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1

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153­159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM : description on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. The Z .GERM chemical Z . Z .reservoirs of the present-day Earth, from core to atmosphere; 2 present-day fluxes between

Mcdonough, William F.

3

NETL: Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

4

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

9

Geological, geochemical, and operational summary, aurora well, OCS Y-0943-1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aurora well is located just off the coast of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The well was spudded November 2, 1987, in 68 ft of water and plugged and abandoned 286 days later on August 30, 1988, after drilling to a total depth (TD) of 18,325 ft below the Kelly Bushing (RKB). The report presents our interpretations of the geologic and geochemical information collected from the Aurora well. Additionally, a significant section of the report is devoted to the operational aspects of drilling the Aurora well.

Paul, L.E.; Choromanski, D.R.; Turner, R.F.; Flett, T.O.; Paul, L.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography. Vol. 1  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography was compiled by selecting 580 references from the Bibliographic Information Data Base of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program. This data base and five others have been created by the Ecological Sciences Information Center to provide technical computer-retrievable data on various aspects of the nation's uranium resources. All fields of uranium geology are within the defined scope of the project, as are aerial surveying procedures, uranium reserves and resources, and universally applied uranium research. References used by DOE-NURE contractors in completing their aerial reconnaissance survey reports have been included at the request of the Grand Junction Office, DOE. The following indexes are provided to aid the user in locating reference of interest: author, keyword, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational index, and taxonomic name.

White, M.B.; Garland, P.A. (comps.)

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of 479 references encompassing the fields of uranium and thorium geochemistry and mineralogy, geology of uranium deposits, uranium mining, and uranium exploration techniques has been compiled by the Ecological Sciences Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography was produced for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, which is funded by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. The references contained in the bibliography have been divided into the following eight subject categories: (1) geology of deposits, (2) geochemistry, (3) genesis O deposits, (4) exploration, (5) mineralogy, (6) uranium industry, (7) reserves and resources, and (8) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas. All categories specifically refer to uranium and thorium; the last category contains basic geologic information concerning areas which the Grand Junction Office feels are particularly favorable for uranium deposition. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

Garland, P.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Daniel, E.W. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Recovery Act: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work under the project entitled "Geologic Sequestration Training and Research," was performed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Company from December 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013. The emphasis was on training of students and faculty through research on topics central to further development, demonstration, and commercialization of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The project had the following components: (1) establishment of a laboratory for measurement of rock properties, (2) evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks, (3) evaluation of porosity, permeability, and storage capacity of reservoirs, (4) simulation of CO2 migration and trapping in storage reservoirs and seepage through seal layers, (5) education and training of students through independent research on rock properties and reservoir simulation, and (6) development of an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Four graduate students and one undergraduate student participated in the project. Two were awarded Ph.D. degrees for their work, the first in December 2010 and the second in August 2013. A third graduate student has proposed research on an advanced technique for measurement of porosity and permeability, and has been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The fourth graduate student is preparing his proposal for research on CCUS and solid waste management. The undergraduate student performed experimental measurements on caprock and reservoir rock samples and received his B.S.M.E. degree in May 2012. The "Caprock Integrity Laboratory," established with support from the present project, is fully functional and equipped for measurement of porosity, permeability, minimum capillary displacement pressure, and effective permeability to gas in the presence of wetting phases. Measurements are made at ambient temperature and under reservoir conditions, including supercritical CO2. During the course of the project, properties of 19 samples provided by partners on companion projects supported by NETL were measured, covering a range of permeabilities from 0.28 ndarcy to 81 mdarcy. Reservoir simulations were performed for injection of 530,000 tonnes of CO2 through a single well into the Middle Donovan formation in Citronelle Dome, in southwest Alabama, over 40 years, followed by migration and trapping for 10,000 years, using the TOUGH2 and TOUGHREACT software packages from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It was estimated that 50 kg CO2/m3 of formation would be converted to mineral phases within the CO2 plume during that time. None of the sand units considered for CO2 storage in Citronelle Dome have thickness exceeding the estimated critical CO2 column height (Berg, 1975) at which seepage might begin, through their confining shale layers. A model for leakage through caprock, based on work by Hildenbrand et al. (2004), including a functional relationship between capillary pressure and the effective permeability to gas in the presence of a wetting phase, demonstrated the sensitivity of long-term storage to caprock permeability and thickness. A traditional course on coal combustion was augmented with material on climate change, coal gasification, and carbon sequestration. A total of 49 students completed the course during two offerings, in Fall 2010 and Fall 2012. It has become a popular advanced elective course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Walsh, Peter; Esposito, Richard; Theodorou, Konstantinos; Hannon, Michael; Lamplugh, Aaron; Ellison, Kirk

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

History of Geochemical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Sources of geochemical modeling software...www.telusplanet.net/public/geogams/index SOLVEQ/CHILLER Mark H. Reed Department of Geological

16

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A compilation of 490 references is presented which is the second in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base is one of six created by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. Major emphasis for this volume has been placed on uranium geology, encompassing deposition, genesis of ore deposits, and ore controls; and prospecting techniques, including geochemistry and aerial reconnaissance. The following indexes are provided to aid the user in locating references of interest: author, geographic location, quadrangel name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W. (comps.)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

18

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

20

Pre-test geological and geochemical evaluation of the Caprock, St. Peter Sandstone and formation fluids, Yakley Field, Pike County, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of these studies is to ensure long-term stable containment of air in the underground reservoirs used in conjunction with compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants. The specific objective is to develop stability criteria and engineering guidelines for designing CAES reservoirs in each of the three major reservoir types, including aquifers, salt cavities, and mined hard rock caverns. This document characterizes the geologic nature of porous media constituents native to the aquifer field test site near Pittsfield, Illinois. The geologic samples were subjected to geochemical evaluations to determine anticipated responses to cyclic air injection, heating and moisture - conditions typical of an operating CAES reservoir. This report documents the procedures used and results obtained from these analyses.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Drill-hole data, drill-site geology, and geochemical data from the study of Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume is presented as a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential of Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 3: Uranium Assessment for Precambrian Pebble Conglomerates in Southeastern Wyoming. Volume 1 summarized the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of uranium-bearing conglomerates in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of southeastern Wyoming. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of U and Th in quartz-pebble conglomerates. This volume contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes.

Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Schmidt, T.G.; Inlow, D.; Flurkey, A.J.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Coolidge, C.M.; Sever, C.K.; Quimby, W.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during heater tests at proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (Nevada), Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) and Spycher et al. (2003) enhanced TOUGHREACT on (1) high temperature geochemistry, (2) mineral reactive surface area calculations, and (3) porosity and permeability changes due to mineral alteration. On the other hand, Pruess et al. (1999) updated the TOUGH2 simulator to TOUGH2 V2. The present version of TOUGHREACT was developed by introducing the work of Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) to the original work of Xu and Pruess (1998), and by replacing TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al, 1999). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of ''self-documenting'' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following different TOUGH2 fluid property or ''EOS'' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for water, or two waters with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (2) EOS2 for multiphase mixtures of water and CO{sub 2} also with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (3) EOS3 for multiphase mixtures of water and air with typical applications to vadose zone and nuclear waste disposal problems, (4) EOS4 that has the same capabilities as EOS3 but with vapor pressure lowering effects due to capillary pressure, (5) EOS9 for single phase water (Richards. equation) with typical applications to ambient reactive geochemical transport problems, (6) ECO2 for multiphase mixtures of water, CO{sub 2} and NaCl with typical applications to CO{sub 2} disposal in deep brine aquifers.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. Vol. 2, Rev. 1. [490 references  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography, a compilation of 490 references, is the second in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base is one of six data bases created by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. Major emphasis for this volume has been placed on uranium geology, encompassing deposition, genesis of ore deposits, and ore controls; and prospecting techniques, including geochemistry and aerial reconnaissance. The following indexes are provided to aid the user in locating references of interest: author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W. (comps.)

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Novel Concepts Research in Geologic Storage of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs of the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2007 period of the project. As discussed in the report, the main accomplishment was an announcement by AEP to move forward with a {approx}100,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year capture and sequestration project at the Mountaineer site. This decision was the outcome of last several years of research under the current DOE funded project involving the technology, site-specific characterization, modeling, risk assessment, etc. This news marks a significant accomplishment for DOE's research program to translate the theoretical potential for carbon sequestration into tangible measures and approaches for the region. The program includes a 30-megawatt thermal product validation at the Mountaineer Plant where up to 100,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year will be captured and sequestered in deep rock formations identified in this work. Plans include further steps at Mountaineer with capture and storage at a very expedited pace. Work continued on the design and feasibility support tasks such as development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase of the project has reached a major milestone. Plans to facilitate the next steps of the project will be the main work remaining in this portion of the project as the program moves toward the proposed capture and sequestration system.

Neeraj Gupta

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage September 16, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2). View Project Details Funding for the projects includes $49.75 million from the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act and will result in substantial employment opportunities for local and regional organizations over the next three years while providing hands-on scientific experience for individuals looking to be employed in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry.

29

Geothermal Research Program of the US Geological Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The beginning of the Geothermal Research Program, its organization, objectives, fiscal history, accomplishments, and present emphasis. The projects of the Geothermal Research Program are presented along with a list of references.

Duffield, W.A.; Guffanti, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Novel Concepts Research in Geologic Storage of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs of the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the April-June 2007 period of the project. As discussed in the report, the main accomplishments related to preparation to move forward with a 100,000-300,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year capture and sequestration project at the Mountaineer site. The program includes a 10 to 30-megawatt thermal product validation at the Mountaineer Plant where up to 300,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year will be captured and sequestered in deep rock formations identified in this work. Design and feasibility support tasks such as development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, reservoir storage simulations, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site were developed for the project. Plans to facilitate the next steps of the project will be the main work remaining in this portion of the project as the program moves toward the proposed capture and sequestration system.

Neeraj Gupta

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO2: An Integrated Global Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JAF21006.DOC JAF21006.DOC First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory May 15-17, 2001 Washington, D.C. Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO 2 : An Integrated Global Research Program S. H. Stevens (sstevens@adv-res.com, (703) 528 8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe Road, Suite 600 Arlington, VA USA 22201 703-528-8420 J. M. Pearce (jmpe@bgs.ac.uk, (0)115 9363 222) British Geological Survey Nottingham, NG12 5GG, United Kingdom. A. A. J. Rigg (a.rigg@petroleum.crc.org.au, 61-2-9490 8225) Australian Petroleum Cooperative Research Centre Sydney, NSW Australia ABSTRACT Coordinated research efforts are underway on three continents (North America, Europe,

32

GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

Rosemary Knight

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geologic and hydrologic research on the Moana geothermal system, Washoe County, Nevada. Final report October 1, 1982-December 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and drilling exploration surveys were used to assess the Moana geothermal resource in Washoe County, Nevada, and to determine its relationship with nearby Steamboat Hot Springs. Moana is the largest single moderate-temperature resource in Nevada that supports geothermal space heating applications. Results show that the general geology and structure for the two systems is similar, but important differences exist with respect to reservoir rocks. Gravity data delineated the contact between important volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Moana, but contour trends did not correlate well with mapped faults. Fluid geochemistry data show major differences in bulk chemical composition, stable-light isotope ratios, and radiocarbon ages for Moana and Steamboat geothermal waters. Water level measurements in observation wells in Moana show simultaneous increasing and decreasing values in different sections of the geothermal area. Temperature-depth profiles changed little during the six-month monitoring period. Direct use of the resource is increasing and longer-lasting, more efficient down-hole heat exchangers are replacing previous equipment that was prone to scaling and corrosion. A computer program that calculates heat output for state-of-the-art heat exchangers is described. Recommendations for continued monitoring, heat exchanger design, and fluid reinjection studies are included. Data are available to government agencies responsible for regulation as well as local residents and potential developers to ensure prudent resource utilization.

Flynn, T.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reactive transport modeling for CO2 geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers.geological storage of carbon dioxide. Int. J. Greenhouse GasIPCC special report on carbon dioxide capture and storage.

Xu, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling  

SciTech Connect

The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract N/A Author Donald Thomas Published Journal US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350, 1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Citation Donald Thomas. 1987. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350. (!) . Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_geochemical_model_of_the_Kilauea_east_rift_zone&oldid=682589" Categories: Missing Required Information References Uncited References Geothermal References

37

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

39

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Haida Gwaii, by Algorithm, Airphoto Interpretation, and Aerial Survey Methods By F. Louise Waterhouse Alan E, by Algorithm, Airphoto Interpretation, and Aerial Survey Methods. Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BC

40

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermalsystem underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea Alid is avery late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widelyover an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an activehydrothermal system underlies much of that part of

42

Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in underground formations, and the evaluation of the risk of potential CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers.

Gutierrez, Marte

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Geological investigation of the Socorro geothermal area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a comprehensive geological and geochemical study of the Socorro geothermal area are presented. The following are discussed: geologic setting, structural controls, stratigraphic controls, an ancient geothermal system, modern magma bodies, geothermal potential of the Socorro area, and the Socorro transverse shear zone. (MHR)

Chapin, C.E.; Sanford, A.R.; White, D.W.; Chamberlin, R.M.; Osburn, G.R.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at

46

Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data Analysis Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=594157" Categories: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Techniques

47

CGDK: An extensible CorelDRAW VBA program for geological drafting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corel Geological Drafting Kit (CGDK), a program written in VBA, has been designed to assist geologists and geochemists with their drafting work. It obtains geological data from a running Excel application directly, and uses the data to plot geochemical ... Keywords: CGDK, CorelDRAW, Excel, Geological drafting, Software, VBA

Jun-Ting Qiu; Wan-Jiao Song; Cheng-Xin Jiang; Han Wu; Raymond M. Dong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Geologic and Geochemical Evaluation of the Potential for CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

suitability for this project. Gasses cannot be used as inputs to the system, preventing simulation of injection of CO 2 and pressure is fixed at 1 atm. However, its...

49

Basic research for assessment of geologic nuclear waste repositories: What solubility and speciation studies of transuranium elements can tell us  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} {sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, and {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a candidate high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 90{degrees}C) and pH values (6, 7, and 8.5) are presented and compared with published modeling calculations. The comparison results indicate that there is a great need for experimental data on the solubility and speciation of transuranium elements under a wide range of conditions, for example, pH, Eh, temperature, and composition of groundwaters. Additionally, the influence of alpha radiation and the radiolysis of the secondary transuranium solids on solubility and speciation should be studies. Solubility studies and model calculations should be extended to other important long-lived nuclear waste radionuclides such as nickel, zirconium, cadmium, radium, and thorium. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Nitsche, H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern Azerbaijan, with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern AzerbaijanEarth and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington,TX, USA zAzerbaijan NationalAcademy of Sciences Geology Institute ^ 29 A. H. Javid Pr., Baku, Azerbaijan ABSTRACT Fine-grained Palaeogene

Johnson, Cari

53

The U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey has conducted four assessments of world oil and gas resources over the past 15 years. Recently, a new five year plan for the World Energy Program was completed. Eight regional coordinators were appointed and planning activities for a new world assessment which will include oil, natural gas and coal resources is planned within four years. Currently the program is undertaking U.S. AID sponsored collaborative work with research organizations in Russia including VINIGNI and VNIGRI. Some of the products planned for this collaborative effort include a petroleum basin map of the former Soviet Union and eventually a basin map of the world at a scale of 1:5,000,000 and databases characterizing past exploration activities in Russia. Centers are being established in Moscow and Tyumen to where state of the art seismic processing, organic geochemistry and geographic information systems will be operational. Additionally, collaborative research particularly organic geochemical studies and unconventional natural gas studies in the Timon-Pechora basin are underway. Training of Russian scientists both at the USGS and in Russia on equipment purchased for the Russian institutes has been underway for the past year. An analogous program, but at a smaller scale, focusing primarily on seismic processing and compilation of databases is underway with Ukranian geologists. Similar collaborative activities in coal research are underway in Armenian and Kyrgyzstan, and recently completed in India and Pakistan. Collaborative organic geochemical research, natural gas research with particular emphasis on basin centered gas accumulations or unconventional natural gas accumulations such as coal bed methane have been undertaken or are anticipated in several countries including Hungary, Poland, China, several Middle East countries, South America and Indonesia.

Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

55

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

56

The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand weathering, global mass budgets, natural reaction rates, and paleoclimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the sedimentary column, and diagenetic alteration of Ca isotope signals over geologic time scales. The overallThe global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand of Doctor of Philosophy in Geology in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Fantle, Matthew

57

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

58

Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

62

RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic & Reservoir Data Data Sets Online Data Rooms Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well...

63

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R. E.; McIver, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima-u.ac.jp)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima,3 1 Department of Earth & Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739 for Multiple Isotope Research for Astro-and Geochemical Evolution (MIRAGE), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima

65

FERNANDO GILBES-SANTAELLA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Campus Faculty of Arts and Sciences Department of Geology + Spectral Analyses and Sedimentation of the West Coast Beaches of Puerto Rico Undergraduate Research Final, and mineralogy along the west coast of Puerto Rico. These sand sediments were sampled at different geologic

Gilbes, Fernando

66

Christopher U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christopher Magirl U.S. Geological Survey 934 Broadway Suite 300 Tacoma, Washington 98402 Phone; Hydraulic modeling; Computer programming (C/C++, Fortran, Perl), Field survey; Geographic information Research Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington. September 2009 ­ present · Analyzing

67

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A geochemical expert system prototype using object-oriented knowledge representation and a production rule system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: MINEQL, artificial intelligence, expert systems, geochemical expert system, geochemical modeling, geochemistry

Forrest M. Hoffman; Vijay S. Tripathi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

70

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from a geologic carbon sequestration site showing the

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy ...  

Researchers at ORNL developed a down-well heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract ...

72

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

73

Summary outline of DOE geoscience and geoscience - related research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) supports long-range, basic research in those areas of the geosciences which are relevant to the nation's energy needs. The objective of the Geoscience program is to develop a quantitative and predictive understanding of geological, geophysical and geochemical structures and processes in the solid earth and in solar-terrestrial relationships. This understanding is to assure an effective knowledge base for energy resource recognition, evaluation and utilization in an environmentally acceptable manner. The work is carried out primarily in DOE laboratories and in universities, although some is conducted by other federal agencies and by the National Academy of Sciences. Principal areas of interest include: Geology, Geophysics, and Earth Dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy Resource Recognition, Evaluation and Utilization; Hydrologic and Marine Sciences; and Solar-Terrestrial/Atmospheric Interactions.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Bureau of Economic Geology. 1978 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bureau research programs and projects are designed to address many of the State's major concerns in the areas of geologic, energy, mineral, land, and environmental resouces. Research programs incorporate geologic concepts that will build toward an understanding of a specific resource and its impact on human activities. In addition to resource assessments in uranium, lignite, and geopressured geothermal energy, the Bureau continued research into analysis of governmental policy related to energy. Systemic geologic mapping, coastal studies, basin analysis projects, and investigations in other areas of economic geology further indicate the range of research programs carried forward in 1978. Specifically, research on mineral resources and land resources, coastal studies, hydrogeology, basin studies, geologic mapping, and other research (tektites and meteorites, carboniferous of Texas, depositional environments of the Marble Falls Formation, Central Texas) are reported. The establishment of the Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute is followed. Contracts and grant support and contract reports are listed. The publications eminating from the Bureau are listed. Services rendered by the Bureau and personnel information are included. (MCW)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298 and/or log Kr,298 are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at temperatures in the range of 50C to 100C or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING IN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF BRAZIL August/2010 Mônica Mazzini Perrotta Remote Sensing Division Head #12;SUMMARY The Geological Survey of Brazil mission The Remote Sensing Division Main remote, Paleontology, Remote Sensing Director of Hydrology and Land Management But Remote Sensing Division gives

77

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

NATIONAL USES AND NEEDS FOR SEPARATED STABLE ISOTOPES IN PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, AND GEOSCIENCE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York, K. Rankama, Isotope Geology, McGraw-Hill, New York,geochronometry and isotope geology. elements report. ofisotopes were utilized in the research areas and geology,

Zisman, M.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining and milling of uranium ore. Nonetheless, the use of leaching fluids to mine uranium contaminatesNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

SciTech Connect

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi/sup 2/ area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO/sub 4/), xenotime (Y,DyPO/sub 4/), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO/sub 4/) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

83

A Short Course VU March, 2009 Peter Swart University of Miami Arthur M., Anderson T., Kaplan I., Veizer J., and Land L. (1983) Stable Isotopes in Sedimentary Geology, SEPM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Anderson T., Kaplan I., Veizer J., and Land L. (1983) Stable Isotopes in Sedimentary Geology, SEPM Short. (2006) Stable Isotope Ecology. Springer-Verlag. Ginsburg R. N. (2001) Subsurface geology of a prograding. and O'Neil J. R. (1977) Compilation of stable isotope fractionation: Factors of geochemical interest

Miami, University of

84

Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Memoir 2006/02 (CG2006_M02) Illustrated glossary of terms used in foraminiferal research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of terms used in foraminiferal research Lukas HOTTINGER 1 Summary: An illustrated glossary of terms used in the analysis of the shells of recent and fossil foraminifera supplemented by a rigorous selection of terms anatomy, Foraminifera, hierarchy of terms, glossary, micropaleontology Citation: HOTTINGER L. (2006

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

88

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound basis of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric, and solar/terrestrial sciences which relate to DOE's many missions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the work performed during 1978, include the scope of the work to be performed in 1979 and provide information regarding some of the research planned for 1980. The following is an outline of the research areas included: geology, geophysics, and earch dynamics (large-scale earth movements; evolution of geologic structures; properties of earth materials; rock flow, fracture, and failure; continental drilling for scientific purposes); geochemistry (geothermal fluids; static rock--water interactions; organic geochemistry; geochemical migration); energy resource recognition, evaluation, and utilization (resource definition and utilization; reservoir dynamics and modeling; magma energy resources; information compilation, evaluation, and dissemination); hydrologic and marine sciences (ground water hydrology; fresh water systems; oceanography); and solar--terrestrial/atmospheric interactions (magnetospheric physics and chemistry; upper atmosphere chemistry and physics; solar radiation; meteorology and climatology). (RWR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Geology of Nevada: The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology plays a central role in Nevadas human history, economy, and future. Cordilleran tectonics have created the Basin and Range landscape and interior drainage of the Great Basin, provided a rain shadow to make Nevada the nations driest state, and generated frequent earthquakes along normal and strike-slip faults. Geology is key to reducing risks from Nevadas natural and anthropogenic hazards (earthquakes, flash floods, drought, land subsidence, erosion after wildland fires, landslides, swelling and collapsing soils, radon, arsenic, and others). Nevadas geologic fortunes make it the leading state in the production of gold, silver, barite, lithium, and mercury and a major producer of geothermal power and gypsum. The metals are primarily related to igneous activity, with major pulses of magma during the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary. Barite is mined from Paleozoic

Jonathan G. Price

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Multielement analysis of geologic materials by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Atomic emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source permits the rapid acquisition of multielement geochemical data from a wide variety of geologic materials. Rocks or other solid samples are taken into solution with a four acid digestion procedure and introduced directly into the plasma; fluid samples are acidified or analyzed directly. The entire process is computer-controlled, fully-automated, and requires less than five minutes per sample for quantitative determination of 37 elements. The procedures and instrumentation employed at the ESL for multielement ICP analysis of geologic materials are described and these are intended as a guide for evaluating analytic results reported from this laboratory. The quality of geochemical data can be characterized by precision, limits of quantitative determination, and accuracy. Precision values are a measure of the repeatability of analyses. In general, major element and analyses have precision of better than 5% and trace elements of better than 10% of the amount present. (MHR)

Christensen, O.D.; Kroneman, R.L.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the United States regulations and project experiences associated with permitting injection wells used for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This report is an update of a previous Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study on this subject published in December 2008 when the draft regulations governing geologic sequestration were first published.BackgroundSeparating ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

The KU Geologic Record Volume 1, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the articles. KU has one of the strongest research groups in the world working on car- bonate rocks. GeotimesPhil- lips) was cited as the example of resurgent focus on hydro- thermal oil and gas reser- voirs. These are systems in which hot fluids move though rocks and enhance porosity. Such studies integrate hydro- geology

Peterson, Blake R.

93

JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, VOL. 70, NO. 1, JANUARY, 2000, P. 227239 Copyright 2000, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1073-130X/00/070-227/$03.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1073-130X/00/070-227/$03.00 ANKERITE CEMENTATION IN DEEPLY BURIED.K. e-mail: j.hendry@qub.ac.uk 2 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland, U.K. 3 Isotope Geosciences Unit, Scottish

Haszeldine, Stuart

94

Mineral resource potential and geology of the Challis National Forest, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an assessment of the mineral potential of the Challis National Forest based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical data compiled at a 1:250,000 scale and on published information on mineral deposits and occurrences. More than half of the forest has a high to moderate resource potential for one or more of the following commodities: Ag, Au, Ba, Bi, Cu, Mo, Nb, Pb, REE, Ta, Th, Sb, Sn, U, V, W, Zn, fluorspar, geothermal energy, and common variety minerals.

Worl, R.G.; Wilson, A.B.; Smith, C.L.; Kleinkopf, M.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

96

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

97

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal...

98

DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

Ashby, Matthew (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geological Sciences College of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

postgraduate studies in Engineering Geology. `From going to mines and quarries, looking at what the job entails to his childhood when he would enjoy visiting mines and caves while on holidays around the UK, learning Geological Evolution of NZ and Antarctica GEOL 483 Coal & Petroleum Geology GEOL488 Special Topics

Hickman, Mark

100

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Multiblock grid generation for simulations in geological formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating fluid flow in geological formations requires mesh generation, lithology mapping to the cells, and computing geometric properties such as normal vectors and volume of cells. The purpose of this research work is to compute and process the geometrical ...

Sanjay Kumar Khattri

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

103

Assistant Professor Quantitative Structural Geology or Geomechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/tectonics, hydrogeology, stable isotope geochemistry, environmental geology, sedimentology and stratigraphyAssistant Professor Quantitative Structural Geology or Geomechanics The Department of Geology structural geology with interest in the study of fractured reservoirs and geomechanics. The successful

Mohaghegh, Shahab

104

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

105

Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwaters containing greater than or equal to 7.35 ppB uranium are present in scattered clusters throughout the area sampled. Most of these groundwaters are from wells drilled where the Inyan Kara Group is exposed at the surface. The exceptions are a group of samples in the northwestern part of the area sampled and south of the Dewey Terrace. These groundwaters are also produced from the Inyan Kara Group where it is overlain by the Graneros Group and alluvium. The high uranium groundwaters along and to the south of the terrace are characterized by high molybdenum, uranium/specific conductance, and uranium/sulfate values. Many of the groundwaters sampled along the outcrop of the Inyan Kara Group are near uranium mines. Groundwaters have high amounts of uranium and molybdenum. Samples taken downdip are sulfide waters with low values of uranium and high values of arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Stream sediments containing greater than or equal to 5.50 ppM soluble uranium are concentrated in basins draining the Graneros and Inyan Kara Groups. These values are associated with high values for arsenic, selenium, and vanadium in samples from both groups. Anomalous values for these elements in the Graneros Group may be caused by bentonite beds contained in the rock units. As shown on the geochemical distribution plot, high uranium values that are located in the Inyan Kara Group are almost exclusively draining open-pit uranium mines.

Butz, T.R.; Dean, N.E.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of resource assessment methods and geologic controls--deep natural gas plays and zones, United States and Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep (greater than 4.5 km--15,000 ft) conventional natural gas resources will play an important role in the future energy needs of the United States and Russia. Deep sedimentary basins are widespread in these countries and have formed in a variety of depositional and tectonic settings. Significant volumes of undiscovered deep natural gas are in the Gulf Coast, Anadarko, Permian, and Rocky Mountain basins of the U.S., and in the Timan-Pechora, West Siberia, East Siberia, and North and South Caspian basins of the former Soviet Union. Deep natural gas resources are regularly assessed by the All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Institute (VNIGRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of their normal research activities. Both VNIGRI and the USGS employ similar assessment methods involving play (or zone) analysis using geological data and based on an analysis of confirmed and hypothetical plays using field-size distributions, discovery-process models, and statistical estimation procedures that yield probabilistic estimates of undiscovered accumulations. Resource estimates for the deep structural and statigraphic plays of the Anadarko basin and deep Paleozoic zones in the Timan-Pechora basin are compared and contrasted using both methods. Differences in results of assessments between VNIGRI and USGS arise due to (1) the way in which plays/zones are defined, (2) different geochemical models for hydrocarbon generation as applied to hypothetical plays, (3) variations in the ways in which statistical estimation procedures are applied to plays and regions, and (4) differences in economic and technologic assumptions, reserve growth calculations, and accumulation size limits and ranges.

Dyman, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Belonin, M.D. (All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

State Geological Surveys, will test the viability of turning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may be required.) "Geochemical effects of CO 2 sequestration in sandstones under simulated in-situ conditions of deep saline aquifers." The geochemical effects of brine and...

108

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

109

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

110

Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frontiers Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1 , Jillian F occurs. Yet, the field of molecular geomicrobiology remains in its infancy. In the foreseeable future, merging of modern biogeochemistry with molecularly resolved ecological studies will inspire

Macalady, Jenn

111

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

112

The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program  

SciTech Connect

Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration techniques with in-country collaborators. Training programs included the geochemical, geophysical, and geological techniques needed for geothermal exploration. However, the most important aspect was long-term field work with in-country collaborators. Four geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled, three in Honduras and one in Guatemala. One of the coreholes was co-financed with Honduras, and showed their commitment to the project. Three of the exploration holes encountered high-temperature fluids, which provided information on the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoirs at promising sites in both countries. A geothermal well logging system was built and is shared between four Central American countries. For the evaluation of geothermal fluids, a geochemistry laboratory was established in Tegucigalpa, Honduras; it is now self-sufficient, and is part of Honduras' energy program. Through the teaching process and by working with counterparts in the field, the team expanded its own experience with a wide variety of geothermal systems, an experience that will be beneficial in the future for both the US investigators and in-country collaborators. At the working-scientists level, new contacts were developed that may flourish and professional ties were strengthened between scientists from a variety of US agencies. Rather than competing for research and field budgets, they worked together toward a common goal.

Heiken, G.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Janik, K. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Igneous and Geothermal Processes)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii geologic map data Citation Hawaii geologic map data Internet. 2013....

114

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

115

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

116

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

118

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

119

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time,

120

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

122

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 112, 2005. DOE, Carbon sequestration research andNational Conference on Carbon Sequestration, National Energyverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute  

SciTech Connect

During 1990--1991, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program. About 70% of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1990 calendar year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 17 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, characterization and processing, extractive metallurgy, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, and mined-land reclamation. Research areas include the following: Fluid-inclusion studies on fluorspar mineral deposits in an actively mined region; Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Characterization of coal particles for surface-based beneficiation; Impact of surface mining and reclamation of a gypsum deposit area on the surrounding community; Stress-strain response of fine coal particles during transport and storage; Recovery of metal values from mining wastes using bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Mathematical modeling of breakage for optimum sizing during crushing of rock.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Impact of geologic parameters on enhanced oil recovery - workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this workshop is to identify and develop objectives for future geologic research needed to increase light oil production with the enhanced oil recovery processes and to identify quantitative studies with potential to predict the impact reservoir heterogeneities on the light oil recovery processes. With these goals in mind, four workshop groups were organized to discuss and develop a conceptual R and D program to minimize the geologic constraints to E.O.R. These workshop groups will provide guidance and input into DOE's light oil research program and will help decide where time and resources are most effectively utilized. Working groups studied: (1) rock-fluid interactions; (2) reservoir heterogeneity; (3) reservoir description; and (4) geologic imput into EOR simulation studies. The question addressed is whether the present technology is adequate to quantitatively define each of these areas for predictive uses. If it is not, what techniques and instrumentation is necessary to define these for each EOR process.

Peterson, M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Distribution and Geochemical Evolution of Fluoride in Groundwater of Taiyuan Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogeochemistry data were utilized to understand origin, distribution, and geochemical evolution of the high-fluoride groundwater in Taiyuan basin, China. In the study area, the spatial distribution of the high fluoride groundwater are strictly controlled ... Keywords: fluoride, geochemical mechanism

Xiangquan Li; Xinwei Hou; Zhichao Zhou; Lingxia Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Stream sediment geochemical surveys for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Stream sediment is more universally available than ground and surface waters and comprises the bulk of NURE samples. Orientation studies conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory indicate that several mesh sizes can offer nearly equivalent information. Sediment is normally sieved in the field to pass a 420-micrometer screen (US Std. 40 mesh) and that portion of the dried sediment passing a 149-micrometer screen (US Std. 100 mesh) is recovered for analysis. Sampling densities usually vary with survey objectives and types of deposits anticipated. Principal geologic features that can be portrayed at a scale of 1:250,000, such as major tectonic units, plutons, and pegmatite districts, are readily defined using a sampling density of 1 site per 5 square miles (13 km/sup 2/). More detailed studies designed to define individual deposits require greater sampling density. Analyses for elements known to be associated with uranium in a particular mineral host may be used to estimate the relative proportion of uranium in several forms. For example, uranium may be associated with thorium and cerium in monazite, and with zirconium and hafnium in zircon. Readily leachable uranium may be adsorbed to trapped in oxide coatings on mineral particles. Soluble or mobile uranium may indicate an ore source, whereas uranium in monazite or zircon is not likely to be economically attractive. Various schemes may be used to estimate for form of uranium in a sample. Simple elemental ratios are a useful first approach. Multiple ratios and subtractive formulas empirically designed to account for the presence of particular minerals are more useful. Residuals calculated from computer-derived regression equations or factor scores appear to have the greatest potential for locating uranium anomalies.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

Joseph N. Moore

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Geologic Repository at a Geologic Repository Operations Area at Yucca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted its license application (LA) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a construction authorization for a geologic repository pursuant to Section 114 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended

Mountain Nevada; William J. Boyle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

132

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Geologic setting and geochemistry of thermal water and geothermal assessment, Trans-Pecos Texas. Final report, June 1, 1976-May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot springs and wells in West Texas and adjacent Mexico are manifestations of active convective geothermal systems, concentrated in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Maximum temperatures are 47/sup 0/ and 72/sup 0/C for hot springs and wells in Texas and 90/sup 0/C for hot springs in Mexico within 5 km of the border. Existing information is summarized and the results of a 1-year intensive study of the area are presented. The study includes several overlapping phases: (1) compilation of existing geologic information, both regional studies of geology, structure and geophysics, and more detailed local studies of individual hot spring areas; (2) detailed geologic mapping of hot spring areas to understand the origin and geologic controls of hot springs; (3) field measurement and sampling of hot spring or well waters for geochemical analysis; and (4) synthesis and interpretation of the data.

Henry, C.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A geological framework for temporal sedimentary dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical, geochemical and geotechnical methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal aspects of sediment distribution, accumulation, post-depositional alterations, and seafloor response and recovery to major events in a temperate, paraglacial, turbid outwash fjord. The goals of this study are to generate a complete geological model and compare the results to the global distribution of fjords. The over arching theme of this study is that the ratio of the area of the watershed to the area of the receiving basin can provide a first order indicator of many factors including glacial mass; the timing of glacial retreat; sediment input, accumulation, and preservation; and other factors. Temporal observations reveal the change of this fjord from a glaciated basin to and estuarine environment. These observations become important when viewed in the context of global climate change and the continued loss of ice. Preserved strata provide a 2800 yr record of changing modes of sedimentation as the system evolved from a glaciated basin to a non-glaciated fjord revealing a detailed chronology of change between end-member systems which can be used to infer changes as glaciers retreat from other fjords. Short lived radio isotopes were used to investigate post-depositional alteration of modern sediments. Without an understanding of how biological and physical processes work to modify sedimentary fabric during preservation, changes seen in sediment and rock core data cannot be accurately resolved. Physical processes can cause erosion and lateral transport; winnowing and armoring; and instantaneous sedimentation, all of which may be preserved. Biological processes can modulate the preservation of strata by destroying sedimentary fabric and integrating signals. The final fundamental need is to investigate the seafloor response and recovery to these events. Massive earthquakes are frequent in the study area and cause perturbations to sediment input and preservation. By understanding how lakes and deltas modulate sediment discharge after the event; how shorelines are modified after the event; and where sediment is deposited we can determine the influence these changes have on the environment and on humans.

Noll, Christian John

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations October 5, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact onCCS Opportunities in the United States [click on imageto link to the publication]Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed the manual to better understand the characteristics of geologic formations

137

Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geology, Society and the Environmental health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the pollutant. Three cleanest states are Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota. Four worst states are California pollution, radon gas Cancer and the geochemical environment #12; Stationary sources with relatively fixed

Pan, Feifei

139

GEOLOGY, April 2010 315 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOLOGY, April 2010 315 INTRODUCTION The redox evolution of the oceans through Earth history shaped; Erbacher et al., 2005). In this study we use variations in the isotope composition of U, a trace element and Palmer, 1991). As recently observed, the burial of U into sediments is associated with isotope fraction

Pross, Jörg

140

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and...

143

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: The Role of Injection-Induced Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at In Salah CO2 Storage Project: Status ReportQuarter end, June 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Salah Gas Project (ISG), a joint venture (JV) of BP, Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro, has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 bcfy natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian Central Sahara, and (2) successful minimization of the associated environmental footprint by capture and subsurface isolation of the excess CO{sub 2} extracted from production streams and subsurface isolation in the Krechba sandstone reservoir. The In Salah project provides an opportunity to study key physical and chemical processes in operational deployment of geological carbon sequestration. The objectives of the research are to study two components relevant to storage effectiveness and operational success at In Salah: Reactive chemistry of the brine-CO{sub 2}-reservoir-caprock-wellbore system, and the geomechanical effects of large-scale injection on crustal deformation and fault leakage hazards. Results from this work will enhance predictive capability of field performance, provide a new basis for interpretation of geophysical monitoring at In Salah, and provide additional information relevant to the creation of geological sequestration standards. The Joint Industry Partners (JIP: BP, StatoilHydro, Sonatrach) and LLNL will share data and results to achieve the objectives of the proposed work. The objective of the work performed at LLNL is to integrate LLNL core strengths in geochemistry and geomechanics to better understand and predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2} in the field. The mechanical, chemical and transport properties of the reservoir-caprock system are coupled. We are using LLNL-developed quantitative tools to assess the potential for CO{sub 2} migration/leakage caused by injection-induced deformation. The geomechanical work is focused upon fault activation, fluid induced fracturing of the caprock and permeability field evolution of the fractured reservoir. These results will be used in concert with reactive transport calculations to predict the ultimate fate of the CO{sub 2}. We will integrate laboratory and reactive transport modeling to assess CO{sub 2} plume migration and partitioning between different trapping mechanisms. Geochemical reactive transport modeling will be used to address multiphase flow (supercritical CO{sub 2} and water), CO{sub 2} dissolution, mineral sequestration, and porosity/permeability changes. The reactive transport portion of the work ultimately couples with geomechanical modeling. In particular, the distribution of the pressure perturbation induced by injection drives the geomechanical response. Subsequently, the geochemical work determines if water-rock interactions eventually enhance or suppress fractures. A key focus of this work is to establish the site specific interactions of geomechanics, reactive flow and transport. This involves building and refining models of the reservoir and overburden. The models will undergo continual refinement in response to data collected in the field and experiments performed at LLNL and elsewhere. This project commenced in FY08, with DOE funding starting in April, FY08. We have successfully initiated a cross-disciplinary study of the In Salah CO{sub 2} sequestration project and have met all FY08 and FY09 Q1, Q2 and Q3 milestones. During the reporting period, we continued to acquire and process data from the JIP to import into our own geomechanical and geochemical computational tools. The lab testing program continued using both locally formulated cements and field samples from Krechba. The geomechanical studies indicate that pore fluid pressures induced by injection will lead to significant permeability enhancement of the combination of fracture network and fault network within the reservoir in the vicinity of the injectors. We continued reactive transport calculations for CO{sub 2} rich fluids flowing through fractures. These calculations demonstrate that although porosity and permeability changes are expected in response to CO{sub 2} injection they are not anticipated to have a significant effect upon transport properties within the reservoir or c

Morris, J P; McNab, W W; Carroll, S K; Hao, Y; Foxall, W; Wagoner, J L

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Azaroual and P. Durst, Improvement of the calculationAzaroual, J. Pearce and P. Durst, Geochemical interactions

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

147

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

148

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

149

Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media.flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media:1985) for fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media. The

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media.multiphase fluid and heat flow. The program is applicable to porous

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tFavorability and Evidence Data 7 WinRAR ZIP files and links to detailed metadata. Includes data from regression models, gravity and temperature gradients, dilational strain data, and weighted earthquake epicenter data.

155

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, a geologic and geophysical case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geochemical and geophysical data are presented for one of the major geothermal systems in the western United States. Regional data indicate major tectonic structures which are still active and provide the conduits for the geothermal system. Detailed geologic mapping has defined major glide blocks of Tertiary volcanics which moved down from the Tushar Mountains and locally act as a leaky cap to portions of the presently known geothermal system. Mapping and geochemical studies indicate three periods of mineralization have affected the area, two of which are unrelated to the present geothermal activity. The geologic relationships demonstrate that the major structures have been opened repeatedly since the Tertiary. Gravity and magnetic data are useful in defining major structures beneath alluvium and basalt cover, and indicate the importance of the Cove Fort-Beaver graben and the Cove Creek fault in localizing the geothermal reservoir. These structures and a high level of microearthquake activity also suggest other target areas within the larger thermal anomaly. Electrical resistivity surveys and thermal gradient holes both contribute to the delineation of the known reservoir. Deep exploration wells which test the reservoir recorded maximum temperatures of 178 C and almost isothermal behavior beginning at 700 to 1000 m and continuing to a depth of 1800 m. Costly drilling, high corrosion rates and low reservoir pressure coupled with the relatively low reservoir temperatures have led to the conclusion that the reservoir is not economic for electric power production at present. Plans are underway to utilize the moderate-temperature fluids for agribusiness, and exploration continues for a deep high-temperature reservoir.

Ross, Howard P.; Moore, Joseph N.; Christensen, Odin D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Integrated Geochronologic, Geochemical, and Sedimentological Investigation of Proterozoic-Early Paleozoic Strata: From Northern India to Global Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope systematics of the Vindhyan Supergroup, India. Geology isotope trends from Aravalli strata. Regional geology and

McKenzie, Neil Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

Hatcher, Robert D

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute. Final report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

During 1990--1991, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program. About 70% of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1990 calendar year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 17 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, characterization and processing, extractive metallurgy, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, and mined-land reclamation. Research areas include the following: Fluid-inclusion studies on fluorspar mineral deposits in an actively mined region; Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Characterization of coal particles for surface-based beneficiation; Impact of surface mining and reclamation of a gypsum deposit area on the surrounding community; Stress-strain response of fine coal particles during transport and storage; Recovery of metal values from mining wastes using bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Mathematical modeling of breakage for optimum sizing during crushing of rock.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When the scCO2 was released from the reactor, less than 60% of the injected lighter compounds (benzene, toluene) were transported through dry sand column by the CO2, while more than 90% of the heavier organics were trapped in the sand column. For wet sand columns, most (80% to 100%) of the organic compounds injected into the sand column passed through, except for naphthalene which was substantial removed from the CO2 within the column. A spectrophotometric method was developed to measure pH in brines in contact with scCO2. This method provides an alternative to fragile glass pH electrodes and thermodynamic modeling approaches for estimating pH. The method was tested in simulated reservoir fluids (CO2NaClH2O) at different temperatures, pressures, and ionic strength, and the results were compared with other experimental studies and geochemical models. Measured pH values were generally in agreement with the models, but inconsistencies were present between some of the models.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

Gable named Geological Society of America Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

member of a large team that received a Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award for the Yucca Mountain Project. About the Geological Society of America Established in 1888, The...

163

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geologic flow characterization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

164

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

165

An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NETL: News Release - DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2010 5, 2010 DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Information in Comprehensive Report Important to Carbon Capture and Storage Research Washington, D.C. - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States [click on image to link to the publication] Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's

167

Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US sub-tropical reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The phase distribution of trace metals and oxyanions was investigated within a South Texas watershed hosting a high density of surface uranium mine pits and tailings. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the potential impact of these old uranium mining sites on the watershed with particular emphasis on spatial and temporal changes in water quality of a reservoir that serves as the major source of freshwater to a population of {approx} 350,000 people in the region. A livestock pond, bordered by uranium mine tailings, was used as a model case-study site to evaluate the cycling of uranium mine-derived oxyanions under changing redox conditions. Although the pond showed seasonal thermal and chemical stratification, geochemical cycling of metals was limited to Co and Pb, which seemed to be mostly associated with redox cycling of Mn mineral phases, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the ponds hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were too low to support strong inputs from th e tailings into the water column of the pond. The strong relations observed between particulate Cr, Cs, V and Fe suggest that these metals are associated with a stable particulate phase (probably allochthonous aluminosilicates) enriched in unreactive iron. This observation is supported by a parallel relationship in sediments collected across a broad range of sediment depositional processed (and histories) in the basin. Arsenic, though selectively enriched in the ponds water column, remained stable and mostly in solution throughout the depth of the profile and showed no sign of geochemical cycling or interaction with Fe-rich particles. We found no evidence of anthropogenic impacts of U mines beyond the purely local scale. Arsenic does decrease in concentration downstream of uranium mining sites but its presence within the Nueces drainage basin is related to interactions between surface and ground waters with uranium-rich geological formations rather than long-scale transport of contaminants downstream of the U mine pits and tailings. As in Lyssy pond, arsenic (and other oxyanions) in Lake Corpus Christi's water column are not affected by the abundant presence of Fe-rich particles but instead behave conservatively throughout the entire period of study. A quantitative mass balance model, constructed using monthly hydrological data for the reservoir, provides quantitative evidence of seasonal evaporative concentration of as in surface waters demonstrating the predominance of hydrodynamic constraints, over geochemical ones, on the cycling of this metal in selected aquatic systems.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce; Tissot, Philippe

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions with Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration in Deep Geological Formations  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations has quickly emerged as an important option for reducing greenhouse emissions. If CCS is implemented on the scale needed for large reductions in CO2 emissions, a billion of tonnes or more of CO2 will be sequestered annually a 250 fold increase over the amount sequestered annually today. Sequestering these large volumes will require a strong scientific foundation of the coupled hydrological-geochemical-geomechanical processes that govern the long term fate of CO2 in the subsurface. Methods to characterize and select sequestration sites, subsurface engineering to optimize performance and cost, safe operations, monitoring technology, remediation methods, regulatory oversight, and an institutional approach for managing long term liability are also needed.

Benson, Dr. Sally [Stanford University; Cole, David R [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geothermal research, Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. Quarterly progress report, August 1-October 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research results in geophysics, geochemistry, petrology, geologic mapping, drilling, hydrology, and modeling are reviewed briefly. Management details are mentioned. (MHR)

Bowman, J.R.; Brown, F.H.; Cook, K.L.; Nash, W.P.; Parry, W.T.; Sill, W.R.; Smith, R.B.; Ward, S.H.; Whelan, J.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modules based on the geochemical model PHREEQC for use in scripting and programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geochemical model PHREEQC is capable of simulating a wide range of equilibrium reactions between water and minerals, ion exchangers, surface complexes, solid solutions, and gases. It also has a general kinetic formulation that allows modeling of ... Keywords: C, C++, COM, Component object model, Fortran, Geochemical modeling, PHREEQC, Reactive-transport modeling

Scott R. Charlton; David L. Parkhurst

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

STOMP-ECKEChem: An Engineering Perspective on Reactive Transport in Geologic Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECKEChem (Equilibrium, Conservation, Kinetic Equation Chemistry) is a reactive transport module for the STOMP suite of multifluid subsurface flow and transport simulators that was developed from an engineering perspective. STOMP comprises a suite of operational modes that are distinguished by the solved coupled conservation equations with capabilities for a variety of subsurface applications (e.g., environmental remediation and stewardship, geologic sequestration of greenhouse gases, gas hydrate production, and oil shale production). The ECKEChem module was designed to provide integrated reactive transport capabilities across the suite of STOMP simulator operational modes. The initial application for the ECKEChem module was in the simulation of the mineralization reactions that occurred with the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into deep Columbia River basalt formations, where it was implemented in the STOMP-CO2 simulator. The STOMP-ECKEChem solution approach to modeling reactive transport in multifluid geologic media is founded on an engineering perspective: (1) sequential non-iterative coupling between the flow and reactive transport is sufficient, (2) reactive transport can be modeled by operator splitting with local geochemistry and global transport, (3) geochemistry can be expressed as a system of coupled nonlinear equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, (4) a limited number of kinetic equation forms are used in geochemical practice. This chapter describes the conceptual approach to converting a geochemical reaction network into a series of equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, the implementation of ECKEChem in STOMP, the numerical solution approach, and a demonstration of the simulator on a complex application involving desorption of uranium from contaminated field-textured sediments.

White, Mark D.; Fang, Yilin

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Methodology for the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage Program September 2010 Summary of the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide 2 Authors: U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D John Litynski U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D/Sequestration Division Dawn Deel Traci Rodosta U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Office of Research and Development George Guthrie U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/

176

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

177

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

178

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact of increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. Energyof potential impact for carbon dioxide injection. Journal ofGeochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers.

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geologic Carbon Storage Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporation 9302005 Enhanced Microbial Pathways for Methane Production from Oil Shale Western Research Institute 1012005 Carbon Sequestration for Existing Power Plants...

180

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

Archer, David (University of Chicago)

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: report for January-March 1985. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical information relevant to the retention of radionuclides by the Hanford Site (in basalt) and the Yucca Mountain site (in tuff), candidate high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories being developed by US Department of Energy (DOE) projects, is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Our evaluation of the sorption of technetium by basalt/groundwater systems was essentially completed this quarter and the results summarized; we conclude that the experimental methodology and results reported by the DOE for the Hanford Site have not conclusively established that significant retardation of technetium migration may be provided by phases present in the basalts of the Hanford Site. We have shown that sodium boltwoodite is the saturating uranium solid phase in two basalt/groundwater systems. Because thermodynamic data are not available for sodium boltwoodite, calculated solubilities for uranium are erroneous in these systems. Results of radionuclide solubility/speciation calculations, published by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site, were evaluated this quarter under our geochemical modeling task. We express concerns relative to the inherent limitations of such calculations. Samples of Yucca Mountain tuff and J-13 well water were received for use in our planned radionuclide sorption/solubility experiments. These Yucca Mountain materials will be used to evaluate radionuclide sorption and apparent concentration limit values published by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. 40 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Meyer, R.E.; Jacobs, G.K.; Whatley, S.K.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

BULLETIN OF CANADIAN PETROLEUM GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling

184

The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geochemical exploration for uranium in the Red Desert, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical exploration techniques for uranium were performed at a known deposit, the ENQ uranium deposit, which is in arkosic sandstones of the Battle Spring Formation in the Red Desert of Wyoming. Regional gross-gamma aerial data did not indicate the most favorable terrain for follow-up surveys, but instead the radionuclide distribution mapped radioactive mudstones. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio and total uranium concentration in ground water were successful downflow indicators of the ENQ deposit. Helium concentration increased downflow in the ground water flowing from the deposit, while Cu, Pb, and Ba decreased. Radon emanometric techniques generally produced data that coincided with the equivalent uranium concentrations at shallow depth. Helium content in soil was interpreted to reflect local lithology and gaseous migration. Multielement geochemical analyses on soils were effective in delineating the general vicinity of the orebody. Factor analysis was used to recognize three lithologic subgroups. Leachable uranium in soils was the best indicator of subsurface mineralization for the entire subregional area. Equivalent uranium, as determined from the gamma-spectral borehole logs, revealed a consistent dispersion pattern within the host sand of the Battle Spring Formation, whereas gross gamma logs could not detect the subtle gradients in radioelement content. Halo models developed to explain the distribution of helium, radon, radioelements, and trace elements demonstrate uranium itself as the most mobile indicator. Radon and helium appear to reflect local generation from radium accumulations. Vertical leakage due to hydraulic flow against an impermeable barrier is interpreted to be the major secondary redistribution process responsible for the measureable surface signals.

Pacer, J.C.; Bramlett, L.; Moll, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Holocene deposition in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas: a geochemical approach  

SciTech Connect

The origins and depositional history of Holocene sediment in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas (NWPC) have been determined using geochemical measurements coupled with textural data, petrographic examination, and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the channel is 200 to 2000 m deep, and nearly 100% of the sediment is calcium carbonate. Shallow water platform sources contribute 75-90% of the Holocene sediment in NWPC. Bank derived sand is most abundant near the platforms (nearly 100%) and is concentrically distributed around a central area of abundant non-platform sand. Bank-derived mud (<62 ..mu..m) accounts for more than 80% of the mud fraction in NWPC. The coarse silt (62-16 ..mu..m), fine silt (16-4 ..mu..m) and clay (< 4 ..mu..m) fractions from LLB (Bight of Abaco) are geochemically distinct from the mud fractions of Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Their distributions in NWPC demonstrate that both platforms are significant sediment contributors to NWPC. The observed sediment distribution clearly indicates that significant off bank transport occurs. With regard to sediment transport, no windward or leeward effects are observed in Holocene sediment deposition. Gravity flow processes are not significant to Holocene deposition. 80% of the present sedimentation rate results from the banktop flooding and confirms that 75%-90% of the Holocene sediment is derived from platform sources. The C-14 dated Holocene sediment layer is approximately 50 cm thick, and its transition with the Pleistocene occurs over a vertical interval of less than 20 cm as a result of mixing by benthonic organisms. This Holocene sediment layer should remain intact to permanently record this banktop episode, and should have a different diagenetic future from the underlying stable (calcite-rich) sediment.

Boardman, M.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program...

189

Florida Geological Survey - 2011 Monthly Oil and Gas Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Geological Survey - 2011 Monthly Oil and Gas Production Data The Florida Geological Survey is where data related to oil, gas, and geothermal resources for the state of...

190

Pages that link to "Idaho Geological Survey" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Idaho Geological Survey" Idaho Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search What links...

191

Changes related to "Idaho Geological Survey" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Idaho Geological Survey" Idaho Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search This is a...

192

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND...

193

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR PREDICTING THE FLUID FLOW ATTRIBUTES OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM QUANTITATIVE GEOLOGIC DATA AND MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work carried out during the period of September 29, 2000 to January 15, 2004 under DOE Research Contract No. DE-FC26-00BC15308. High temperatures and reactive fluids in sedimentary basins dictate that interplay and feedback between mechanical and geochemical processes significantly influence evolving rock and fracture properties. Not only does diagenetic mineralization fill in once open fractures either partially or completely, it modifies the rock mechanics properties that can control the mechanical aperture of natural fractures. In this study, we have evolved an integrated methodology of fractured reservoir characterization and we have demonstrated how it can be incorporated into fluid flow simulation. The research encompassed a wide range of work from geological characterization methods to rock mechanics analysis to reservoir simulation. With regard to the characterization of mineral infilling of natural fractures, the strong interplay between diagenetic and mechanical processes is documented and shown to be of vital importance to the behavior of many types of fractured reservoirs. Although most recent literature emphasizes Earth stress orientation, cementation in fractures is likely a critically important control on porosity, fluid flow attributes, and even sensitivity to effective stress changes. The diagenetic processes of dissolution and partial cementation are key controls on the creation and distribution of open natural fractures within hydrocarbon reservoirs. The continuity of fracture-porosity is fundamental to how fractures conduct fluids. In this study, we have made a number of important discoveries regarding fundamental properties of fractures, in particular related to the prevalence of kinematically significant structures (crack-seal texture) within otherwise porous, opening-mode fractures, and the presence of an aperture size threshold below which fractures are completely filled and above which porosity is preserved. These observations can be linked to models of quartz cementation. Significant progress has been made as well in theoretical fracture mechanics and geomechanical modeling, allowing prediction of spatial distributions of fractures that mimic patterns observed in nature. Geomechanical modeling shows the spatial arrangement of opening mode fractures (joints and veins) is controlled by the subcritical fracture index of the material. In particular, we have been able to identify mechanisms that control the clustering of fractures in slightly deformed rocks. Fracture mechanics testing of a wide range of clastic rocks shows that the subcritical index is sensitive to diagenetic factors. We show geomechanical simulations of fracture aperture development can be linked to diagenetic models, modifying fracture porosity as fractures grow, and affect the dynamics of fracture propagation. Fluid flow simulation of representative fracture pattern realizations shows how integrated modeling can give new insight into permeability assessment in the subsurface. Using realistic, geomechanically generated fracture patterns, we propose a methodology for permeability estimation in nonpercolating networks.

Jon E. Olson; Larry W. Lake; Steve E. Laubach

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Geological Survey Utah Geological Survey Name Utah Geological Survey Address 1594 W. North Temple Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6100 Phone number 801.537.3300 Website http://geology.utah.gov/ Coordinates 40.7713859°, -111.9367973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7713859,"lon":-111.9367973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

196

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

197

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, capabilities, and operations in response to a natural or man-made disaster1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Information Response Team (GIRT) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) contains the GIRT

Fleskes, Joe

198

Geological Assessment of the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the ...

Thomas J. Crowley

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

200

Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories: Annual report, fiscal year 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multidisciplinary project was initiated in fiscal year 1986. It comprises 11 reports in two major interrelated tasks: The technical assistance part of the project includes reviewing the progress of the major projects in the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive waste Management (OCRWM) Program and advising the Engineering and Geotechnology Division on significant technical issues facing each project; analyzing geotechnical data, reports, tests, surveys and plans for the different projects; reviewing and commenting on major technical reports and other program documents such as Site Characterization Plans (SCP) and Study Plans; and providing scientific and technical input at technical meetings. The topical studies activity comprises studies on scientific and technical ions and issues of significance to in-situ testing, test analysis methods, and site characterization of nuclear waste geologic repositories. The subjects of study were selected based on discussions with DOE staff. One minor topic is a preliminary consideration and planning exercise for postclosure monitoring studies. The major task, with subtasks involving various geoscience disciplines, is a study of the mechanical, hydraulic, geophysical and geochemical properties of fractures in geologic rock masses.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Carbon Dioxide Storage: Geological Security and Environmental Issues Case Study on the Sleipner Gas Field in Norway Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one option for mitigatining atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and thereby contributes in actions for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Carbon dioxide storage in geological formations has been in practice since early 1970s. Information and experience gained from the injection and/or storage of CO2 from a large number of existing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects indicate that it is feasible to safely store CO2 in geological formations as a CO2 mitigation option. Industrial analogues, including underground natural gas storage projects around the world and acid gas injection projects, provide additional indications that CO2 can be safely injected and stored at well-characterized and properly managed sites. Geological storage of CO 2 is in practice today beneath the North Sea, where nearly 1 MtCO2 has been successfully injected annually in the Utsira formation at the Sleipner Gas Field since 1996. The site is well characterized and the CO 2 injection process was monitored using seismic methods and this provided insights into the geometrical distribution of the injected CO 2. The injected CO2 will potentially be trapped geochemically pressure build up as a result of CO2 injection is unlikely to occur. Solubility and density dependence of CO2-water composition will become the controlling fluid parameters at Sleipner. The solubility trapping has the effect of eliminating the buoyant forces that drive CO2 upwards, and through time it can lead to mineral trapping, which is the most permanent and secure form of geological storage. Overall, the study at the Sleipner area demonstrates the geological security of carbon dioxide storage. The monitoring tools strengthen the verification of safe injection of CO2 in the Utsira formation. This proves that CO2 capture and storage is technically feasible and can be an effective method for greenhouse mitigation provided the site is well characterized and monitored properly. 1

Semere Solomon; The Bellona Foundation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NETL: Office of Science and Engineering Research - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Environmental Systems George Guthrie 412-386-6571 Materials Science Bryan Morreale 412-386-5929 Division Directors Engineering Research Daniel Maloney...

204

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

205

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Preliminary digital geologic maps of the Mariposa, Kingman, Trona, and Death Valley Sheets, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parts of four 1:250,000-scale geologic maps by the California Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines and Geology have been digitized for use in hydrogeologic characterization. These maps include the area of California between lat. 35{degree}N; Long. 115{degree}W and lat. 38{degree}N, long. 118{degree}W of the Kingman Sheet (Jennings, 1961), Trona Sheet (Jennings and others, 1962), Mariposa Sheet (Strand, 1967), and Death Valley Sheet (Streitz and Stinson, 1974). These digital maps are being released by the US Geological Survey in the ARC/INFO Version 6.1 Export format. The digitized data include geologic unit boundaries, fault traces, and identity of geologic units. The procedure outlined in US Geological Survey Circular 1054 (Soller and others, 1990) was sued during the map construction. The procedure involves transferring hard-copy data into digital format by scanning manuscript maps, manipulating the digital map data, and outputting the data. Most of the work was done using Environmental Systems Research Institute`s ARC/INFO software. The digital maps are available in ARC/INFO Rev. 6.1 Export format, from the USGS, Yucca Mountain Project, in Denver, Colorado.

D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Reservoir simulation and geochemical study of Cerro Prieto I wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined reservoir simulation and geochemical data analysis are used to investigate the effects of recharge and other reservoir processes occurring in the western part of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field (i.e., Cerro Prieto I area). Enthalpy-based temperatures and bottomhole temperatures are calculated based on simplified models of the system, considering different reservoir boundary conditions and zones of contrasting initial temperatures and reservoir properties. By matching the computed trends with geothermometer-based temperature and enthalpy histories of producing wells, the main processes active in the western area of Cerro Prieto are identified. This part of the geothermal system is strongly influenced by nearby groundwater aquifers; cooler waters readily recharge the reservoirs. In response to exploitation, the natural influx of cold water into the shallower alpha reservoir is mainly from the west and down Fault L, while the recharge to the deeper beta reservoir in this part of the field, seems to be only lateral, from the west and possibly south. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

210

Geological assessment of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the sensitivity of the system to greenhouse gas changes cannot yet be constrained by paleoclimate data below its present large range. Geologic records do not support one of the major predictions of greenhouse models-namely, that tropical sea surface temperatures will increase. Geologic data also suggest that winter cooling in high-latitude land areas is less than predicted by models. As the above-mentioned predictions appear to be systemic features of the present generation of climate models, some significant changes in model design may be required to reconcile models and geologic data. However, full acceptance of this conclusion requires more measurements and more systematic compilations of existing geologic data. Since progress in data collection in this area has been quite slow, uncertainties associated with these conclusions may persist for some time. 106 refs., 6 figs.

Crowley, T.J. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

212

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope evidence for multistage melt-peridotite interactions in the lithospheric mantle of eastern China. Chemical Geology

Macris, Catherine Amy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in stable isotope geochemistry. Geochimica et Cosmochimicafor high-temperature geochemistry if relevant fractionationstatistical method to geochemistry. International Geology

Macris, Catherine Amy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

217

Book review for Geotechnical and Geological Engineering Dr C.E. Augarde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book review for Geotechnical and Geological Engineering Dr C.E. Augarde 14/03/01 Modeling­49218­3 This book consists of 26 individually prepared chapters brought together by the editors into a 700­page volume. The aim of the book, expressed in its Preface, is to close the ``gap'' between current research

Augarde, Charles

218

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

219

GEOLOGY FIELD TRIPS IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- Exploration for Petroleum and Natural Gas (optional laboratory) 87 -- The Obelisk: Revisited 96 -- References recording past events. Rather than letters and words, rock characteristics such as shape, color, composition of answers to questions about the nature of geological data gathered through the field trips and laboratory

Engelder, Terry

220

Geology of magma systems: background and review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of basic concepts and current models of igneous geology is presented. Emphasis is centered on studies of magma generation, ascent, emplacement, evolution, and surface or near-surface activity. An indexed reference list is also provided to facilitate future investigations.

Peterfreund, A.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ROSE MURPHY Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ro s e m ur phy an d m a r k jac c a rd Carbon dioxide capture and storage (ccs) offers the promise that humanity can continue

222

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

The College of Geosciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and isotope geochemistry · Geobiology · Petroleum geology · Geological hazards · Ocean ecology, biology · Geology & Geophysics · Oceanography RESEARCH/OUTREACH CENTERS · Geochemical and Environmental Research · Coastal processes, sea level change · Large-scale and coastal circulations Geology & Geophysics

224

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geologic carbon sequestration. Geophys Res Lett 2005;from geologic carbon sequestration sites: Unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration Jennifer L.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Probability Estimation of CO2 Leakage Through Faults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on EffectiveFaults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Yingqi Zhang*,faults at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites is a

Zhang, Yingqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the...

231

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

232

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

233

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

234

MICHAEL T. HREN UNIVERISTY OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Geological & Env. Sciences) ­ Stanford University · Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry, Laboratory Methods., Chamberlain, C.P. (In Prep for Geology) Compound- specific stable isotope records of Cenozoic climateMICHAEL T. HREN UNIVERISTY OF MICHIGAN · DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 2534 C.C. LITTLE

Hren, Michael

235

United States Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Survey Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Geological Survey Name United States Geological Survey Address USGS National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive Place Reston, VA Zip 20192 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 1879 Phone number 703-648-5953 Website http://www.usgs.gov/ Coordinates 38.947077°, -77.370315° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.947077,"lon":-77.370315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Idaho Geological Survey Name Idaho Geological Survey Address 300 North 6th Street Suite 103 City, State Boise, Idaho Zip 83720-0050 Website http://www.idahogeology.org/Dr Coordinates 43.615992°, -116.199217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615992,"lon":-116.199217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State North Carolina State North Carolina Name North Carolina Geological Survey Address 1612 Mail Service Center City, State Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27699-1612 Website http://www.geology.enr.state.n Coordinates 35.67°, -78.66° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.67,"lon":-78.66,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

238

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating 21st Century Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

DePaolo, D. J.; Orr, F. M.; Benson, S. M.; Celia, M.; Felmy, A.; Nagy, K. L.; Fogg, G. E.; Snieder, R.; Davis, J.; Pruess, K.; Friedmann, J.; Peters, M.; Woodward, N. B.; Dobson, P.; Talamini, K.; Saarni, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

NETL: News Release - DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage 75.5 Million in CCS Research Supported by Recovery Act Funds Washington, D.C. - The Department of...

248

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

249

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

Price, P.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Geology of the Breitenbush River Area, Linn and Marion Counties, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a geologic map and accompanying descriptive text highlighting structural geology, mineralization, and geothermal resources. (ACR)

Priest, G.R.; Woller, N.M.; Ferns, M.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geochemical and Taphonomic Analysis of Very Well-Preserved Late-Middle Cambrian Lingulid Brachiopods From Laurentia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope fractionations between seawater and the shell of Terabratalia transversa (Brachiopoda). Chemical Geology,

Robles, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 4778 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­78 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution) and Pichowiak (1994). ARTICLE IN PRESS W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­7848 #12;These east (Oficina Viz Fm.) on a wide front to the west (Caleta Ligate Fm.). W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der

Siebel, Wolfgang

254

Modeling of concentrated aqueous solutions: Efficient implementation of Pitzer equations in geochemical and reactive transport models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling concentrated solutions demands the use of ion-interaction models such as Pitzer equations, which involve a large number of operations. Implementation of these models in large reactive transport simulations significantly increases the computation ... Keywords: Concentrated solutions, Evaporation of seawater, Geochemical modeling, HMW model, Invariant points, Object-oriented programming, Pitzer, Reactive transport modeling

S. A. Bea; J. Carrera; C. Ayora; F. Batlle

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Soil geochemical survey over concealed kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area in northern Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lengths of 562 m over the Whiskey kimberlite and 740 m over the Yankee kimberlite pipe. B-horizon soil of the kimberlite pipes. Ammonium acetate leach at pH 5 (AA5) dissolves most of these carbonates, and shows geochemical characteristics of kimberlites in com- parison with peridotites, oceanic basalts (MORB

256

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium depositCo Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit is the most efficient analytical method to detect these anomalies. Athabasca Basin Figure 1: Denison Mine

257

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

258

Geochemical modeling of the nuclear-waste repository system. A status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the geochemical modeling task is to develop an understanding of the waste-repository geochemical system and provide a valuable tool for estimating future states of that system. There currently exists a variety of computer codes which can be used in geochemical modeling studies. Some available codes contain the framework for simulating a natural chemical system and estimating, within limits, the response of that system to environmental changes. By data-base enhancement and code development, this modeling technique can be even more usefully applied to a nuclear-waste repository. In particular, thermodynamic data on elements not presently in the data base but identified as being of particular hazard in the waste-repository system, need to be incorporated into the code to estimate the near-field as well as the far-field reactions during a hypothetical breach. A reaction-path-simulation code, which estimates the products of specific rock/water reactions, has been tested using basalt and ground water. Results show that the mass-transfer capabilities of the code will be useful in chemical-evolution studies and scenario analyses. The purpose of this report is to explain the status of geochemical modeling as it currently applies to the chemical system of a hypothetical nuclear-waste repository in basalt and to present the plan proposed for further developmet and application.

Deutsch, W.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program. [For National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed. (JSR)

Arendt, J.W.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Analytical Performance Models for Geologic Repositories  

SciTech Connect

This report presents analytical solutions of the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides in geologic repositories. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the equations resulting from these analyses. The subjects treated in the present report are: (a) Solubility-limited transport with transverse dispersion (Chapter 2); (b) Transport of a radionuclide chain with nonequilibrium chemical reactions (Chapter 3); (c) Advective transport in a two-dimensional flow field (Chapter 4); (d) Radionuclide.transport in fractured media (Chapter 5); (e) A mathematical model for EPA's analysis of generic repositories (Chapter 6); and (f) Dissolution of radionuclides from solid waste (Chapter 7).

Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Fujita, A.; Kanki, T.; Kobayashi,A.; Lung, H.; Ting, D.; Sato, Y.; Savoshy, S.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mineralogic model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Rev 2.0 . , Losfrom tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Geochim.in zeolitized tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Geochim.

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media:1985) for fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media. The

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drift, heat was applied solely to the drift-center gridsquares) indicate grid block coordinates. Heat was appliedgrid block KCYC=KCYC+1 Time step: ?t Solve fluid and heat

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

TOUGHREACT: a new code of the TOUGH Family for Non-Isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) we consider not only porous

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reaction Mechanisms in Petroleum: From Experimentation to Upgrading and Geological Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the numerous questions that arise concerning the exploitation of petroleum from unconventional reservoirs, lie the questions of the composition of hydrocarbons present in deep seated HP-HT reservoirs or produced during in-situ upgrading steps of heavy oils and oil shales. Our research shows that experimental hydrocarbon cracking results obtained in the laboratory cannot be extrapolated to geological reservoir conditions in a simple manner. Our demonstration is based on two examples: 1) the role of the hydrocarbon mixture composition on reaction kinetics (the "mixing effect") and the effects of pressure (both in relationship to temperature and time). The extrapolation of experimental data to geological conditions requires investigation of the free-radical reaction mechanisms through a computed kinetic model. We propose a model that takes into account 52 reactants as of today, and which can be continuously improved by addition of new reactants as research proceeds. This model is complete and detailed enou...

Lannuzel, Frdric; Bounaceur, Roda; Marquaire, Paul-Marie; Michels, Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

271

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the...

275

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

277

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NA, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Citation...

278

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,...

279

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geological occurrence of gas...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geological occurrence of gas hydrates at the Blake Outer Ridge, western North Atlantic Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

280

April 7, 2008 Dr. Mark Myers, Director US Geological Survey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US Geological Survey 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Mail ... The Central and Eastern United States hazard ... coastal California and the Basin and Range ...

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

COMPUTER MODELING OF NUCLIDE ADSORPTION ON GEOLOGIC MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aqueous transport of radionuclides through geologic media,lead J the exchange of radionuclide mass between the aqueousdistribution of a given radionuclide between the solid and

Silva, R.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modeling wetland loss in coastal Louisiana: Geology, geography ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Habitat change in coastal Louisiana from 1955/6 to 1978 was analyzed to determine the influence of geological and man-made changes on landscape ...

283

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -...

284

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

285

Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO2 Storage Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Development Office of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority; Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky Geological Surveys; Western Michigan University; and Battelle's Pacific Northwest...

286

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...

287

Geologic Distribution of U.S. Proved Reserves, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geologic Distribution of U.S. Proved Reserves, 2009 Although proved reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, and natural gas have historically been

288

Current Status of Deep Geological Repository Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk provided an overview of the current status of deep-geological-repository development worldwide. Its principal observation is that a broad consensus exists internationally that deep-geological disposal is the only long-term solution for disposition of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Also, it is now clear that the institutional and political aspects are as important as the technical aspects in achieving overall progress. Different nations have taken different approaches to overall management of their highly radioactive wastes. Some have begun active programs to develop a deep repository for permanent disposal: the most active such programs are in the United States, Sweden, and Finland. Other countries (including France and Russia) are still deciding on whether to proceed quickly to develop such a repository, while still others (including the UK, China, Japan) have affirmatively decided to delay repository development for a long time, typically for a generation of two. In recent years, a major conclusion has been reached around the world that there is very high confidence that deep repositories can be built, operated, and closed safely and can meet whatever safety requirements are imposed by the regulatory agencies. This confidence, which has emerged in the last few years, is based on extensive work around the world in understanding how repositories behave, including both the engineering aspects and the natural-setting aspects, and how they interact together. The construction of repositories is now understood to be technically feasible, and no major barriers have been identified that would stand in the way of a successful project. Another major conclusion around the world is that the overall cost of a deep repository is not as high as some had predicted or feared. While the actual cost will not be known in detail until the costs are incurred, the general consensus is that the total life-cycle cost will not exceed a few percent of the value of the electricity generated by the power reactors that have produced the waste. Of course, the current international situation is that no nation is currently willing to take any radioactive waste from another nation for deep disposal. This means that every nation will ultimately need to develop its own deep repository. This makes no sense, however--many nations have only a modest amount of waste, or do not have appropriate geological settings for a repository, or both. Ultimately, the need for one or more multi-national or international repositories will emerge, although so far this has not happened.

Budnitz, R J

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Florida Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Florida Name Florida Geological Survey Address 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard M.S. 49 City, State Tallahassee, Florida Zip 32399 Website http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geo Coordinates 30.47491°, -84.357967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.47491,"lon":-84.357967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

290

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Summaries of FY 1995 geosciences research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either direct or indirect to the Department of Energy`s long-range technological needs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geology of the Tambaredjo oil field, Suriname  

SciTech Connect

After the initial discovery in the sixties of oil below the coastal plain of Suriname (S. America), the State Oil Company of Suriname started production of the unique Tambaredjo field in 1982. The heavy, biodegraded oil (14-16[degrees] API) is produced under compaction drive, from the Paleocene T-sand (average thickness 5 m) at a depth of about 300 m. More than 300 wells have been drilled in an area of about 200 km[sup 2]. High resolution seismics makes it possible to correlate units down to 2 m thick. This dense network of bore holes is very suitable for geological correlations and 3D modeling. The T-sand reservoir consists of angular, medium to coarse grained unconsolidated sands with interfingering clays and lignites. The sands are deposited on a well cemented erosional Cretaceous basement. The reservoir is sealed by locally continuous clays. The oil is trapped in structural highs created by syn-sedimentary rejuvenated basement faults. The depositional environment of the T-sand ranges from fluviatile to deltaic. Frequent avulsion and synsedimentary faulting created a highly compartmented reservoir. Although interconnectedness of the sand bodies is high, clay smears and silting out of the edges confine reservoir compartments. The best genetic sand units such as channel fills or mouth bar deposits hardly correlate over more than a few hundred meters. The Tambaredjo oil field offers an unique opportunity to study the detailed sedimentology and petroleum geology of a fluvio-deltaic transitional realm on the passive margin along the Guiana coast.

Dronkert, H. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Wong, T.E. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Haarlem (Netherlands))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Evaluation of selected geochemical anomalies in Colorado and the Southeastern US. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the utility of HSSR geochemical data from stream sediment in exploration for uranium. In the southeastern US, four uraniferous occurrences and associated radiometric anomalies were identified in areas where uranium mineralization has not been previously reported. At two localities, assays of about .01% have been obtained from saprolite. There is some evidence which suggests that uranium may have been leached at these localities and that higher grades of U are likely at depth.

Carpenter, R H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

FERNANDO GILBES-SANTAELLA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2011 WATER. #12;RFP Water Resources Research Grant State Program FY2009 1 PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES resources problems of state and regional significance. The research priority areas for Puerto Rico

Gilbes, Fernando

299

FERNANDO GILBES-SANTAELLA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2012 WATER. #12;RFP Water Resources Research Grant State Program FY2012 1 PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES resources problems of state and regional significance. The research priority areas for Puerto Rico

Gilbes, Fernando

300

Research Specialist/Laboratory Manager Stable Isotope Laboratory for Earth and Environmental Science Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Specialist/Laboratory Manager Stable Isotope Laboratory for Earth and Environmental Science Research Department of Geology & Planetary Science, University of Pittsburgh We invite applications for a full-time Research Specialist/Laboratory Manager position for the Stable Isotope Laboratory

Sibille, Etienne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Automatic Building of Structured Geological Models Sylvain Brandel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological models used for oil and gas exploration. We present a prototype of a "geological pilot" which Modeling for oil and gas exploration Hydrocarbon reservoir models are a major tool currently used involved in oil and gas exploration have acquired a huge amount of seismic data, which are neither

Brandel, Sylvain

302

A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

doi: 10.1130/G30308A.1 2009;37;1015-1018Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology doi: 10.1130/G30308A.1 2009;37;1015-1018Geology Kendra J. Williams Gregory D. Hoke, Carmala isotope altimeter: Do Quaternary pedogenic carbonates predict Email alerting services articles cite Geological Society of America on December 18, 2009geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;GEOLOGY, November

Garzione, Carmala N.

304

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

306

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

307

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Project Description The project is expected to make large quantities of geothermal-relevant geoscience data held by the State Geological Surveys available via the NGDS. State Arizona Objectives Expand and enhance the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermalrelevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

308

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Paleontological Resources Preservation Act 43 CFR 8365.1-5: Public Property and Resources 43 CFR 3620: Petrified Wood 16 USC 4301: Federal Cave Resources Protection Act 43 CFR 1610.7-2: Areas of Critical Environmental Concern Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

309

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 5. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the northern Cache Valley area, Franklin County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the north-south trending graben structure known as northern Cache Valley in southeastern Idaho were sampled during the summer and fall of 1973. Geologic and gravity data for the area indicate fault control for nearly all thermal water occurrences. Thermal-water discharges are generally restricted to the course of the Bear River with few known in areas away from the river. Spring deposits in the form of travertine may not be indications of low temperature thermal waters because abundant limestone and dolomite make up the geologic framework. Much gas, believed to consist mostly of carbon dioxide, is being evolved from many of the springs. The hottest water is found near Battle Creek and Squaw hot springs approximately 4 kilometers northwest of the town of Preston. Metoric waters descend along fault planes, fractures, and fissures to depths at which they are heated by increasing rock temperatures (geothermal gradient of 5/sup 0/C per 100 meters). Due to decreased density, the heated waters rise along the same or adjacent fault planes to the surface. The quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer applied to the thermal water discharges indicates temperatures approaching 150/sup 0/C may be encountered by deep drilling. Mixing models, based on quartz solubility, indicate higher aquifer temperatures than the quartz equilibrium thermometer, but chloride concentration vs. temperature plots are not linear. The sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometer indicates higher temperatures than quartz equilibrium and mixing models. The thermal waters are higher in total dissolved solids (12,000 to 13,000 milligrams per liter) than are known elsewhere in Idaho and represent potential pollution hazards should large scale withdrawal be attempted.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geochemical studies relevant to carbon sequestration.National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC,Conference on Carbon Sequestration, May 14-17, Washington

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Basic research needed for the development of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic research needed to facilitate development of geothermal energy is identified. An attempt has been made to make the report representative of the ideas of productive workers in the field. The present state of knowledge of geothermal energy is presented and then specific recommendations for further research, with status and priorities, are listed. Discussion is limited to a small number of applicable concepts, namely: origin of geothermal flux; transport of geothermal energy; geothermal reservoirs; rock-water interactions, and geophysical and geochemical exploration.

Aamodt, R.L.; Riecker, R.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Lehua Pan,of CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NETL: Carbon Storage - Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois State agencies, and university researchers...

317

Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is supported by interpreting the combined geological, geophysical, and thermal data. In the model, heat is transferred from an area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock.

Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a greater number were thought to be related to faulting. Measured water temperatures at the 124 wells and springs inventoried ranged from 12/sup 0/ to 93/sup 0/C (degrees Celsius) and averaged 50/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, calculated using the silica and the sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, range from 5/sup 0/ to 370/sup 0/C and averaged 110/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures in excess of 140/sup 0/C were found at 42 sites. No areal patterns to the distribution of temperatures either at the surface or subsurface were found. Generally, the quality of the waters sampled was good. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 14 to 13,700 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and averaged 812 mg/l, with higher values occurring in the southeastern part of the State. Twenty-five areas were selected for future study. Of these areas, 23 were selected on the basis of estimated aquifer temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher and two on the basis of geologic considerations.

Young, H.W.; Mitchell, J.C.

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lietzke, D.A. (Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)); McMaster, W.M. (McMaster (William M.), Heiskell, TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NETL Publications - Journal of Energy and Environmental Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2002 Full Issue PDF-19MB PDF Linked Version PDF-411KB (See NOTE Below) Journal of Energy and Environmental Research - Vol. 2 No. 1 IN THIS ISSUE: Journal Papers, Geologic...

322

Oceanographic Data at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Areas of research at MBARI include marine biology, geology, and chemistry; physical oceanography, and marine technology. Numeric data, images and video, GIS maps, and sensor data are all available from various projects.

323

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

324

Geologic mapping of tunnels using photogrammetry: Camera and target positioning  

SciTech Connect

A photogrammetric method has been developed by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Reclamation for the use in geologic mapping of tunnels (drifts). The method requires photographing the tunnel walls and roof with a calibrated small-format camera to obtain stereo pairs of photos which are then oriented in an analytical stereo plotter for measurement of geologic features. The method was tested in G-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site. Calculations necessary to determine camera and target positions and problems encountered during testing were used to develop a set of generic formulas that can be applied to any tunnel. 7 figs.

Coe, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dueholm, K.S. [Danmarks Tekniske Hoejskole, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. of Surveying and Photogrammetry

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

326

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of geologic carbon sequestration Catherine A. Petersleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites. Env EarthDOE) Conference on Carbon Sequestration, 2005. Alexandria,

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology...

328

Geological characterization report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical information is presented relevant to the WIPP site in the Delaware Basin in SE New Mexico. This volume covers regional geology, site geology, and seismology. (DLC)

Powers, D.W.; Lambert, S.J.; Shaffer, S.E.; Hill, L.R.; Weart, W.D. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

330

Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage, April 2-4, 2007  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

Goodenough, J. B.; Abruna, H. D.; Buchanan, M. V.

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Prototype Geologic Database and Users Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described here is aimed at assembling a prototype database of raw geologic data typically used to identify and differentiate hydrologically significant lithostratigraphic units. The domain of the prototype database was focused on the T, TX, TY Tank farm area and the 216-Z-9 Trench area in 200 West Area and focused on ''orphan'' data that was not already captured in existing databases, as well as new data coming from core projects. A total of 86 boreholed-wells (78 in the T, TX, TY Tank Farm Area, and 8 in the immediate vicinity of 216-Z-9) are included in the initial prototype database. The prototype database currently consists as a series of Excel workbooks, one for each borehole/well, with multiple worksheets representing the different data tables. The number and complexity of the worksheets is dependent on the type and complexity of the data available for a given borehole. By far the most available data sets for these boreholes were as built drawings (pdf files), geophysical log data (internet links and/or depth specific numerical array), and/or ROCSAN data (particle-size, calcium-carbonate, and Folk/Wentworth Classification). Note that secondary data tables that required manual entry of data were completed only for the eight 216-Z-9 Trench boreholes. Note also, that data tables dealing with the sample, laboratory, and/or analytical information needed to qualify the data also have also not yet been completed, as this requires a greater level of effort than originally planned for this initial exercise.

FOGWELL, T.W.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framework for the Analysis of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and Geomechanical Framework for the Analysis of Geological and Geomechanical Framework for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments (Geysers) Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framework for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments (Geysers) Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Induced Seismicity Project Description Water injection is used in engineered or enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to increase rock permeability, a process which involves fracture initiation and/or reactivation of joints through pore pressure and stress perturbations. This stimulation process is often accompanied by multiple microseismic events associated with rock failure or shear slip on pre-existing fractures. The microseismic signals can be used to understand the hydraulic fracturing process and the properties of the created reservoir. Despite progress in quantitative and qualitative analysis of reservoir stimulation using MEQs, the fundamental mechanisms still are poorly understood and several key questions remain unresolved namely, the variation of seismic activity with injection rate, delayed micro-seismicity, the relation of the stimulated zone to the injected volume and its rate, the connectivity of fractures hosting MEQs, and the resulting reservoir permeability. In addition, longer term phenomena such as permeability evolution related to thermal contraction remain to be investigated.

333

GS3: A Knowledge Management Architecture for Collaborative Geologic Sequestration Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern scientific enterprises are inherently knowledge-intensive. In general, scientific studies in domains such as groundwater, climate, and other environmental modeling as well as fundamental research in chemistry, physics, and biology require the acquisition and manipulation of large amounts of experimental and field data in order to create inputs for large-scale computational simulations. The results of these simulations must then be analyzed, leading to refinements of inputs and models and further simulations. In this paper we describe our efforts in creating a knowledge management platform to support collaborative, wide-scale studies in the area of geologic sequestration. The platform, known as GS3 (Geologic Sequestration Software Suite), exploits and integrates off-the-shelf software components including semantic wikis, content management systems and open source middleware to create the core architecture. We then extend the wiki environment to support the capture of provenance, the ability to incorporate various analysis tools, and the ability to launch simulations on supercomputers. The paper describes the key components of GS3 and demonstrates its use through illustrative examples. We conclude by assessing the suitability of our approach for geologic sequestration modeling and generalization to other scientific problem domains

Gorton, Ian; Black, Gary D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Wurstner, Signe K.; Hui, Peter SY

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

335

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

336

STATE OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OREGON OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Portland, Oregon 97201 910 State Office Building r DOE/ID/12526--T2 OPEN-FILE REPORT 0-86-3 DE87 013077 INVESTIGATION OF THE TEIERMAL REGIME AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF THE DRILLING IN THE CASCADE RANGE CASCADE VOLCANIC ARC: FIRST PHASE OF A PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFIC Prepared by George R . Priest Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Preparation and publication of this document were supported b the Ore on Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Grant No. DE-%G07-841&.2526 from the U . S . Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

337

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

338

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

339

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

340

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In recent years there has been interest in the possibility of generating electricity from geothermal steam in many countries. The initial stage is the preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources and, apart from economic considerations, the problem is essentially geological. This paper deals with the factors involved in the selection of areas that warrant expenditure on investigation and development. Preferred requirements in geothermal fields for power generation are temperatures above 200°C and permeable aquifers or zones within 2000 m from the surface. The existence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

342

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

343

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

344

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

345

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

346

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

348

Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

Haidari, Arman S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Geologic interpretation of space shuttle radar images of Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space shuttle mission in November 1981 acquired images of parts of the earth with a synthetic aperture radar system at a wavelength of 23.5 cm (9.3 in.) and spatial resolution of 38 m (125 ft). This report describes the geologic interpretation of 1:250,000-scale images of Irian Jaya and eastern Kalimantan, Indonesia, where the all-weather capability of radar penetrates the persistent cloud cover. The inclined look direction of radar enhances subtle topographic features that may be the expression of geologic structures. On the Indonesian images, the following terrain categories are recognizable for geologic mapping: carbonate, clastic, volcanic, alluvial and coastal, melange, and metamorphic, as well as undifferentiated bedrock. Regional and local geologic structures are well expressed on the images.

Sabing, F.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

351

NETL: News Release - DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test CO2 Injection Begins in Existing Production Well to Evaluate CO2 Storage Potential, Oil Recovery Washington, D.C. - A U.S. Department...

352

Data for the geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the geochemical data and the methods of data collection from the former tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Data are from a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. Selected solid samples are water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The waters, extracts, and solid samples were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Summaries of FY 1993 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the DOE`s many missions. The Geosciences Research Program is supported by the Office of Energy Research. The participants in this program include DOE laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the DOE and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar-atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the oceans. Chemical Geology: Isotope Geoscience section 80(Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, for her Li isotopeisotopes and origin of high-Cl magmas of the Stillwater Complex, Montana. Geology

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO2 sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Migration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO2 sequestration. A CO2 leak may cause mineral precipitation/ dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO2 from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence (#2;-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO2 is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO2 causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO2 was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal scavenging due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO2 intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

Viswanathana, Hari; Daia, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckelc, Kirk G; Zhengd, Liange; Guthrie, George D.; Pawara, Rajesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Best Practice Guidelines for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Geologic Storage Options, Site Evaluation, and Monitoring/Mitigatio n  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to set forth a set of "best practices" that support long-term, secure storage of captured carbon dioxide (CO2). For each of a suite of geologic storage options, the report establishes background and basic concepts, defines site selection criteria and procedures, and sets forth monitoring and mitigation options. The initial suite of geologic CO2 storage options to be addressed includes saline aquifers, depleted oil fields, depleted natural gas fields, and deep unmineable coal...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

Lindquist, W Brent

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of an Experimental Data Base and Theories for Prediction of Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes of Geochemical Significance at Supercritical Temperatures and Pressures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to combine new experimental measurements on heat capacities, volumes, and association constants of key compounds with theoretical equations of state and with first principles quantum mechanical calculations to generate predictions of thermodynamic data. The resulting thermodynamic data allow quantitative models of geochemical processes at high temperatures and pressures. Research funded by a DOE grant to Prof. Robert Wood at the University of Delaware involved the development of new theoretical equations of state for aqueous solutions of electrolytes and non-electrolytes, methods to estimate thermodynamic data not available from experiments, collection of data on model compounds through experiments and predictions of properties using ab initio quantum mechanics. During the last three and a half years, with support from our DOE grant, 16 papers have been accepted or published, and 3 more are in preparation. Results of this research have been reported in numerous invited and contributed presentations at national and international meetings. For this report, we will briefly comment on the highlights of the last 3 and a half years and give a complete list of papers published, accepted, or submitted during these years.

Wood, Robert H.

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Current Status of The Romanian National Deep Geological Repository Program  

SciTech Connect

Construction of a deep geological repository is a very demanding and costly task. By now, countries that have Candu reactors, have not processed the spent fuel passing to the interim storage as a preliminary step of final disposal within the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Romania, in comparison to other nations, represents a rather small territory, with high population density, wherein the geological formation areas with radioactive waste storage potential are limited and restricted not only from the point of view of the selection criteria due to the rocks natural characteristics, but also from the point of view of their involvement in social and economical activities. In the framework of the national R and D Programs, series of 'Map investigations' have been made regarding the selection and preliminary characterization of the host geological formation for the nation's spent fuel deep geological repository. The fact that Romania has many deposits of natural gas, oil, ore and geothermal water, and intensively utilizes soil and also is very forested, cause some of the apparent acceptable sites to be rejected in the subsequent analysis. Currently, according to the Law on the spent fuel and radioactive waste management, including disposal, The National Agency of Radioactive Waste is responsible and coordinates the national strategy in the field and, subsequently, further actions will be decided. The Romanian National Strategy, approved in 2004, projects the operation of a deep geological repository to begin in 2055. (authors)

Radu, M.; Nicolae, R.; Nicolae, D. [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON), ILFOV County (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

368

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

369

Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mines and Geology Mines and Geology Jump to: navigation, search State Nevada Name Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Address University of Nevada/178 City, State Reno, Nevada Zip 89557 Website http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/Oil&Ga Coordinates 39.5440601°, -119.8136573° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5440601,"lon":-119.8136573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

371

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

372

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

373

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env The Summary of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,

374

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a

375

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Abstract This report presents a stratigraphic study of an area of about 860 square miles in the southern part of the Carson Desert, near Fallen, Churchill County, Nev. The exposed rocks and surficial sediments range in age from early Tertiary (?) to Recent. The late Quaternary sediments and soils were especially studied: they furnish a detailed history of the fluctuations of Lake Lahontan (a huge but intermittent late Pleistocene lake) and of younger lakes, as well as a history of late Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, soil development, and climatic change that probably is

376

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar

Clift, Peter

378

VOLTINT: A Matlab-based program for semi-automated processing of geochemical data acquired by voltammetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress has resulted in the development of advanced techniques to acquire geochemical information in situ in aquatic systems. Among these techniques, voltammetry has generated significant interest for its ability to detect several important redox-sensitive ... Keywords: Data processing, Geochemistry, Integration, Matlab, Software, Voltammetry

Gwendolyn Bristow; Martial Taillefert

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

Carol Lutken

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manometric Sorption Test Facility Manometric Sorption Test Facility One of today's pressing issues associated with fossil fuel consumption is how to curb greenhouse gas emissions, chiefly CO2. NETL research focuses on ways to capture CO2 from power plant fuel streams and flue stack emissions, and safely store (or sequester) it into geological formations such as coal bed strata , natural gas fields, or saline formations. NETL's Manometric Sorption Test Facility aids these efforts by applying elevated temperature (from 55ºC to 300ºC) and pressure (up to 3,000 psig) to coal samples. Under these conditions, researchers study changes to the CO2 or other fluids being absorbed or adsorbed by the sample, all with a precision of 0.1 psi. In this manner, the sorbent capacity of a particular coal sample can be calculated and its usefulness for future carbon sequestration can be gauged.

383

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries in the document describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1982 to 1983. The Geoscience Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's technological needs.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

385

Optimal Reservoir Management and Well Placement Under Geologic Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir management, sometimes referred to as asset management in the context of petroleum reservoirs, has become recognized as an important facet of petroleum reservoir development and production operations. In the first stage of planning field development, the simulation model is calibrated to dynamic data (history matching). One of the aims of the research is to extend the streamline based generalized travel time inversion method for full field models with multimillion cells through the use of grid coarsening. This makes the streamline based inversion suitable for high resolution simulation models with decades long production history and numerous wells by significantly reducing the computational effort. In addition, a novel workflow is proposed to integrate well bottom-hole pressure data during model calibration and the approach is illustrated via application to the CO2 sequestration. In the second stage, field development strategies are optimized. The strategies are primarily focused on rate optimization followed by infill well drilling. A method is proposed to modify the streamline-based rate optimization approach which previously focused on maximizing sweep efficiency by equalizing arrival time of the waterfront to producers, to account for accelerated production for improving the net present value (NPV). Optimum compromise between maximizing sweep efficiency and maximizing NPV can be selected based on a 'trade-off curve.' The proposed method is demonstrated on field scale application considering geological uncertainty. Finally, a novel method for well placement optimization is proposed that relies on streamlines and time of flight to first locate the potential regions of poorly swept and drained oil. Specifically, the proposed approach utilizes a dynamic measure based on the total streamline time of flight combined with static and dynamic parameters to identify "Sweet-Spots" for infill drilling. The "Sweet-Spots" can be either used directly as potential well-placement locations or as starting points during application of a formal optimization technique. The main advantage of the proposed method is its computational efficiency in calculating dynamic measure map. The complete workflow was also demonstrated on a multimillion cell reservoir model of a mature carbonate field with notable success. The infill locations based on dynamic measure map have been verified by subsequent drilling.

Taware, Satyajit Vijay

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review  

SciTech Connect

The broad range of activities on radioactive waste isolation that are summarized in Table 1.1 provides a comprehensive picture of the operations that must be carried out in working with this problem. A comparison of these activities with those published in the two previous reviews shows the important progress that is being made in developing and applying the various technologies that have evolved over the past 20 years. There are two basic challenges in perfecting a system of radioactive waste isolation: choosing an appropriate geologic barrier and designing an effective engineered barrier. One of the most important developments that is evident in a large number of the reports in this review is the recognition that a URL provides an excellent facility for investigating and characterizing a rock mass. Moreover, a URL, once developed, provides a convenient facility for two or more countries to conduct joint investigations. This review describes a number of cooperative projects that have been organized in Europe to take advantage of this kind of a facility in conducting research underground. Another critical development is the design of the waste canister (and its accessory equipment) for the engineered barrier. This design problem has been given considerable attention in a number of countries for several years, and some impressive results are described and illustrated in this review. The role of the public as a stakeholder in radioactive waste isolation has not always been fully appreciated. Solutions to the technical problems in characterizing a specific site have generally been obtained without difficulty, but procedures in the past in some countries did not always keep the public and local officials informed of the results. It will be noted in the following chapters that this procedure has caused some problems, especially when approval for a major component in a project was needed. It has been learned that a better way to handle this problem is to keep all stakeholders fully informed of project plans and hold periodic meetings to brief the public, especially in the vicinity of the selected site. This procedure has now been widely adopted and represents one of the most important developments in the Third Worldwide Review.

Witherspoon Editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson Editor, G.S.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Name Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Address Ste. 965 Northeast Oregon Street Place Portland, OR Zip 97232 Website http://www.oregongeology.org/s Coordinates 45.5286301°, -122.656652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5286301,"lon":-122.656652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

Phase-field simulations of partial melts in geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diffuse interface description based on a multi-phase-field model for geological grain microstructures is introduced, especially useful in the treatment of partially molten structures. Each grain as well as different phases are represented by individual ... Keywords: Grain growth, Microstructure, Numerical modelling, Partial melt, Phase-field model

Frank Wendler; Jens K. Becker; Britta Nestler; Paul D. Bons; Nicolas P. Walte

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of NCEP model to historical seismic moment rate 18 CONCLUSIONS 18 APPENDIX A 19 The database: structure Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Mark Petersen California Division of Mines & Geology Carol S. Prentice U length (l) 5 Fault down-dip width (w) 5 Magnitude (Mw) 5 Average coseismic slip (d) 6 Long-term slip rate

390

Geologic map of the Hood River Quadrangle, Washington and Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Location and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Quebec, is organic-rich black shale and hosting oil and gas. It is equivalent to the Ithaca shaleLocation and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale in the Anticosti Island in the Gulf of St. d13C for calcite disseminated in the black shale range from 2.6o to 2.8 / The values are lower

392

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. | Admission is FREE Hanford may be home to the world's first industrial scale nuclear reactor, but did you, the nuclear industry faces unique hurdles to expansion and waste management. Geology plays a critical role the fate of contaminants in the environment, inspiring ideas for ceramic waste forms, and storing used

393

Z .Chemical Geology 182 2002 139178 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 182 2002 139­178 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo The cretaceous Ladakh arc and trace elements and Sr, Nd, Pb isotopes of the Mid-Cretaceous lavas of the Ladakh side of the arc.80 . Isotope and trace element data of western Ladakh lavas are compatible with high-degree melting Z . wZ . Z

Demouchy, Sylvie

394

Z .Chemical Geology 181 2001 6771 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 181 2001 67­71 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo Hydrogen-isotope analysis Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Hydrogen; Isotopes; Organic; Toxic materials; Water 1. Introduction Hydrogen-isotope analysis of potentially haz- ardous organic materials is problematic. Conti

Edwards, Thomas W.D.

395

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract hydrocarbons for energy needs. The apparatus provides more. The apparatus allows the liquid metal to distribute heat evenly throughout the oil shale. This reduces by providing more even heat distribution ·· Reduces costs associated with in situ heat extraction of oil shale

Seamons, Kent E.

396

Geologic map of the Mount Adams Quadrangle, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation - second worldwide review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first world wide review of the geological problems in radioactive waste isolation was published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991. This review was a compilation of reports that had been submitted to a workshop held in conjunction with the 28th International Geological Congress that took place July 9-19, 1989 in Washington, D.C. Reports from 15 countries were presented at the workshop and four countries provided reports after the workshop, so that material from 19 different countries was included in the first review. It was apparent from the widespread interest in this first review that the problem of providing a permanent and reliable method of isolating radioactive waste from the biosphere is a topic of great concern among the more advanced, as well as the developing, nations of the world. This is especially the case in connection with high-level waste (HLW) after its removal from nuclear power plants. The general concensus is that an adequate isolation can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the underground system with its engineered barriers. This document contains the Second Worldwide Review of Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation, dated September 1996.

Witherspoon, P.A. [ed.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Research Opportunities. ... NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships Program; NIST NRC Program Description. ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

GSIS: A 3D geological multi-body modeling system from netty cross-sections with topology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

True 3D geological models are instrumental in addressing practical geology problems. A 3D geological modeling method is a vital module which converts raw data in lower dimensions into 3D bodies. To be geologically practical, the method must take cross-sections ... Keywords: 3D geological modeling, Data consistency, Fault modeling, Geomodeller

Jing Ming; Mao Pan; Honggang Qu; Zhihong Ge

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Case studies of current trends in development geology  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, development geologists have been responsible for studying leases, logs, and cores in detail in support of engineering functions. These responsibilities have grown from defining gross reservoir geometries to understanding subtle differences in reservoirs attributed to stratigraphic and structural complexities, depositional environments, and hydrodynamic processes. To handle these increased responsibilities, expertise has become essential in the areas of computer applications, log analysis, modeling, and management of produced water. Examples of the use and application of each area to projects from fields on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley demonstrate current techniques employed by development geologists and the evolution of a development department within Texaco. A study of a property in the South Belridge field on which 330 wells were drilled over a two-year period illustrates how computer resources have become vital in handling the vast amount of data needed to perform detailed geologic studies. Intricate geologic characterization has become essential to optimizing and defining reservoir performance in several fields: (1) Southeast Lost Hills, a complex diagenetic trap; (2) Buena Vista Hills, where log analysis is needed to make reserve estimates and step-out potential meaningful; (3) Midway-Sunset field, for which detailed geology leads to new field-wide models and future prospects. Increasing environmental concern over waste disposal has required an important involvement of development geologists in the geologic and hydrologic aspects of subsurface injection of produced water and other brines in the Santiago Creek field. Instead of providing a training ground for future explorationists, development geology should be viewed as an alternative career with potential for a much greater demand in the future.

Livingston, N.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect

Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Summaries of physical research in geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The summaries in this document describe the work performed during 1975 and include the scope of the work to be performed in 1976. The Division of Physical Research, through its Geosciences Program, supports research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, basic meteorology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, physical oceanography, seismology, and natural resource analysis including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary relationships, as well as their relationships, as well as their relationship to ERDA's technological needs.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities. Volume 5. Gas hydrates in the Russian literature. [271 references  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is Volume V of a series of reports entitled ''Geological Evolution and Analysis of Confirmed or Suspected Gas Hydrate Localities.'' Volume V is an analysis of ''Gas Hydrates in the Russian Literature.'' This report presents an assessment of gas hydrate research as documented in Russian literature. It presents material that includes regional and local settings, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides some necessary regional and geological background of major hydrate occurrences in Russia. This report provides a better understanding of the gas hydrate phenomena in Russia and gives a detailed account of gas production history from a gas hydrate field in Siberia. It provides an important assessment of the understanding of gas hydrate deposition and production. 271 refs., 51 figs., 19 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

Storage of CO2 in Geologic Formations in the Ohio River Valley...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OH 43201 614-424-3820 gupta@battelle.org Storage of Co 2 in geologiC formationS in the ohio river valley region Background The storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in a dense,...

407

Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources in Berkeley, June 12, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPAs mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}brine might occur.

Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Summaries of FY 1994 geosciences research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geosciences Research Program is directed by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Research (OER) through its Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES). Activities in the Geosciences Research Program are directed toward the long-term fundamental knowledge of the processes that transport, modify, concentrate, and emplace (1) the energy and mineral resources of the earth and (2) the energy byproducts of man. The Program is divided into five broad categories: Geophysics and earth dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy resource recognition, evaluation, and utilization; Hydrogeology and exogeochemistry; and Solar-terrestrial interactions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs in these main areas and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor, Presented at the Oil Reserves Conference, Paris,water, coal, oil & gas, mineral reserves or other geological

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Research - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our research is outlined our research proposals below. Samples of completed research may be found under "Sample Papers" and under "Project Highlights" on ...

412

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

413

Geological disposal analysis in salt leaching rock through modeling and simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The improvement in geology and the progress in computer technology have provided geo-science with entirely new possibilities in recent years. Embedding modeling and simulation allow easy handling of structural geological data which is of enormous value. ... Keywords: geological modeling, methodological approach, partitioning, salt leaching

Dietmar P. F. Mller; Rolf Bielecki

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Integration of regional to outcrop digital data: 3D visualisation of multi-scale geological models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale geological models contain three-dimensional, spatially referenced data, typically spanning at least six orders of magnitude from outcrop to regional scale. A large number of different geological and geophysical data sources can be combined ... Keywords: Digital geological mapping, Immersive visualisation, Terrestrial laser-scanning, User interaction, Virtual outcrop models

R. R. Jones; K. J. W. McCaffrey; P. Clegg; R. W. Wilson; N. S. Holliman; R. E. Holdsworth; J. Imber; S. Waggott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Professor in Geology and Geophysics Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

416

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

417

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope geochemistry is difficult because. Writing an effective book on geochemistry is thus even more difficult. Claude Allègre's Isotope Geology geochemistry book, given how effective the texts by Faure and Dickin are. However, Allègre's Isotope Geology

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

418

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology, 2013, Oxygen isotope composition of meltwater from a Neoproterozoic glaciation in South China. Geology1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

419

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2007- Associate professor in Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana Physical Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

420

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2008 in Hydraulic Conductivity to Represent Bedrock Structure #12;Cover. Photograph showing aerial view looking by David L. Nelms, U.S. Geological Survey. #12;Ground-Water Resources Program National Cooperative Geologic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geoscience Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's technological needs.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Luedtke: An Archaeologist's Guide to Chert and Flint: Archaeological Research Tools 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Chert and Flint- Archaeological Research Tools 7.book. The equal emphasis of flint and chert in the tide isAmerican geological usage, flint is sub- sumed under the

Elston, Robert G

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study of the Coso Formation Study of the Coso Formation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geologic Study of the Coso Formation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the

425

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

426

An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 1 An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration Gardiner Hill, BP Craig Lewis, Chevron 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 2 Disclaimer * The following may not be the only Industry Perspective on Storage & Sequestration * It represents the opinions of BP and Chevron and some other energy companies that we have talked to 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 3 Overview * Potential New Business Impact * Business Drivers for R&D * Technology Objectives * Definitions of Storage & Sequestration * Break-down of Geologic Storage R&D Categories * Where We Think Industry (and others) are already strong * Where We Think Additional R&D Gaps Still

427

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

428

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah expose a detachment fault that separates a hanging wall of Paleozoic rocks from Proterozoic and Archean rocks of the footwall. Beneath the detachment lies a 100 to 300m-thick top-to-the-east extensional shear zone. Geologic mapping, strain and kinematic analysis, and 40Ar/39 Ar thermochronology suggest that the shear zone and detachment fault had an initial low-angle regional

429

Performance Assessment Strategy Plan for the Geologic Repository Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations to assess compliance with the performance requirements in the regulations for a geologic repository and to support the development of the repository. The strategy for these evaluations has been documented in the Performance Assessment Strategy Plan (DOE, 1989). The implementation of the performance assessment strategy is defined in this document. This paper discusses the scope and objectives of the implementation plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans, summarizes the performance assessment areas and the integrated strategy of the performance assessment program. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

431

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geochemical and physical properties of soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of the unimpacted soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been completed. The maximum, minimum, median, standard deviation, and mean values for metals, radionuclides, inorganic anions, organic compounds, and agricultural indicator parameters are summarized for six soil series that were identified as representative of the 29 soil series at SRS. The soils from unimpacted areas of SRS are typical of soils found in moderately aggressive weathering environments, including the southeastern United States. Appendix 8 organic compounds were detected in all samples. Since these constituents are not generally present in soil, this portion of the investigation was intended to assess possible laboratory artifacts. An additional objective of the SRS Soil Study was to determine if the composition of the split spoon sampler biased chemical analysis of the soils. Twenty-five duplicate samples were analyzed for a number of metals, radiological and agricultural parameters, and organics by two laboratories currently contracted with to analyze samples during waste site characterization. In all cases, the absolute values of the average differences are relatively small compared to the overall variability in the population. 31 refs., 14 figs., 48 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Ramdeen, M.; Pickett, J. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Rogers, V. (Soil Conservation Service, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Site Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Scott, M.T.; Shirley, P.A. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (USA))

1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Changes in Bacterial And Archaeal Community Structure And Functional Diversity Along a Geochemically Variable Soil Profile  

SciTech Connect

Spatial heterogeneity in physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils allows for the proliferation of diverse microbial communities. Factors influencing the structuring of microbial communities, including availability of nutrients and water, pH, and soil texture, can vary considerably with soil depth and within soil aggregates. Here we investigated changes in the microbial and functional communities within soil aggregates obtained along a soil profile spanning the surface, vadose zone, and saturated soil environments. The composition and diversity of microbial communities and specific functional groups involved in key pathways in the geochemical cycling of nitrogen, Fe, and sulfur were characterized using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of both 16S rRNA (bacterial and archaeal) and functional genes (amoA and dsrAB) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Fe(III)-reducing organisms. Here we found that the microbial communities and putative ammonia-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing communities varied greatly along the soil profile, likely reflecting differences in carbon availability, water content, and pH. In particular, the Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences are largely unique to each horizon, sharing a distribution and diversity similar to those of the putative (amoA-based) ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. Anaerobic microenvironments within soil aggregates also appear to allow for both anaerobic- and aerobic-based metabolisms, further highlighting the complexity and spatial heterogeneity impacting microbial community structure and metabolic potential within soils.

Hansel, C.M.; Fendorf, S.; Jardine, P.M.; Francis, C.A.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO[subscript 2] sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration. A CO{sub 2} leak may cause mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO{sub 2} from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO{sub 2} is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO{sub 2} causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO{sub 2} was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal 'scavenging' due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO{sub 2} intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

Viswanathan, Hari; Dai, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Zheng, Liange; Gutherie, George D.; Pawar, Rajesh (EPA); (LBNL); (LANL); (NETL)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial or academic partner perform joint research with outcomes ... these collaborations arise spontaneously and the researchers jointly pursue ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Story Research at PNNL Home Featured Highlights Archive Research Directorates Energy & Environment Fundamental & Computational Sciences National Security Facilities...

437

Guest Researchers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... If confidentiality of cooperative research results are desired a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) may be appropriate. ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Transport and Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive review and analysis of United States (U.S.) regulations that will have a direct impact on permitting and commercial-scale deployment of carbon dioxide (CO2) transport and sequestration projects. The report focuses on specific regulations associated with CO2 transport and sequestration, including pipeline regulations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) proposed rules for characterizing, operating, monitoring, and closing CO2 geologic sequestration we...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

Transuranic Burning Issues Related to a Second Geologic Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines issues that need to be addressed by a development program recently initiated to establish the viability of a transuranic burning concept application that would achieve a substantial delay to the need date for a second geologic repository. The visualized transuranic burning concept application is one in which spent fuel created after a date in the 2010 time frame or later would be processed and the separated plutonium used to start up liquid metal reactors (LMRs).

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reservoir technology research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been conducting geothermal reservoir research and testing sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1983. The INEL research program is primarily aimed at the development of reservoir engineering techniques for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Numerical methods have been developed which allow the simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex fractured reservoirs. Sensitivity studies have illustrated the importance of incorporating the influence of fractures in reservoir simulations. Related efforts include fracture characterization, geochemical reaction kinetics and field testing.

Stiger, S.G.; Renner, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE SECOND PRODUCTION-TEST FLARING, PROJECT RULISON ( R u l i s o n - 1 0 ) a 1 9 7 1 P r e p a r e d U n d e r A g r e e m e n t No. A T ( 2 9 - 2 ) -474 '. f o r the N e v a d a Operations Office . . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . USGS -474 - 1 2 2 R u l i sdn- 10 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 8 0 2 2 5 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE S EC OND PRODUCTION- TES T FLARING,

443

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geologic setting and gas reserves of the Venezuelan LNG project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four gas fields, Mejillones, Patao, Dragon, and Rio Caribe, were discovered by Lagoven, a subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., during an exploratory campaign during 1978-1982, offshore northeastern Venezuela. Thirteen wells drilled in the four fields discovered 13.9 tcf of gas, including 1.2 tcf of gas and condensate in the Rio Caribe field. In February 1991, Lagoven entered into an agreement with Shell, Exxon, and Mitsubishi to assess the viability of producing and exporting gas from the four offshore gas fields in the form of liquified natural gas. This is the Venezuelan LNG Project, otherwise called the Cristobal Colon Project. As part of the agreement the participants established a Project Team in Caracas and undertook the acquisition of 1600 km[sup 2] of 3D seismic data over the four fields to evaluate the geological model of the area. In addition, interpretation of the 3D data has led to a preliminary geological model for the gas bearing sands which envisages deposition in a regional setting varying from bathyal turbidites in the Rio Caribe and Mejillones fields in the west to shelf deposits over the Patao and Dragon fields in the east. In addition to the geological setting this paper will discuss preliminary results of the reserves evaluation for the Rio Caribe, Patao, and Dragon fields.

Prieto, R.; Van der Molen, I.; Ramirez de Arellano, R. (Lagoven, Caracas (Venezuela))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Perspectives on the geological and hydrological aspects of long-term release scenario analyses  

SciTech Connect

Information that may be relevant to individuals involved with analyzing long-term release scenarios of specific repositories for nuclear waste is presented. The bulk of the information is derived from recent studies in West Germany and the United States. Emphasis is on the specific geological and hydrological phenomena that, alone or in concert, could potentially perturb the area around specific repository sites. Research is continuing on most of the topics discussed within this report. Because research is ongoing, statements and conclusions described in this document are subject to change. The main topics of this report are: (1) fracturing, (2) geohydrology, (3) magmatic activity, and (4) geomorphology. Therefore, the site-specific nature of the problem cannot be overemphasized. As an example of how one might combine the many synergistic and time-dependent parameters into a concise format the reader is referred to A Conceputal Simulation Model for Release Scenario Analysis of a Hypothetical Site in Columbia Plateau Basalts, PNL-2892. For additional details on the topics in this report, the reader is referred to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) consultant report listed in the bibliography.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

An Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2 Karsten Pruess (K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510/486-6732) Chin-Fu Tsang (CFTsang@lbl.gov; 510/486-5782) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. David H.-S. Law (Law@arc.ab.ca; 780/450-5034) Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Rd., Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1E4, Canada Curtis M. Oldenburg (CMOldenburg@lbl.gov; 510/486-7419) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Mathematical models and numerical simulation tools will play an important role in evaluating the feasibility of CO2 storage in subsurface reservoirs, such as brine aquifers,

448

Criticality safety considerations in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Features of geologic disposal which hamper the demonstration that criticality cannot occur therein include possible changes of shape and form, intrusion of water as a neutron moderator, and selective leaching of spent fuel constituents. If the criticality safety of spent fuel disposal depends on burnup, independent measurements verifying the burnup should be performed prior to disposal. The status of nondestructive analysis method which might provide such verification is discussed. Calculations were performed to assess the potential for increasing the allowed size of a spent fuel disposal canister if potential water intrusion were limited by close-packing the enclosed rods. Several factors were identified which severely limited the potential of this application. The theoretical limit of hexagonal close-packing cannot be achieved due to fuel rod bowing. It is concluded that disposal canisters should be sized on the basis of assumed optimum moderation. Several topics for additional research were identified during this limited study.

Gore, B.F.; McNair, G.W.; Heaberlin, S.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management study. The objective of this report is to give an out- line of this work and some results to date plots was established at the Station (Warrack 1949). More recently the Forest Service has worked or height to live crown. Each treatment plot is approxi- mately 0.5 ha and encloses a 0.13 ha measurement