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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

U.S. Geological Survey National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 (PROVISIONAL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Geological Survey National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 (PROVISIONAL (USGS) National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 are provisional and subject to revision Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 should be used with careful consideration of its limitations

Torgersen, Christian

2

A Geological and Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal Area, Hidalgo County, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geological...

3

September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

Suzuki, Masatsugu

4

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

6

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

9

SciTech Connect: Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal Research:...

10

Junior Research Fellowship in Geology (Test Codes: GEA and GEB)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Junior Research Fellowship in Geology (Test Codes: GEA and GEB) The candidates for Junior Research Fellowship in Geology will have to take two tests: Test GEA (forenoon session) and Test GEB and Geostatistics: Analysis of orientation and time-series data, Mohr's Circle of stress and strain, Geological

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

11

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

12

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

13

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

14

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

15

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bibliography of 479 references encompassing the fields of uranium and thorium geochemistry and mineralogy, geology of uranium deposits, uranium mining, and uranium exploration techniques has been compiled by the Ecological Sciences Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography was produced for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, which is funded by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. The references contained in the bibliography have been divided into the following eight subject categories: (1) geology of deposits, (2) geochemistry, (3) genesis O deposits, (4) exploration, (5) mineralogy, (6) uranium industry, (7) reserves and resources, and (8) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas. All categories specifically refer to uranium and thorium; the last category contains basic geologic information concerning areas which the Grand Junction Office feels are particularly favorable for uranium deposition. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

Garland, P.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Daniel, E.W. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

19

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

20

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

22

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

23

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

24

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

25

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

26

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

27

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

28

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 1524 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 15­24 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the Yellow Sea: Grain-size normalization and sediment provenance D.I. Lima,�, H.S. Jungb , J.Y. Choic , S 14 November 2005 Abstract The geochemistry of sediment samples from Korean and Chinese rivers

Yang, Shouye

30

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

31

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

32

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

33

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology,Tsitika Watershed.Research Section,CoastForest Region,BCMOF, Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-021. EN-021 Hydrology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-021 March 2006 Forest Research

34

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Hudson and Axel Anderson KEYWORDS: Water management, Coastal watersheds, hydrological modeling CITATIONPractice. ResearchSection,Coast ForestRegion, BCMOF,Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-022. EN-022 Hydrology March 2006

35

Pre-test geological and geochemical evaluation of the Caprock, St. Peter Sandstone and formation fluids, Yakley Field, Pike County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of these studies is to ensure long-term stable containment of air in the underground reservoirs used in conjunction with compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants. The specific objective is to develop stability criteria and engineering guidelines for designing CAES reservoirs in each of the three major reservoir types, including aquifers, salt cavities, and mined hard rock caverns. This document characterizes the geologic nature of porous media constituents native to the aquifer field test site near Pittsfield, Illinois. The geologic samples were subjected to geochemical evaluations to determine anticipated responses to cyclic air injection, heating and moisture - conditions typical of an operating CAES reservoir. This report documents the procedures used and results obtained from these analyses.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

C.3 SOLAR SYSTEM WORKINGS The Solar System Workings program element supports research into atmospheric, climatological,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into atmospheric, climatological, dynamical, geologic, geophysical, and geochemical processes occurring proposals for innovative scientific research related to understanding the atmospheric, climatological

Rathbun, Julie A.

38

Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

39

The Geological Research in France - The Dossier 2005 Argile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of fifteen years of research defined by the French act of December 30, 1991 on radwaste management, ANDRA gave a report, 'Dossier Argile 2005', which concluded with the feasibility of a reversible disposal in the argillaceous Callovo-Oxfordian formation studied by means of an underground research laboratory at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site. Starting from source data like the characteristics of the geological medium and the waste inventory, the process followed by ANDRA to achieve this conclusion is of a sequential type, and iterative between concept design, scientific knowledge, in particular that of the phenomenological evolution of the repository and its geological environment from operating period to long term, and safety assessment. The 'Dossier Argile 2005' covers a broad radwaste inventory, ILLW, HLW and Spent Fuel, so that it makes it possible to cover the whole of the technological, scientific and safety topics. This article will give an overview of the geological disposal studies in France and draw the main conclusion of the Dossier 2005 Argile. It will be focused on the near field (engineering components and near field host rock), while considering, if necessary, its integration within the whole system. After a short description of the concepts (including waste inventory and the characteristics of the Meuse/Haute the Marne site) and the functions of the components of repository and geological medium, one will describe, successively, the broad outline of the phenomenological evolution of repository and the geological medium in near field, in particular, by releasing the time scales of processes and uncertainties of knowledge. On this basis, one will indicate the safety scenarios that were considered and the broad outline of performance and dose calculations. Lessons learn from the Dossier 2005 Argile will be discussed and perspectives and priorities for future will be indicated. (authors)

Plas, Frederic; Wendling, Jacques [DS/IT, Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, Chatenay-Malabry, 92298 (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Paris Basin, seal integrity Predicting long-term geochemical alteration of wellbore cement in a generic geological CO21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is particularly high, such as it often occurs in depleted gas and/or oil fields. The12 of an idealized abandoned wellbore at the top of the Dogger aquifer in Paris18 Basin, France, where CO2 geological from reservoir: (i) a first,24 "clogging" stage, characterized by a decrease in porosity due to calcite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

42

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

43

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for naturalGeneralEnergy Geologic

45

Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

46

Geothermal Research Program of the US Geological Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beginning of the Geothermal Research Program, its organization, objectives, fiscal history, accomplishments, and present emphasis. The projects of the Geothermal Research Program are presented along with a list of references.

Duffield, W.A.; Guffanti, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geologic Maps Geology 200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geologic Maps Geology 200 Geology for Environmental Scientists #12;Geologic Map of the US #12;Symbols found on geologic maps #12;Horizontal Strata #12;Geologic map of part of the Grand Canyon. Each color represents a different formation. #12;Inclined Strata #12;Dome #12;Geologic map of the Black Hills

Kammer, Thomas

48

RESEARCH SUMMARY BY QUANLIN ZHOU During my stay at LBNL from March 2001, I have been working on (1) geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on (1) geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) projects for mitigating global climate change, (2) the DOE projects. 1 Research Highlights 1.1. Geological Carbon Sequestration I have been working on eight research projects in the area of geologic carbon sequestration since 2006. I have been PI or Co-PI for six projects

Zhou, Quanlin

49

JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, VOL. 74, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER, 2004, P. 730735 Copyright 2004, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1527-1404/04/074-730/$03.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1527-1404/04/074-730/$03.00 RESEARCH METHODS PAPERS QUANTIFICATION, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, U.K. 2 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute

Haszeldine, Stuart

50

HBH-GEOCHEM-GEOPHY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003015WKSTN00 Hiereachical Bayesian Model for Combining Geochemical and Geophysical Data for Environmental Applications Software   

51

OCE 290A (Topics in Chemical Oceanography) Application of Isotopes in Geological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and biological reaction rates Tracking and tracing pollution sources (hydrosphere, soils, atmosphere) Ground system Radioactive geochronology Reaction and formation temperatures of rocks and minerals Geochemical and soil) Atmospheric chemistry and dynamics Weathering rates and geomorphology Circulation and mixing

Paytan, Adina

52

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospects In Northern Nevada Abstract Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction...

53

Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called “frontier basins ” are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision – 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

54

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...

55

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2).

56

Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

57

US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and reaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be important hosts of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) in UMT. Extrapolating from studies of barite dissolution in anerobic lake sediments, the leaching of {sup 226}Ra from UMT by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated; a marked increase in {sup 226}Ra release to aqueous solution as compared to sterile controls was demonstrated. A similar action of iron(III)-reducing bacteria was later shown. Ion exchangers such as clay minerals can also promote the dissolution of host-phase minerals and thereby influence the fate of radionuclides such as {sup 226}Ra. Radon release studies examined particle size and ore composition as variables. Aggregation of UMT particles was shown to mask the higher emanating fraction of finer particles. Studies of various ores and ore components showed that UMT cannot be assumed to have the same radon-release characteristics as their precursor ores, nor can {sup 226}Ra retained by various substrates be assumed to emanate the same fraction of radon. Over the last decade, USGS research directed at offsite mobility of radionuclides form uranium mining and milling processes has focused on six areas: the Midnite Mine in Washington; Ralston Creek and Reservoir, Colorado; sites near Canon City, Colorado; the Monument Valley District of Arizona and Utah; the Cameron District of Arizona; and the Puerco River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. 48 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Landa, E.R.; Gray, J.R. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering Geosciences Careers in the ik ou ve n ver see t b f rel e y ' e n i e o ! Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Queen's University See the World Geological Sciences Arts and Science Faculty

Ellis, Randy

59

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Sediments from an UMTRA Site. American Society forREDUCTION AT THE OLD RIFLE UMTRA SITE. Geological Society of

Long, P.E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform From the Strategic Research Agenda to its Deployment - 12015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several European waste management organizations (WMOs) have initiated a technology platform for accelerating the implementation of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Europe. The most advanced waste management programmes in Europe (i.e. Finland, Sweden, and France) have already started or are prepared to start the licensing process of deep geological disposal facilities within the next decade. A technology platform called Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) was launched in November 2009. A shared vision report for the platform was published stating that: 'Our vision is that by 2025, the first geological disposal facilities for spent fuel, high-level waste, and other long-lived radioactive waste will be operating safely in Europe'. In 2011, the IGD-TP had eleven WMO members and about 70 participants from academia, research, and the industry committed to its vision. The IGD-TP has started to become a tool for reducing overlapping work, to produce savings in total costs of research and implementation and to make better use of existing competence and research infrastructures. The main contributor to this is the deployment of the IGD-TP's newly published Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The work undertaken for the SRA defined the pending research, development and demonstration (RD and D) issues and needs. The SRA document describing the identified issues that could be worked on collaboratively was published in July 2011. It is available on the project's public web site (www.igdtp.eu). The SRA was organized around 7 Key Topics covering the Safety Case, Waste forms and their behaviour, Technical feasibility and long-term performance of repository components, Development strategy of the repository, Safety of construction and operations, Monitoring, and Governance and stakeholder involvement. Individual Topics were prioritized within the Key Topics. Cross-cutting activities like Education and Training or Knowledge Management as well as activities remaining specific for the WMOs were as well identified in the document. For example, each WMO has to develop their own waste acceptance rules, and plan for the economics and the funding of their waste management programmes. The challenge at hand for the IGD-TP is to deploy the SRA. This is carried out by agreeing on a Deployment Plan (DP) that guides organizing the concrete joint activities between the WMOs and the other participants of the IGD-TP. The first DP points out the coordinated RD and D projects and other activities that need to be launched to produce these results over the next four to five years (by the end of 2016). The DP also describes general principles for how the joint work can be organised and funded. (authors)

Ouzounian, P. [ANDRA, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Palmu, Marjatta [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland); Eng, Torsten [SKB, Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ORIGINAL PAPER Geochemical Evolution of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discipline, US Geological Survey, 2329 Orton Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84119, USA R. J. Spencer GeoscienceORIGINAL PAPER Geochemical Evolution of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA Blair F. Jones Ã? David L. Naftz Ã? Ronald J. Spencer Ã? Charles G. Oviatt Received: 13 June 2008 / Accepted: 10 November 2008

62

Generated on 04/07/13 by the Office of Institutional Research and Planning. Doctoral Program Profile: Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Profile: Geology This program is part of the Department of Geology in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. Additional information available at http://www.geo.ku.edu/~geology/prospectiveGrads/prospectiveGrads.shtml Department Faculty: Geology Fall 2012 Total Faculty 22 Tenured and Tenure Track Faculty 21 Tenured Faculty 16

63

Upscaling geochemical reaction rates using pore-scale network modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To examine the scaling behavior of reaction kinetics, these continuum-scale rates from the network model as a valuable research tool for examining upscaling of geochemical kinetics. The pore-scale model allowsUpscaling geochemical reaction rates using pore-scale network modeling Li Li, Catherine A. Peters

Peters, Catherine A.

64

Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

65

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Online Exam 2 Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boundary types (transform, divergent, convergent); microplates Orogenesis Cycles of mountain building, ophiolites Examples in the modern world Wilson (Supercontinent) Cycles Geochemical Cycles Energy sources for geology: solar, gravity, internal heat Reservoirs (sources and sinks) and fluxes; residence time Positive

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

66

Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

none,

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical...

69

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2006 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main accomplishments were analysis of Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' reservoir test results from the AEP No.1 well and design and feasibility support tasks. Reservoir test results indicate injection potential in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' may be significantly higher than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. In addition, organizational and scheduling issues were addressed to move the project toward an integrated carbon capture and storage system at the Mountaineer site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the October through December 2005 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main field activity was reservoir testing in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' in the AEP No.1 well. In addition reservoir simulations were completed to assess feasibility of CO{sub 2} injection for the Mountaineer site. These reservoir testing and computer simulation results suggest that injection potential may be substantially more than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work also continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

YOUNG GEOLOGY UNIVERSITY May, 1962 GEOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN WASATCH MOUNTAINS AND VICIN~IM,UTAH C O ....................J. Keith Rigby 80 Economic Geology of North-Central Utah ...,............... Kcnneth C.Bdodc 85 Rod Log ........................Lehi F. Hintze, J. Ka# Ri&, & ClydeT. Hardy 95 Geologic Map of Southern

Seamons, Kent E.

72

Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research Thrust Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium:andNationalCNMS HoursCenter forNCGC

74

Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research Thrust Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium:andNationalCNMS HoursCenter forNCGC- Controlling

75

Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research Thrust Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium:andNationalCNMS HoursCenter forNCGC-

76

Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research Thrust Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium:andNationalCNMS HoursCenter forNCGC-- Nanopore

77

INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Geology Publications 1 Fieldiana: Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Ten Numbers) 73 No. 1. North American Plesiosaurs. By S. W. Williston. 1903. 78 pages, 34 illus. 77 No. Williston. 1903. 38 pages, 7 illus. 1 #12;Geology Publications 2 Fieldiana: Geology Pub. No. 82 No. 4

Westneat, Mark W.

79

Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

GEOLOGY, March 2010 287 An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Recognition of a consistent pattern of pre- cursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical (Frank et al., 1977); Akutan and Iliamna, Alaska, in 1996 (Lu et al., 2000; Roman et al., 2004); Iwate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html Revised: 03/2013 Geology is a scientific discipline that aims to understand every aspect of modern and ancient Earth. A degree in geology the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees. A master

Jiang, Huiqiang

82

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Brady et al. Geological Materials Research v.1, n.2, p.1 Copyright 1998 by the Mineralogical Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and several major talc mines were in operation in the 1990's. Olson (1976) and Berg (1979) described , Chris Green2 , Mathieu Duvall3 , Ari Kogut4 Lewis Kaufman5 , Dana Kovaric1 Departments of Geology: 1 of America Introduction Talc has been mined in southwest Montana for over fifty years (Olson, 1976

Brady, John B.

84

Geochemical assessment of nuclear waste isolation. Report of activities during fiscal year 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the following investigations is reported: canister/overpack-backfill chemical interactions and mechanisms; backfill and near-field host rock chemical interactions mechanisms; far-field host rock geochemical interactions; verification and improvement of predictive algorithms for radionuclide migration; and geologic systems as analogues for long-term radioactive waste isolation.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological and geochemical variations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is roughly half a meter per year. Furthermore, in the south part, around two sites of gas storage and geochemical variations in Eocene sand aquifer, south western France E. MALCUIT 1 , Ph. NEGREL 2 , E. PETELET-GIRAUD 3 , P. DURST 1 1 BRGM, Regional Geological Survey Service Bordeaux, France, 2 BRGM, Metrology

Boyer, Edmond

86

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources Canada Geological Survey of Canada with Provincial and Territorial Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit

87

Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed.

Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

1980-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has promoted the systematic philosophical and fundamental study of geology since 1893. The Journal publishes original research across a broad range of subfields in geology, including geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology

Mateo, Jill M.

89

R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro-leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kingdom) and a geological con- sultant for various oil companies. His research focused primarilyAUTHORS R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro- leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Texas 77060; rene.jonk@exxonmobil.com Rene Jonk received his M.Sc. degree in structural geology from

Mazzini, Adriano

90

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Geological flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

Yu. N. Bratkov

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

A publication of the Department of Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigharn Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblin Cynthia M. Gardner Brigham Young University Geology Studies is published semiannually by the department. Geology Studies consists of graduate-student and staff research

Seamons, Kent E.

93

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

Watson, Andrew

94

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geochemical aspects of Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the Northern Michigan Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten projects had been installed by the end of 1982 so that significant operational results are available for evaluation. The design and operating programs initially planned for the projects have been proven successful. Operating data from some of the more mature projects indicate that the understanding and proper management of the geochemical systems for these projects will be crucial to the success of the project. The intent of this paper is to present what is currently known and understood about the geochemistry of Michigan waterfloods. The geochemical system is here defined as all the various interconnected fluid environments constituting the project, namely the fresh water source system, the injection well system, the reservoir, the production wells, the production facilities, and the produced water disposal or reinjection facilities. Problem areas have been identified and corrective action has been taken or planned to counteract the detrimental effects of disruptions to the geochemical system. These upsets are brought about by injection of water into the reservoir where an equilibrium condition had existed between the formation fluids and the rock.

Tinker, G.E.; Barnes, P.F.; Olson, E.E.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R.E.; McIver, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Handbook for Geology Students Why study Geology?.............................................................................................3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Handbook for Geology Students #12;2 Contents Why study Geology ..................................................................................7 Why Appalachian Geology?................................................................................10 Geology Faculty and Staff

Thaxton, Christopher S.

98

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeoGeochemical

99

Steven Constable studied geology at the University of Western Australia, graduating with first class Honors in 1979 and the Rex T. Prider Medal, awarded to the geology graduate showing the greatest aptitude for research. In 1983  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steven Constable studied geology at the University of Western Australia, graduating with first is currently Professor of Geophysics. Constable is interested in all aspects of electrical conductivity exploration" and the 2007 SEG Distinguished Achievement Award to Scripps. During his career Constable has

Constable, Steve

100

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2013 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

Rhoads, James

102

Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2012 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

Rhoads, James

103

Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Fall 2014 Application ASU No #12;Page 2 of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

Rhoads, James

104

Graduate Studies in Volcanology, Igneous Petrology & Economic Geology For more information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Studies in Volcanology, Igneous Petrology & Economic Geology VIPER For more information Volcanology, Igneous Petrology and Economic geology Research group Interested in Volcanoes? Magmas? Ore) John Dilles (ore deposits, igneous petrology) Randy Keller (igneous petrology, marine geology) Roger

Kurapov, Alexander

105

GARY KOCUREK Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School, University of Texas, 1 University Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D., Geology, University of Wisconsin, 1980 RESEARCH AREAS: Sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, aeolian ­ Sedimentary Geology, Sedimentology, Summer Field Camp, Field Methods, Geology of the National Parks, Earth Committee, First International Conference on Mars Sedimentology & Stratigraphy, 2009 - 2010, El Paso Field

Yang, Zong-Liang

106

Geochemical aspects of Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the N. Michigan Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten projects had been installed by the end of 1982 so that significant operational results are available for evaluation. This study presents what is currently known and understood about the geochemistry of Michigan waterfloods. Project monitoring procedures, established to control and optimize waterflood operations, have made it possible to develop the proper approach to the geochemical disruptions. The more important items in this program are the measurement of produced and injected volumes, transient pressure analyses, injection well profile surveys, chemical analysis of the injection and production fluid samples, radioactive injection tracers, and continuous bottom-hole pressures from submersible pumps. 15 references.

Tinker, G.E.; Barnes, P.F.; Olson, E.E.; Wright, M.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

177Geology GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE A major in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology 160, 185, 211, 311, 330, 350

Dresden, Gregory

108

Regional Geologic Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Regional Geologic Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

110

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

Denham, M.E.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

ELSEVIER Sedimentary Geology 124 (1999) 131147 UPb ages and geochemistry of granite pebbles from the Devonian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELSEVIER Sedimentary Geology 124 (1999) 131­147 U­Pb ages and geochemistry of granite pebbles from 1998 Abstract The geochemical composition of some garnet-bearing biotite granite pebbles within from two samples. The granites have suffered low-grade metamorphism as shown by the development

Dörr, Wolfgang

113

Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage Using'expériences -- Dans le contexte de l'étude du stockage géologique du dioxyde de carbone dans les réservoirs al. (2007) Energy Convers. Manage. 48, 1782-1797; Gunter et al. (1999) Appl. Geochem. 4, 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneof CO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN, SOUTHERN UASCSTCH H Q - W T A X H E i i - UT&H #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Department of Gedogy Provo, Utah #12;GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN PART OF DRY MOUNTAIN, SOUTHERN WASATCH M O U N

Seamons, Kent E.

116

GEOCHEMICAL APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF LIFE AND DEATH OF DINOSAURS FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS CEDAR MOUNTAIN FORMATION, UTAH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

___________________________ G.L. Macpherson ___________________________ Larry D. Martin Date defended:_______________ iii ABSTRACT Celina A. Suarez, Ph.D. Department of Geology, April 2010 University of Kansas In this dissertation, geochemical analysis..., it can be determined that the proximity of the Western Interior Seaway and the rise of the Sevier Mountains were the cause of isotopic variability and dominant control on regional climate during the Cedar Mountain Formation time. iv...

Suarez, Celina Angelica

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Summary outline of DOE geoscience and geoscience - related research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) supports long-range, basic research in those areas of the geosciences which are relevant to the nation's energy needs. The objective of the Geoscience program is to develop a quantitative and predictive understanding of geological, geophysical and geochemical structures and processes in the solid earth and in solar-terrestrial relationships. This understanding is to assure an effective knowledge base for energy resource recognition, evaluation and utilization in an environmentally acceptable manner. The work is carried out primarily in DOE laboratories and in universities, although some is conducted by other federal agencies and by the National Academy of Sciences. Principal areas of interest include: Geology, Geophysics, and Earth Dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy Resource Recognition, Evaluation and Utilization; Hydrologic and Marine Sciences; and Solar-Terrestrial/Atmospheric Interactions.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at tempera¬tures in the range of 50ºC to 100ºC or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part

Harbor, David

120

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 33, Part 1 CONTENTS Tertiary Geologic History Geology of the Deadman Canyon 7112-Minute Quadrangle, Carbon County, Utah, Utah. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .James Douglas Smith 135 Geology

Seamons, Kent E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geologic Map of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area - GIS Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neal Hot Springs—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Three cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and exploration wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples. - Location of XRF geochemical samples. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

Faulds, James E.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geochemical composition and provenance discrimination of coastal sediments around Cheju Island in the southeastern Yellow Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the southeastern Yellow Sea S.Y. Yanga,b,*, D.I. Lima , H.S. Junga , B.C. Ohc a Marine Environment and Climate Change Laboratory, Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan P.O. Box 29, Seoul 425) compositions and geochemical discrimination diagrams were revealed to be useful indices for identifying

Yang, Shouye

123

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date associated with uranium mining sites throughout the United States are also included in this report. A tableNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In

124

Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces Krista Pursuing a degree within the Geology & Geological Engineering department Record of financial need the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in geological engineering in 1982. After earning

Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

125

Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section Read Ch. 7 before you begin. The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic

Harbor, David

126

Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html Revised: 04/2004 Environmental geology in environmental geology provides the diverse skills required to work in many different employment settings issues. Within the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees

Jiang, Huiqiang

127

EMSL - subsurface geological field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subsurface-geological-field en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-s...

128

subsurface geological field | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

field subsurface geological field Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

129

Geochemical engineering and materials program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) was designated as lead agency in discharging the overall legislative mandate for federal R&D to assist the private sector in developing appropriate technology for exploiting geothermal energy resources. The Geochemical Engineering and Materials (GEM) Program was conceived, as part of DOE'S overall strategy, to address specific and plant-wide problems and uncertainties in the use of materials and in geochemical engineering. This program assists industry in the conduct of long-term,high-risk R&D needed to overcome the significant technical and economic GEM-related obstacles faced by developers and potential developers of this alternative energy source. The program focuses on: (1) Increasing the knowledge about the properties of materials and their performance under geothermal energy system conditions; (2) Developing and utilizing more reliable and/or cost-effective materials than previously available; and (3) Developing a greater understanding of and control over geochemical processes during fluid production and transport, energy conversion, and waste management. As a stand-alone program and as support to other DOE geothermal technology development programs, the GEM Program contributes to the feasibility of designing and operating efficient, reliable, and safe fluid handling and energy conversion systems.

None

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, VOL. 70, NO. 1, JANUARY, 2000, P. 227239 Copyright 2000, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1073-130X/00/070-227/$03.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1073-130X/00/070-227/$03.00 ANKERITE CEMENTATION IN DEEPLY BURIED.K. e-mail: j.hendry@qub.ac.uk 2 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, Grant

Haszeldine, Stuart

131

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

132

Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle Research Program: availability of geotoxic material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents an analog approach to the characterization of the environmental behavior of geotoxic waste materials (toxic material emplaced in the earth's crust) as drawn from literature on the Oklo natural fission reactors and uranium ore deposits relative to radioactive wastes, and hydrothermal metal ore deposits relative to stable toxic wastes. The natural analog data were examined in terms of mobility and immobility of selected radioactive or stable waste elements and are presented in matrix relationship with their prime geochemical variables. A numerical system of ranking those relationships for purposes of hazard-indexing is proposed. Geochemical parameters (especially oxidation/reduction potential) are apparently more potent mobilizers/immobilizers than geological or hydrological conditions in many, if not most, geologic environments for most radioactive waste elements. Heavy metal wastes, by analogy to hydrothermal ore systems and geothermal systems, are less clear in their behavior but similar geochemical patterns do apply. Depth relationships between geochemical variables and waste element behavior show some surprises. It is significantly indicated that for waste isolation, deeper is not necessarily better geochemically. Relatively shallow isolation in host rocks such as shale could offer maximum immobility. This paper provides a geochemical outline for examining analog models as well as a departure point for improved quantification of geological and geochemical indexing of toxic waste hazards.

Wachter, B.G.; Kresan, P.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tim Naish, Senior Scientist at the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (GNS) has started a part time position as Deputy Director of the Antarctic Research Centre. Tim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drilling) Project, leading a combined Foundation for Research Science and Technology grant to ARC, GNS partnerships with organisations such as Webster Drilling and Antarctica New Zealand, which are so crucial to work at GNS, leading research projects in New Zealand Quaternary climate history. Tim gained his Ph

134

REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ASTER that operate in visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum and Reflection Radiometer) Imagery Collection in CPRM Examples of sensors used in the CPRM geologic projects #12

135

MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for geologic carbon sequestration in the Midcontinent Rift System in Minnesota, Minnesota Geological Survey IN THE MIDCONTINENT RIFT SYSTEM OF MINNESOTA : ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL FOR DEEP GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION OF CARBONMINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director POTENTIAL CAPACITY FOR GEOLOGIC CARBON

136

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting...

137

Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation. Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone...

138

Geochemical Controls on Contaminant Uranium in Vadose Hanford...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Controls on Contaminant Uranium in Vadose Hanford Formation Sediments at the 200 Area and 300 Area, Hanford Site, Geochemical Controls on Contaminant Uranium in Vadose Hanford...

139

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce...

140

DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

Ashby, Matthew (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascade SierraStatusGeothermalpower.jpgGasGeochemical

142

Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral/Water Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral in the Earth's Critical Zone is the kinetics. The timescales for geochemical processes range from milliseconds geochemical processes including surface complexation, mineral transformations, and oxidation

Sparks, Donald L.

143

Interpretation of Geological Correlation Borings 1, 2, 3 in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geophysical Correlation Boring (GCB) Program was organized to provide a comprehensive correlation capability between geological core and advanced borehole geophysical data, surface high resolution reflection seismic information and, when available, borehole geochemical and cone penetrometer data. This report provides results and initial geological interpretations of borings one, two, and three (GCB-1, GCB-2, GCB-3) located within the Upper Three Runs Watershed (A/M Area) of the Savannah River Site.

Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cumbest, R.J.; Aadland, R.K.; Syms, F.H.; Stephenson, D.E.; Sherrill, J.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geology, compositional heterogeneities, and geochemical origin of the Yacheng gas field, Qiongdongnan Basin, South China Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yacheng gas field is located in the footwall of the No. 1 fault, the boundary fault between the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan basins. All strata are normally pressured in the gas field except for the Meishan Formation. The Meishan Formation is overpressured near the No. 1 fault in the gas field and in the adjacent Yinggehai Basin. An obvious thermal anomaly occurs below 3600 m in the gas field. This anomaly, characterized by an abrupt increase in drill-stem test and fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures, vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}), and Rock-Eval T{sub max}, and by an abnormally low temperature/R{sub o}/T{sub max} gradient, diminishes away from the Yinggehai Basin. The gases and condensates have abnormally high aromatic hydrocarbon contents and show obvious heterogeneities. Away from the No. 1 fault, the C{sub 2+} hydrocarbon content and C{sub 2+}/{Sigma}C{sub n} increase; carbon dioxide content decreases; {delta}{sup 13}C values for methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide become lighter; the heptane and isoheptane values decrease; and the relative contents of aromatic hydrocarbons, both in C{sub 6}/C{sub 7} light hydrocarbons and in the condensates, decrease. The gas field was charged from both the Qiongdongnan and the Yinggehai basins. Hydrocarbons sourced from the Qiongdongnan Basin have relatively low maturities, whereas hydrocarbons from the Yinggehai Basin have relatively higher maturities and seem to have been in association with hydrothermal fluids. The hydrothermal fluids from the Yinggehai Basin, in which methane, ethane, carbon dioxide, and especially aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved under the high-temperature and high-pressure subsurface conditions, migrated along the No. 1 fault and caused the abnormally high concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as the thermal anomalies in the gas field, especially near the No. 1 fault.

Hao, F.; Li, S.; Sun, Y. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Dept. of Petroleum Geology; Zhang, Q. [Nanhai West Oil Corp., Guangdong (China). Inst. of Petroleum Exploration and Development

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Petroleum potential of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois: A coordinated geological and geochemical study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois, predominantly composed of shale, calcareous shale, and carbonates, has long been considered a potential source for Illinois basin hydrocarbons. Methods used to better define the petroleum potential of the Maquoketa in the Illinois basin were lithostratigraphic study, Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) analyses, comparison of molecular markers from whole-rock extracts and produced oil, and construction of burial history models. Organic-rich submature Maquoketa potential source rocks are present in western Illinois at shallow depths on the basin flank. Deeper in the basin in southern Illinois, Rock-Eval analyses indicate that the Maquoketa shale is within the oil window. Solvent extracts of the Maquoketa from western Illinois closely resemble the Devonian New Albany Shale, suggesting that past studies may have erroneously attributed Maquoketa-generated petroleum to a New Albany source or failed to identify mixed source oils. Subtle differences between Maquoketa and New Albany solvent extracts include differences in pristane/phytane ratios, proportions of steroids, and distribution of dimethyldibenzothiophene isomers. Maquoketa solvent extracts show little resemblance to Middle Ordovician oils from the Illinois or Michigan basins. Lithostratigraphic studies identified localized thick carbonate facies in the Maquoketa, suggesting depositional response to upper Ordovician paleostructures. Sandstone facies in the Maquoketa in southwestern Illinois offer a potential source/trap play, as well as serving as potential carrier beds for hydrocarbon migration. Maquoketa source and carrier beds may feed older Ordovician rocks in faulted areas along and south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Kruge, M.A. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The geological and geochemical study of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azerbaijan is a classic region for the study of mud volcanism. Of the 700 mud volcanoes known in the world, 220 are in Azerbaijan. These are of great interest, not least in relation to oil and gas exploration since they give information on subsurface sediments beyond the reach of drilling. Mud volcanoes are clearly visible on satellite images. They are confined to structural lineaments and associated fractures. Changes in the morphology of some mud volcanoes post-eruption can be detected from a series of images pre-dating and post-dating eruptions. Mud volcanoes are notable for gradients of temperature that are by an order of magnitude or a factor of 102 greater than the temperature gradients established elsewhere. The gases of mud volcanoes consist mainly of methane (95-100%). There are small amounts of C{sub 2-6}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, He and Ar. The isotopic composition of carbon (ICC) within the methane varies from -61.29. to -35.W{close_quotes} which is isotopically heavier than the methane from producing fields. The ICC of the CO{sub 2} has a very wide range (from -49.6% to +23.1%), indicating several sources of its formation. The isotopically superheavy CO{sub 2} (+5%) is especially interesting. Oils from mud volcanoes are typically severely biodegraded. Their ICC ranges from -24.76% to -28.2%. A relationship between {partial_derivative}{sup l3}C of oils and ages of accumulations has been established. Waters of mud volcanoes are lightly mineralised, containing chiefly bicarbonates and sodium. The hydrogen composition of the water is abnormally heavy. Ejected rocks from mud volcanoes range in age from Cretaceous - Pliocene. Their study suggests that deeply buried reservoirs maintain good poroperm characteristics because of relatively little catagenesis.

Guliyev, I.A.; Aliyev, A.A.; Rahmanov, R.R. [Geological Institute of the Azerbaijan academy of sciences (GIA), Baku (Azerbaijan)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Geological and Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China) |System,

148

A variety of opportunities exist for geology graduates in the private and public sectors and in education. Petroleum companies, petroleum service companies, mining companies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY A variety of opportunities exist for geology graduates in the private and public sectors, and research. Federal government resource agencies use geologists for geologic mapping, oil and rehabilitation programs, and research. State and local governments hire geologists for geologic and soils mapping

149

Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Chapter 14 Geology and Soils  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

activity, could affect the project. Related information can be found in Chapter 15, Water and Appendix J, Geologic Hazard Assessment. 14.1 Affected Environment 14.1.1 Geology...

152

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION A number of geodetic and morphotectonic techniques. 2). Geology, November 2008; v. 36; no. 11; p. 871­874; doi: 10.1130/G25073A.1; 3 figures; Data

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

153

GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION Deformations around transpressive plate boundaries numerical models constrained by global positioning system (GPS) observations and Geology, September 2010; v. 38; no. 9; p. 823­826; doi: 10.1130/G30963.1; 3 figures; 1 table. © 2010 Geological Society

Demouchy, Sylvie

154

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

155

The Lapworth Museum of Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lapworth Museum of Geology www.lapworth.bham.ac.uk www.bham.ac.uk Events The Lapworth Lectures take place on evenings during University term time. These lectures are on a wide range of geological geological topics, usually based around collections in the museum. These provide an opportunity to see

Birmingham, University of

156

Geologic characterization of tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of US Geological Survey (USGS) work during FY 89 were to conduct geologic research characterizing tight gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs and their resources in the western United States. Our research has been regional in scope but, in some basins, our investigations have focused on single wells or small areas containing several wells where a large amount of data is available. The investigations, include structure, stratigraphy, petrography, x-ray mineralogy, source-rock evaluation, formation pressure and temperature, borehole geophysics, thermal maturity mapping, fission-track age dating, fluid-inclusion thermometry, and isotopic geochemistry. The objectives of these investigations are to provide geologic models that can be compared and utilized in tight gas-bearing sequences elsewhere. Nearly all of our work during FY 89 was devoted to developing a computer-based system for the Uinta basin and collecting, analyzing, and storage of data. The data base, when completed will contain various types of stratigraphic, organic chemistry, petrographic, production, engineering, and other information that relate to the petroleum geology of the Uinta basin, and in particular, to the tight gas-bearing strata. 16 refs., 3 figs.

Law, B.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project provided hands-on training and networking opportunities to undergraduate students in the area of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and transport, through fundamental research study focused on advanced separation methods that can be applied to the capture of CO2 resulting from the combustion of fossil-fuels for power generation . The project team’s approach to achieve its objectives was to leverage existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) course materials and teaching methods to create and implement an annual CCS short course for the Tuskegee University community; conduct a survey of CO2 separation and capture methods; utilize data to verify and develop computer models for CO2 capture and build CCS networks and hands-on training experiences. The objectives accomplished as a result of this project were: (1) A comprehensive survey of CO2 capture methods was conducted and mathematical models were developed to compare the potential economics of the different methods based on the total cost per year per unit of CO2 avoidance; and (2) Training was provided to introduce the latest CO2 capture technologies and deployment issues to the university community.

Vahdat, Nader

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to quantitatively determine the major elemental abundance of the remaining samples. PLS analysis suggests that the major element compositions can be determined with root mean square errors ca. 5% (absolute) for SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(total), MgO, and CaO, and ca. 2% or less for TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO, K{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}O. Finally, the Raman experiments have been conducted under supercritical CO{sub 2} involving single-mineral and mixed-mineral samples containing talc, olivine, pyroxenes, feldspars, anhydrite, barite, and siderite. The Raman data have shown that the individual minerals can easily be identified individually or in mixtures.

Clegg, Sanuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphries, Seth D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaniman, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, S. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Misra, A. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Dyar, M. D. [MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Smrekar, S. E. [JET PROPULSION LAB.

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological factors controlling the formation, stability, and distribution of gas hydrates of the Beaufort Sea region were investigated by basin analysis. Geological, geophysical, and geochemical data from the region were assembled and evaluated to determine the relationships of geological environments and gas hydrates. The Beaufort Sea is the southern part of the Arctic Ocean offshore of the North Slope of Alaska and the Yukon and Mackenzie districts of Canada. The Beaufort Sea study region extends northward from the Arctic coasts of Alaska and Canada between Point Barrow on the west to Cape Beaufort on the east. The northern boundary of the Beaufort Sea study region is 72.5{degrees}N. The study region comprises broad continental shelves, slopes, rises, and the Arctic abyssal plain. 84 refs., 76 figs., 9 tabs.

Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)...

162

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La...

163

A general-purpose, geochemical reservoir simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geochemical simulator for the analysis of coupled reaction and transport processes is presented. The simulator is based on the numerical solution of the equations of coupled multi-phase fluid flow, species transport, energy balance and rock/fluid reactions. It also accounts for the effects of grain growth/dissolution and the alteration of porosity and permeability due to mineral reactions. The simulator can be used to analyze core floods, single-well scenarios and multiple production/injection well systems on the reservoir scale. Additionally, the simulator provides two flow options: the Darcy law for fluid flow in porous media and the Brinkman law that subsumes both free and porous medium flows. The simulator was tested using core acidizing data and results were in good agreement with laboratory observations. The simulator was applied to analyze matrix acidizing treatments for a horizontal well. The evolution of the skin factor was predicted and the optimal volume of acid required to remove the near-wellbore damage was determined. Reactive fluid infiltration was shown to lead to reaction-front fingering under certain conditions. Viscosity contrast in multiphase flow could also result in viscous fingering. Examples in this study also address these nonlinear fingering phenomena. A waterflood on the reservoir scale was analyzed and simulation results show that scale formation during waterfloods can occur far beyond injection wells. Two cases of waste disposal by deep well injection were evaluated and our simulation results were consistent with field measured data.

Liu, X.; Ortoleva, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

hydrothermal alteration) - Geologic field work - OSU detailed mapping - Geophysics * Gravity - 1km grid collected * High resolution aeromagnetic - currently being collected *...

165

Co2 geological sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Xu, Tianfu

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

RECOVERY ACT: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding accessProposal Title: Community

167

Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. ? Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. ? Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Petroleum geology of Tunisia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent discoveries and important oil shows have proven the existence of hydrocarbons in newly identified depocenters and reservoirs. In general, except for some areas around the producing fields, Tunisia is largely underdrilled. The national company ETAP has decided to release data and to publish a synthesis on the petroleum geology of Tunisia. The geology of Tunisia provides a fine example of the contrast between Alpine folding, which typifies northern Tunisia and the African craton area of the Saharan part. Eastern Tunisia corresponds to an unstable platform forming plains or low hills and extending eastwards to the shallow Pelagian Sea. There are a wide variety of basins: central and northern Tunisia represents a front basin the Saharan Ghadames basin or the Chott trough are sag basins; the Gulf of Gabes was formed as a distension margin the Gulf of Hammamet is a composite basin and several transversal grabens cut across the country, including offshore, and are rift-type basins. All these features are known to be oil prolific throughout the world. Two large fields and many modest-size pools are known in Tunisia. Oil and gas fields in the surrounding countries, namely the Saharan fields of Algeria and Libya the large Bouri field offshore Tripolitania and discoveries in the Italian part of the Straits of Sicily, suggest a corresponding potential in Tunisia. Exposed paleogeographic and structural maps, balanced sections, and examples of fields and traps will support an optimistic evaluation of the future oil exploration in Tunisia.

Burollet, P.F. (CIFEG, Paris (France)); Ferjami, A.B.; Mejri, F. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

May 23, 2013 Geological Society of America 2013 NorthCentral Section Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Illinois CURRY, B. Brandon, Prairie Research Institute, Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL, 615 E. Peabody, Champaign, IL 61820, aphillps@illinois.edu, CARON, Olivier, Illinois State Geological Survey, Prairie Research Institute, 615 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, BRYK, Alexander B

Polly, David

170

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Montana State University 1 Geology Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Geology Option The Geology Option is a degree program designed and private sectors in fields such as petroleum geology, mining geology, seismology (including earthquake and volcanic risk assessment), hydrology (surface and ground water) natural-hazard geology, environmental clean

Maxwell, Bruce D.

172

WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum (structural)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum Geology GEL 3300 (structural) GEL 3400 (sed/strat) Geology Elective 1 Geology Elective 2 Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 PHY 2130/31 MAT 2010 PHY 2140/41 CHEM 1220/30 MAT 1800 Cognates GEL 5593 (writing intensive) GEL 3160 (petrology) GEL 3650 (field camp) Geology Elective 3 GEL 2130

Berdichevsky, Victor

173

Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the geologic framework model (200 feet [61 meters]), discussed in Section 6.4.2, limits the size of features that can be resolved by the model but is appropriate for the distribution of data available and its intended use. Uncertainty and limitations are discussed in Section 6.6 and model validation is discussed in Section 7.

T. Vogt

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

Collins, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5342 Geological Engineering: Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 EOSC 535 Transport Processes in Porous Media 3 2 Site Investigation and Management 3 2 CIVL 574 Experimental Soil Mechanics 3 2 CIVL 579 Geosynthetics 2 Geological Engineering Soils and Weak Rocks 3 2 CIVL 408 Geo-Environmental Engineering 3 2 CIVL 410

176

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

GEOLOGY AND FRACTURE SYSTEM AT STRIPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of underground test site •• 1.5 Regional bedrock geology.Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine area.Fig. 2.1 Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine

Olkiewicz, O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

Peters, Catherine A

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) collaborative was formed to address basic science and engineering knowledge gaps relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The original funding round of ZERT (ZERT I) identified and addressed many of these gaps. ZERT II has focused on specific science and technology areas identified in ZERT I that showed strong promise and needed greater effort to fully develop. Specific focal areas of ZERT II included: ? Continued use of the unique ZERT field site to test and prove detection technologies and methods developed by Montana State University, Stanford, University of Texas, several private sector companies, and others. Additionally, transport in the near surface was modelled. ? Further development of near-surface detection technologies that cover moderate area at relatively low cost (fiber sensors and compact infrared imagers). ? Investigation of analogs for escape mechanisms including characterization of impact of CO2 and deeper brine on groundwater quality at a natural analog site in Chimayo, NM and characterization of fracture systems exposed in outcrops in the northern Rockies. ? Further investigation of biofilms and biomineralization for mitigation of small aperture leaks focusing on fundamental studies of rates that would allow engineered control of deposition in the subsurface. ? Development of magnetic resonance techniques to perform muti-phase fluid measurements in rock cores. ? Laboratory investigation of hysteretic relative permeability and its effect on residual gas trapping in large-scale reservoir simulations. ? Further development of computational tools including a new version (V2) of the LBNL reactive geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, extension of the coupled flow and stress simulation capabilities in LANL’s FEHM simulator and an online gas-mixtureproperty estimation tool, WebGasEOS Many of these efforts have resulted in technologies that are being utilized in other field tests or demonstration projects.

Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Barnhart, Elliot; Lageson, David; Nall, Anita; Dobeck, Laura; Repasky, Kevin; Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Johnson, Jennifer; Hogan, Justin; Codd, Sarah; Bray, Joshua; Prather, Cody; McGrail, B.; Oldenburg, Curtis; Wagoner, Jeff; Pawar, Rajesh

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geologic Storage - Types Types of Underground Storage Aquifers Aquifers are similar in geology to depleted reservoirs, but have not been proven to trap gas and must be developed....

182

Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management with measurement frequency (0.125and1Hz)andwasdependentuponthedominantmetabolic process. The spectral effect Groundwater contamination by industrial sources and nuclear weapons programs has promoted research

Hubbard, Susan

184

Geochemical Data for 95 Thermal and Nonthermal Waters of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors Fraser E. Goff, Tamsin McCormick, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale A. Counce and...

185

Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

Weislogel, Amy

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geochemical characteristics of the Bulgarmarse Granite of the Fall River Pluton in the Avalonian Superterrane of southeastern New England  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 600 m.y. Bulgarmarsh Granite of the Fall River Pluton crops out along the SE margin of the Pennsylvanian-age Narragansett Basin in the Dedham terrane of the New England Avalonian Superterrane. The Bulgarmarsh is a coarse-grained, quartz-rich, very leucooratic granite, in which mafic minerals, generally less than 5--8%, occur chiefly as chlorite, biotite and garnet disequilibrium intergrowths. Most of the granite is very slightly deformed, but there are many localized zones of deformation, both brittle and plastic, that vary in degree of intensity. The Bulgarmarsh intrudes Basin margin metavolcanics similar to those of Price Neck Formation that crop out within the Basin in Newport and on Gould Island. The Bulgarmarsh Granite has many of the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of an A-type granite. Its geochemistry places it in the post-orogenic classification of Maniar and Piccoli (1989). New major and minor element geochemical data clearly discriminate between the Bulgarmarsh Granite and the adjacent calc-alkaline Metacom Granite Gneiss. Avalonian Orogeny, occupying a place in geologic history similar to that of the Newport Granite.

Mancuso, C.I.; Puffer, J.H. (Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Preliminary delineation of natural geochemical reactions, Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a study to determine the natural geochemistry of the Snake River Plain aquifer system at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. As part of this study, a group of geochemical reactions that partially control the natural chemistry of ground water at the INEL were identified. Mineralogy of the aquifer matrix was determined using X-ray diffraction and thin-section analysis and theoretical stabilities of the minerals were used to identify potential solid-phase reactants and products of the reactions. The reactants and products that have an important contribution to the natural geochemistry include labradorite, olivine, pyroxene, smectite, calcite, ferric oxyhydroxide, and several silica phases. To further identify the reactions, analyses of 22 representative water samples from sites tapping the Snake River Plain aquifer system were used to determine the thermodynamic condition of the ground water relative to the minerals in the framework of the aquifer system. Principal reactions modifying the natural geochemical system include congruent dissolution of olivine, diopside, amorphous silica, and anhydrite; incongruent dissolution of labradorite with calcium montmorillonite as a residual product; precipitation of calcite and ferric oxyhydroxide; and oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron. Cation exchange reactions retard the downward movement of heavy, multivalent waste constituents where infiltration ponds are used for waste disposal.

Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

argentina mineralogical geochemical: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

argentina mineralogical geochemical First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A shocking state:...

189

Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)] [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geology 331 Paleontology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dinosaur eggs in Patagonia #12;A single egg laying on an outcrop #12;Dinosaur developing in the egg #12;Researcher working on a nest of sauropod dinosaur eggs #12;Mother and hatchlings in Patagonia sometime

Kammer, Thomas

191

IU GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES graduatehandbookappendices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pratt Biogeochemistry, Sedimentology/ Stratigraphy 5-9203 MSBII 416 prattl Geol Sci Professor Sara Pryor 5-3848 G421 douglasb Geol Sci Research Scientist Erika Elswick Geochemistry, Sedimentology

Polly, David

192

Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-H 340 Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology Member Guide OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE #12;Contents 4-H Geology Project 3 Project Recommendations 3 Books on Geology 4 Trip Planning 4 Contests 7 Identification of Rocks and Minerals 7 Physical Properties of Minerals 8 Generalized Geologic

Tullos, Desiree

193

Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

Eaton, L. Scott

194

242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 201415  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Geology Chairperson: Abdel. Assistant Instructor: P Hajj-Chehadeh, Abdel-Halim The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology, and Master of Science degrees in certain areas of the vast

195

Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012 1. Learning Goals ALL students in geology, classification schemes, geologic history and processes, and the structure of the Earth. 3. demonstrate an understanding of the variability, complexity, and interdependency of processes within geologic systems. 4. use

Bogaerts, Steven

196

149Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201415  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

149Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Geology Chairperson: Abdel. Assistant Instructor: P Hajj-Chehadeh, Abdel-Halim MS in Geology Candidates pursuing the Master of Science program in geology must complete seven graduate courses (21 cr.) and a thesis (9 cr.). Students may select

197

to shape the world C. R. Stelck Chair in Petroleum Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to shape the world #12;C. R. Stelck Chair in Petroleum Geology BUILDING ALBERTA'S ENERGY LEADERSHIP,RoyalSocietyofCanada(1960) · OrderofCanada(1997) · InducteePetroleumHallofFame(2005) The University of Alberta has led and his legacy lives on in the research supported by the C. R. Stelck Chair in Petroleum Geology

Machel, Hans

198

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE WWW.GEOLOGY" for a complete range of advising information plus the latest Environmental Geology requirements. CORE COURSES (check each as completed): (30 credits) ____Choose one of the following introductory geology classes

Jiang, Huiqiang

199

Argonne Geothermal Geochemical Database v2.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A database of geochemical data from potential geothermal sources aggregated from multiple sources as of March 2010. The database contains fields for the location, depth, temperature, pH, total dissolved solids concentration, chemical composition, and date of sampling. A separate tab contains data on non-condensible gas compositions. The database contains records for over 50,000 wells, although many entries are incomplete. Current versions of source documentation are listed in the dataset.

Harto, Christopher

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

Argonne Geothermal Geochemical Database v2.0  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A database of geochemical data from potential geothermal sources aggregated from multiple sources as of March 2010. The database contains fields for the location, depth, temperature, pH, total dissolved solids concentration, chemical composition, and date of sampling. A separate tab contains data on non-condensible gas compositions. The database contains records for over 50,000 wells, although many entries are incomplete. Current versions of source documentation are listed in the dataset.

Harto, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Asphaltenes as indicators of the geochemical history of oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of decomposition of native asphaltenes from naphthenic oils is proposed as a source of information on the geochemical history of the oils. It is demonstrated that formation of naphthenic oils occurs in nature through biodegradation of primary paraffinic oils. The relative abundances of structural groups and individual saturated hydrocarbons obtained from the asphaltenes in naphthenic oils is similar to the relative abundance of hydrocarbons in paraffinic oils, which are their genetic precursors. (JMT)

Aref'yev, O.A.; Makushina, V.M.; Petrov, A.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart 1101, 1102, 1103,1104, 1105 2250 3160 2500 hours geology junior standing; six hours geology depends on course senior standing, permission hours geology six hours geology Evolution of the Earth Geophysics Physical Geology , Historical Geology

Thaxton, Christopher S.

203

Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

show distinct responses to the Chalfant Valley earthquakes. Authors Christopher D. Farrar, M.L. Sorey, S.A. Rojstaczer, A.C. Steinemann and M.D. Clark Published U.S. Geological...

204

Multiblock Grid Generation for Simulations in Geological Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulating fluid flow in geological formations requires mesh generation, lithology mapping to the cells, and computing geometric properties such as normal vectors and volume of cells. The purpose of this research work is to compute and process the geometrical information required for performing numerical simulations in geological formations. We present algebraic techniques, named Transfinite Interpolation, for mesh generation. Various transfinite interpolation techniques are derived from 1D projection operators. Many geological formations such as the Utsira formation (Torp and Gale, 2004; Khattri, Hellevang, Fladmark and Kvamme, 2006) and the Snohvit gas field (Maldal and Tappel, 2004) can be divided into layers or blocks based on the geometrical or lithological properties of the layers. We present the concept of block structured mesh generation for handling such formations.

Sanjay Kumar Khattri

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, AnticipatingUSA Macdougall, Doug. Why Geology Matters: Decoding theE-book available. Why Geology Matters pursues two goals: to

Anderson, Byron P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

www.geology.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electron microscope, atomic absorption spectrometer, ICP-mass spectrometer, ground penetrating radarGEOLOGY www.geology.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Geology Bachelor

207

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Technical Geologic Overview of Long Valley Caldera for the Casa...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of geothermal production. This report addresses geologic considerations in preparing an EISEIR including:Geology, soils and mineralsGeologic hazardsSeismic hazardsFaulting...

210

National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Volume 1. Summary of the geology and uranium potential of Precambrian conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of uranium-, thorium-, and gold-bearing conglomerates in Late Archean and Early Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks have been discovered in southern Wyoming. The mineral deposits were found by applying the time and strata bound model for the origin of uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates to favorable rock types within a geologic terrane known from prior regional mapping. No mineral deposits have been discovered that are of current (1981) economic interest, but preliminary resource estimates indicate that over 3418 tons of uranium and over 1996 tons of thorium are present in the Medicine Bow Mountains and that over 440 tons of uranium and 6350 tons of thorium are present in Sierra Madre. Sampling has been inadequate to determine gold resources. High grade uranium deposits have not been detected by work to date but local beds of uranium-bearing conglomerate contain as much as 1380 ppM uranium over a thickness of 0.65 meters. This project has involved geologic mapping at scales from 1/6000 to 1/50,000 detailed sampling, and the evaluation of 48 diamond drill holes, but the area is too large to fully establish the economic potential with the present information. This first volume summarizes the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of the uranium-bearing conglomerates. Volume 2 contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates.

Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Flurkey, A.J.; Coolidge, C.M.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Sever, C.K.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Geology in coal resource utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 37 papers in this book were compiled with an overriding theme in mind: to provide the coal industry with a comprehensive source of information on how geology and geologic concepts can be applied to the many facets of coal resource location, extraction, and utilization. The chapters have been arranged to address the major coal geology subfields of Exploration and Reserve Definition, Reserve Estimation, Coalbed Methane, Underground Coal Gasification, Mining, Coal Quality Concerns, and Environmental Impacts, with papers distributed on the basis of their primary emphasis. To help guide one through the collection, the author has included prefaces at the beginning of each chapter. They are intended as a brief lead-in to the subject of the chapter and an acknowledgement of the papers' connections to the subject and contributions to the chapter. In addition, a brief cross-reference section has been included in each preface to help one find papers of interest in other chapters. The subfields of coal geology are intimately intertwined, and investigations in one area may impact problems in another area. Some subfields tend to blur at their edges, such as with reserve definition and reserve estimation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Peters, D.C. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

GEOLOGY, February 2008 151 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Yemane Asmerom Victor Y. Polyak Department of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, Florida 33149, USA Peter Cole Department of Geology, Cornell College, 600 1st Street West, Mount Vernon, Iowa 52314, USA Ann F. Budd Department of Geoscience

Asmerom, Yemane

213

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the various data generated by the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The project's goals are to: · Perform a preliminary geologic characterization of the carbon dioxide sequestration of carbon sequestration potential. · For select formations previously studied in the Southern Sacramento

214

Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook #12 Environmental Management 14 Environmental Science 18 Geography 22 Geographic Information Science 26 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook Editors David Hayward, Ilse

Goodman, James R.

215

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

TOUGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic M  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing, an overarchingInformationTHERMOANALYTICAL

218

Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL NANOPARTICLES AND

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifers geochemical results Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: aquifers geochemical results Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas via ocean outfalls. In...

220

, UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

Seamons, Kent E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

Dresden, Gregory

222

Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL) geoL 102 our dynAMiC eArtH: introduCtion to geoLogy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Empha- sis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Labo- ratory study

Ravikumar, B.

223

Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break 2015 Interested in field geology? Interested in environmental hazards and climate? Want to visit #12;Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan This is a 3-week course for students interested in mixing field

Alpay, S. Pamir

224

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological there is a large amount of missing observations, which often is the case in geological applications. We make,predictions,MarkovchainMonteCarlo,simulatedannealing,incomplete observations. INTRODUCTION In many geological applications, there is an interest in predicting properties

Baran, Sándor

225

Roadmap: Geology Environmental Geology -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO] College of Arts This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses on page 2 General Elective 8 #12;Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS

Sheridan, Scott

226

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University © 2006 #12;i PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Ninth Edition Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University #12;ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank

Merguerian, Charles

228

Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

Hatcher, Robert D

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology, Stratigraphy Paleontology, Geography and Environment, Dynamic Geology and Tectonics/ Hydrogeology, Geophysics

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

230

Hydrological and geochemical investigations of selenium behavior at Kesterson Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1985 to the present we have studied the behavior of selenium in various habitats and environments at Kesterson reservoir, shifting emphasis as remedial actions altered the physical setting. Investigations have evaluated the efficacy of several remedial alternatives, from innovative techniques relying on the complex geochemical behavior of selenium alternatives, from innovative techniques relying on the complex geochemical behavior of selenium in aquatic environments to conventional excavation schemes. Results of these studies supported two cost-effective remedial measures; drain water deliveries were terminated in 1986 and, in 1988, 1 million cubic yards of soil were imported and used to fill the low lying areas of the former Kesterson Reservoir. To date, these two actions appear to have eliminated the aquatic habitat that caused waterfowl death and deformity at Kesterson from the early 1980's to 1987. Biological, surface water and groundwater monitoring data collected by the USBR indicate that Kesterson is now a much safer environment than in past years when drainage water containing 300{mu}g/l of selenium was delivered to the Reservoir. The continued presence of a large inventory of selenium within the upper portions of unfilled areas of Kesterson Reservoir and immediately below the fill material requires that a continued awareness of the status of this inventory be maintained and improved upon. 83 refs., 130 figs., 19 tabs.

Benson, S.M.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Zawislanski, P.; Yee, A.W.; Daggett, J.S.; Oldfather, J.M.; Tsao, L.; Johannis, P.W.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

B.S. GEOLOGY (Geology Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major Geology Core Courses: 9-10 courses, 33-34 credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B.S. GEOLOGY (Geology Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major Geology Core Courses: 9 - Experiencing Geology Lab and either GEOSCI 103 - Intro to Oceanography or GEOSCI 105 - Dynamic Earth 4 (1) (4 semester GEOSCI 201 ­ History of the Earth 4 1st or 2nd year, spring semester GEOSCI 231 ­ Geological Field

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

232

MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM ACTIVE VOLCANIC Name: MAURI Guillaume Degree: PhD of Science Title of Thesis: Multi-scale analysis of multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data from active volcanic systems Examining Committee: Chair: Dr John Clague

Williams-Jones, Glyn

233

Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada and their application to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada.sader@mmg.com) ABSTRACT: Peat groundwater compositions at depths of 0.4 and 1.1 m below ground surface in the Attawapiskat on hydrogeological measurements and variations in peat groundwater geochemical parameters (pH and EC are high

235

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report – Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When the scCO2 was released from the reactor, less than 60% of the injected lighter compounds (benzene, toluene) were transported through dry sand column by the CO2, while more than 90% of the heavier organics were trapped in the sand column. For wet sand columns, most (80% to 100%) of the organic compounds injected into the sand column passed through, except for naphthalene which was substantial removed from the CO2 within the column. A spectrophotometric method was developed to measure pH in brines in contact with scCO2. This method provides an alternative to fragile glass pH electrodes and thermodynamic modeling approaches for estimating pH. The method was tested in simulated reservoir fluids (CO2–NaCl–H2O) at different temperatures, pressures, and ionic strength, and the results were compared with other experimental studies and geochemical models. Measured pH values were generally in agreement with the models, but inconsistencies were present between some of the models.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

237

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

TheU-Tube: A Novel System for Acquiring Borehole Fluid Samplesfrom a Deep Geologic CO2 Sequestration Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase (supercritical CO2-brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The datasets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydro-geochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-Tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-Tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaluation of the geologic relations and seismotectonic stability of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI); Final report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of progress for the project ``Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI)`` for the eighteen month period of January 1, 1987 to June 10, 1988. This final report was preceded by the final report for the initial six month period, July 1, 1986 to December 31, 1986 (submitted on January 25, 1987, and revised in June 1987.) Quaternary Tectonics, Geochemical, Mineral Deposits, Vulcanic Geology, Seismology, Tectonics, Neotectonics, Remote Sensing, Geotechnical Assessments, Geotechnical Rock Mass Assessments, Basinal Studies, and Strong Ground Motion.

NONE

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M. (LBNL Earth Sciences Division) [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Arizona Geological Society Digest 22  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi |Arizona Geological

244

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Marine geology of the Bay of Campeche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY /i & L IBRRAYA B/ iA&Co MARINE GEOLOGY OP SHE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGER ? ? ? Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August, 1958 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography MARINE GEOLOGY OF THE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGEB Approved as to style and content by: JLN. Chairman of Committee Heady Department...

Creager, Joe S.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A geologic investigation of Longhorn Cavern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GEOLOGIC INVESTIGATION OF LONGHORN CAVERN A Thesis by VICTORIA LYNN WALTERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992... Major Subject: Geology A GEOLOGIC INVESTIGATION OF LONGHORN CAVERN A Thesis by VICTORIA LYNN WALTERS Approved as to style and content by: Christ pher C. Mathewson (Chair of Committee) Wy M Ah (Member) J. R. Giardino (Member) John H. Spang...

Walters, Victoria Lynn

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

249

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

Torgersen, Christian

250

Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of...

251

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

252

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geochemistry and microbiology of a uranium-contaminated subsurface environment that had undergone two seasons of acetate addition to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction was examined. There were distinct horizontal and vertical geochemical gradients that could be attributed in large part to the manner in which acetate was distributed in the aquifer, with more reduction of Fe(III) and sulfate occurring at greater depths and closer to the point of acetate injection. Clone libraries of 16S rRNA genes derived from sediments and groundwater indicated an enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the order Desulfobacterales in sediment and groundwater samples. These samples were collected nearest the injection gallery where microbially reducible Fe(III) oxides were highly depleted, groundwater sulfate concentrations were low, and increases in acid volatile sulfide were observed in the sediment. Further down-gradient, metal-reducing conditions were present as indicated by intermediate Fe(II)/Fe(total) ratios, lower acid volatile sulfide values, and increased abundance of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the dissimilatory Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducing family Geobacteraceae. Maximal Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction correlated with maximal recovery of Geobacteraceae 16S rRNA gene sequences in both groundwater and sediment; however, the sites at which these maxima occurred were spatially separated within the aquifer. The substantial microbial and geochemical heterogeneity at this site demonstrates that attempts should be made to deliver acetate in a more uniform manner and that closely

Uranium Bioremediation; Field Site; Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-bernad; Kathleen R. O’neill; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

STOMP-ECKEChem: An Engineering Perspective on Reactive Transport in Geologic Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ECKEChem (Equilibrium, Conservation, Kinetic Equation Chemistry) is a reactive transport module for the STOMP suite of multifluid subsurface flow and transport simulators that was developed from an engineering perspective. STOMP comprises a suite of operational modes that are distinguished by the solved coupled conservation equations with capabilities for a variety of subsurface applications (e.g., environmental remediation and stewardship, geologic sequestration of greenhouse gases, gas hydrate production, and oil shale production). The ECKEChem module was designed to provide integrated reactive transport capabilities across the suite of STOMP simulator operational modes. The initial application for the ECKEChem module was in the simulation of the mineralization reactions that occurred with the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into deep Columbia River basalt formations, where it was implemented in the STOMP-CO2 simulator. The STOMP-ECKEChem solution approach to modeling reactive transport in multifluid geologic media is founded on an engineering perspective: (1) sequential non-iterative coupling between the flow and reactive transport is sufficient, (2) reactive transport can be modeled by operator splitting with local geochemistry and global transport, (3) geochemistry can be expressed as a system of coupled nonlinear equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, (4) a limited number of kinetic equation forms are used in geochemical practice. This chapter describes the conceptual approach to converting a geochemical reaction network into a series of equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, the implementation of ECKEChem in STOMP, the numerical solution approach, and a demonstration of the simulator on a complex application involving desorption of uranium from contaminated field-textured sediments.

White, Mark D.; Fang, Yilin

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY AND ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF A WILCOX LIGNITE DEPOSIT IN NORTHEASTERN RUSK COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by William F. Cole Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) ad of Department) August 1980 ABSTRACT Geology and Engineering Geology of a Wilcox Lignite Deposit in Northeastern Rusk County, Texas (August, 1980) William 7. Cole, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman...

Cole, William F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coal quality activities at the new US Geological Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently issued Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) calls for many changes including increased emphasis on the quality of natural resources, applied research, technology transfer, and issue-driven studies. To achieve these objectives the USGS will have to rely on partnerships with other Federal agencies, academia, State and local governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private industry. The coal quality activities at the USGS are briefly described and examples of the practical, team-oriented research being pursued are given.

Finkelman, R.B. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

26 AUGUST 2009, GSA TODAY Murray Hitzman, Dept. of Geology and Geological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geology. Economic geology flourished from the end of World War II into the early 1970s, with major, industrial minerals, construction aggregates, and uranium but excludes carbon-based energy resources geology in academia: An impending crisis? (~15%) of the 2007 U.S. gross domestic product. The United

Barton, Mark D.

259

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

Demouchy, Sylvie

260

B. M. EGLINGTON AND R. A. ARMSTRONG SOUTH AFRICAN JOURNAL OF GEOLOGY, 2004, VOLUME 107, PAGE 13-32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. M. EGLINGTON AND R. A. ARMSTRONG SOUTH AFRICAN JOURNAL OF GEOLOGY, 2004, VOLUME 107, PAGE 13. Armstrong Research School of Earth Sciences, ANU, Canberra, Australia e-mail: richard.armstrong

Patterson, William P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geologic history of the National Geotechnical Experimentation Sites, Texas A&M University Riverside Campus, Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Foundation. The NGES sites were created to accelerate research in geotechnical and geo-environmental engineering by allowing multi-user access to well characterized sand and clay areas. The geologic history in this report will contribute...

Jennings, Susan Patricia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U sing a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.525 trillion barrels of oil in place in seventeen oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado.

unknown authors

263

Geological Sciences Jeffrey D. Keith, Chair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as assessment and forecasting of natural hazards, environmental change, and discovery of energy and mineral resources. Some of the diverse disciplines that can be studied in this department include general geology Catalog. Global Geology Program Each year the department provides opportunities for advanced

Hart, Gus

264

Geology, Society and the Environmental health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Environmental analysis Sustainability Learning Objectives #12; As members of the biological The water we drink The air we breathe Geologic factors in environmental health #12; Health can be definedChapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future #12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste

Pan, Feifei

265

Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coal, and water. Environmental geology ­ study of problems associated with pollution, waste disposal ­ study of earth materials of economic interest, including metals, minerals, building stone, petroleum Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, mining

Logan, David

266

Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As it turns out, a good portion of the pipeline is not in the Sandhills and doesn't overlie the Ogallala1 Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke Providing a short, succinct description of the sandhills geology is a difficult and nebulous request. The sandhills themselves are primarily eolian

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

267

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin; Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 7462, 35 pGEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462 Alteration within the basement rocks associated with the P2 fault and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin E.E. Adlakha, K. Hattori, G

268

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3 CONTENTS Three Creeks Caldera ................................................................................................................................... Scott Dean Geology of the Antelope Peak Area of the Southern .................................................................................................................. Craig D. Hall Geology of the Longlick and White Mountain Area, Southern San Francisco Mountains

Seamons, Kent E.

269

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I Preble Formation, a Cambrian Outer ..........................................................................J. Roger Olsen Geology of the Sterling Quadrangle, Sanpete County, Utah ..............................................................................James Michael Taylor Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Aertalphorograph rhowing

Seamons, Kent E.

270

Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Chair: Dr. Clarence R Technical Exchange (open) Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: DOE & Performance Analysis and the Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: Repository

271

Quantification of Hydrological, Geochemical, and Mineralogical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Uranium over Multiple Scales in Hanford Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term measure of the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is to provide sufficient scientific understanding to allow a significant fraction of DOE sites to incorporate coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship by 2015. Our research targets two related, major obstacles to understanding and predicting contaminant transport at DOE sites: the heterogeneity of subsurface geologic media, and the scale dependence of experimental and modeled results.

Fendorf, Scott; Mayes, Melanie A.; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Elmer; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Tang, Guoping

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Do geochemical estimates of sediment focusing pass the sediment test in the equatorial Pacific?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do geochemical estimates of sediment focusing pass the sediment test in the equatorial Pacific] The paleoceanographic recording fidelity of pelagic sediments is limited by chemical diagenesis and physical mixing (bioturbation and horizontal sediment transport). Diagenesis and bioturbation are relatively well

Kurapov, Alexander

274

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Geochemical Behaviour of S, Cl and Fe in Silicate Melts/Glasses...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical Behaviour of S, Cl and Fe in Silicate MeltsGlasses Simulating Natural Magmas Monday, March 26, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 G. Giuli, R. Alonso-Mori, E....

276

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

277

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Abstract Geology...

279

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatise of Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields,A-A’). phy, geology, stratigraphic contacts, oil and gas andgeology, initial information available from hydrogeology, oil

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy January 11, 2013 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area are described. Geologic faults, sheared or brecciated rock, volcanic vents, geothermal wells, hydrothermal alteration, springs, thermal springs, fumaroles, and geologic...

282

Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated.

Wielinga, B.; Lucy, J.K.; Moore, J.N.; Seastone, O.F.; Gannon, J.E. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

MINTEQ2 geochemical code: provisionary organic data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic components in aqueous radioactive chemical sources, surface waters, and ground waters could substantially alter the mobility of radioactive and other important nonradioactive elements released from a defense waste disposal system. It is therefore important to be able to predict, as accurately as possible, the effects of selected organic components on the solubilities of radionuclides and important nonradioactive elements. The geochemical code MINTEQ2 can be used to assess solubilities provided that appropriate thermochemical data for organic and inorganic aqueous species and solids are available for its use. The code accepts an assemblage of gaseous and solid phases in contact with an aqueous phase and calculates the thermochemical equilibrium between these phases. Unlike typical hydrologic flow and transport codes where the data base is entirely site specific (i.e., parameters particular to the specific site), MINTEQ2 requires an additional generic thermochemical data base. This report discusses the addition of provisionary organic reactions and associated equilibrium constants to the generic data base that can be used by MINTEQ2 in scoping calculations or preliminary performance assessments.

Morrey, J.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Dove, F.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Biogeochemical Changes at Early Stage After the Closure of Radioactive Waste Geological Repository in South Korea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the subterranean environment has been the preferred method of many countries, including Korea. A safety issue after the closure of a geological repository is that biodegradation of organic materials due to microbial activities generates gases that lead to overpressure of the waste containers in the repository and its disintegration with the release of radionuclides. As part of an ongoing large-scale in situ experiment using organic wastes and groundwater to simulate geological radioactive waste repository conditions, we investigated the geochemical alteration and microbial activities at an early stage (~63 days) intended to be representative of the initial period after repository closure. The increased numbers of both aerobes and facultative anaerobes in waste effluents indicate that oxygen content could be the most significant parameter to control biogeochemical conditions at very early periods of reaction (<35 days). Accordingly, the values of dissolved oxygen and redox potential were decreased. The activation of anaerobes after 35 days was supported by the increased concentration to ~50 mg L-1 of ethanol. These results suggest that the biogeochemical conditions were rapidly altered to more reducing and anaerobic conditions within the initial 2 months after repository closure. Although no gases were detected during the study, activated anaerobic microbes will play more important role in gas generation over the long term.

Choung, Sungwook [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Um, Wooyong [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Seho [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Francis, Arokiasamy J. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Sungpyo [Korea Univ., Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk-Hoon [FNC Technology Co., Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

David Archer

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

David Archer

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

JUDSON MEAD GEOLOGIC FIELD STATION OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2013 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology G Structural Geology G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sophomore G

Polly, David

289

Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Exam 1 Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Last Appearance Datum; Zone #12;Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem Era (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source Weathering

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

291

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expensive, real reduction in CO2 emissions from their ownstored CO2 must create an actual reduction in the emissionsCO2 is instead obtained from geologic formations then the goal of the emission reduction

Hoversten, Shanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

A geologic application of Biot's buckling theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Geophysics A GEOLOGIC APPLlCATION OF BIOT'S BUCKLING THEORY A Thesis by WILLIAM DANIEL HEINZE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commit e) (Head of Department-Member) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT A Geologic..., et al. , (1967) indicates that the Georgetown was never buried by more than 2000 meters of sediment. The Del Rio Mark, 20 m thick, is predominantly clay and calcareous clay intercalated with thin lenses of clayey limestone. The thick-bedded Buda...

Heinze, William Daniel

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1 Papers reviewing geology of field trip areas, 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28 ....................................................................................................................................................... Geology of Volcanic Rocks and Mineral Deposits in the Southern Thomas Range, Utah: A Brief Summary

Seamons, Kent E.

295

Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics Graduate work in Geology are designed to provide you with an understanding of the fundamentals and principles of geology, geochemistry and Environmental Geochemistry · Mineralogy/Petrology/Economic Geology · Geophysics/Tectonics/Remote Sensing

Missouri-Rolla, University of

296

Page 1 | B.S. in Geology | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 | B.S. in Geology | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geology Academic Plan Available: No · Other Information: GEO (Geology & Earth Science Organization); GTU (Gamma Theta Upsilon coordinator for METR, thsirle@uncc.edu PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Geology at UNC Charlotte is for students who

Raja, Anita

297

HYDROGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and GEOCHEMical equilibria in reactive multicomponent systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the development of a hydrogeochemical transport model for multicomponent systems. The model is designed for applications to proper hydrological setting, accommodation of complete suite of geochemical equilibrium processes, easy extension to deal with chemical kinetics, and least constraints of computer resources. The hydrological environment to which the model can be applied is the heterogeneous, anisotropic, saturated-unsaturated subsurface media under either transient or steady state flow conditions. The geochemical equilibrium processes included in the model are aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions. To achieve the inclusion of the full complement of these geochemical processes, total analytical concentrations of all chemical components are chosen as the primary dependent variables in the hydrological transport equations. Attendant benefits of this choice are to make the extension of the model to deal with kinetics of adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, and redox relatively easy. To make the negative concentrations during the iteration between the hydrological transport and geochemical equilibrium least likely, an implicit form of transport equations are proposed. To alleviate severe constraints of computer resources in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and CPU memory, various optional numerical schemes are incorporated in the model. The model consists of a hydrological transport module and geochemical equilibrium module. Both modules were thoroughly tested in code consistency and were found to yield plausible results. The model is verified with ten examples. 79 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Yeh, G.T.; Tripathi, V.S.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water and Environmental Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research observatory to document change. Issues of integrated water, wastewater, power and heating systems for rural villages are always an ongoing challenge. WERC faculty derive 54 % of their research dollars from, Geochemical Processes, Treatment Descriptors: arsenic, sorption, aluminum hydroxide, XAS Principal

299

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gulf Coast Carbon Center GCCC applies technical and educational resources to implementation of geologic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combined industry-academic funding, GCCC provides training for future geotechnical research experts in CO2 Principal Investigator and a renowned expert in using geologic media to reduce atmospheric release of CO2 technologies to monitor retention of CO2 in the subsurface. Two more projects are currently being developed

Texas at Austin, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Gulf of California rift forms a geologically young and active plate boundary that links the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Andreas strike-slip fault system in California to the oceanic spreading system of the East Pacific Rise and surround- ing regions is complex and poorly understood due to a lack of geological and geophysical data research community, the data collected from the stations will be made available immediately following

Ritsema, Jeroen

302

PHOTOGALLERY OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH Laura Toran, Dept of Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Janet Frey Summer 02 Env consulting, Grad school Temple Lawn chemical stormwater monitoring John Peake temperature sensors #12;Jen Kehler stormwater sampling John Petriello sampling a well Matt Sophy by an urban, VA, March 25-27. John Petriello 2004 US Forest Service, Grad School U South Florida Sediment

Toran, Laura

303

Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

Antoun, T

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Geology of a portion of the northern Kings Mountain belt, North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by D. J. Milton, Sigma Xi, Grant-in-kid of Research, the Geological Survey Section of the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, and the Department of Geology, Texas A&M University. I am particularly grateful to D..., 1981b'I and Butler (1981). These have been described as zones of semi-brittle deformation which overprint the earlier D, and D phases. 1 The zones generally follow lithologic contacts and are marked by retrogressive metamorphi. sm to the green...

Michie, Joanna

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

ANDRA UNDERGROUND RESEARCH LABORATORY: INTERPRETATION OF THE MINERALOGICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA ACQUIRED IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 . 1: BRGM, Orléans-45 (France); 2: ANTEA, Orléans-45 (France); 3: ANDRA, Bure- 55 (France); 4: ERM, Poitiers-86 (France); # : author to whom the correspondence should be addressed; *: present address: IRSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses-92 (France). e.gaucher@brgm.fr fax :33 2 38 64 30 62; c.robelin@brgm.fr fax : 33 2 38 64

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

AEGIS technology demonstration for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology demonstration of current performance assessment techniques as applied to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia Plateau Basalts was conducted. Hypothetical repository coordinates were selected for an actual geographical setting on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Published hydrologic and geologic data used in the analyses were gathered in 1979 or earlier. The following report documents the technology demonstration in basalt. Available information has been used to establish the data base and initial hydrologic and geologic interpretations for this site-specific application. A simplified diagram of the AEGIS analyses is shown. Because an understanding of the dynamics of ground-water flow is essential to the development of release scenarios and consequence analyses, a key step in the demonstration is the systems characterization contained in the conceptual model. Regional and local ground-water movement patterns have been defined with the aid of hydrologic computer models. Hypothetical release scenarios have been developed and evaluated by a process involving expert opinion and a Geologic Simulation Model for basalt. (The Geologic Simulation Model can also be used to forecast future boundary conditions for the hydrologic simulation.) Chemical reactivity of the basalt with ground water will influence the leaching and transport of radionuclides; solubility equilibria based on available data are estimated with geochemical models. After the radionuclide concentrations are mathematically introduced into the ground-water movement patterns, waste movement patterns are outlined over elapsed time. Contaminant transport results are summarized for significant radionuclides that are hypothetically released to the accessible environment and to the biosphere.

Dove, F.H.; Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Theodore M. Flynn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D. in Geology, 2011 University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, Ind. B.S. in Environmental Geoscience, 2004 Research metals such as uranium · Integrate geochemical modeling combined with laboratory incubations of anaerobic · Geochemical Society · Geological Society of America · International Society for Microbial Ecology Honors

Kemner, Ken

311

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Kinetics of the Dissolution of Scheelite in Groundwater: Implications for Environmental and Economic Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tungsten, Its History, Geology, Ore-dressing, Metallurgy,5.1 Implications for Environmental Geology…………………………..26 5.2Implications for Economic Geology………………………………..27 6. Future

Montgomery, Stephanie Danielle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: a short description of the AEGIS approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet licensing criteria and protection standards for HLW disposal, research programs are in progress to determine acceptable waste forms, canisters, backfill materials for the repository, and geological formations. Methods must be developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the total system. To meet this need, methods are being developed to assess the long-term effectiveness of isolating nuclear wastes in geologic formations. This work was started in 1976 in the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and continues in the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program. The evaluation of this long-term effectiveness involves a number of distinct steps. AEGIS currently has the methods for performing these evaluation steps. These methods are continuously being improved to meet the inreasing level of sophistication which will be required. AEGIS develops a conceptual description of the geologic systems and uses computer models to simulate the existing ground-water pathways. AEGIS also uses a team of consulting experts, with the assistance of a computer model of the geologic processes, to develop and evaluate plausible release scenarios. Then other AEGIS computer models are used to simulate the transport of radionuclides to the surface and the resultant radiation doses to individuals and populations. (DLC)

Silviera, D.J.; Harwell, M.A.; Napier, B.A.; Zellmer, J.T.; Benson, G.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating 21st Century Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

DePaolo, D. J.; Orr, F. M.; Benson, S. M.; Celia, M.; Felmy, A.; Nagy, K. L.; Fogg, G. E.; Snieder, R.; Davis, J.; Pruess, K.; Friedmann, J.; Peters, M.; Woodward, N. B.; Dobson, P.; Talamini, K.; Saarni, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Precambrian Research 148 (2006) 125144 The uranium mineralization potential of the Paleoproterozoic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precambrian Research 148 (2006) 125­144 The uranium mineralization potential. Hanlya,, T. Kurtis Kysera, Eric E. Hiattb, Jim Marlattc, Sandra Fosterc a Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont., Canada K7L 3N6 b Geology

Hiatt, Eric E.

320

Scientific Computation Survey of Research Interests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Agricultural Engineering Astronomy Biochemistry Chemical Engineering Chemical Physics Chemistry Civil _________________________________________________________________________ Date _____________________ Areas of Research Aerospace Engineering Biomedical Engineering Biosystems Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Geology Geophysics Mathematics Mechanical Engineering

Thomas, David D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microscale geochemical gradients in Hanford 300 Area sediment biofilms and influence of uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence and importance of microenvironments in the subsurface at contaminated sites were suggested by previous geochemical studies. However, no direct quantitative characterization of the geochemical microenvironments had been reported. We quantitatively characterized microscale geochemical gradients (dissolved oxygen (DO), H(2), pH, and redox potential) in Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms. Our results revealed significant differences in geochemical parameters across the sediment biofilm/water interface in the presence and absence of U(VI) under oxic and anoxic conditions. While the pH was relatively constant within the sediment biofilm, the redox potential and the DO and H(2) concentrations were heterogeneous at the microscale (<500-1000 ?m). We found microenvironments with high DO levels (DO hotspots) when the sediment biofilm was exposed to U(VI). On the other hand, we found hotspots (high concentrations) of H(2) under anoxic conditions both in the presence and in the absence of U(VI). The presence of anoxic microenvironments inside the sediment biofilms suggests that U(VI) reduction proceeds under bulk oxic conditions. To test this, we operated our biofilm reactor under air-saturated conditions in the presence of U(VI) and characterized U speciation in the sediment biofilm. U L(III)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed that 80-85% of the U was in the U(IV) valence state.

Nguyen, Hung D.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments and the unvegetated sediments, and various vascular plants specific to these swamps. An elemental, pyrolytic sediments characterised by great changes in the redox conditions. Several specific results have already been

Boyer, Edmond

323

Laghi di Monticchio (Southern Italy, Region Basilicata): genesis of sediments--a geochemical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laghi di Monticchio (Southern Italy, Region Basilicata): genesis of sediments--a geochemical study and Sediments, Telegrafenberg C328, 14473 Potsdam, Germany (2) Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO Cedex 2, France Abstract The sedimentation record of Lago Grande di Monticchio (LGM) is one of the most

Boyer, Edmond

324

Discrimination of geochemical compositions between the Changjiang and the Huanghe sediments and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrimination of geochemical compositions between the Changjiang and the Huanghe sediments and its application for the identi¢cation of sediment source in the Jiangsu coastal plain, China S.Y. Yang a;b;� , C 2002 Abstract Concentrations of 25 elements in the fine-grained fraction ( 6 63 Wm) of bottom sediments

Yang, Shouye

325

Measuring prehistoric mobility strategies based on obsidian geochemical and technological signatures in the Owens Valley, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring prehistoric mobility strategies based on obsidian geochemical and technological; Lithic technology; LA-ICP-MS; Mobility strategies; Owens Valley 1. Introduction Obsidian studies compare the organization of obsidian flaked stone technologies in two different time periods at CA-INY-30

326

Assessing XRF for the geochemical characterization of radiolarian chert artifacts from northeastern North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing XRF for the geochemical characterization of radiolarian chert artifacts from northeastern 2012 Keywords: Chert XRF Geochemistry Non-destructive Weathering Quarries Quebec a b s t r a c-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) as a first-order technique to determine chert whole-rock geochemistry for archaeological

Long, Bernard

327

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the potential for contamination from toxic substances in hydraulic fracturing fluid and/or pro- duced brinesGeochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow of stray gas, metal-rich formation brines, and hydrau- lic fracturing and/or flowback fluids to drinking

328

Inferring dispersal and migrations from incomplete geochemical baselines: analysis of population structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2008). Trace element tags as well as stable iso- topes contained within inert structures, such as fish baseline or reference atlas. Individuals of unknown origin are then assigned to one of the sources in this reference atlas based on their geochemical signature. The identifiability of potential sources is

Shima, Jeff

329

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE? By: Emily courtesy LTSN Bioscience. http://bio.ltsn.ac.uk/imagebank/ Just as trace metals are important to humans to the structural stability of molecules and membranes. For these reasons, incorrect trace metal levels can

Nottingham, University of

330

Organic geochemical evidence for pine tar production in middle Eastern Sweden during the Roman Iron Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic geochemical evidence for pine tar production in middle Eastern Sweden during the Roman Iron Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden b Upplands muse´et, St: Eriks gra¨nd 6, SE-753 10 Uppsala, Sweden Received 21 September 2004; received in revised form 15 June 2005; accepted 21

331

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore sampled in the continental margins offshore India (Fig 1). A volcanic ash layer was recovered below seafloor Surrounding Sediments: Grey sediment in A is a nannofossil and plant debris bearing clay

New Hampshire, University of

332

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

333

The impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical weathering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the physical and chemical processes of soil production and erosion and revisit three granitic study areas on the hillslope-scale physical and chemical soil production and erosion processes. To explain why understandingThe impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical

Heimsath, Arjun M.

334

Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation to seeping fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation of carbon derived from the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), the oxidation of organic matter and from sea water. Methane is the dominant component among other hydrocarbon gases in these sediments. Its

Mazzini, Adriano

335

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

336

Department of Geological Sciences Undergraduate Handbook 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about future sea-level rise, and are there untapped energy and mineral resources both onshore and offshore New Zealand; are also increasingly important concerns both at the regional and global scales. Come-exploration, volcanology, hazard management, engineering geology, environmental planning, water resources, science teaching

Hickman, Mark

337

Department of Geological Sciences Postgraduate Handbook 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about future sea-level rise, and are there untapped energy and mineral resources both onshore and offshore New Zealand; are also increasingly important concerns both at the regional and global scales. Come-exploration, volcanology, hazard management, engineering geology, environmental planning, water resources, science teaching

Hickman, Mark

338

145Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201314  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the exploration for petroleum and other resources. GEOL 305 Geophysics II 3.0; 3 cr. A course on electrical and their methods of interpretation. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL 221 and GEOL 222. GEOL 306 Economic Minerals Geology of their formation; ore forming processes and ore deposit models; advanced techniques to evaluate ore genesis

Shihadeh, Alan

339

APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437 SPRING 2014 OF NATURAL RESOURCES INCLUDING OIL, COAL, MINERALS AND GROUNDWATER. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF GEOPHYSICS MAY, IF AVAILABLE, WE WILL VISIT AN OIL DRILLING RIG IN OPERATION. DATES FOR FIELD TRIPS WILL DEPEND ON THE WEATHER

Nickrent, Daniel L.

340

INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH ADVANCED CONSTRAINED INVERSIONS by Peter George framework (i.e. minimization of an objective function). I developed several methods to reach this goal constraints to the inverse problem. Lastly, I developed an iterative procedure for cooperatively inverting

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Internal Geology and...

342

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Geologic Storage of CO2, in Carbon Dioxide Capture forFormations - Results from the CO2 Capture Project: GeologicBenson, Process Modeling of CO2 Injection into Natural Gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Iowa Tracheophyta (vascular plants) Spores, New Albany Shale Sporing bodies, Dugger Fm. #12;Department (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

Polly, David

344

What can I do with a degree in Geology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What can I do with a degree in Geology? Science Planning your career Choosing a career involves.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Geology? Geology in the twenty-first century is a fascinating, exciting,incredibly diverse,earthquakes,dramatic and varied geomorphology,and its 500 million years of pre and post-Gondwana geological history,is one

Hickman, Mark

345

FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN By R.M. Flores,1 C.W. Keighin,1 A.M. Ochs,2 P.D. Warwick,1 L.R. Bader,1 and E.C. Murphy3 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 3 North

346

Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Geological Engineering CEE 330 & GLE 474 or instructor consent 3 0.0 CEE 631 Toxicants in the Environment

347

area geological characterization: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Utilization Websites Summary: Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL sequestration pilot studies to determine...

348

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geochemistry in carbon sequestration environments. Abstractimplications for carbon sequestration. Environ Earth Sci. ,from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ductivities. Geologic logs sometimes show thin layers limit further spreading of contaminants. This flow model accounts for of potentially high hydraulic conductivity embedded complex geologic units that vary measured different methods can be employed to represent thein a geologic unit. A composite model was used

351

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3 CONTENTS Studies for Students #lo, Geologic Guide to Provo Canyon and Weber Canyon, Central Wasatch Mountains, Utah ............................................................................................................................. Randy L. Chamberlain The Geology of the Drum Mountains, Millard and Juab Counties, Utah

Seamons, Kent E.

352

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part I Papers presented at the 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28-29, 1978, at Brig- ham Young ............................................................................................................................Publications and Maps of the Geology Department 91 Cover The Great Basrn seen from a htgh

Seamons, Kent E.

353

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2 CONTENTS The Kinnikinic Quartzite ........................................................Robert Q. Oaks,Jr., and W . Calvin James Geology of the Sage Valley 7 W'Quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho, and Lincoln County, Wyoming ....................J ohn L. Conner Geology of the Elk Valley Quadrangle, Bear

Seamons, Kent E.

354

Semantic e-Science and Geology Clinton Smyth1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semantic e-Science and Geology Clinton Smyth1 , David Poole2 and Rita Sharma3 1 Georeference Online@cs.ubc.ca Abstract e-Science, as implemented for the study of geology with Geographic Information Systems over the Internet, has highlighted the need for standardization in the semantics of geology, and stimulated

Poole, David

355

CHAPTER II GEOLOGY Blank page retained for pagination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER II GEOLOGY #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;SHORELINES AND COASTS OF THE GULF or discordant with the grain (dominant trend) of the geologic structures of a coastal regi?n, but King (1942, pIOnal geology, geomorphology, sedimentation, oceanography of the inshore zone, meteorology, climatology, biol

356

SEPM (Society for Sedementary Geology) Twenhofel medal awarded to USGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEPM (Society for Sedementary Geology) Twenhofel medal awarded to USGS Scientist Emeritus Walter the highest award given by the Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) -- the Twenhofel medal. Walt joins an illustrious list of past Twenhofel recipients, which reads as a veritable "Who's Who" of sedimentary geology

Torgersen, Christian

357

Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA b Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713

358

Job Vacancy Notice Job Title: Assistant Professor -Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Job Vacancy Notice Job Title: Assistant Professor - Geology Job ID: 6477 Location: Regular-track Assistant Professor in the general area of "hardrock" geology. The SEES community includes 14 full-time faculty members, 25 Masters and PhD candidates, and approximately 150 Geology, Environmental Science

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

359

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

360

Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

Kihara, Daisuke

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4 The Fossil Vertebrates of Utah Salt Lake Gty, Utah 84102 W .E. Miller Deparlment~of Geology and Zoology Bngham Young Unrwerrrly Provo of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblln Cynthia M. Gardner Issue

Seamons, Kent E.

362

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

Rathbun, Julie A.

363

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology College of Sciences geoscience.unlv.edu/ Mission of the College: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Geology Career Geoscientists are stewards understanding of Earth processes and history. Value of the Geology Degree Opportunities for interesting

Walker, Lawrence R.

364

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology Course Syllabus Spring 2011 Instructor: Professor David L. Kimbrough email: dkimbrough@geology.sdsu.edu, Phone: 594-1385 Office: GMCS-229A; Office Necessary: Field notebook similar to "Rite in the Rain" all-weather Geological Field Book No., 540F J

Kimbrough, David L.

365

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 24, Part 2 CONTENTS Studies for Students ............................................................................................................................... Robert C. Ahlborn Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Sahara dune sand, X130. Photo, Univer~ityof Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham

Seamons, Kent E.

366

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 29, Part 2 CONTENTS Stratigraphy ...................................................................................................... Terry C. Gosney 27 Geology of the Champlin Peak Quadrangle,Juab and Millard Counties, Utah ..................................................................................................................................... David R. Keller 103 Publications and Maps of the Department of Geology 117 Cover: Rafted orjoreign

Seamons, Kent E.

367

Inverse Modelling in Geology by Interactive Evolutionary Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse Modelling in Geology by Interactive Evolutionary Computation Chris Wijns a,b,, Fabio of geological processes, in the absence of established numerical criteria to act as inversion targets, requires evolutionary computation provides for the inclusion of qualitative geological expertise within a rigorous

Boschetti, Fabio

368

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 30, Part 1 CONTENTS Diagenetic Aspects ................................................................................................... Steven G. Driese Geology of the Dog Valley-Red Ridge Area, Southern Pavant Mountains, Millard County .................................................................................................. Lynn C Meibos Geology of the Southwestern Quarter of the Scipio North (15-Minute) Quadrangle, Millard

Seamons, Kent E.

369

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 25, Part 3 CONTENTS Remains of Ornithopod ...........................................................................................................................................................ames M. Stolle Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Index to volumes 21-25 of Brigham Young University Geology Studies ........................................Carol T . Smith and Nathan M. Smith Cwec

Seamons, Kent E.

370

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2 CONTENTS A New Large Theropod................................................................................................................................................................ Danny J. Wyatt Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Cretaceouscoals near Castle Gate, Utab. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors

Seamons, Kent E.

371

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;P I - #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3 Conodont Biostratigraphy-meeting field trip held in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain section, Geological Society of America of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblin Cynthia M

Seamons, Kent E.

372

Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

Kihara, Daisuke

373

VOLUMF -31, PART 1 BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y O U N G VOLUMF -31, PART 1 #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES VOLUME 31.PART 1 CONTENTS .................................................................. Ralph E.Lambert Geology of the Mount Ellen Quadrangle. Henry Mountains. Garfield County. Utah near White Horse Pass. Elko County. Nevada ............Stephen M Smith Geology of the Steele Butte

Seamons, Kent E.

374

Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.O. Box 1000, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964-8000, USA c Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the pond's hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were between surface and groundwaters with U- and As-rich geological formations rather than large- scale

Louchouarn, Patrick

375

Geology Department Graduate Certificates: These certificates are designed to provide practicing professionals an opportunity to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology Department Graduate Certificates: These certificates are designed to provide practicing are offered: Certificate in Engineering Geology Purpose The Graduate Certificate in Engineering Geology provides practicing geologists an opportunity to upgrade their engineering geology credentials while

376

International Journal of Geography and Geology, 2013, 2(1):1-13 THE REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY, NEW CHALLENGES FOR GEOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Journal of Geography and Geology, 2013, 2(1):1-13 1 THE REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY, NEW CHALLENGES FOR GEOLOGICAL AND MINING MAPPING IN THE WEST AFRICAN CRATON - THE EXAMPLE OF CÔTE D'IVOIRE Gbele of the evolution on the use of remote sensing imagery for geological and mining mapping in West Africa

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

Price, P.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Comparisons of hydrocarbon and nitrogen distributions in geologically diverse tar sand bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of bitumens from different tar sand deposits are generally significantly different and affect the utilization of the resource. The chemical and physical properties of bitumen are a result of maturation reactions on the varied organic sediments. For example, saturated hydrocarbon distributions have been related to the geochemical history of organic matter. Very paraffinic or sometimes paraffinic-naphthenic distributions in organic matter are derived from a nonmarine depositional environment. More aromatic and paraffinic-naphthenic hydrocarbon distributions are derived from organic matter deposited in a marine environment. The characteristics of the bitumen also influence the potential for recovery and subsequent processing of the material. For example, saturated hydrocarbons contribute to the high pour points of recovered oils. The origin and composition of an oil influence its viscosity, API gravity, and coke formation during processing, particularly under low-temperature oxidation conditions. The objective of this work is to determine the chemical and physical properties of several samples of bitumen from geologically diverse tar sand deposits. The compound-type distributions and LTD properties of these bitumens are discussed relative to the depositional environment and processing potential of the organic matter.

Holmes, S.A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Summaries of physical research in the geosciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The summaries in this document describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1984-1985. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of the Fayetteville Shale development, north-central Arkansas q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

similar to the brine in the Fayetteville Shale. Nonetheless, no spatial relationship was found between CH4. The integration of multiple geochemical and isoto- pic proxies shows no direct evidence of contamination

Jackson, Robert B.

385

Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

386

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Reaction Mechanisms in Petroleum: From Experimentation to Upgrading and Geological Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the numerous questions that arise concerning the exploitation of petroleum from unconventional reservoirs, lie the questions of the composition of hydrocarbons present in deep seated HP-HT reservoirs or produced during in-situ upgrading steps of heavy oils and oil shales. Our research shows that experimental hydrocarbon cracking results obtained in the laboratory cannot be extrapolated to geological reservoir conditions in a simple manner. Our demonstration is based on two examples: 1) the role of the hydrocarbon mixture composition on reaction kinetics (the "mixing effect") and the effects of pressure (both in relationship to temperature and time). The extrapolation of experimental data to geological conditions requires investigation of the free-radical reaction mechanisms through a computed kinetic model. We propose a model that takes into account 52 reactants as of today, and which can be continuously improved by addition of new reactants as research proceeds. This model is complete and detailed enou...

Lannuzel, Frédéric; Bounaceur, Roda; Marquaire, Paul-Marie; Michels, Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drift, heat was applied solely to the drift-center gridsquares) indicate grid block coordinates. Heat was appliedgrid block KCYC=KCYC+1 Time step: ?t Solve fluid and heat

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner.

Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Piepkho, M.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively sequester CO2 in saline aquifers.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mechanisms of geochemical and geophysical variations along the western Galapagos Spreading Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stephanie Ingle, Garrett Ito, John J. Mahoney, William Chazey III, and John Sinton Department of Geology January 2010; Published 16 April 2010. Ingle, S., G. Ito, J. J. Mahoney, W. Chazey III, J. Sinton, M

Ito, Garrett

393

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Application of Synchrotron Radiation in the Geological and Environmental Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of some of the different ways that synchrotrons x-ray beams can be used to study geological materials is presented here. This field developed over a period of about 30 years, and it is clear that the geological community has made major use of the many synchrotrons facilities operating around the world during this time period. This was a time of rapid change in the operational performance of the synchrotrons facilities and this in itself has made it possible for geologists to develop new and more refined types of experiments that have yielded many important results. The advance in experimental techniques has proceeded in parallel with a revolution in computing techniques that has made it possible to cope with the great amount of data accumulated in the experiments. It is reasonable, although risky, to speculate about what might be expected to develop in the field during the next five- to ten-year period. It does seem plausible that the rate of change in the performance of what might now be called conventional x-ray storage rings will slow. There are no new facilities that are superior to the ESRF, ALS, APS, or SPring8 facilities under construction or about to come into operation. Thus, performance increments in the characteristics of the x-ray sources may come through the introduction of specialized devices in existing storage rings. The free electron laser is one example of a developing new technology that should take us into new regions of performance for radiation sources and stimulate new types of experimental applications. It is also likely that major advances will come through the introduction of more sophisticated experimental devices developed for use with the very recently operational undulator or wiggler sources at the newer rings. Improved x-ray optics and x-ray detectors and more powerful computation and high-speed data transmission can bring about more refined experiments and make the synchrotrons facilities more widely available to the experimental community. The next years should therefore be a time of high productivity and great excitement quite comparable to the previous era of synchrotron-based geological research.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hydrological and geochemical investigations of selenium behavior at Kesterson Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research relevant to selenium specification, fractionation, physical redistribution, reduction and oxidation, and spatial distribution as related to Kesterson Reservoir. The work was carried out by scientists and engineers from the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory over a two year period from October 1992 to September 1994. Much of the focus of these efforts was on the effects of two above-average rainfall years (1991/1992 and 1992/1993). These events marked a departure from the previous six years of drought conditions, under which oxidation of Se in the soil profile led to a marked increase in soluble Se. Evidence from the last two years show that much of the re-oxidized Se was once more reduced due to increased soil moisture content. Also, in areas of high hydraulic conductivity, major vertical displacement of selenium and other solutes due to rainfall infiltration was observed. Such observations underscore the dependence of the future of Se speciation and distribution on environmental conditions.

Zawislanski, P.T.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Benson, S.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hydrological, geochemical, and ecological characterization of Kesterson Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Kesterson Reservoir related research activities carried out under a cooperative program between Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of California during FY89. The primary objectives of these investigations are: Predict the extent, probability of the occurrence, and selenium concentrations in surface water of temporary wetland habitat at Kesterson; assess rates and direction of migration of the drainage water plume that seeped into the aquifer under Kesterson; monitor and predict changes in quantity and speciation of selenium in surface soils and vadose zone pore-waters; and develop a comprehensive strategy through soil, water, and vegetation management to safely dissipate the high concentrations of selenium accumulated in Kesterson soils. This report provides an up-date on progress made in each of these areas. Chapter 2 describes results of recent investigations of water table fluctuations and plume migration. Chapter 3 describes results of ongoing monitoring of soil water selenium concentrations and evaporative accumulation of selenium at the soil surface. Chapter 4 describes early results from the soil, water, and vegetation management field trials as well as supporting laboratory and theoretical studies. In Chapter 5, new analytical methods for selenium speciation are described and quality assurance/quality control statistics for selenium and boron are provided. 110 refs., 138 figs., 62 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (CRWMS M&O 2000b) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) engineering design basis in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The engineering design basis documented in the PDD is to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the engineering design basis from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the engineering design basis captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 2-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1),the Engineering Design Bases (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. M. Curry

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

House Committee on Natural Resources The Future of Fossil Fuels: Geological and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Howard Herzog Principal Research Engineer Massachusetts Institute to the Technical Group of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (see www.cslforum.org). Just two weeks ago, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss Carbon Dioxide (CO2) geological

400

Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential radioactive waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for the repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 2.

R. Clayton

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy CoFirst SecondTianjingNordwindGeological Survey

403

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open Energy InformationAirQualityPermitProcessAreaGeology

404

Summaries of FY 1995 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either direct or indirect to the Department of Energy`s long-range technological needs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Geology and Marine Science Departments invite you to: Annual Symposium of Caribbean Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Geology and Marine Science Departments invite you to: The 28th Annual Symposium of Caribbean Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program) Conference Title: Multipurpose Sea Level Network in the Caribbean Time: 3, and Adaptation in the Caribbean Region Time: 5:00 PM ­ 5:30 PM #12;

Gilbes, Fernando

407

Geology and Geothermal Potential of the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Thesis: Geology and Geothermal Potential of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Area, Beaver County,...

408

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract...

409

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological...

411

Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida region, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geologic interpretation of...

412

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,...

413

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...

414

Development of a Geological and GeomechanicalFramework for the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

during shearing; geological study of the mechanisms accommodating deformation at fracture walls using literature review, core observations, and numerical simulations 5 | US...

415

Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 8, 2012 ... greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide in depleted hydrocarbon ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insulation. These characteristics CROATIA CH. Figure 7.3.Geologic map of Croatia:. 1- Precambrian (metamorphicChina Other Studies China Croatia Site Selection of Low and

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 Geological Storage and Ground Water Resources U.S.and Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) State and Federal Statutes Storage,

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geologic setting of the low-level burial grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the regional and site specific geology of the Hanford Sites low-level burial grounds in the 200 East and West Areas. The report incorporates data from boreholes across the entire 200 Areas, integrating the geology of this area into a single framework. Geologic cross-sections, isopach maps, and structure contour maps of all major geological units from the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group to the surface are included. The physical properties and characteristics of the major suprabasalt sedimentary units also are discussed.

Lindsey, K.A.; Jaeger, G.K. [CH2M Hill Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Slate, J.L. [Associated Western Universities Northwest, Richland, WA (United States); Swett, K.J.; Mercer, R.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial...

420

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

- 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

Faulds, James E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Paleomagnetism, Potassium-Argon Ages, and Geology of Rhyolites...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Dalrymple, 1966). Authors Richard R. Doell, G. Brent Dalrymple, Robert Leland Smith and Roy A. Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoirs, 1968 DOI...

422

Geophysics, Geology and Geothermal Leasing Status of the Lightning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Status of the Lightning Dock KGRA, Animas Valley, New Mexico Author C. Smith Published New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

423

A seismic modeling methodology for monitoring CO2 geological ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 20, 2011 ... possible causes of the greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the. 30 options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide ...

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Publications AASG State Geological Survey National Geothermal Data Systems Data Acquisition and Access National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance...

425

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and...

426

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE's) Coal Program...

429

New River Geothermal Research Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation: Project objectives: Demonstration of an innovative blend of modern tectonic research applied to the Imperial Valley with a proprietary compilation of existing thermal and drilling data. The developed geologic model will guide the targeting of two test wells and the identification of permeable zones capable of commercial geothermal power production.

430

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

V. Trebules

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist in cross section and the channel flows along a boundary between the t  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist length. The highest percentage of bedrock coverage per geologic type appears in combined categories (Fig

Curran, Joanna C.

433

doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1975)32.0.CO;2 1975;3;361-363Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1975)32.0.CO;2 1975;3;361-363Geology R. Gordon Gastil Geological Society of America on July 8, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on July 8, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on July 8, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on July 8, 2011geology

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

434

MAY, 2008 VOLUME 47, NUMBER 5 WEST TEXAS GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and residual gas measurements on sidewall and/or core samples Tight rock analysis, adsorption and geochem Mechanical properties, rock-fluid compatibility Special Core Analysis and Enhanced Oil Recovery Ultracentrifuge tight gas analysis Wettability and water flood Electrical resistivity, capillary pressure Relative

Fouke, Bruce W.

435

Page 204 Geology Sonoma State University 2006-2008 Catalog Department Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 204 Geology Sonoma State University 2006-2008 Catalog Department Office Darwin Hall 116 (707) 664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology Department chair Matthew J. James aDministrative cOOrDinatOr Gayle Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Geology Minor in Geology Secondary Education

Ravikumar, B.

436

Geology Page 145Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog DEPARTMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology Page 145Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OFFICE Darwin Hall 116 (707) 664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology DEPARTMENT CHAIR Matthew J. James ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Cory Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Earth Sciences Minor in Geology Minor

Ravikumar, B.

437

Page 148 Geology Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog DEPARTMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 148 Geology Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OFFICE Darwin Hall 116 (707) 664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology DEPARTMENT CHAIR Matthew J. James ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR. Smith Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Earth Science Minor in Geology

Ravikumar, B.

438

Page144 Geology Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Department Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page144 Geology Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog geology Department Office DarwinHall116 (707)664-2334 www.sonoma.edu/geology Department chair MatthewJ.James aDministrative cE.Smith Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Earth Science Minor in Geology Minor

Ravikumar, B.

439

Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geological resources, geological hazards and environmental pollution. The curriculum includes courses fromThe Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set- ting (Structural Geology). The Geology Department is housed in the historic and newly renovated Old Main Building

Baskaran, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Standard guide for characterization of spent nuclear fuel in support of geologic repository disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide provides guidance for the types and extent of testing that would be involved in characterizing the physical and chemical nature of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of its interim storage, transport, and disposal in a geologic repository. This guide applies primarily to commercial light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and spent fuel from weapons production, although the individual tests/analyses may be used as applicable to other spent fuels such as those from research and test reactors. The testing is designed to provide information that supports the design, safety analysis, and performance assessment of a geologic repository for the ultimate disposal of the SNF. 1.2 The testing described includes characterization of such physical attributes as physical appearance, weight, density, shape/geometry, degree, and type of SNF cladding damage. The testing described also includes the measurement/examination of such chemical attributes as radionuclide content, microstructure, and corrosion product c...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage, April 2-4, 2007  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

Goodenough, J. B.; Abruna, H. D.; Buchanan, M. V.

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy and Environment Research Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University seeks a research scientist to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Environment Research Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the environment, with particular emphasis on geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The research program at Princeton University seeks a research scientist to develop a new research program at the nexus of energy

Bou-Zeid, Elie

446

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geochemical studies relevant to carbon sequestration.National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC,Conference on Carbon Sequestration, May 14-17, Washington

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

Faulds, James E.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology Internal Use Version Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4: Total UD Credits: 46 Total Credits: 120 3/19/12 #12;FourYear Academic Plan 20122013 BA in Geology

449

A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

US Geological Survey, Geospatial Information Response Team Team Charter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Geological Survey, Geospatial Information Response Team Team Charter Revised December 15, 2010 This charter outlines the purpose, responsibility and structure of the U.S. Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Team (GIRT). Purpose--The primary purpose of the Geospatial Information Response Team

Torgersen, Christian

451

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross?section.

Hinz, Nick

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Verification of geological/engineering model in waterflood areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of a detailed geological/engineering model is the basis for development of the methodology for characterizing reservoir heterogeneity. The NIPER geological/engineering model is the subject of this report. The area selected for geological and production performance studies is a four-section area within the Powder River Basin which includes the Tertiary Incentive Project (TIP) pilot. Log, well test, production, and core data were acquired for construction of the geological model of a barrier island reservoir. In this investigation, emphasis was on the synthesis and quantification of the abundant geological information acquired from the literature and field studies (subsurface and outcrop) by mapping the geological heterogeneities that influence fluid flow. The geological model was verified by comparing it with the exceptionally complete production data available for Bell Creek field. This integration of new and existing information from various geological, geophysical, and engineering disciplines has enabled better definition of the heterogeneities that influence production during different recovery operations. 16 refs., 26 figs., 6 tabs.

Sharma, B.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Honarpour, M.; Schatzinger, R.A.; Tillman, R.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Presented, the nuclear industry faces unique hurdles to expansion and waste management. Geology plays a critical role in the nuclear fuel cycle beyond just the mining of uranium for nuclear fuel. Come hear Frannie Skomurski

454

1919-32: Geology Department In School of Commerce: 190508 Geology taught by Prof. John F. Fulton, Metallurgy and Mining Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1919-32: Geology Department In School of Commerce: 1905­08 Geology taught by Prof. John F. Fulton, Metallurgy and Mining Engineering 1907­13 Geology course o ered in the School of Engineering and Mechanical Art 1900­04 Geology course o ered in the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy 1913­1923 Henry Parks

455

The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories Robert G. McWilliams Professor Emeritus Department of Geology Miami University Oxford, Ohio 45056 mcwillrg@muohio.edu #12;The Geology of North

Lee Jr., Richard E.

456

Checklist for Minor in GEOLOGY The minor in geology is flexible, so that it can complement the student's major in the best  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Checklist for Minor in GEOLOGY The minor in geology is flexible, so that it can complement the student's major in the best possible manner. Students minoring in Geology are strongly encouraged to plan their programs with an undergraduate geology advisor. A total of 20 credits are required for the minor as follows

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

457

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 1999 0882-8121/99/0100-0113$16.00/1 1999 International Association for Mathematical Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Association for Mathematical Geology 113 On the Ergodicity Hypothesis in Heterogeneous Formations1 Hongbin

Zhan, Hongbin

458

Geology and hydrocarbon prospects of Latvia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil prospects in Latvia are associated with the Baltic syneclise. Latvia occupies about one fourth of that large tectonic depression; zones of oil accumulation continue there from adjacent areas: the Telshai rampart (Lithuania) and the Leba nose (Polish offshore). The oil prospects in separate areas are determined by their position regarding the sources of oil generation--the Gdansk-Kura and Liepaya depressions. The most prospective areas are the Liepaya-Saldus zone of highs and the Pape-Barta trough. The Liepaya-Saldus zone was situated so that the hydrocarbon migration path crossed it. It probably is an important oil accumulation zone. The paper describes the geology of Latvia and the one oil field in Latvia.

Freimanis, A. (Latvian Dept. of Geology, Riga (Latvia)); Margulis, L.; Brangulis, A.; Kanev, S.; Pomerantseva, R. (Inst. of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Riga (Latvia))

1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geology of the Olkaria Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Up to now development of the resource in Olkaria geothermal field, Kenya, has been based on fragmental information that is inconclusive in most respects. Development has been concentrated in an area of 4 km/sup 2/ at most, with well to well spacing of less than 300 m. The move now is to understand the greater Olkaria field by siting exploratory wells in different parts of the area considered of reasonable potential. To correlate the data available from the different parts of the field, the geology of the area, as a base for the composite field model, is discussed and shown to have major controls over fluid movements in the area and other features.

Ogoso-Odongo, M.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Public Geology at Griffith Park in Los Angeles: A Sample Teachers’ Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.geo.cornell.edu/geology/faculty/RWA/programs.htmlR. J. (1987). Quaternary geology and seismic hazard of the1953). Special Report 33: Geology of the Griffith Park area,

Helman, Daniel S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1972 Mathematical Techniques for Paleocurrent Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1972 Mathematical Techniques for Paleocurrent Analysis procedure. Finally, theprocedures for testing the homogeneity of directional data from several geological directions from different geological formations belong to significantly different populations. KEY WORDS

Jammalamadaka, S. Rao

463

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

464

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

465

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors-581-7250) Faculty Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

Johnson, Cari

466

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2013-14 academic year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

Johnson, Cari

467

LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology Laboratory. Our catalog also includes material housed in the separately administered Law Library in White Hall and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in the Department

McConnell, Terry

468

U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02328 Geological Survey of Canada Open File 4350  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02­328 Geological Survey of Canada Open File 4350 August, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6, Canada #12;ISBN: 0 of Canada and the University of Victoria. This meeting was held at the University of Victoria's Dunsmuir

Goldfinger, Chris

469

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

Lindquist, W Brent

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

Society for Geology Applied to Ore Deposits GENEVA MINERALS: Industry and Academia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society for Geology Applied to Ore Deposits GENEVA MINERALS: Industry and Academia Creating links Tripodi, Vanga Resources, Geneva · A student view of economic geology. Honza Catchpole, President

Halazonetis, Thanos

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual engineering geology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manhattan Summary: , C. A., 1994, Bedrock and engineering geology maps of New York County and parts of Kings and Queens... -199 in New York (State) Geological Survey Annual...

472

Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Fifth Biennial Geographic Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations ........................................................................ 2 Review Process, SRTM, Digital Photogrammetry, and LIDAR- Derived Digital Elevation Models: Implications for Geological Digital Geologic Mapping at Yucca Mountain, Nevada ............................................. 13

Torgersen, Christian

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment geologic procedures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geologic procedures Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessment geologic procedures Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 INTRODUCTION By...

474

Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium concentrations (NURE). Fig. 3. Geologic map of Newuranium concentrations (NURE). New Hampshire Geology Geol.Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), which were processed (

Apte, M.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study of geologic carbon sequestration Catherine A. Petersleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites. Env EarthDOE) Conference on Carbon Sequestration, 2005. Alexandria,

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Geochemical fluid characteristics and main achievements about tracer tests at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) 1 EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical fluid characteristics and main achievements about tracer tests at Soultz Related with Work Package WP1a (Short term fluid circulation tests) and WP1c (Data acquisition) GEOCHEMICAL FLUID CHARACTERISTICS AND MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS ABOUT TRACER TESTS AT SOULTZ-SOUS-FORÃ?TS (FRANCE

Boyer, Edmond

477

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University consists of five full-time faculty and five  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology (Site Assessment, Soils and Soil Pollution, Environmental Isotope Geochemistry, Environmental (Economic Geology). The Geology Department is housed in the historic Old Main Building, and owns in traditional fields (Hydrogeology, Eco- nomic Geology, Geochronology), and in the field of Environmental

Baskaran, Mark

478

Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lietzke, D.A. [Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (William M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Modeling and Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Sequestration at the Geologic-basin Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives. The overall objective of this proposal was to develop tools for better understanding, modeling and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} permanence in geologic formations at the geologic basin scale. The main motivation was that carbon capture and storage (CCS) will play an important role as a climate change mitigation technology only if it is deployed at scale of gigatonne per year injections over a period of decades. Continuous injection of this magnitude must be understood at the scale of a geologic basin. Specifically, the technical objectives of this project were: (1) to develop mathematical models of capacity and injectivity at the basin scale; (2) to apply quantitative risk assessment methodologies that will inform on CO{sub 2} permanence; (3) to apply the models to geologic basins across the continental United States. These technical objectives go hand-in-hand with the overarching goals of: (1) advancing the science for deployment of CCS at scale; and (2) contributing to training the next generation of scientists and engineers that will implement and deploy CCS in the United States and elsewhere. Methods. The differentiating factor of this proposal was to perform fundamental research on migration and fate of CO{sub 2} and displaced brine at the geologic basin scale. We developed analytical sharp-interface models of the evolution of CO{sub 2} plumes over the duration of injection (decades) and after injection (centuries). We applied the analytical solutions of CO{sub 2} plume migration and pressure evolution to specific geologic basins, to estimate the maximum footprint of the plume, and the maximum injection rate that can be sustained during a certain injection period without fracturing the caprock. These results have led to more accurate capacity estimates, based on fluid flow dynamics, rather than ad hoc assumptions of an overall “efficiency factor.” We also applied risk assessment methodologies to evaluate the uncertainty in our predictions of storage capacity and leakage rates. This was possible because the analytical mathematical models provide ultrafast forward simulation and they contain few parameters. Impact. The project has been enormously successful both in terms of its scientific output (journal publications) as well as impact in the government and industry. The mathematical models and uncertainty quantification methodologies developed here o?er a physically-based approach for estimating capacity and leakage risk at the basin scale. Our approach may also facilitate deployment of CCS by providing the basis for a simpler and more coherent regulatory structure than an “individual-point-of-injection” permitting approach. It may also lead to better science-based policy for post-closure design and transfer of responsibility to the State.

Juanes, Ruben

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Summaries of FY 1993 geosciences research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the DOE`s many missions. The Geosciences Research Program is supported by the Office of Energy Research. The participants in this program include DOE laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the DOE and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar-atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geological research geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

research areas: Near-Field Perturbation, Engineered Barrier Integrity, Radionuclide Transport, and Demonstration of Integrated System Behavior. Currently, UFD has joined five...

482

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the GEO-SEQ project was a multidisciplinary effort focused on investigating ways to lower the cost and risk of geologic carbon sequestration. Through our research in the GEO-SEQ project, we have produced results that may be of interest to the wider geologic carbon sequestration community. However, much of the knowledge developed in GEO-SEQ is not easily accessible because it is dispersed in the peer-reviewed literature and conference proceedings in individual papers on specific topics. The purpose of this report is to present key GEO-SEQ findings relevant to the practical implementation of geologic carbon sequestration in the form of a Best Practices Manual. Because our work in GEO-SEQ focused on the characterization and project development aspects, the scope of this report covers practices prior to injection, referred to as the design phase. The design phase encompasses activities such as selecting sites for which enhanced recovery may be possible, evaluating CO{sub 2} capacity and sequestration feasibility, and designing and evaluating monitoring approaches. Through this Best Practices Manual, we have endeavored to place our GEO-SEQ findings in a practical context and format that will be useful to readers interested in project implementation. The overall objective of this Manual is to facilitate putting the findings of the GEO-SEQ project into practice.

Benson, Sally M.; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Doughty, Christine A.; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Hoversten, Mike; Gasperikova, Erica; Daley, Thomas; Majer, Ernie; Lippmann, Marcelo; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Knauss, Kevin; Johnson, James; Foxall, William; Ramirez, Abe; Newmark, Robin; Cole, David; Phelps, Tommy J.; Parker, J.; Palumbo, A.; Horita, J.; Fisher, S.; Moline, Gerry; Orr, Lynn; Kovscek, Tony; Jessen, K.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Cakici, M.; Hovorka, Susan; Holtz, Mark; Sakurai, Shinichi; Gunter, Bill; Law, David; van der Meer, Bert

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

483

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

Mobilization of Metals from Eau Claire Siltstone and the Impact of Oxygen under Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) has been proposed as a viable strategy to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission; however, the increased cost that will be incurred by fossil energy production facilities is a deterrent to implementation of this technology. Allowing impurities in the effluent CO2 stream could result in significant financial and energy savings for CO2 capture and separation. However, impurities such as O2 have the potential to influence the redox state and alter the geochemical interactions that occur within GCS reservoirs, which increases the concern for CO2 and brine leakage from the storage reservoir as well as the overlying groundwater contamination. In this work, to investigate the impact of O2 co-injected with CO2 on the geochemical interactions, especially the trace metal mobilization from a GCS reservoir rock, batch studies were conducted with Eau Claire siltstone collected from CO2 sequestration sites. The rock was reacted with synthetic brines in contact with either 100% CO2 or a mixture of 95 mole% CO2-5 mole% O2 at 10.1 MPa and 75 °C. Both microscopic and spectroscopic measurements, including 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and chemical extraction were combined in this study to investigate reaction mechanisms. The Eau Claire siltstone contains quartz (52 wt%), fluorapatite (40%), and aluminosilicate (5%) as major components, and dolomite (2%), pyrite (1%), and small-particle-/poorly-crystalline Fe-oxides as minor components. With the introduction of CO2 into the reaction vessel containing rock and brine, the leaching of small amounts of fluorapatite, aluminosilicate, and dolomite occurred. Trace metals of environmental concern, including Pb, As, Cd, and Cu were detected in the leachate with concentrations up to 400 ppb in the CO2-brine-rock reaction system within 30 days. In the presence of O2, the mobilization of Pb, Cd, and Cu was significantly enhanced, whereas As concentrations decreased, compared with the reaction system without oxygen. The presence of oxygen resulted in the formation of secondary Fe-oxides which appear to be Fe(II)-substituted P-containing ferrihydrite. Although the rock contained only 1.04 wt% total Fe, oxidative dissolution of pyrite, leaching and oxidation of structural Fe(II) in fluorapatite, and precipitation of Fe-oxides significantly decreased the pH in brine with oxygen(pH 3.3-3.7), compared with the reaction system without oxygen (pH 4.2-4.4). In the CO2-rock-brine system without O2, the majority of As remained in the rock, with about 1.1% of the total As being released from intrinsic Fe-oxides to the aqueous phase. The release behavior of As to solution was consistent with competitive adsorption between phosphate/fluoride and As on Fe-oxide surfaces. In the presence of O2 the mobility of As was reduced due to enhanced adsorption onto both intrinsic and secondary Fe-oxide surfaces.When O2 was present, the dominant species in solution was the less toxic As(V). This work will advance our understanding of the geochemical reaction mechanisms that occur under GCS conditions and help to evaluate the risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration.

Shao, Hongbo; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Krogstad, Eirik J.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

Reitze, Arnold

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

487

doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1994)0222.3.CO;2 1994;22;1023-1026Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology doi: 10.1130/0091-7613(1994)0222.3.CO;2 1994;22;1023-1026Geology Michael.S. government employees within scope of their Notes Geological Society of America on May 27, 2010geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on May 27, 2010geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;on May 27, 2010geology

Torsvik, Trond Helge

488

THE CAPE ANN PLUTONIC SUITE: A FIELD TRIP FOR PETROLOGY CLASSES John B. Brady, Department of Geology, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01060  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Geology, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01060 John T. Cheney, Department of Geology, Amherst College

Brady, John B.

489

Geochemical evidence of a near-surface history for source rocks of the central Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical evidence of a near-surface history for source rocks of the central Coast Mountains to ,50 Ma, indicate that the source regions for these rocks were relatively uniform and typical abundance of deep crustal or upper-mantle source rocks (DePaolo 1981; Kistler 1990; Chen and Tilton 1991; De

Wetmore, Paul H.

490

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 19 JUNE 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1183 Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimate the net flux of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen from diffuse and focused hydrothermal vents on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids Scott D. Wankel1 , Leonid N. Germanovich2 , Marvin D. Girguis1 * Hydrothermal vents along mid-ocean systems host unique, highly productive biological

Girguis, Peter R.

491

Assessment of peat quality by molecular and bulk geochemical analysis: Application to the Holocene record of the Chautagne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of peat quality by molecular and bulk geochemical analysis: Application to the Holocene in general from a limited variety of local plants, peat is however sensitive to physicochemical changes the information on peat quality provided by various families of biochemical components (lipids, lignin, sugars

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

492

Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical and biological evolution of Earth. The oceans appear to be loosing oxygen due to on-going climate change, with resulting impacts on marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles. As oxygen levels

Handy, Todd C.

493

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County, Nevada, in: Gold and Silver...

495

Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

496

Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

Haidari, Arman S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

498

Occurrence and Stability of Glaciations in Geologic Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth is characterized by episodes of glaciations and periods of minimal or no ice through geologic time. Using the linear energy balance model (EBM), nonlinear EBM with empirical ice sheet schemes, the general circulation model coupled with an ice...

Zhuang, Kelin

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

499

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Online Exam 1 Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Last Appearance Datum; Zone Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) #12;Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem: detrital (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

500

High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z