American Biotic Interchange between South and North America. Depending on the methods of investigation used, and due to the lack of data available, the time when this collision began is still widely debated and poorly constrained. To better constrain this age, we have studied the rock formations and the tectonic deformations in central and eastern Panama that have occurred since the Late Cretaceous. This study presents new rock ages, field-work documentation and analyses, and seismic-line interpretations, and it is complemented by spatial images for the eastern Panama area. During the Middle Eocene, a number of changes suddenly appeared in the geological records that were synchronous with the break-up of southern Central America into two smaller blocks: Chorotega and Chocó. Our main results identify the prevalence of an extensional tectonic regime from the Middle Eocene to the Middle Miocene that caused the formation of horst and graben structures with thick sedimentary basin fills, and a synchronous clockwise block rotation. Here, we propose that these geologic events are associated with the initiation of the oblique collision of southern Central America with South America. The first contact of the southeastern extremity of Central America occurred around 40 Ma to 38 Ma, and then propagated northwestwards. We describe here this long-term collision episode in relation to the history of the Panama Isthmus.

Flore Barat; Bernard Mercier de Lépinay; Marc Sosson; Carla Müller; Peter O. Baumgartner; Claudia Baumgartner-Mora

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

to shape the world C. R. Stelck Chair in Petroleum Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to shape the world #12;C. R. Stelck Chair in Petroleum Geology BUILDING ALBERTA'S ENERGY LEADERSHIP,RoyalSocietyofCanada(1960) · OrderofCanada(1997) · InducteePetroleumHallofFame(2005) The University of Alberta has led and his legacy lives on in the research supported by the C. R. Stelck Chair in Petroleum Geology

Machel, Hans

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481

Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.....................................................................................................................................................1 Transition to Electronic Data ManagementQuality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological Survey;#12;Quality-Assurance and Data Management Plan for Groundwater Activities by the U.S. Geological Survey

482

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic performance computing to assess the risks involved in carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations-thermal- chemical processes in variably saturated, non-isothermal porous media is applied to sequestration

Mills, Richard

483

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, product or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey Marine Geology laboratory, Menlo Park. Similar methods are described in Carver (1971 in a beaker with ,00 ml of distilled water and 5 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide. The samples were stirred tc

484

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geology and gas-phase (methane) seepage for the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field, one of the worldORIGINAL Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field constructed from 3D seismic and well data allowed investigation of the relationship between the subsurface

Luyendyk, Bruce

485

Natural iodine in a clay formation: Implications for iodine fate in geological disposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a significant contribution to potential overall long-term dose resulting from the waste storage (Altmann, 2008 Laboratory of Environmental Geology, Research Group of Geoenvironmental/Engineering Division of Solid Waste problematic radioisotopes in the context of nuclear waste geological disposal due to its high mobility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

486

Geological Constraints on High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal and their Relationship to Possible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Possible Long Term Storage Solutions- A Case Study of the Yucca Mountain Project Teresa Dunn 2013 #12;Dunn systems and geologic composition in the selection and development of a secure, long-term storage facilityDunn 1 Geological Constraints on High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal and their Relationship

Polly, David

487

Geologic versus wildfire controls on hillslope processes and debris flow initiation in the Green River canyons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geologic versus wildfire controls on hillslope processes and debris flow initiation in the Green are unknown. A recent episode of enhanced debris-flow and wildfire activity provided an opportunity to examine with recent debris flows to determine how surficial geology, wildfire, topography, bedrock strength

Pederson, Joel L.

488

A geological and geophysical study of the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in northeastern Brazil (north of Salvador). The extensional stress that created this rift was caused by a change in the force acting on the plate during the Aptian. A series of offshore rifts also opened at this time, adjacent to the R-T-J rift................................................................................ 16 Offshore Basin Geology............................................................................. 17 Sergipe-Alagoas Geology........................................................................... 17 Lower Cretaceous Unconformity...

Melton, Bradley Douglas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

489

GEOL 663 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND COURSE SYLLABUS 2014 Fall Semester  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 663 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND COURSE SYLLABUS � 2014 Fall Semester Course Meets will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind wind turbine